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tarkine
03-12-2012, 02:45 AM
I have a few questions about life in American for a story I'm writing. Since I've never been to the USA, I have absolutely no idea about what day to day life is like.



1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?


Thanks in advance. :-D

Have a new question:

International travel - you check in, get your ticket, book in your luggage at least 2-3 hours before flight departure time. Then you go to a seperate departure lounge area (with shops etc). To get into the international departure lounge you need your ticket and if you don't have a ticket, you don't get it.

What happens in America? I'm more interested if a non ticket holder can get into the international departure lounge/waiting area.

Thanks for all your help. Your answers are awesome.

alleycat
03-12-2012, 03:01 AM
Some of those might take several "exceptions" to explain. I'll take a couple.

2. We would possibly call it a summer shower (if it is summer), a light downpour, a light rain, a brief shower, or a sprinkling. There are other terms that could be used.

5. There are generally plenty of convenience stores in the suburbs. There may or may not be a separate deli (for a story you can say there is if that's what you need), but most larger suburbs will have one or more grocery stores nearby and they will often have a deli.

Karen Junker
03-12-2012, 03:16 AM
1) cable television is often from different companies even in different neighborhoods of the same city, so...different levels.

2) In Seattle area where I live, the situation you describe wouldn't even be noticed, much less called anything particular. It is said Seattleites have a hundred words for rain. In LA or Austin, TX, it would be notable.

3) Depends on the city or area of the country in which your story takes place. A small, tear-down quality house in my neighborhood (across the street from Microsoft) goes for around $1800 US dollars a month. A room in a basement would be around $500-800.
4) I don't know.

5) lots of convenience stores, 7-11s, Subway sandwich shops and Starbucks in the suburbs of many cities.

Where does your story take place?

alleycat
03-12-2012, 03:18 AM
I'll try to answer one more.

3. This is going to vary a lot from place to place. I assume by "good area" you mean a decent, safe area, not necessarily an upscale area. It could be either way; there are still small houses that are for rent in nice areas. Finding a small apartment to rent is also possible. For a story, I think you would be safe to use either one. Around larger metropolitan areas the rent is high for even a small house in a really nice area; less so in the smaller cities.

archerjoe
03-12-2012, 03:20 AM
1. Cable TV is one or more different companies. Where I live, it's CableOne. Other communities may have a choice. Going to a different area of the company, I would not expect to have the same cable provider nor the same channels.

Another option, satellite TV is generally provided by the two biggest companies: Dish Network and DirecTV.

2. I'd heard a separate term for that but I like AlleyCat's post.

3. The question is pretty vague. If you are asking tiny house vs. condo or apartment, it is more likely to rent an apartment or condo. Where I live, it isn't unusual for a small house to be torn down to build a duplex or four-plex.

4. A quick internet search shows lots of advice for getting onto reality shows. Some applications are in person, some are by video, etc. The producers are generally looking for certain personality types.

5. Yes, there are lots of convenience stores. In some tiny rural towns, the sole business might be a gas station/convenience store/movie rental and bait shop (if it's near a popular place for fishing).

sheadakota
03-12-2012, 03:37 AM
I have a few questions about life in American for a story I'm writing. Since I've never been to the USA, I have absolutely no idea about what day to day life is like.


1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?Cable or satellite TV- do you mean does it pick up both local anmd national news?Also just a side note- we call it vacation here, not Holiday.

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by? Sun shower- but this will differ from region to region.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage? for the vacation? Yes it is possible to rent a house to stay in for vacation if thats what you mean.

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent... the application would be online, but that's all I can answer.

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs? there're everywhere.not just the burbs.

Thanks in advance. :-D
.

tarkine
03-12-2012, 03:44 AM
Thank you all so much for the information. It's all incredibly useful.


Now the question with cable television. Over here we have maybe 20-40 channels nationally (haven't research the numbers), but I've heard that in the US you can have hundreds - or am I getting confused with satellite TV?

Karen Junker
03-12-2012, 03:50 AM
I have 998 channels, but you have to subscribe to them in package deals. So for basic cable, you might have only 35-50 channels, with a premium package you pay around $100 a month and get a few hundred. Specialty channels like HBO and Showtime are on separate package deals.

tarkine
03-12-2012, 03:56 AM
1) cable television is often from different companies even in different neighborhoods of the same city, so...different levels.

2) In Seattle area where I live, the situation you describe wouldn't even be noticed, much less called anything particular. It is said Seattleites have a hundred words for rain. In LA or Austin, TX, it would be notable.

3) Depends on the city or area of the country in which your story takes place. A small, tear-down quality house in my neighborhood (across the street from Microsoft) goes for around $1800 US dollars a month. A room in a basement would be around $500-800.
4) I don't know.

5) lots of convenience stores, 7-11s, Subway sandwich shops and Starbucks in the suburbs of many cities.

Where does your story take place?

(Just a quick thank you for your response.)

My story is set in LA, and later in Denver. I chose LA because it's where anyone in the world could imagine reality TV shows being shot - it's the first place you think of when you think of TV stars (If it was stage stars, I'd think of broadway).

Denver was chosen just because it was in my mind at the time, when I was fishing for US city names.

I just needed a place that was decent size, where corporate america could have headquarters and some place that was cold and not remotely subtropical. Plus it's close to Aspen and that's where the rich holiday? (well I think it's one of the places).

Since my character is Australian, sunshowers are something really special (but then so is rain, when you've had 11 years of drought, although we have more than made up for the drought in the past twoish years with major floods).

Siri Kirpal
03-12-2012, 04:12 AM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I lived most of my childhood in San Diego. LA's climate is similar to Australia's. Dry most of the time, rarely raining in summer. But rain in August tends to be muggy, which is otherwise unusual for the area.

Little houses abound in LA, so renting one would be a possibility, but remember that we drive on the other side of the street, and you need a car to get around in LA.

Delis, convenience stores abound also.

