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LaneHeymont
03-19-2012, 03:39 AM
:snoopy:

Richard White
03-19-2012, 03:45 AM
90% of my twitter feed is from writers, agents, publishers, editors and other people in the writing business. (10% is NFL or Central Missouri football-related.)

So, yeah, I can't see any "etiquette" issues with this.

KalenO
03-19-2012, 03:48 AM
I don't think etiquette has anything to do with honestly. Most people just do it because its helpful to them, gives them a sense (or at least the illusion of one) of an agent's tastes, methods and schedule. I honestly don't think agents care on way or another.

Amarie
03-19-2012, 03:55 AM
Some agents tweet how up-to-date they are with their queries, so if you are querying those particular people, it can be useful. I follow one agent, even though I already have an agent, just because she tweets interesting information about the publishing world.

Sage
03-19-2012, 03:56 AM
I follow a lot of agents on twitter because it gives me insight into the publishing world. However, a caution. When you follow agents you're querying, the possibility exists that you're going to go crazy from their twitter feed. Resist the urge to read too much into anything at all that they tweet.

Filigree
03-19-2012, 05:01 AM
I follow no one yet, but I do check in occasionally. It's great when agents and editors tweet useful information. But how much shoe/clothing/foodie /etc outside information can a person handle before the reader suffers information overload? At some point, it feels more like stalking or the frenzied social obsessions of high school girls waiting for A Boy to call.

In my case, I don't have Twitter access during my normal day job hours, so I don't have the compulsion to follow everything all the time.

Chumplet
03-19-2012, 05:15 AM
I don't mind following them, usually to get information about their tastes and what their query reading stats are. I have connected with a few who follow me back, but it's mostly because we share interests or a sense of humour. Many don't represent what I write, but that's okay with me.

leahzero
03-19-2012, 05:23 AM
I followed agents I was querying who had active, interesting Twitters. The most awesome moment was when my future agent followed me back. I had a feeling good things were going to happen then. :D

Only do it if you won't drive yourself crazy over-analyzing everything they tweet.

LaneHeymont
03-19-2012, 05:36 AM
I followed agents I was querying who had active, interesting Twitters. The most awesome moment was when my future agent followed me back. I had a feeling good things were going to happen then. :D

Only do it if you won't drive yourself crazy over-analyzing everything they tweet.

I'm actually almost never on twitter, but pop in once in a while. I never really thought of it, until this lady mentioned it. I felt a little foolish that I never thought of it! :e2cookie:

Richard White
03-19-2012, 05:41 AM
Oh okay, but that made me laugh! :)

Actually, almost all of my internet activity is tied up with Football, (either K.C. Chiefs or the University of Central Missouri - my alma mater), Kendo, or writing.

That and checking my work/college e-mail every so often to ensure I don't miss something.

Family and friends? That's what the phone's for.

lauralam
03-19-2012, 02:24 PM
I follow quite a few, and 2 who have my full MS have followed me back. In a way it's good--because they're following me I've self-censored a lot of my anxious tweeting.

Stacia Kane
03-19-2012, 03:06 PM
I follow quite a few agents; my own doesn't have a Twitter but generally my entire feed is publishing professionals. It's fun to gossip and see what other people are thinking.

Jersey Chick
03-19-2012, 05:27 PM
I follow agents I think I may be interested in querying someday. I follow writers I like, my husband because I have to, and a bunch of other people because I like what they tweet.

I don't autofollow and every so often, I go in and cull the herd (kind of like my FB friends list.) I can go days without tweeting, and then make up for it in a few short hours. Oh, and I hate the new Tweetdeck with a passion, but I think I'm the only one who does. :D

popmuze
03-19-2012, 05:30 PM
One time I followed up with what an agent was requesting on a Twitter site, but it felt like stalking. So I never did it again.

Araenvo
03-19-2012, 06:09 PM
Following agents - or anyone - is fine, and I know lots of writers do it. I've had some great advice from agents on Twitter too, using hashtag '#askagent' (several agents will sporadically advertise that they're answering any and all questions for the next half an hour or so) or #pubtip. I've been followed back by a couple and I'm R+R'ing for an agent I only originally submitted to because I found her on Twitter and checked out her site.

