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View Full Version : What's Your Favorite Type of Pen??



randi.lee
02-05-2012, 06:18 PM
This is important stuff! :)

Mine is a Uniball Vision Elite. Writes so fluently and I love the way it feels in my hand.

scarletpeaches
02-05-2012, 06:21 PM
Sean Penn.

swvaughn
02-05-2012, 06:30 PM
Sean Penn.

:roll:You win!

My preference is the Bic Cristal Stick medium point, black ink. They're cheap, they work every time, and I've only had one explode in my jacket pocket, in like 15 years of using them. :)

Chrissy
02-05-2012, 06:49 PM
The kind that writes with lead and has an eraser :D

seun
02-05-2012, 06:57 PM
Any one with ink in it.

scarletpeaches
02-05-2012, 07:04 PM
Any one with ink in it.Ever written a book with a squid, then?

robjvargas
02-05-2012, 07:10 PM
The Zebra pens have been surprising for me, in the best of ways. I like a very fine point in my pens, and Zebra seems to "get me" in that regard.

shaldna
02-05-2012, 07:26 PM
I prefer to write with pencils where possible - I like the noise they make on the paper.

scarletpeaches
02-05-2012, 07:26 PM
Uni-ball fine gel pen for me.

Course, most of my work is typed onto the laptop, but when I make notes or write longhand, I prefer gel pens. They require less pressure on the page, which helps avoid wrist strain.

Filigree
02-05-2012, 07:27 PM
Mr. Filigree and I collect pens. My favorite special-occasion pen is either the fountain or rollerball sterling-silver Namiki Dragon pen he got me for an anniversary present. My favorite everyday pen is a custom job made for me by a penmaker friend of ours at Penchetta: http://www.penchetta.com/

I'll use a Uniball if need be. But I have carpal issues with my right hand, so I'm picky about pens.

willietheshakes
02-05-2012, 07:28 PM
I'm writing Black Feathers with a rotation of a Pelikan steno pen, a Sailor PG, and a Lamy 2000.

KellyAssauer
02-05-2012, 07:32 PM
I've been somewhat happy with the Pilot G-2 07* gell - when I can't find a Uniball Signo*.

*Manufacturers interested in my online and public support of their writing products should send a case -100 count or more- of a medium point, black ink, to the following address...

cameron_chapman
02-05-2012, 07:36 PM
I like my Lamy Safari fountain pen, but find refilling it too much of a chore. So usually any gel pen with an ultra-fine point (.4mm or thinner). I also have these cheap ball point pens from the dollar store I really like.

Shakesbear
02-05-2012, 07:42 PM
A fountain pen with an italic nib,usually a Parker. Or a quill - love a quill, nice and slow and the fingres get all inky and messy. Though I draw the line at making my own ink.

CrastersBabies
02-05-2012, 07:50 PM
For editing? Plain ole red bic.

For writing in notebook or writing journal, hmmmm.... the smooth ones. I try out quite a few. I'll probably go pick up a few based on some of the replies here. My handwriting is so atrocious that I guess it doesn't matter what I use in the end. :)

gothicangel
02-05-2012, 07:53 PM
A bic or gel pen.

Most comfortable grip, and smooth ink flow.

Chris1981
02-05-2012, 08:05 PM
Pilot's G2 gel-ink pen is nice--like Scarlet said, less pressure required. I also like Sharpie pens.

Snowstorm
02-05-2012, 08:05 PM
Fountain pen. Fountain pens are sexy.

Filigree
02-05-2012, 08:31 PM
Yep, they are. Dead sexy. Some folks call them 'elitist' - but not the folks who've actually written with a good one.

firedrake
02-05-2012, 08:37 PM
A blue or black BIC crystal ballpoint for me (medium).

bearilou
02-05-2012, 08:56 PM
Uni-ball fine gel pen for me.

Course, most of my work is typed onto the laptop, but when I make notes or write longhand, I prefer gel pens. They require less pressure on the page, which helps avoid wrist strain.

Pilot G-2 (10) gel pen.

edit: *waves to the other Pilot gel pen fans*

Jamesaritchie
02-05-2012, 09:01 PM
My favorite type of pen changes every so many years. I have arthritic hands, so I usually use a Pilot Dr. Grip SE gel pen with custom grips I had made.

But after trying fifty or sixty fountain pens, I've concluded that my favorite pen for easy, pleasant wrtiing is a Conklin, the same one Mark Twain used near the end of his life. http://www.conklinpens.com/product/crescent.html

You can find them for around $130, which isn't at all bad for a good fountain pen.

