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View Full Version : How Incredibly Awesome is it when you Hard Copy your Entire Completed Novel?



Paul
02-10-2012, 04:47 AM
Well?


(complete with typos...)

Paul
02-10-2012, 05:38 AM
Wonder if this is the right forum?

(bump)

DeaK
02-10-2012, 06:05 AM
.

backslashbaby
02-10-2012, 08:09 AM
Oh, my first kiss was so bad.

I have never printed out a whole novel (except as serials, a looong time ago). Is it fun, then? I mainly write shorts. They aren't very exciting to print out :ROFL:

ladyleeona
02-10-2012, 09:53 AM
Oh, my first kiss was so bad.

Ugh--seconded.

And it usually feels pretty good. Until I find all the typos, anyway. :cry::chores

gothicangel
02-10-2012, 01:07 PM
I actually think it's more terrifying, than OMG.

More, like your kid's first day at school. He's heading out into the big, bad world, and there's nothing more you can do to protect him.

Becky Black
02-10-2012, 01:19 PM
It's pretty awesome. A word count on screen is nice, makes you think "wow, I wrote 80,000 words!" or whatever. But printing it out and seeing the size of that in a physical way is very exciting for me. The longest one I ever printed was I think about 120k, and double-spaced single-sided 10 point size the thing was thick as a brick and it weighed 8lbs! That's as much as a baby!

It always makes me chuckle when writer characters are shown on TV or in movies with the MS of their supposed novel and it's a skinny little thing -- coincidentally more like the size of a movie script! Makes me think "I hope that's just your partial, because that ain't no novel." :D

Once I'm actually working on it I extract the current chapter I'm editing from the rest though. For one thing, I don't want to have to use a wheelbarrow to carry it around, and for another, that big hulking mass of paper can be intidimating at least until the "done" part is bigger than the "still to do" part.

Paul
02-10-2012, 05:07 PM
It's pretty awesome. A word count on screen is nice, makes you think "wow, I wrote 80,000 words!" or whatever. But printing it out and seeing the size of that in a physical way is very exciting

.
'zackly. The physical mass weight thingy.

Back in the day of type writers (or worse hand written!) I suppose the writer had an entire psychology and language around producing that physical mass. (when it's half an inch, full inch,, reaches my whiskey glass etc)

It really is a nice feeling.

shaldna
02-10-2012, 05:42 PM
I love it! I like to print them all out and I keep them in their own binders on a shelf. Gives me an enormous amount of satisfaction.

CaroGirl
02-10-2012, 06:07 PM
I'll be doing that today (yikes!) so I can send it to an agent who requested a full snail mail manuscript. The agent thing is very exciting. Printing the whole novel is a pain in the patootie. But, combined, I guess it comes out to Pretty Awesome.

Snowstorm
02-10-2012, 06:27 PM
OMG! Seeing that bulk and its heft just means I have a REAL novel! Fanning the pages and feeling the breeze makes me breath in the effort. Love it. Then I start editing.

Paul
02-10-2012, 06:50 PM
the editing yes.

for the moment I'm just sitting, watching it. Grinning.

editing. yes.

soon.

soon.

Phaeal
02-10-2012, 06:52 PM
It makes me realize once again how much I love my computer and digital files -- no paper and ink costs.

KathleenD
02-10-2012, 07:25 PM
The first time I printed out something long, I didn't know about Kinkos (or whatever the copy place is called now) and killed my poor little cheap printer.

Now my printer is expensive, but now so is the ink. Then again, enough time has elapsed since the last time I wrote anything long that agents are willing to take digital files.

Ch-ch-ch-changes!

LJD
02-10-2012, 07:43 PM
I love printing it out.
I usually do my editing on the hardcopy, then transfer to computer.

Susan Littlefield
02-10-2012, 07:45 PM
Paul,

Love your posts and your polls.