And as said, many update their query stats, so it stops a lot of compulsive e-mail checking!

BUT... don't spam agents with loads of 'witty' comments and replies and retweets. I suggest keeping pretty much silent and simply following their feed until you have a specific reason to communicate.

Pisarz
03-19-2012, 06:41 PM
It's funny this should come up because I've been wondering the same. :) I've followed quite a few agents for a long time, so I didn't think much of it when it was time to query. But then I had these dilemmas about agents I hadn't followed yet but *had* queried. I did an R & R for an agent but didn't follow before querying, and now I'm holding off. The timing doesn't seem right.

Just chalk it up to another obsession of the querying writer.

Wow, do I know how to give a helpful non-answer or what? ;)

kaitie
03-19-2012, 07:03 PM
I would find it crazy-making, personally.

YAreaderwriter
03-19-2012, 08:06 PM
I don't see anything wrong with following an agent your querying. They have thousands of followers anyway and wont even know its "you" following them.

MysteryRiter
03-19-2012, 08:15 PM
Oh, and I hate the new Tweetdeck with a passion, but I think I'm the only one who does. :D

I have nothing to add to this thread, other than: I HATE it, too! Drives me crazy! :)

*falls back into shadows*

lauralam
03-20-2012, 02:59 AM
One time I followed up with what an agent was requesting on a Twitter site, but it felt like stalking. So I never did it again.

What do you mean by that? The types of stuff they tend to request, or you specific request/submission?

If it's the latter, I'd never do that. Even with the agent who approached me about my writing via Twitter DM. I switched to email for the most part.

I have a feeling I might have misunderstood what you meant, though.

popmuze
03-20-2012, 03:16 AM
It was something specific. I might have emailed the agent with: "I just saw on Twitter you were looking for such and such...and here it is." Not sure if it resulted in a read.

lauralam
03-20-2012, 03:20 AM
Oh, if it's incorporating something like that into the query letter, as a touch of personalisation, that's usually fine to include, but hard to phrase in a non-stalkery way, I agree ;).

JQTrotter
03-20-2012, 05:15 AM
I follow agents that represent what I'm interested in and what I write. I agree with what a lot of people have said already--don't over analyze what the agents are saying. I just think it's a good idea to get a feel for what the agents like and to get more information about what's going on in the marketplace.

AGragon
03-20-2012, 05:13 PM
I'm following quite a few agents on Twitter, even the ones that already rejected me. Mainly for updates on the publishing world or because they could be useful for future projects, as to not forget their names.

popmuze
03-20-2012, 05:40 PM
But the question is, do you respond to their tweets in your correspondence to them? To me that's going over the line.

Toothpaste
03-20-2012, 06:26 PM
Well it depends what you say. If you say, "I saw on Twitter your request for awesome books, and so I am sending you my awesome book" that shouldn't be a problem. It shows you are paying attention, it personalises the query, and demonstrates you know how to use social media.

If however you write something like, "I see from your tweets you like cats, I like cats too, here's my query" well, that's just kind of silly.

Ctairo
03-20-2012, 08:12 PM
Even if you aren't comfortable following individual agents, you might want to pay attention to hashtags like #askagent. I've seen Twitter chats pop up occasionally with that hashtag, and there's always good information. If you have a specific question, the chat's also a wonderful opportunity to get it out there.

RKLipman
03-20-2012, 10:14 PM
Agents are just people, guys. They're on Twitter to network and talk and have fun and dish about the industry and take pictures of their breakfasts like the rest of you.

I follow a bunch, including agents who've already rejected me, agents who currently have my full, and agents who I'd never query because they don't rep my genre. Several of them follow me, as well.

If one of them tweets about penguins and I have something to say because hey, I like penguins too! I would talk to them. If they ask you to query them or for pages via Twitter (and yes, this does happen), be grateful and send those things along, and then pretend it never happened.