Haven't been to Denver, except the airport. What I could see out the airport windows: looks like a high mountain plateau. It will also have a dry climate.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

tarkine
03-12-2012, 05:26 AM
I have 998 channels, but you have to subscribe to them in package deals. So for basic cable, you might have only 35-50 channels, with a premium package you pay around $100 a month and get a few hundred. Specialty channels like HBO and Showtime are on separate package deals.


*jaw drops*

998 channels....whoa, that's amazing.

Sydneyd
03-12-2012, 05:34 AM
Oo oo I want to play :)

I have a few questions about life in American for a story I'm writing. Since I've never been to the USA, I have absolutely no idea about what day to day life is like.


1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?
Different from state to state and by company to company, while the channels are the same, their order and who broadcasts them are different. At my work we have two different providers, one allows
us to watch certain sports games while the other doesn't, also one is about four hours ahead in programming lineup

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

Here, a spring shower.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

Depends on the state, the midwest more so. The closer you get to more popular areas the less likely to impossible it becomes.

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

My sister tried to get on the Biggest Loser, it involved sending in a video, being chosen as a finalist, interviews, basically the casting agents are looking for a type, and they will search till they find it.

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?

I say yes. More convenience stores than anything else, but in my immediate area I can think of at least four.
Thanks in advance. :-D

backslashbaby
03-12-2012, 05:40 AM
For the weather one, I'd say "It just sprinkled" or "it's sprinkling". We do have houses to rent where I am from that can be reasonable, but they are usually pretty old then, or in a not-so-safe neighborhood, one.

The corner store is very true here, but keep in mind that you still might need to drive there. Too often, there is nothing resembling a sidewalk/pavement at all. It's often too dangerous to try to squeeze in beside traffic; there may be walls right by the road, briar patches, drop-offs, etc.

I have channels into the 600's, but most of them are crap :D :D

blacbird
03-12-2012, 07:14 AM
LA's climate is similar to Australia's.

Australia is a nation comparable in size to the United States, minus Alaska. LA's climate is similar to that in Sydney. It isn't anything like that in Brisbane, which would be closer to the climate in Miami. Australia is closer to the equator, which means there really isn't a place as cold as the very cold places in the U.S. Tasmania might have a climate similar to Missouri or Kansas in terms of temperature, but would be wetter. The U.S. doesn't have a locale similar in climate to Darwin. And Australia lacks really high mountains, like the Rockies, so those kinds of climatic conditions aren't comparable, either. No Oz city is comparable to Denver.

And certainly not to Anchorage, where I live, at 61 degrees north latitude, and where we have had (so far) the second-highest snowfall on record, something like 125 inches. With more predicted for later in the week. The record is 132, and we're going after it this year.

caw

auriel
03-12-2012, 07:52 AM
1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?
Different cable companies have different packages, but the basic package is pretty much going to have most of the "core" channels that people expect for cable. Satellite tv can get you a whole lot of extra channels, and that's pretty much available anywhere from one of the two companies mentioned previously.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?
I just moved into a nice starter-home neighborhood (one of those where all the houses are pretty much alike) in the suburbs. The houses are good-size, not small but not mansions, in a "good" area. Right next to my house is one that is being rented by about 4 college kids. It's uncommon here, as most people just purchase a house (as it's cheap), but not unusual.

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?
Tons. We have a Dollar General on nearly every corner, which sells cheap food/drinks/random housewares. Dedicated delis, not so much - they're typically inside supermarkets. Convenience stores are pretty much the same as gas stations, and unless you're in a good/rich part of the city you're not going to have sidewalks - but I live outside the city limits in a rural area that's suddenly becoming suburban, and taxes are cheap so there's not a lot of public works projects, haha.


My cousins live in Denver but I've never been there, unfortunately. I know it's dry and they go skiing a lot, and the weather can change from 70s and sunny to a blizzard the next week. :tongue
Hope that helps some.

L.C. Blackwell
03-12-2012, 08:11 AM
If it's anything of interest, there's an old saying that if it rains while the sun is shining, it will rain again tomorrow.

Don't know if that's true or not--usually by the time tomorrow comes, you've forgotten about it. :)

MeretSeger
03-12-2012, 08:18 AM
I have a few questions about life in American for a story I'm writing. Since I've never been to the USA, I have absolutely no idea about what day to day life is like.


1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?
Each cable plan can have like 5 different levels with different channels offered for different prices per month. Also there are several different options: cable, sometimes more than one company, The Dish etc. Most will include the local channels, a national news channel like Fox or CNN, and an assortment of channels like the kids channels, home improvement channels, some movie channels...sports. And always in LA: several Spanish-language channels.

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by? A shower. If it was warm and showering, it would be during a monsoonal flow, otherwise it would be cool when showering.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?
Totally feasable to rent a tiny house in a good area, and more likely than a garage apartment. Many places in California also have 'mother-in-law units' which are small apartments with separate entrances either attached or separate from a main house. That is also an option in older areas of LA, like say, Burbank. We're not big on basements in California, though. Those are only in older houses if at all.

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent... OK, it starts with an application, then an interview with a producer, probably over the phone the first time. The next step would be actual screen testing in the form of a video interview. Then a lot of producers get together, look at the tape, and give a yeah or nay. A lot of people make it through the first few steps and then put their foot in it in the video. If it is a game show, then you actually do a practice game. If it is say, a real estate show, often the producers will work with real estate agents to find the couples for the show.

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs? A gazillion of them, but this can be very neighborhood based. If the neighborhood is a little more urban, the 7-11 might be the "corner store"...my bff lived in Burbank, and rather than a deli, they had a Cuban bakery/restaurant. Oh my gosh, you have no idea how good... However, important to know: we have a car culture from hell out here. No one walks when they can drive, and that means people are more likely to drive over to Von's or Ralph's (supermarkets) than walk down to the neighborhood store. But do they exist for your writing purposes? Yes.