I think printing out a hard copy is pretty darn awesome. Then I get to edit. :D

scarletpeaches
02-10-2012, 08:18 PM
Meh. I don't get that excited about it, because I've never doubted my ability to finish a novel. Seeing the to-be-edited first draft in hard copy isn't that different to seeing it on a computer screen, or in my head. What I like is seeing the cover art for the first time. And cashing the royalties cheques.

Paul
02-10-2012, 08:32 PM
Meh. I don't get that excited about it, because I've never doubted my ability to finish a novel. Seeing the to-be-edited first draft in hard copy isn't that different to seeing it on a computer screen, or in my head. What I like is seeing the cover art for the first time. And cashing the royalties cheques.
Scarlet...if I didnt know you better I think you were only in this for the moola.


@ Susan. Thanks. ;)

Drachen Jager
02-10-2012, 10:20 PM
I have to say I'm with peaches on this one. I really felt no different seeing it on paper than I felt with it on the computer. In fact I only printed one full copy of my first novel out, I haven't even bothered with the second.

However, when I sign with a publisher I'll do a little jig of joy (then get back to work).

When I see my first advance cheque I'll enjoy the moment, maybe spend some of it on something frivolous (depending on how much the advance is).

When I first see my cover art I'm sure I'll be thrilled, so long as it's good.

When I get the ARC in the mail I'm going to be smiling for a few days straight.

When I first see it on the bookstore shelves I'm probably just going to stop and stare, grinning like an idiot until the store clerks ask me to leave because I'm creeping out the customers.

scarletpeaches
02-10-2012, 10:24 PM
Scarlet...if I didnt know you better I think you were only in this for the moola.Even Shakespeare gotta get paid, yo.

Cyia
02-10-2012, 11:34 PM
I print to edit, and usually stick a hard copy in a file cabinet when I'm done, but I actually get more use out of uploading the final document to my kindle for a last read through. It looks like a "real" book on the kindle the way it doesn't when printed on paper, and it's a lot easier to find places to slash and burn on final edit.

scarletpeaches
02-10-2012, 11:37 PM
I print to edit, and usually stick a hard copy in a file cabinet when I'm done, but I actually get more use out of uploading the final document to my kindle for a last read through. It looks like a "real" book on the kindle the way it doesn't when printed on paper, and it's a lot easier to find places to slash and burn on final edit.Can I ask, how do you stop the formatting going all wonky? I tried saving a WIP as a .PDF file, and when I put it on the Kindle, the fonts were all over the place. Some of the page was in 'normal' and some words were in what looked like Papyrus.

Drachen Jager
02-10-2012, 11:44 PM
Can I ask, how do you stop the formatting going all wonky? I tried saving a WIP as a .PDF file, and when I put it on the Kindle, the fonts were all over the place. Some of the page was in 'normal' and some words were in what looked like Papyrus.

http://navigatingtheslushpile.blogspot.com/2011/04/formatting-your-ms.html

Formatting tips by Vickie Motter.

Cyia
02-11-2012, 12:12 AM
Can I ask, how do you stop the formatting going all wonky? I tried saving a WIP as a .PDF file, and when I put it on the Kindle, the fonts were all over the place. Some of the page was in 'normal' and some words were in what looked like Papyrus.


I don't use PDF. I import the Word file to the device through the cable, just drop it into the documents folder where the regular kindle books are stored and it should show up exactly like it is on your screen, italics and indents included.

JoyMC
02-11-2012, 01:10 AM
Can I ask, how do you stop the formatting going all wonky? I tried saving a WIP as a .PDF file, and when I put it on the Kindle, the fonts were all over the place. Some of the page was in 'normal' and some words were in what looked like Papyrus.