Libbie
02-05-2012, 09:34 PM
My keyboard.

Barring that, a Pilot 0.7 gel pen with black ink.

JayMan
02-05-2012, 09:38 PM
I've been somewhat happy with the Pilot G-2 07* gell - when I can't find a Uniball Signo*.

*Manufacturers interested in my online and public support of their writing products should send a case -100 count or more- of a medium point, black ink, to the following address...
Haha :D

I do like the Pilot G2 chambered in 0.7 mm, but gel ink is too dark and smudge-prone for my taste, plus the relatively large volume of ink discharged during normal use causes the line to broaden noticeably, not to mention the cartridges run out of ink prohibitively fast. So while the Pilot G2 may be my favorite pen to sign my name with, I prefer the Zebra F-402 which, while also possessing a tasteful 0.7 mm point, produces a fine yet powerful line, one that is neither too dark like the G2's nor crudely light and inconsistent like so many cheap dime-a-dozen Bics.

On top of that, it's sturdy and has a stainless steel barrel; it's got weight, and it's got authority, and for enthusiasts of torquing your pen into the air and catching it as you think about what to write next (such as myself) it has a mass distribution I've not encountered with any other pen to date, granting it a sensible center of gravity that allows measurable throws and accurate catches.

For the price, it's the best pen you can buy.

juniper
02-05-2012, 09:42 PM
Depends on what I'm using it for. But they're almost always blue ink.

For general household stuff, I like the Zebra F-301 blue finepoint. I like refillable, retractable pens.

At work and school they're some medium point blue thing. Ballpoint.

For writing letters, a fountain pen seems right, but I don't write as many of those as I think I should.

Ken
02-05-2012, 09:56 PM
... Papermate. Price is right: 10 for $4. And the ink supply is steady and constant. That's probably a given with the costly types, mentioned above. With disposables, it isn't though.

cornetto
02-05-2012, 11:01 PM
I like free pens best, lol.

But it depends on the task. I do most of my hand writing at work: I use cheap ballpoints to write out sales tickets (3 copy carbonless), 0.5 mm Pentel pencil for store tags and 0.9 mm pencil for plant and flat labels. At home, I mostly use the 0.9 mm pencil.

kuwisdelu
02-05-2012, 11:03 PM
Ever written a book with a squid, then?

Not a whole book, but I've signed my name in it.

bettielee
02-05-2012, 11:54 PM
I use fountain pens - and I love the maintaining of them - including the refilling and the cleaning.

I'm weird like that.

Alitriona
02-06-2012, 12:20 AM
Parker Pen, blue ballpoint. Premier monochrome in silver finish. I like the weight.

Kitty Pryde
02-06-2012, 12:47 AM
Does anybody have a very affordable fountain pen to recommend? You know, like one that would get me hooked so I could start pawning my belongings to buy the good stuff? :D

OnlyStones
02-06-2012, 12:52 AM
Haha :D

I do like the Pilot G2 chambered in 0.7 mm, but gel ink is too dark and smudge-prone for my taste, plus the relatively large volume of ink discharged during normal use causes the line to broaden noticeably, not to mention the cartridges run out of ink prohibitively fast. So while the Pilot G2 may be my favorite pen to sign my name with, I prefer the Zebra F-402 which, while also possessing a tasteful 0.7 mm point, produces a fine yet powerful line, one that is neither too dark like the G2's nor crudely light and inconsistent like so many cheap dime-a-dozen Bics.

On top of that, it's sturdy and has a stainless steel barrel; it's got weight, and it's got authority, and for enthusiasts of torquing your pen into the air and catching it as you think about what to write next (such as myself) it has a mass distribution I've not encountered with any other pen to date, granting it a sensible center of gravity that allows measurable throws and accurate catches.

For the price, it's the best pen you can buy.

I feel the same. Lovely pen for signatures but an absolute slob after two or three paragraphs.

Cyia
02-06-2012, 12:55 AM
Bic Atlantis, or if I can find them, a razor-point gel pen. I also like to use Micron artist pens, .005, because the points are teeny tiny.

For refillables, I use Koh-I-Noor drawing pens (Rapidograph)

Scribhneoir
02-06-2012, 12:55 AM
I'm quite fond of the Zebra Sarasa gel pens. The Forest Green ink is my favorite, but I rotate through all the pretty colors.

I also really like the Pentel EnerGel pen and its friend the Pentel EnerGize pencil. When I'm feeling particularly literary, my Cross fountain pen.