Thanks in advance. :-D

jmho: I live in Northern California now, but I am from LA and go here several times a year.

tarkine
03-12-2012, 09:30 AM
Australia is a nation comparable in size to the United States, minus Alaska. LA's climate is similar to that in Sydney. It isn't anything like that in Brisbane, which would be closer to the climate in Miami. Australia is closer to the equator, which means there really isn't a place as cold as the very cold places in the U.S. Tasmania might have a climate similar to Missouri or Kansas in terms of temperature, but would be wetter. The U.S. doesn't have a locale similar in climate to Darwin. And Australia lacks really high mountains, like the Rockies, so those kinds of climatic conditions aren't comparable, either. No Oz city is comparable to Denver.

And certainly not to Anchorage, where I live, at 61 degrees north latitude, and where we have had (so far) the second-highest snowfall on record, something like 125 inches. With more predicted for later in the week. The record is 132, and we're going after it this year.

caw

Thanks for the input. I think it was Charles Darwin all those years ago, he said that Australia would never be as great as America because we simply didn't have the water.

Thanks for the comparisons. I've always wondered if Brissy was like Miami - certainly makes it easier to imagine the settings.

tarkine
03-12-2012, 09:36 AM
Thank you to everyone for taking time out to answer my questions. I've been adding rep points for all your answers.

Spy_on_the_Inside
03-12-2012, 10:30 AM
I'm not sure if you're still needing people to answer questions, but America is a big place, and I suppose there's no such thing as too much information.

1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?

In cable, there are two types of channals, local and national. National channals will have the same schedule no matter where you are in the country. Local channals will still have some major TV shows out of Hollywood, but they will have more control over the schedule, and there will be a different news station running the nightly report depending on where you are. But the news station will be close to where your watching from, and it will relay news stories occuring in the area.


2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

Drizzle? Shower? I'm not sure. It's not something that happens enough to have a name. But ther is a song about it.

I wanna now, have you ever seen the rain comin' down on a sunny day.


3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

It really depends on where you are. In a smaller town, it might be possible to rent a house for not a lot of money, but in larger cities, I would say the word 'tiny' is subjective, but the general rule is the better an area is, the more expensive the rent is going to be. But by extention, the houses are also going to be nicer. You aren't going to find a lot of tiny, trashy houses in nice neighborhoods. Brings down the property value.


4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

I live near the Mall of America, and I have actually seen times where agents just come there and hold interviews for people to be on reality shows.


5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?

You'll usually see a few, but it's a dying industry. I know that there has been a big problem lately with Walmarts opening in small towns, because it forces all smaller business to shut down because they can't complete.

Siri Kirpal
03-12-2012, 11:26 PM
Australia is a nation comparable in size to the United States, minus Alaska. LA's climate is similar to that in Sydney. It isn't anything like that in Brisbane, which would be closer to the climate in Miami. Australia is closer to the equator, which means there really isn't a place as cold as the very cold places in the U.S. Tasmania might have a climate similar to Missouri or Kansas in terms of temperature, but would be wetter. The U.S. doesn't have a locale similar in climate to Darwin. And Australia lacks really high mountains, like the Rockies, so those kinds of climatic conditions aren't comparable, either. No Oz city is comparable to Denver.

And certainly not to Anchorage, where I live, at 61 degrees north latitude, and where we have had (so far) the second-highest snowfall on record, something like 125 inches. With more predicted for later in the week. The record is 132, and we're going after it this year.

caw

Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"-- a Sikh greeting)

I thought about that after I posted and was heading to bed. Thanks for the corrections. (Though I doubt the OP would mistake LA for Alaska.)

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

jaksen
03-13-2012, 12:19 AM
I am in New England, which can be a whole other world compared to the south or the west coast. So my answers probably won't be as helpful, but in case you set a scene out in MA, CT, RI, ME, NH or VT, here you go:

1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?

We get about 500 channels through Comcast (Xfinity). In my town that's the only cable company available. In other towns and cities around me, Verizion is also available (FIOS.) So there is variation just from small town to small town and town to city.

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

We would call that a cloudburst or a little cloudburst.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

Yes, it is. In almost every small town in NE there's a section of town which is often older with bigger homes, many of which are divided into apartments or condos. BUT, there are also houses for rent in the same area.

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

Most likely you'd apply for this online, with an online application and a video sent in, too. (Uploaded along with the application.)

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?

Tons of these everywhere. In a 'ritzier' part of town you might have to drive a small distance as in some 'residential areas' they wouldn't be allowed. In most NE towns there are sections zoned for residential, or commercial, or both. This is why you might see a Seven-Eleven or Tedeschi's (common where I live) in an area of older homes. It'll be there on the corner along with a dentist office, maybe a realtor's office and next to the big mansion that's been converted into a funeral home.

thothguard51
03-13-2012, 12:39 AM
The west coast of America has very little similarities to the east coast of America. Or as we say, the left coast the the right coast...

Mark G
03-13-2012, 01:27 AM
I have a few questions about life in American for a story I'm writing. Since I've never been to the USA, I have absolutely no idea about what day to day life is like.


1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?

At a hotel, you get whatever the hotel system uses; otherwise your choices are related to geography for "cable" since they have localized monopolies.

For my area (about 25 miles from L.A.), the providers are:

Time Warner Cable
Verizon FiOS (fiber optic)
Dish Network (satellite)
DirecTV (satellite)
all have hundreds of channels of totally useless drivel.


2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

If you're in L.A., it's called a "Miracle!" with a capital M. It very rarely rains here except when it's cold; and then it's either a longer lasting drizzle or mist or all out rain. You're describing Hawaii beautifully, though. That's exactly how it is on Kawaii almost every day: warm, light shower, goes away in a minute.

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

Yes, absolutely, houses are available for rent all over the place. There are entire websites devoted to houses for Rent - Google can help there. Small apartments, houses, guest houses, or what some call a "granny flat". The world is your oyster.
www.losangeles.craigslist.org (]link removed[/URL]
[URL="http://www.losangeles.craigslist.org)
www.zillow.com/homes/for_rent/Los-Angeles-CA/house_type/ (http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_rent/Los-Angeles-CA/house_type/)


4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

LOL. Okay, only weirdos and freaks do that. That said, I did it once. :) I got to see my face on TV! (eek!) You fill out an app with bio, then you meet with producers who interview you to find out if you're interesting enough to bring in ratings... at the time, I was renting a room in a condo with 2 girls... :)

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?

oh, yeah. Of course, every neighborhood is different, but our house is .6 miles of pleasant walk from a shopping center with Vons, CVS pharmacy, a quaint little coffee shop (not Starbucks, that's another 1/4 mile around the block) and there's plenty more a block in either direction from there. If you want to plan on a specific area in the L.A. vicinity, I can give details about quite a few. Living in each will be very different.