They are not going to be shocked or scandalized if you follow, @, or subsequently query them. They are just human beings. So follow and chat away.

Who knows? You may even make a friend.

popmuze
03-20-2012, 10:54 PM
I really don't agree with the above. It's just a gut feeling.

RKLipman
03-20-2012, 10:58 PM
popmuze - Can you explain what, specifically, you don't agree with? I have a number of friends who are agents and, while I certainly can't speak for everyone, I can tell you they share these sentiments. It's social media; they expect you'll be social when the urge strikes you.

What are your objections? What has led you to feel this way?

Old Hack
03-20-2012, 11:47 PM
I've become firm friends with a couple of agents I "met" on Twitter: I've stayed with one of them for weekends, even. They're confident I'm not going to start pitching my books at them; we get on well; it works. It's almost like they're (gasp!) real people!

RKLipman
03-20-2012, 11:50 PM
It's almost like they're (gasp!) real people!

SHIRLEY YOU JEST.

Ctairo
03-21-2012, 12:25 AM
She jests not. And why are you calling her Shirley?

lauralam
03-21-2012, 12:48 AM
I'm with Rick. I follow plenty, including ones who have rejected me. All my rejects on fulls have been super nice--they're just not the right agent, but they're lovely folks. Hell, one who rejected me I'm now FB friends with.

popmuze
03-21-2012, 01:07 AM
The idea of becoming a Facebook friend or Twitter fan of an agent and not pitching them books is curious to me. Same as if I became friends with an agent in real life. It's like if you were dying of some disease and couldn't ask a doctor friend of yours what you had. Maybe it would be different if I had an agent or a current best seller. Following their posts for information is fine. Pitching them what they say they're looking for is probably fine as well. Pretending they don't hold the key to advancing my career is something else.

Titan Orion
03-21-2012, 01:12 AM
Some agents tweet how up-to-date they are with their queries, so if you are querying those particular people, it can be useful. I follow one agent, even though I already have an agent, just because she tweets interesting information about the publishing world.

Any chance of a namedrop?

RKLipman
03-21-2012, 01:29 AM
It's one thing to recognize that there's value in say, following or chatting with an agent because you learn from their company. It's another to milk a relationship the way you describe. And quite frankly, the inability to separate THEM as people from what they can do for YOU is way cynical, and not the generally accepted practice.

Also, the idea that wanting to publish a book is in any way like wanting to survive a terminal illness is off-putting, to say the least.

RKLipman
03-21-2012, 01:32 AM
Any chance of a namedrop?

Titan - I'm not the original poster there, but Sara Megibow, Ginger Clark, Jenn Laughran, Kate Testermann, and many others are all quite active on Twitter and tweet lots of interesting things about queries, the pub industry, etc. - especially this week, while many of them are in Bologna! (Ginger's "trendwatch" has been super interesting this week.)

Old Hack
03-21-2012, 01:37 AM
The idea of becoming a Facebook friend or Twitter fan of an agent and not pitching them books is curious to me. Same as if I became friends with an agent in real life. It's like if you were dying of some disease and couldn't ask a doctor friend of yours what you had. Maybe it would be different if I had an agent or a current best seller. Following their posts for information is fine. Pitching them what they say they're looking for is probably fine as well. Pretending they don't hold the key to advancing my career is something else.

My bold. I find that bit quite extraordinary.

We're friends because we like one another, and not because I think I can earn something else from the equation. We became friends because we have mutual interests and similar senses of humour. I'm not "pretending they don't hold the key to advancing my career": I'm being their friend, and recognising that they are human beings, not just someone I can get something out of.