You can also email Word documents to your Kindle. I do that and have no formatting problems.

scarletpeaches
02-11-2012, 01:19 AM
Ah, I tried with .RTF at first, which didn't work. Didn't think of simply using a word.doc. Thanks, guys.

scarletpeaches
02-11-2012, 05:14 PM
Just tried an MS Word .doc and it doesn't work. It's not showing on my Kindle when I copy it over to the documents folder.

jaksen
02-11-2012, 05:24 PM
Never had a novel in hard copy. I've seen my stories many times in print mags - and it is exciting to get the cover art and your name in big letters across the cover.

I live for the day to see one of my novels in hardcover, though.

Cyia
02-11-2012, 05:58 PM
Okay, I'm an idiot.

You have to convert the .doc with mopipocket (it's free in the US; I don't know about the UK). It creates a Kindle-compatible ebook.

scarletpeaches
02-11-2012, 06:03 PM
Yep, I did that and it worked okay. The page breaks cause some problems, bumping text onto another line when it should continue in the same paragraph but I'll figure it out eventually.

Becky Black
02-11-2012, 06:57 PM
The simplest way of all is to save the document as a plain text file and copy it to the Kindle using the USB cable. You lose italics and such, but indents are preserved and it looks totally fine, gives a very book-like experience reading it.

kuwisdelu
02-11-2012, 09:11 PM
I just export to .epub and read it in iBooks. :)

I do like seeing a big printout, but more for sentimentality or fake nostalgia than anything else. It's too much of a pain to really do.

Jamesaritchie
02-11-2012, 09:26 PM
Ah, youth. I started writing when typewriters were still the tool of choice, so a hard copy was automatic. My first thought was never, "This is awesome", it was, "Damn, how much is it going to cost to mail this thing?"

I still write the first draft of my novels in longhand, so a hard copy is automatic there, as well.

Paul
02-12-2012, 12:03 AM
Ah, youth. I started writing when typewriters were still the tool of choice, so a hard copy was automatic. My first thought was never, "This is awesome", it was, "Damn, how much is it going to cost to mail this thing?"

I still write the first draft of my novels in longhand, so a hard copy is automatic there, as well.
I...I dont know what to say to that....


wow.

Old Hack
02-12-2012, 01:14 AM
I write my fiction in longhand too. What's so strange about that?

kuwisdelu
02-12-2012, 01:20 AM
The cost of erasers becomes a limiting factor.

Paul
02-12-2012, 01:33 AM
I write my fiction in longhand too. What's so strange about that?
What, you think I'm gonna give lip to a kitty with a tommy?

:chair

:) No, 'scool, to each his own.


for me, noooooooooooo.

scarletpeaches
02-12-2012, 06:38 PM
I used to write first drafts longhand too. My first novel was 150k long and took me six months to write. I wrote one third in a fortnight when I started it.

aruna
02-12-2012, 08:37 PM
It always makes me chuckle when writer characters are shown on TV or in movies with the MS of their supposed novel and it's a skinny little thing -- coincidentally more like the size of a movie script! Makes me think "I hope that's just your partial, because that ain't no novel." :D

.

Yep, and it's usually in a neat little folder, as well. :rolleyes:

Jamesaritchie
02-12-2012, 08:40 PM
I...I dont know what to say to that....


wow.

You'd be amazed by how many pro writers still write first drafts in longhand. Neil Gaiman may be my favorite of the bunch, though it is a big bunch to choose from. Stephen King even wrote one of his very long novels in longhand.

kaitie
02-12-2012, 09:07 PM
I used to write in longhand, and I still write sections in notebooks when I'm away from my computer. My last book had filled an entire notebook with various scenes.

KathleenD
02-13-2012, 08:50 PM
I keep a notebook by my bed - if I haven't been able to get my thousand words done because of work or family or whatever, I try to at least write an entire scene in the notebook before I pass out.

I've tried writing in bed on the laptop, but something about the bright screen seems to hit my brain like caffeine. If I'm reduced to writing in bed, it's because it's late as hell and I really need to be sleeping ASAP.

Cella
02-13-2012, 08:52 PM
it felt SUPER awesome to print it out 3 times.


all 800 pgs.