Thanks in advance. :-D

Hope that helps! Google Maps can give you tons of detail. Combine that with a craigslist search for rentals or one of the other sites, and you can get even more specific.

Feel free to PM me if you have questions about a specific neighborhood, since they can be radically different.

Cathy C
03-13-2012, 01:46 AM
I'd be happy to answer anything about Denver. :) Haven't lived in LA but Denver I know after spending 20+ years there. Answering below for Denver:


1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?

The primary cable provider in Denver is Comcast. The basic package (that you would probably get when renting a house) would be 50-75 channels.

2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

In Denver in summer, it's a daily occurrence around 3:00 p.m. Generally considered "a light sprinkle" or "the afternoon shower".

3. is it feasible to rent a tiny house in a good area? Or would it be more likely that someone might sublet say, a small apartment over a garage?

Absolutely! Most of Denver proper is very old and a lot of the original houses are quite tiny (think 750-900 sq. ft.) Note I say "Denver proper." The City & County of Denver takes up only a small portion of what is considered "Denver Metro". Denver Metro consists of 7-9 counties with multiple enclaves and cities. For your purposes, an area right off downtown would be perfect. There are a lot of older houses near the courthouse where the streets are narrow and the houses small. The big thing in Denver right now are "scrape-offs" where a smaller house is bulldozed right down to the foundation and then rebuilt in place with a two-story house or townhomes.

4. The application process for appearing on reality teleivision. I'm sure there is something like a paper application, then an interview with a casting agent...

Not really a big thing in Denver. I presume this is an LA question.

5. What about the good old corner shop - deli, 7/11, convenience store? Are there a lot of those around in the suburbs?

It very much depends on the neighborhood in Denver. The older zoning ordinances wouldn't allow for businesses in a residential district. The newer areas like Stapleton do. But there's always the 16th Street Mall, which is literally a long stretch of mall where there are no cars allowed--only shuttle buses and pedestrian traffic. It's not really comfortable walking distance from the courthouse (probably 1-2 miles away by foot) but there are very reliable buses in Denver, along with light rail trains. Very do-able. :)


Hope that helps!

tarkine
03-13-2012, 03:05 AM
Cathy C - you are from Denver.. Awesome. Yep the reality TV question was for LA.

What sort of presence does corporate America have there? I imagine that like most cities, it has it's fair share of local business mogals? Is this right? Does it have a large centre of business?

What is the drive like to Aspen? My characters are driving up there at night - is that something that would happen, or would they have to be careful of wildlife on the road (any information you can give me on this would be fabulous). What is the road like?


Yes I know I could google most of these, but I'd much rather ask you guys, because I don't have a lot of time to spend on google (battling a 3 year old who thinks it's fun to jump on the keyboard while I type this)

Thanks everyone.. Master 3 is back for round 2

Chris P
03-13-2012, 03:16 AM
Have a new question:

International travel - you check in, get your ticket, book in your luggage at least 2-3 hours before flight departure time. Then you go to a seperate departure lounge area (with shops etc). To get into the international departure lounge you need your ticket and if you don't have a ticket, you don't get it.

What happens in America? I'm more interested if a non ticket holder can get into the international departure lounge/waiting area.

Thanks for all your help. Your answers are awesome.

You must have a boarding pass to get past security, which in nearly every US airport I've gone through is not far from the ticketing counter where you drop your checked bags. Without a boarding pass, you cannot get near the boarding gate.

MeretSeger
03-13-2012, 03:50 AM
And you have heard stories about the security here, right, Tarkine? Because the happy, friendly days of shopping and watching the planes are gone.

However, at the International Terminal of the San Francisco Airport, by sheer pre-911 luck, much of the shopping area is public. It is in a huge open atrium before you got through security (no duty free until after security, of course), so this will vary. You'll need a frequent flyer through whatever airport you choose for the details.

backslashbaby
03-13-2012, 05:25 AM
After security you can shop and sit at a cafe, etc. if you have time (I always do). There are usually tons of shops, and many capitalize on selling what security limits if brought from home ;) A big bottle of shampoo, anyone? :D Bottled drinks? Pricey, but they are there in droves.

Security checks ID of all sorts, so yeah, there's no getting through without it. You could lose it in the shops and nobody would know until you tried to board, however.

tarkine
03-13-2012, 05:39 AM
Thanks to you all.

I knew the security had changed everywhere after 9/11, but I wanted to make sure that a non-ticket holder couldn't get to the gate.


The world sure has changed.

Cathy C
03-13-2012, 03:08 PM
Answers below


Cathy C - you are from Denver.. Awesome. Yep the reality TV question was for LA.

What sort of presence does corporate America have there? I imagine that like most cities, it has it's fair share of local business mogals? Is this right? Does it have a large centre of business?

Oh, of course. Denver is one of the largest centers of business in the American west. There are branches of pretty much every agency of the U.S. Government, including the FBI and GSA (General Service Administration) along with tons of corporations. There's a whole section of town called The Federal Center where a lot of the agencies have offices. Much of downtown is skyscrapers. Did you have something specific in mind for your story where you want to use real names or places?

What is the drive like to Aspen? My characters are driving up there at night - is that something that would happen, or would they have to be careful of wildlife on the road (any information you can give me on this would be fabulous). What is the road like?