I had a small operation last week. I have a Twitter-friend who is a doctor. I talked to her about it and she's asked me how I'm getting on: but I didn't ask her to do the operation for me, or to treat me in any way. It's the same with my agent friends: I talk to them about my writing, they talk to me about their agenting, and we all enjoy ourselves without there being any expectations.

popmuze
03-21-2012, 02:24 AM
I'm just an old "expectations" guy, that's why the Internet has been so frustrating to me. Like, I've got about 100 Facebook friends, any one of whose reviews might have gained me thousands of copies of sales of my last book. No, I didn't ask them to review it. And none of them did. But that doesn't make it any less frustrating, even though I always genially comment on their interesting comings and goings. Maybe they see through my ruse. But I don't see how someone with a book they're trying to make salable would create a friendship with an agent on Facebook or Twitter (or even should you meet one at a party or a charity fund raiser) and not want to get that agent's opinion on what's wrong with their book.

popmuze
03-21-2012, 02:27 AM
Titan - I'm not the original poster there, but Sara Megibow, Ginger Clark, Jenn Laughran, Kate Testermann, and many others are all quite active on Twitter and tweet lots of interesting things about queries, the pub industry, etc. - especially this week, while many of them are in Bologna! (Ginger's "trendwatch" has been super interesting this week.)



I have in the past followed these agents and others, singly and in groups. I just haven't become friends with any of them. I'm not even friends with my last agent.

Ctairo
03-21-2012, 05:51 AM
I'm just an old "expectations" guy, that's why the Internet has been so frustrating to me. Like, I've got about 100 Facebook friends, any one of whose reviews might have gained me thousands of copies of sales of my last book. No, I didn't ask them to review it. And none of them did. But that doesn't make it any less frustrating, even though I always genially comment on their interesting comings and goings.

Commenting on goings and comings isn't the same as taking the time to read and review a book. It's an absolutely unequal exchange. (Unless I'm misunderstanding you.)


Maybe they see through my ruse.Possibly. Or maybe you haven't connected in a way that's meaningful enough for them to extend themselves.


But I don't see how someone with a book they're trying to make salable would create a friendship with an agent on Facebook or Twitter (or even should you meet one at a party or a charity fund raiser) and not want to get that agent's opinion on what's wrong with their book.Any agent can only offer an individual opinion, and they admit, sometimes they're wrong. I don't see the value in seeking feedback on your work from agents from social networking sites. If you want feedback, there are contests and conventions and workshops where agents are prepared to offer feedback, and yes, more often than not, you have to pay.

When you're attempting to sell--be it a book, a sandwich, or a widget--the onus is on you to do everything you can to get your product to market, not the other way around. So yeah, I'm with Old Hack. The agents don't hold the key to advancing your career. You do.

thothguard51
03-21-2012, 06:04 AM
I'm still not sold that Twitter is good? While I follow some writers, sports and a few others, I only have a handful of followers. Now this is more than likely my fault as I do not post all that much on twitter.

But what I have found is that even those who have followed, often un-follow me because I am mostly inactive on a daily basis.

Like anything else, you only get out of it what you put into it.

Though there are members like GRR Martin who has thousands of followers and yet, he follows no one and rarely if ever post. Says he does not have the time...

RKLipman
03-21-2012, 06:10 AM
I'm still not sold that Twitter is good?


Like anything else, you only get out of it what you put into it.

Define "good"? It looks to me like you solved your own problem here.

LaneHeymont
03-21-2012, 07:24 AM
I'm just an old "expectations" guy, that's why the Internet has been so frustrating to me. Like, I've got about 100 Facebook friends, any one of whose reviews might have gained me thousands of copies of sales of my last book. No, I didn't ask them to review it. And none of them did. But that doesn't make it any less frustrating, even though I always genially comment on their interesting comings and goings. Maybe they see through my ruse. But I don't see how someone with a book they're trying to make salable would create a friendship with an agent on Facebook or Twitter (or even should you meet one at a party or a charity fund raiser) and not want to get that agent's opinion on what's wrong with their book.

I'm the OP, and to be honest I didn't think of following agents for any reason (foolish on my part I guess) until a friend mentioned. I was just curious about the etiquette. I follow Angela James, though I've not submitted to Carina, but she tweets great/interesting info. We've had some enlightening tweets back and forth.

