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Celia Cyanide
12-21-2005, 10:45 PM
Just wanted to say Happy Solstice. That is all! :)

Richard
12-21-2005, 10:49 PM
(Deleted - just a riff on all the fuss in the other thread. Not actually seething, with fury or anything else)

Puddle Jumper
12-21-2005, 11:04 PM
Isn't that tomorrow? Ha, I don't even know what it is.

Happy first day of Winter!!!

Did that make your eyes hurt?

Shadow_Ferret
12-21-2005, 11:18 PM
Yay! It's all uphill from here daylight-wise!

Celia Cyanide
12-21-2005, 11:59 PM
I believe it's today, isn't it?

robeiae
12-22-2005, 12:05 AM
It's on December 22nd.

Rob :)

CaitlinK18
12-22-2005, 12:06 AM
Happy Solstice everyone! And Merry Yule to us pagan types. Blessed be :).

robeiae
12-22-2005, 12:07 AM
Today is Solstice-eve Day.

Rob :)

My-Immortal
12-22-2005, 12:13 AM
So what do you do to celebrate this? Sit in the dark? :)

Take care all - Happy Whatever, Merry You-Know-What, and all that other stuff. LOL

CaitlinK18
12-22-2005, 12:16 AM
There's usually a Yule-log involved in my house, and drinking.

My-Immortal
12-22-2005, 12:18 AM
There's usually a Yule-log involved in my house, and drinking.

Hmmm...that sounds nice. :)

Enjoy.

Shadow_Ferret
12-22-2005, 12:22 AM
Today is Solstice-eve Day.

Rob :)
My calender says Winter Solstice is today.

Not that I'm one to rush these things, but dang it. I wait all year for this holiday!

*runs out to sacrifice a tree and bathe in it's sap*

Carole
12-22-2005, 12:35 AM
SEETHING FURY!
um...?

blacbird
12-22-2005, 12:45 AM
Solstice really means something where I live. Today we get 5 hours 28 minutes of daylight (I'd say sunlight, except the daytime sky for the past fortnight has been the uniform color of a naval ship). Tomorrow it starts getting longer.

caw.

Pthom
12-22-2005, 12:52 AM
Today is Solstice-eve Day.

Rob :)Sorta.

The precise moment of the 2005 solstice will be December 21, 2005 at 1:35 P.M. EST (18:35 UT). (http://www.infoplease.com/spot/wintersolstice1.html)

Puddle Jumper
12-22-2005, 01:05 AM
My dictionary says that it falls on Dec. 22. The calendar next to my computer doesn't give that information, but it does tell me that the emperor of Japan's birthday is on Friday. Interesting that something like that made it on the calendar - why not Bush's and every other world leader? And my calendar thought to tell me that Dec. 26 is Boxing Day. Ooh. Actually, it tells me that Japan's Independence Day was on Dec. 6. The calendar was printed in China. Maybe that has something to do with it.

Hey, wouldn't it be nice if American companies actually did their manufacturing in the USA? Wouldn't that be nice if we could give Americans more jobs? I mean, surely Americans can compile a calendar as well.

September skies
12-22-2005, 01:14 AM
Is it ok to say the "S" word - Solstice?
and just so that y'all know -- according to Jay Leno -- Jesus should now be referred to as "The holiday infant"
LOL
(not laughing at Jesus - just at the ridiculousness of it all)

Shadow_Ferret
12-22-2005, 02:19 AM
*fills a hot tub with sap*

Anyone want to join me?

It's kinda sticky, but nice and warm. :)

blacbird, wow, a whole 5 hours and 28 minutes of daylight? Where do you live? I remember those days, only I don't recall if we had that much sunshine. ;)

reph
12-22-2005, 02:28 AM
My wall calendar agrees with what Pthom said. Today, 18:35 U.T.

Pthom
12-22-2005, 05:02 AM
My wall calendar agrees with what Pthom said. Today, 18:35 U.T.YES!
Finally, I'm right, for once.

Actually, the issue of on what day the solstice occurs is interesting. Simply, it changes. The solstice is defined as that point on Earth's orbit where, because of the tilt of the planet's axis relative to the plane of its orbit, light rays from the sun strike the planet directly at a point farthest north (summer solstice) or farthest south (winter solstice). Since it takes Earth approximately 365 1/4 days to complete one orbit about the sun, the date and time for events such as solstices or equinoxes (where the sun's rays strike directly on the equator) are never the same on a calendar.

Check out the time and date for next year's winter solstice and it may indeed be on the 22nd.

But who cares, really? From now, till the summer solstice, sometime around June 21, 2006, the days will become increasingly longer. That's in the northern hemisphere. Those of you in Peoria, Brisbane or Monte Video will be looking forward to increasingly shorter days...and skiing in July.

;)

Unique
12-22-2005, 05:25 AM
:banana: Good news! Summer's coming!

Happy Solstice everyone!

Jo
12-22-2005, 06:01 AM
Yay! Winter's coming? :( Nah, doesn't sound as appealing...

I can definitely say the sun is directly overhead down here in Australia. My scalp burnt yesterday when I took the kids to the pool. (We live a little over 2 hours south of the Tropic of Capricorn.) And yes, I have hair... I got burnt where my wet hair parted.

For us, summer has begun (current sunrise: 4:56am; sunset: 6.39pm). Tasmania (our southernmost state) observes daylight saving, and has a 5:29am sunrise and 8:50pm sunset today. And the Antarctic? Well, the sun's up 24 hours... (on New Year's eve, the midnight hour strikes in broad daylight).

Happy Solstice!

robeiae
12-22-2005, 06:05 AM
YES!
Finally, I'm right, for once.
Are you saying I can't celebrate the Solstice on the 22nd in accordance with my personal views?!?!?!

Help! Help! I'm being repressed!

Rob :)

Sage
12-22-2005, 06:56 AM
My calendar & my pagan roommate say it's today.

maestrowork
12-22-2005, 08:11 AM
Actually, the issue of on what day the solstice occurs is interesting. Simply, it changes.

Use a Chinese calendar -- they list the precise date/time. The Winter Solstice is a huge holiday for the Chinese because days will get longer after that, and the Chinese calendar is very precise. Today's the solstice.

emeraldcite
12-22-2005, 08:29 AM
I shall share my Haiku from the Haikuicide thread in TIO...

Ahem!


Solstice was the name
until the Christians stole it
and made it their own.


Happy Holidays everyone!

:)

Just spreading the good cheer...take it in stride. Stay safe everyone!

Pthom
12-22-2005, 11:45 AM
You are right that the solstice (and all other orbital events) is at exactly the same time and place in Earth's orbit. I meant that the solstice changes with respect to the Gregorian calendar. Unfortunately, there is no 'perfect' calendar. Unless you don't care about where the sun is (or isn't) when you get up in the "morning." The Chinese have, in their infinite wisdom, established one single time zone for their entire country. When it's noon in china, the sun will be at the zenith in Beijing, but will have just risen over the western border with Kazakhstan--a 4-hour difference.

Personally, I will take the vagarities of our calendar, including leap years.

Carole
12-22-2005, 02:56 PM
Help! Help! I'm being repressed!

Rob :)
Yes, and you'd better feel good about it. If not, you'd better at least pretend!

Celia Cyanide
12-22-2005, 06:40 PM
Are you saying I can't celebrate the Solstice on the 22nd in accordance with my personal views?!?!?!

Help! Help! I'm being repressed!

Rob :)

Oh, I'll blinking repress you, Rob! ;)