It's a pretty long drive. First, you need to tell me what time of year, because the driving experience varies wildly between seasons. In summer, and provided there aren't any festivals going on, the drive time is about 4-1/2 hours from Denver to Aspen. In winter, tack on another 2-4 hours for traffic and road conditions. Most all of the ski areas are along I-70 westbound, so traffic is hideous. When it's snowing there might be requirements for chains on tires, which can mean dozens or hundreds of cars lining the shoulders of the road putting on chains in the slush & slop. The roads are all paved, of course, with 4-lanes (total) in most places, and 6 on the pass approaches and for the beginnings of the downhills. There's also slowdowns just for steepness. Semis (large trucks) and small cars slow down in the right lane as you approach the passes (Eisenhower Tunnel, Vail Pass). Nothing is more frustrating than having a nice speed of 55 or so in the left lane when all of a sudden you come upon another car doing 25. Once you've slowed down on a 30% incline, there's no speeding up again until the top. You swear and fume and then sigh and move into the right lane with the others. On Hwy. 82, once you've reached Glenwood Springs, it's 4-lane part of the way before narrowing to 2-lane. But that's a fairly recent development, probably in the past 15 years or so. If the book takes place back in the 80's or before, it's a whole different driving experience. Hwy. 82 was known for decades as "killer 82." it had the highest number of deaths per mile of highway as anywhere in the country. Part was animal hits, part curving, narrow roads that wound between the Crystal River on one side and solid, mountain wall on the other (with frequent falling rocks and boulders). Lots of people went into the river after sliding off the road.

And yes, there are deer. Lots and LOTS of deer (with the occasional bighorn sheep, elk or moose) who seem to love nothing more than leaping in front of (or into the side of) your car. I actually worked for an insurance adjuster in Glenwood Springs for a few years and wow, can tell you some stories!!

Hope that helps! Feel free to ask any other questions that these answers might raise!



ETA: BTW, DIA (Denver International Airport) is a whole different experience than a lot of other airports. First, much like NYC airports and L.A., there are different concourses, meaning buildings, for the various airline hubs. An underground train connects them (and frequently breaks down in bad weather--power outages). Blizzards will stop air traffic in its tracks and, even if the plane lands, the highway leading into Denver (the airport is about 15 miles outside the city limits) can be closed, stranding everyone in the main station. You can actually FLY from Denver to Aspen, but it's an . . . interesting landing in Aspen because of the mountain ranges. Think "straight down from 25,000 feet to a short landing strip" with lots of cross winds. Can make for a very exciting scene if you'd rather not put them in a car for hours. :)

Lehcarjt
03-13-2012, 09:22 PM
We travelled internationally out of SFO last year.

We checked in with the airline ticket office (left our bagage at check-in) in the international terminal. There was entire separate terminal for domestic flights.

Then we went through security. Only ticketed passengers could get through security. If you haven't already researched US airport security, you probably should do so.

After security we were on a concourse (I think that is the word) where all the stores and food was located. We walked down the concourse to the waiting area to board our plane and waited there until the flight was ready for us.

At one of the other airports (Miami? I can't remember), there was only one terminal and international passengers were all mixed in with domestic. Once you were past security (and again, only ticketted passengers could get past), you could wander anywhere you wanted up and down the concourse. I remember this clearly because we had kids with us and spent a good hour riding the overhead tram back and forth.

Just incase no one else mentioned this, 'corner shop' in California doesn't necessarily mean the same thing as other places (I've never been to Denver, but I imagine it as more like Calif than say NYC). Food is purchased from large (mostly) chain grocery stores. The grocery stores will often have smaller stores next door to them (it's all called a 'strip mall'). Keep in mind that the only people who can walk to such stores are those in the higher-density parts of very large cities (San Francisco, NYC, etc.). Everyone else has to drive to go to a store - and a lot of this varies by location.

Siri Kirpal
03-13-2012, 10:16 PM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Just a small correction to Lehcarjt's post: It's true that most food here is purchased in large chain stores--Safeway, Vons, etc. But natural food stores have a corner store ambiance, and you do find them in all the larger cities on the West Coast. Also, my Mom lives in an older suburb of San Diego (Hillcrest), which is fairly low density, and she can walk to one large chain store and one natural foods store. And that's not so uncommon.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Lehcarjt
03-14-2012, 05:33 AM
Siri's right. I over generalized a bit and it varies by location. Where I am (suburbs of N. Calif.), most people wouldn't be caught walking to the store though. And most housing is built so that there isn't easy access to strip malls.

tarkine
03-16-2012, 01:45 PM
The overgeneralisations were fine. It was a passing line in the book "She walked down to the 7/11 to pick up some food to cook dinner" type of thing.

Originally Posted by tarkine http://absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=7094515#post7094515)
Cathy C - you are from Denver.. Awesome. Yep the reality TV question was for LA.

What sort of presence does corporate America have there? I imagine that like most cities, it has it's fair share of local business mogals? Is this right? Does it have a large centre of business?

Oh, of course. Denver is one of the largest centers of business in the American west. There are branches of pretty much every agency of the U.S. Government, including the FBI and GSA (General Service Administration) along with tons of corporations. There's a whole section of town called The Federal Center where a lot of the agencies have offices. Much of downtown is skyscrapers. Did you have something specific in mind for your story where you want to use real names or places?

My character is the kind of guy who has a house in Apsen. His company is big enough for a corporate takeover or two, but he's not in the billionaire's club. So I'd like to put his business on a few floors of one of the most prestigous places in town (but naming the building isn't as important as the suburb/district).


After your description of the drive, I think my characters will fly to Aspen, while the landing sounds interesting, it's better than trying to deal with the timing/snow issues if I put it at the wrong time of the year. And I'm guessing that people can fly in during winter, but not during winter storms.

Oh plus I have them doing a crazy promotional stunt in Aspen (well it's not that outrageous -but they are running a street circuit backwards, wearing their pj's). Are there any issues that you, as a local could see in this.

So when would you say is the first and last snowfalls in Denver? (just want to make sure I put that into my story.)

Cathy C
03-16-2012, 03:41 PM
If your MC isn't a billionaire, he'd better be at least a multi-millionaire to have a second home in Aspen. The cost of even a TINY single family home is over $4,000,000. A house commensurate with a corporate executive could easily run double that. Plus the cost of upkeep of the house, from the super-high property taxes to the property manager (sort of required for absentee owners), utilities and such will cost in the high six figures each year.