I think following an agent in order to "gain" something is unreasonable and quite frankly disrespectful (not saying that's you, but just in general.) Like others have said, agents are just people who happen to be agents.

In any relationship you need to be able to distinguish between personal and business. JUst like you may be friends with someone who has opposite political views. You're friends, but understand and accept that's something you shouldn't get so deep into.

It's here, so I'm turning in for the night. Just my thoughts.

Polenth
03-21-2012, 07:51 AM
The idea of becoming a Facebook friend or Twitter fan of an agent and not pitching them books is curious to me. Same as if I became friends with an agent in real life. It's like if you were dying of some disease and couldn't ask a doctor friend of yours what you had. Maybe it would be different if I had an agent or a current best seller. Following their posts for information is fine. Pitching them what they say they're looking for is probably fine as well. Pretending they don't hold the key to advancing my career is something else.

I don't follow people on Twitter with expectations. I like to keep up-to-date with what's going on, and following agents and editors is good for that. But I don't expect them to become friends, want to see my manuscript or anything else. Even if they did become friends, I'd still query via a query letter, as requested.

If you go into Twitter expecting it to be the door that'll open and get you published, you will be disappointed.

kathleea
03-21-2012, 07:51 PM
I follow any agent I find on Twitter, other writers, editors, singers, actors, whoever strikes my fancy. I've met some interesting people this way. If anyone wants to follow me I'm @kathleea
The more the merrier I say!

Titan Orion
03-21-2012, 11:51 PM
Titan - I'm not the original poster there, but Sara Megibow, Ginger Clark, Jenn Laughran, Kate Testermann, and many others are all quite active on Twitter and tweet lots of interesting things about queries, the pub industry, etc. - especially this week, while many of them are in Bologna! (Ginger's "trendwatch" has been super interesting this week.)

Thanks! I've never really paid much attention to that side of it to be honest seeing as I'm nowhere near publishable, but it cant help to learn a thing or three. Nice one :D

Araenvo
03-22-2012, 12:58 AM
If you go into Twitter expecting it to be the door that'll open and get you published, you will be disappointed.

^^ This. It's the same as meeting people at social events in the physical world. If you're interested in talking because they're a cool, interesting person, they'll open up and you can all jive, cool cat style. If you're talking to someone only because you know you can gain something from it, people pick up on that.

I spend some time finding and following unpublished YA / MG writers, because that's what I am, and people going through similar things often tweet cool links or helpful articles. It's great!

JSSchley
03-22-2012, 01:43 AM
I'm following quite a few agents on Twitter, even the ones that already rejected me. Mainly for updates on the publishing world or because they could be useful for future projects, as to not forget their names.

I love the ones that have already rejected me. I'm generally too shy to tweet pre-query...afraid it will seem self-effacing. (Though I know some have used this to great effect.) But once they've rejected my ms. or my query? I @reply with abandon, whenever anyone says something I think is cool. I like to talk about the book industry, and many agents have cool things to converse about.

Old Hack
03-22-2012, 10:57 AM
Polenth wrote,


If you go into Twitter expecting it to be the door that'll open and get you published, you will be disappointed.

True. I started Tweeting because that darned Nicola Morgan told me it was fun and that I should. So I did. And I made friends. And those friends led me to other friends, and some of them turned out to be literary agents who were Tweeting incognito, and one thing led to another and here I am, with agent-friends who have asked me to submit to them (and the ones I have submitted to have then said no, but that's a whole other story: I don't do it any more).

Twitter is great. But only if you use it primarily as a vehicle for fun and discussion, not for promotion. I unfollow people who don't interract with me, or who only plug their work. That's not what I want from Twitter. And yet I keep getting offers of real work from it. Hurrah!

lauralam
03-22-2012, 03:54 PM
Adam Christopher sorta got his publishing deal via Twitter, but he didn't try to, which is the important thing. He just befriended publishing types as well and eventually they asked him to sub, they liked it, and that was that.

Kitty27
03-22-2012, 04:00 PM
Twitter works for the writer as well.