(never mind that it sucked.)

Williebee
02-13-2012, 08:56 PM
That first one? Printed out, double-sided, bound in a soft binder. It was frickin' cool.

thothguard51
02-13-2012, 08:56 PM
I am more excited to send the full copy as a file via email. Why?

Cost...

$19.95 plus tax for a black printer cartridge.
$9.95 for a ream of paper
$4.00 plus for shipping. More if you go next day shipping.

Now add 1 hour of my time waiting while the printer spits out the pages and I have to go through them to make sure there are no ink smears, missing pages and everything is in order. Add another 30 minutes or more to go to the post office and back.

Ohhh, I know the feeling of the offer to read, but these days, I prefer to email the entire manuscript. Cost, free. Time 5 minutes max.

scarletpeaches
02-13-2012, 08:58 PM
Yep, and it's usually in a neat little folder, as well. :rolleyes:Have you ever seen The Ghost and Mrs Muir? Lordy, I love George Sanders' voice. Anyway.

Gene Tierney wrote a book called Blood and Swash, dictated by the (dead) pirate, played by Rex Harrison. She insisted she didn't want to write any rude words, but R.H. (I forget his character's name) insisted. She capitulated, wrote the book, parcelled it up and took it to a publisher. She insisted on the publisher seeing her -- with a little help from the cad, George Sanders -- and he read the book straight away, and offered her a publishing deal!

The book was wafer-thin; probably no more than 100 pages in real life.

Oh, if only publishing really did work like that, complete with dictating, piratical ghost.

Jamesaritchie
02-13-2012, 09:06 PM
Have you ever seen The Ghost and Mrs Muir? Lordy, I love George Sanders' voice. Anyway.

Gene Tierney wrote a book called Blood and Swash, dictated by the (dead) pirate, played by Rex Harrison. She insisted she didn't want to write any rude words, but R.H. (I forget his character's name) insisted. She capitulated, wrote the book, parcelled it up and took it to a publisher. She insisted on the publisher seeing her -- with a little help from the cad, George Sanders -- and he read the book straight away, and offered her a publishing deal!

The book was wafer-thin; probably no more than 100 pages in real life.

Oh, if only publishing really did work like that, complete with dictating, piratical ghost.

Great movie. It's hilarious when she types that first dirty work. They never say what it is, but she hits just four keys on the typewriter, and that says it all.

Not counting the ghost, there are actually quite a few case in real life where publishing has worked exactly like this. It's rare, but it happens. Not as much as it used to, but it does happen.

And it happens like it did with Margaret Mitchell and Gone With the Wind. One of the few times I've heard of a novel selling when it was never submitted anywhere. The publisher pulled it out of a drawer at Mitchel's house, started reading, and couldn't stop.

scarletpeaches
02-13-2012, 09:08 PM
Great movie.Lordy; I think this is the first thing you've said with which I agree! :D

thothguard51
02-13-2012, 09:20 PM
I've got the Kindle Fire and in the US all I do is email by document to my Kindle email address and it then converts the office 2007 document to kindle format and sends it to me. I have no problem with this as the entire format is exactly as I sent, indents, line breaks, chapters, italics. Spread sheets with multiple tabs are another story...

A beta reader of mine has an older model kindle and she has had all kinds of trouble getting the documents I send to her, no matter what version I save and send in. Her husband has a ipad and I had to convert the office file to a compressed zip file in order for him to recieve it on his ipad. Unsure what that is?

kuwisdelu
02-13-2012, 11:33 PM
Her husband has a ipad and I had to convert the office file to a compressed zip file in order for him to recieve it on his ipad. Unsure what that is?

That's weird... An iPad shouldn't have a problem viewing MS Office documents.

Jamesaritchie
02-14-2012, 08:07 PM
Lordy; I think this is the first thing you've said with which I agree! :D

It had to happen sooner or later. But I'm still waiting for the sky to fall.