As for good addresses in Denver, any of the streets in the 'teens are high end. If you just want one to use, use The Colorado Tower at 633 Seventeenth St. Lots of major corporations have offices in that building, including several banks. My copyright attorney's firm, Sherman & Howard has several floors in the building. It's a very high end building, with security & multiple elevators for odd & even floor numbers.

I'm a little confused about the stunt. Do you mean drive backwards or RUN backwards, on foot? Driving backwards would be next to impossible because of how the roads are structured there--tight corners, cars lining both sides of the road, etc. Do you have access to Google Earth? You might go see how the town is structured before you do that scene.

Of course, what might work better for you since you haven't traveled around the mountains is to create your own town. You can call it whatever you want, and refer to it as "the new Aspen", like somehow the other place is passe'. Then you can do whatever you want with the layout. :)

First and last snowfalls in Denver vary wildly from year to year. But generally, in a normal year, the ski areas try to open for the Thanksgiving Day weekend, the third week of November. That means it's been snowing for a few weeks-ish. Plan for the first snow sometime in mid-October, but it's been as early as September and as late as June. On the average, though, most of the snows are gone by Mother's Day in May.

tarkine
03-16-2012, 04:00 PM
If your MC isn't a billionaire, he'd better be at least a multi-millionaire to have a second home in Aspen. The cost of even a TINY single family home is over $4,000,000. A house commensurate with a corporate executive could easily run double that. Plus the cost of upkeep of the house, from the super-high property taxes to the property manager (sort of required for absentee owners), utilities and such will cost in the high six figures each year.

As for good addresses in Denver, any of the streete in the 'teens are high end. If you just want one to use, use The Colorado Tower at 633 Seventeenth St. Lots of major corporations have offices in that building, including several banks. My copyright attorney's firm, Sherman & Howard has several floors in the building. It's a very high end building, with security & multiple elevators for odd & even floor numbers.

I'm a little confused about the stunt. Do you mean drive backwards or RUN backwards, on foot? Driving backwards would be next to impossible because of how the roads are structured there--tight corners, cars lining both sides of the road, etc. Do you have access to Google Earth? You might go see how th town is structured before you do that scene.

Of course, what might work better for you since you haven't traveled around the mountains is to create your own town. You can call it whatever you want, and refer to it as "the new Aspen", like somehow the other place is passe'. Then you can do whatever you want with the layout. :)

Great idea, thanks Cathy.

So where do all the fine folks of Denver go when they want to go skiing?

Oh and the tower, looks awesome :)

Cathy C
03-16-2012, 05:39 PM
Oh, I should mention that there are TWO Colorado Towers. Tower (http://www.tomawest.com/colorado-tower-1.php)I and Tower (http://www.tomawest.com/colorado-tower-2.php)II. 633 is Tower I. 621 is Tower II. There's a terrific picture of the downtown looking towards the mountains in the Tower II images. It would help you get a feel for the area.

People from Denver ski at any of a variety of resorts. Everyone has their favorite. Aspen isn't actually that all that common of a destination for local skiers, because of the expense of getting there and finding a place to stay.

Here's a list of Colorado Ski Resorts (http://www.onthesnow.com/colorado/skireport.html?gclid=CLD9-YbE664CFSHatgodtDqpLQ) with current snowpack. The ones most often talked about in Denver are (in alpabetical order): Arapahoe Basin (called "A-basin" by locals), Copper Mountain, Keystone, Loveland, Vail and Winter Park. Of course, not everyone in Denver likes to ski. A lot of people move there for the other outdoor activities. But skiing is big business, so it's all over the news. Wander over to the Denver Post's Ski Report page (http://www.denverpost.com/skireport)for more info. In fact, it might not be a bad idea to wander around the newspaper's main pages to get a "feel" for the normal topics of conversation in Denver. :)

tarkine
03-17-2012, 12:01 PM
Thanks ever so much for your help Cathy. It's been invaluable.

Tower I looks amazing. I would go to Denver just to see it... and the mountains.

I didn't think the locals would go to Aspen. Most everywhere I've been, there's always been the tourist traps, then there are the places the locals go - and those places are the best.

tedi.s
03-20-2012, 08:20 AM
I skimmed through the responses and wanted to mention some things. The 998 channels. You need to remember that MANY of those channels are just selling you things or are music-- literally music with a screen saver.
I was going to give you the names DirectTV and DishNetwork as the major sattelite providers. Down south we have CableOne and COx Cable as some of the cable companies if you are looking for other examples.
Also, the whole delis and renting houses, that can easily bee seen in NJ. That is also really close to NY where there are also TC shows based out of. You could even consider flipping coasts.
well that was my two cents :)

Good Luck!

tarkine
03-20-2012, 04:49 PM
Thanks Ted, but I think I'll stick with LA - my character is only their briefly, plus the whole flipping around with the seasons is messing with my head enough, without adding snow to the mix. (Summer/winter et al)

glutton
03-20-2012, 04:52 PM
Walking 3 miles to a store is good exercise... although I live in NYC, but I walk that far to work... ;)

Hallen
03-20-2012, 09:34 PM
Cat covered most everything you need about Denver. I'd like to add that it's extremely dry there. The first week you are there, you'll have massively chapped lips, and your sinuses will ache. You'll have a stuffy nose every morning, and often people get bloody noses easily because of the dry air. It usually passes in a few days to a week for most people as your system gets used to the dryness.

If your character walks up stairs, they will notice the altitude. The air is thin and for people used to sea level, going up stairs, or for a run, or a brisk walk is really going to wind you. Newcomers often stop on the landings of two flights of stairs to catch their breath.

I travel to the Denver area four or five times a year for business (out in the Westminster area). It's a shock to my system every time coming from Oregon.

tarkine
03-21-2012, 12:01 PM
Cat covered most everything you need about Denver. I'd like to add that it's extremely dry there. The first week you are there, you'll have massively chapped lips, and your sinuses will ache. You'll have a stuffy nose every morning, and often people get bloody noses easily because of the dry air. It usually passes in a few days to a week for most people as your system gets used to the dryness.