You can get a sense of an agent's personality and if Twitter be of the devil for writers,it can work the same way for agents. I've unfollowed some whose tweets were quite questionable.

I only follow agents who've expressed an interest in horror.

Bubastes
03-22-2012, 05:09 PM
Twitter works for the writer as well.

You can get a sense of an agent's personality and if Twitter be of the devil for writers,it can work the same way for agents. I've unfollowed some whose tweets were quite questionable.


So true! Twitter gives you a good sense of someone's personality because it's so instantaneous. I follow some agents who are perfectly nice but have personalities that I can tell won't mesh with mine. It's good to know that up front.

HistorySleuth
04-14-2012, 09:20 AM
I tweet once in a while. More so lately, usually I just check it a couple times a day though, and tweet a couple things. I mostly follow agents, publishers, a few AW authors etc but not a ton of people, less than 50 actually. I don't want to get overloaded. Most agents/publishers/authors post a link to good info. And I reply if I have a similar interest, or it's answering a question. For fun though. I'm not plugging anything to agents on twitter. Sometimes I do their contests for fun.

I have very few followers as I'm pretty new to it. I mainly signed up for the same reason as a lot of you, to keep up with the publishing world quickly. So I do it to follow others, not necessarily worry who is following me.

Which brings me to a general question. It's probably good etiquette to follow back when someone follows you, but honestly, some I'm not interested in doing that. Some that follow, you can tell are trying to sell services to writers so no follow back there, or maybe it is someone who tweets about something I'm put off by and don't want to follow them back and have to sift through their tweets to get to the ones I do want to read. Is that rude? I don't have a lot of time in my day to read all of it.

wonderactivist
04-14-2012, 09:34 AM
It's probably good etiquette to follow back when someone follows you, but honestly, some I'm not interested in doing that. Some that follow, you can tell are trying to sell services to writers so no follow back there, or maybe it is someone who tweets about something I'm put off by and don't want to follow them back and have to sift through their tweets to get to the ones I do want to read. Is that rude? I don't have a lot of time in my day to read all of it.

I don't think it's rude at all and, while it is good net-iquette to follow fellow writers back, I know I sometimes unfollow if they are constantly self-promoting without being creative about it. I also tweet about fitness, life in general, and politics -- all things I write about too. Some other writers might find that annoying and I certainly don't think they're rude if they unfollow me.

We all use social media in different ways. Like you, I do use Twitter to keep up with the industry, but I also use it to connect with other writers. I feel a like-minded community there.

Regards,

Lucie

HistorySleuth
04-14-2012, 06:23 PM
I agree. I like it much better than facebook for connecting. Twitter is simple, short and to the point. Easier to find time for. I need to hook up with more of my writing buds too on Twitter. I don't think to check people's sig lines here for that. :D

On facebook all my husband's large family found me, and all our kids and their friends have FB pages but they don't seem to tweet. I like it that way. I check FB maybe twice a month. It's all about FB for them, and a lot more drama, course people have more space to write.

firedrake
04-14-2012, 08:00 PM
I follow agents who have interesting things to say. I'm not querying anything and I would never ever dream of pitching anything to an agent on twitter, that's just...tacky.

I've learned a lot about the industry, and had some non-book related chats with one or two. They're just people doing a job not rock-stars.

Medievalist
04-14-2012, 08:17 PM
I think there's some odd misunderstandings in this thread about the nature of Twitter specifically, and social networks in general:

1. Agents who tweet do it because they want to.

2. If someone on Twitter doesn't want you to follow them, they can block you.

3. Agent's can't "make or break" your career; you and or your book does that.

4. Agents are skilled professionals, paid by the authors they rep. They're not gurus.

msforster
04-14-2012, 11:37 PM
Agents are just people, guys. They're on Twitter to network and talk and have fun and dish about the industry and take pictures of their breakfasts like the rest of you.

They are not going to be shocked or scandalized if you follow, @, or subsequently query them. They are just human beings. So follow and chat away.

Who knows? You may even make a friend.