If your character walks up stairs, they will notice the altitude. The air is thin and for people used to sea level, going up stairs, or for a run, or a brisk walk is really going to wind you. Newcomers often stop on the landings of two flights of stairs to catch their breath.

I travel to the Denver area four or five times a year for business (out in the Westminster area). It's a shock to my system every time coming from Oregon.

Thanks Hallen. Is it even dry in winter? or is there more moisture in the air?

Walking around, like a tourist (stopping to look at everything), would that pose any issues with the altitude?

I'm assuming that the locals would be used to it, and wouldn't find things like going for a jog/run an issue?

firedrake
03-21-2012, 12:36 PM
As far as I can recall...if you don't have a ticket, there's not a cat's chance in hell you can get into International Departures.

Mark G
03-21-2012, 08:38 PM
Walking 3 miles to a store is good exercise... although I live in NYC, but I walk that far to work... ;)

Yikes!

We drive to the grocery store .6 miles away. That's the Southern California way! Besides, carrying $140 worth of groceries a half mile in the blazing sun is less fun than it sounds.

I wish I could walk/bike to work. Getting up an hour earlier for the 9 mile commute just doesn't seem to feel right at 6:30am.

Siri Kirpal
03-21-2012, 10:01 PM
Thanks Hallen. Is it even dry in winter? or is there more moisture in the air?

Walking around, like a tourist (stopping to look at everything), would that pose any issues with the altitude?

I'm assuming that the locals would be used to it, and wouldn't find things like going for a jog/run an issue?

Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Whether a tourist would have a problem with the altitude would depend on whether they were drinking enough water and also on their general condition. I once saw a man with a heart problem faint when he rose to a standing position after sitting on the ground for an hour or so. That was in the mountains of New Mexico, a bit higher altitude than Denver.

It's not usually a problem for locals. If it is, they move elsewhere.

Someone else will have to answer about the moistness of winter. But the high altitude does cause dehydration faster than the same lack of humidity at a low altitude.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Cathy C
03-21-2012, 10:53 PM
Thanks Hallen. Is it even dry in winter? or is there more moisture in the air?

Walking around, like a tourist (stopping to look at everything), would that pose any issues with the altitude?

I'm assuming that the locals would be used to it, and wouldn't find things like going for a jog/run an issue?

Oops! I should have mentioned these things. When you said the MC lived in Denver but traveled to Aspen, my head didn't connect the altitude. Denver is the "Mile High City" for a reason. The 10th (I think) step of the county courthouse is exactly 5,280 feet above sea level. Aspen is in the mid-8,000 altitude range. So yes, it's a problem. Altitude sickness is a real thing. It can cause fainting, sweats, dry heaves and even heart attacks/strokes. It takes a person a minimum of a week to acclimate to the elevation, even if just walking around. The person will get tired easily and will need extra water.

The locals are very much used to it but those who live there know you need to take it easy between ski runs, for example, or are careful to limit strenuous activity to short bursts with rest between.

Speaking of walking, most EVERYBODY walks if you live in downtown Denver. Parking is a serious pain. But a lot of people live in the suburbs and commute, so there's plenty of cars on the road. A good percentage of people ride bikes and jog but not everyone. Still, I'd say it's a good 65-70% of the population of Denver proper.

The average humidity level varies depending on where you are in the state. Denver is actually not in the mountains, but is "high plains desert". The average humidity is 20% but can be 10% in the summer and 80% in the winter. So, again, depends on when you set the book---season-wise. :)

Oh, and just like L.A., the locals have names for certain roads. Interstate 25 (the primary north/south roadway through Denver) is known as the "Valley Highway" for longtime residents. It's just I-25 if you've lived there 15 years or less. There's also a configuration where there are multiple flyover highways where I-25, I-70 (the main east/west roadway) I-76, and others meet. It's known as "the Mousetrap" (http://www.airphotona.com/image.asp?imageid=1173) (because it really does look like a mousetrap from the air.) Always good to have some traffic comments in a book when the people live there. :)

glutton
03-22-2012, 06:14 AM
We drive to the grocery store .6 miles away. That's the Southern California way! Besides, carrying $140 worth of groceries a half mile in the blazing sun is less fun than it sounds.


I used to buy stuff from a store with nice discounts 3 miles away (basically where I work now) and walk there and back, we don't get their circular in my neighborhood anymore though so haven't bothered for a while.

tarkine
03-23-2012, 03:58 AM
Oops! I should have mentioned these things. When you said the MC lived in Denver but traveled to Aspen, my head didn't connect the altitude. Denver is the "Mile High City" for a reason. The 10th (I think) step of the county courthouse is exactly 5,280 feet above sea level. Aspen is in the mid-8,000 altitude range. So yes, it's a problem. Altitude sickness is a real thing. It can cause fainting, sweats, dry heaves and even heart attacks/strokes. It takes a person a minimum of a week to acclimate to the elevation, even if just walking around. The person will get tired easily and will need extra water.

The locals are very much used to it but those who live there know you need to take it easy between ski runs, for example, or are careful to limit strenuous activity to short bursts with rest between.

Speaking of walking, most EVERYBODY walks if you live in downtown Denver. Parking is a serious pain. But a lot of people live in the suburbs and commute, so there's plenty of cars on the road. A good percentage of people ride bikes and jog but not everyone. Still, I'd say it's a good 65-70% of the population of Denver proper.

The average humidity level varies depending on where you are in the state. Denver is actually not in the mountains, but is "high plains desert". The average humidity is 20% but can be 10% in the summer and 80% in the winter. So, again, depends on when you set the book---season-wise. :)

Oh, and just like L.A., the locals have names for certain roads. Interstate 25 (the primary north/south roadway through Denver) is known as the "Valley Highway" for longtime residents. It's just I-25 if you've lived there 15 years or less. There's also a configuration where there are multiple flyover highways where I-25, I-70 (the main east/west roadway) I-76, and others meet. It's known as "the Mousetrap" (http://www.airphotona.com/image.asp?imageid=1173) (because it really does look like a mousetrap from the air.) Always good to have some traffic comments in a book when the people live there. :)


Thanks once again Cathy. Now I have a clearer picture of the environment of Denver and Aspen areas, so I can make my MC suffer a little when she arrives (with the altitude).