We're friends because we like one another, and not because I think I can earn something else from the equation. We became friends because we have mutual interests and similar senses of humour. I'm not "pretending they don't hold the key to advancing my career": I'm being their friend, and recognizing that they are human beings, not just someone I can get something out of.

:D

I agree with ALL OF THIS. I have an agent and I still follow quite a few on Twitter. Because they say smart, awesome things about publishing and post funny pictures of cats and really, what more can you ask of a social network?

Also, I mentioned in my query letter to my now-agent that I followed her on twitter and thought her new dog (a common topic of her tweets) was adorable. I must not have sounded too stalker-ish, because she still offered to rep me. :Sun:

Just my two cents...

LaneHeymont
04-14-2012, 11:51 PM
This thread is now :deadhorse

We all agree people are people, right? :Wha:

LOL

happywritermom
04-15-2012, 03:15 AM
I followed an editor who had my partial on Twitter once.
His tweets inspired me to pull my manuscript.
He had recently sold the publishing company to a much larger publisher and they had kept him on as editor. From his tweets, it was obvious that he was unhappy and doing very little real work. My manuscript was likely headed for publishing limbo.

I believe, in this case, Twitter saved me from getting sucked into a huge, murky mess.

lauralam
04-16-2012, 12:02 AM
I remember when I was querying I looked up one agent on Twitter. Most of the feed was being really snarky about queries and the mistakes newbie writers made. There's a difference between offering advice and mocking, and the tone made me strike them off my list. I won't name who it was as that would be really unprofessional, but I was glad I checked so I didn't waste either of our time.

RKLipman
04-16-2012, 12:55 AM
I remember when I was querying I looked up one agent on Twitter. Most of the feed was being really snarky about queries and the mistakes newbie writers made. There's a difference between offering advice and mocking, and the tone made me strike them off my list. I won't name who it was as that would be really unprofessional, but I was glad I checked so I didn't waste either of our time.

I am almost certain I know who you're talking about, because I had the EXACT same reaction.

I was like, "Whoah mama, I'm snarky and even I think this is bad!"

dmickey
05-07-2012, 07:33 AM
When I plan on querying an agent I check their twitter just to get a feel for who they are and what they like. Most agents put tips and what they don't like so that makes it easier to figure out how to approach them.

writera
05-25-2017, 06:21 PM
Hi all. New to the board. My first novel is currently on submission. My agent gave me a list of editor names. Is it a good idea to follow these editors on Twitter - or would this be considered a bad idea?

Thedrellum
05-25-2017, 08:54 PM
My agent suggested not following editors when she told me about them. I ended up following one anyway, just because she was awesome and I wanted to follow her outside of her having my book. However, you'd probably be fine either way, as long as you don't start forcing yourself into their feed, if that makes sense.

LuckyStar
05-30-2017, 12:59 AM
Since the original post seems to be gone, I can just add my two cents to what others have mentioned in the replies.

Twitter is a tool of networking. It can be used for business purposes like any other social media platform.

I have heard of an agent who got extremely upset to find out writers followed her while they were sending her queries, and unfollowed her as soon as they were rejected by her. So I guess she took twitter personally.
I see agents on twitter who mix their business with their personal life in their tweets, so there's no reason to assume their twitter is strictly personal or business.

Since agents use twitter to express what type of ms they are looking for and use hashtags such as mswl, they must expect writers to submit queries drawing attention to the agent's preferences on twitter.

Just like on fb or any other site, you can become friends with, or block, anyone you please, without needing to have pangs of guilt.

Underdawg47
05-30-2017, 09:49 AM
I use Twitter to get the latest news. I love discussing politics with various reporters, politicians, and people interested in politics in general. I only block those who are unable to debate in a civil manner or those who are only there to spam, usually porn related. I usually retweet if I agree with what someone has to say and respond with a tweet of my own if I want to add something or disagree. I chat with both Republicans, Democrats, and Independents.

Not sure if Twitter is a good place to talk politics or religion if you are trying to sell books though. A certain percentage of people will outright hate you if they learn your political leanings. It can get vicious.