I think there might be a traffic jam on the mousetrap, in the book :-D

Thanks everyone for your input. makes me want to travel to Denver to have a look around.

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
03-23-2012, 04:29 AM
1. Cable television. Is it different from state to state? My character is on holiday in LA. And is are there different levels of cable - national, local?


We have several major TV NETWORKS. If you hear someone talking about ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, or FOX, those are networks.

In each metropolitan city or small city, there will be affiliates of those networks, which broadcast our well-known TV shows ("Friends," "The Office," that type of thing). These affiliates have call letters, usually starting with W or K, depending on the area. For instance, the CBS affiliate in Austin Texas is KTBC.

These networks, along with other channels appear on cable. And like others have said, you purchase cable channels in "bundles" or groups. Like they may offer multiple channels that appeal to women together (like Home and Garden TV [HGTV], The Food Network, or Lifetime), and they may bundle all the sports channels together for guys.

In addition, we have what they call "Premium" channels, like HBO or Showtime, which show first-run movies either at the same time they are in the theater, or just after they leave.

We also have something called Netflix, where you can order movies and TV shows through the mail or to watch on your computer (I think. Don't have it).

Very few people I've ever known have all 999 channels. Most people get the "basic" package, which has a little something to appeal to everyone (usually your local affiliates, a movie channel or two [like American Movie Classics], Lifetime, Bravo [arts related programming], A & E [Arts and Entertainment], Comedy Central [lots of stand-up comedians, etc.], a sports channel or two, maybe the Food Network, and a few others. Then they supplement that with maybe one or two bundles, which have around 10-15 channels each.

You usually end up paying at LEAST $60 bucks or so for decent cable, depending on the number of bundles you've added to your basic package.

Hope this helps.
HH

Lehcarjt
03-23-2012, 06:02 AM
The overgeneralisations were fine. It was a passing line in the book "She walked down to the 7/11 to pick up some food to cook dinner" type of thing.

You wouldn't ever go to 7/11 for food requiring cooking. They sell sodas, beer, candies, Doritos - that kind of food. For 'real' food (veggies, pasta, meats, etc.) your protag has to go to a full grocery store.

In my part of California, the only thing worth buying in a 7/11 is a Slurpee. And the 7/11s tend to be located in the older, more rundown parts of towns (and be old and run down themselves). Newer neighborhoods don't want them.

If you want to stick the entire paragraph relating to this topic up here, I (and I'm sure others as well) would be happy to tell you how to write the Calif / Denver stuff correctly.

ULTRAGOTHA
03-24-2012, 07:56 PM
Yogurt. Yogurt and water, water, water (not caffeine!) for altitude sickness

ULTRA "I've learnt the hard way visiting my step daughter" GOTHA

SirOtter
03-24-2012, 09:27 PM
*jaw drops*

998 channels....whoa, that's amazing.

I wouldn't be too impressed. :) I get almost that many, but most seem to be primarily devoted to infomercials. I doubt I regularly watch more than a dozen or so - the main broadcast networks, PBS, Turner Classics, BBC America, Current, Major League Baseball, a few others.

SirOtter
03-24-2012, 09:37 PM
2. What do you call it when the sun is out, the weather is warm and it rains lightly as a cloud passes by?

If you're in L.A., it's called a "Miracle!" with a capital M. It very rarely rains here except when it's cold; and then it's either a longer lasting drizzle or mist or all out rain. You're describing Hawaii beautifully, though. That's exactly how it is on Kawaii almost every day: warm, light shower, goes away in a minute.

South Florida can get the same phenomenon, which the local sometimes call liquid sunshine. I seem to recall reading somewhere (a Charlie Chan novel, I think) that Hawaiians used a similar term, but that may have been peculiar to when the books were written in the 1920s. Or I may be misremembering altogether. ;)

SirOtter
03-24-2012, 09:41 PM
You must have a boarding pass to get past security, which in nearly every US airport I've gone through is not far from the ticketing counter where you drop your checked bags. Without a boarding pass, you cannot get near the boarding gate.

That's also the case in Toronto and at Heathrow, IIRC, but Frankfort had security at the individual gates, which I understand is common on the Continent.

SirOtter
03-24-2012, 09:48 PM
You wouldn't ever go to 7/11 for food requiring cooking. They sell sodas, beer, candies, Doritos - that kind of food. For 'real' food (veggies, pasta, meats, etc.) your protag has to go to a full grocery store.


Not only is the selection limited, the prices are much higher in convenience stores. Ours here in Tennessee seem to sell more Lottery tickets than anything else.

tarkine
03-26-2012, 03:26 AM
Thanks everyone for your help. The 999 channels sound impressive to me, because in Australia we have something like 40 or so (I don't know I don't watch cable TV)

For the local 7/11 down the road, I'll have my character go to the local grocery story - that seems to get rid of that complication, plus it gives her some place to entertain herself (when I went to hong Kong, I spent 30 minutes looking around the shelves at all the different packages just for curiosity's sake).

I'm going to marry one of my characters off, in Denver. It's going to be an early summer wedding,(thinking June). Would that be okay for an outside/garden wedding?


My character's rich mother is planning his wedding. It's got all the bells and whistles and so I'm looking at it from his perspective, and he's going to be a little vague about the details, because he's not interested, and since it's not going to be mentioned beyond a passing line, I think I can get away with not a lot of details.

Cathy C
03-26-2012, 11:47 PM
Go here (http://denver.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-wedding-venues-in-colorado/)to find some amazing locations for an outdoor wedding! Not all will be IN Denver, though. Most of the really picturesque spots for a wedding are in the foothills (which Denver isn't). I recommend Red Rocks--the first site listed. It's an AMAZING place! :)

tarkine
03-27-2012, 01:23 AM
Thanks Cathy. It's so hard to pick a location from a website.