Jamesaritchie
02-06-2012, 01:05 AM
Does anybody have a very affordable fountain pen to recommend? You know, like one that would get me hooked so I could start pawning my belongings to buy the good stuff? :D

I wouldn't go too cheap with a fountain pen. This is one area where you usually get what you pay for. Cheap fountain pens just don't work well, write well, or last very long. A quality fountain pen is a joy to use, and lasts for many, many years. A cheap one is just a waste of money.

The cheapest I've ever tried that remains a quality pen that won't frustrate you to death is a Waterman. Waterman makes quality fountain pens, and some of them are fairly cheap. If you hunt around, you can find a pretty good Waterman for fifty bucks, and that's a steal for a good fountain pen.

Snowstorm
02-06-2012, 01:12 AM
Does anybody have a very affordable fountain pen to recommend? You know, like one that would get me hooked so I could start pawning my belongings to buy the good stuff? :D

Shaeffer has kits that have different sized nibs and comes with a small box of ink cartridges. You can find them in any store that sells art supplies, fine pens, etc. A kit costs around $20??? I've had two kits for about 25 years and they work very nicely. I don't use them often since I have a very nice German Iridium point nib and blue stone grip that I adore using.

elindsen
02-06-2012, 01:18 AM
I use my laptop. The only time I actually write anything I just use whatever is closests, which tends to be the cheapest.

LilliCray
02-06-2012, 01:21 AM
Haa, fountain pens sound nice... but there is simply no way I'd ever be able to spend even $50 on a pen. No matter how wonderfully nice they are. (And most are a crapton more expensive than that.) Besides, most of my writing I do on the computer, and when I do write by hand, I prefer my mechanical pencils.

But, I am another Pilot G-2 fan. I've fallen in love with the .03 point, which I got for Christmas from a friend. I mentioned my favorite brand of pen ONCE, and she remembers it for Christmas. I was incredibly surprised, in a very nice way. :D

But, for editing, I've fallen in love with the PaperMate InkJoy. I've got four colors, and have a fun system for editing hardcopy... red for take-outs and punctuation changes, purple for add-ins, blue for random comments that may or may not serve any useful purpose. The short story I just finished editing is quite colorful indeed. :D And the pens write fairly well.

I think that's just a really long way of saying if it's shaped like a pen and ink comes out when I put it to paper, I'll use it without complaint. :D

willietheshakes
02-06-2012, 01:30 AM
Does anybody have a very affordable fountain pen to recommend? You know, like one that would get me hooked so I could start pawning my belongings to buy the good stuff? :D

All due respect to JAR, but there are lower end pens that are durable, and great writers. The Lamy Safari (and Al-Star, which is a Safari with an aluminum body) is a workhorse of a pen. Kinda funky looking, these are great writers, durable as hell, and affordable. The Pelikan steno pen I'm using right now is fantastic - lightweight, a great writer, and a nice fine tip (which is essential for my scrawl). And one of my favourite pens is the Sailor Calligraphy (http://www.stylusfinepens.com/pens/sailor/sailor-calligraphy-pen/) pen, with a great, unique, variable nib that allows for all sorts of writing. Each of these pens is readily available under $50 -- some of them well under. I've got multiples of each, loaded with different colours.

SaronaNalia
02-06-2012, 01:31 AM
Pencil, of the mechanical variety with point seven lead and a twist-up eraser. I also think felt tip pens are ok. I use them to doodle far more often than I use them to write, but I still carry some around. I don't like ballpoint pens at all. I always end up needing to scribble on the side of my paper to make them work.

Chase
02-06-2012, 01:50 AM
A Cross Ion on a neck lanyard, always in editor blue gel -- because some lips are less readable than others.

cara
02-06-2012, 01:58 AM
I use a ball-point pen, usually a biro. I tend to smudge ink pens because my hand moves around the page a lot...

muravyets
02-06-2012, 02:22 AM
I do most of my writing nowadays with a low-end Sheaffer fountain pen that I've had for over 20 years. I'd misplaced this pen for nearly 7 of those years, recently found it again, cleaned it, got it working, and have happily reignited my mad addiction to how it writes, how the ink looks on the page, the little rituals of maintenance, etc. I love this pen. So satisfying in so many ways.

If for some reason I don't have the fountain pen handy, I go for the cheap Bic-Stic or Papermate ballpoints, by the box. I like how they write the best of all ballpoints. Best ink flow, best color density, easiest grip for me (my Sheaffer is also thinner than many other fountain pens, which suits my grip better). I like them in blue.

Third option for me is a Ticonderoga #1 extra soft pencil. Nice and black, though one does have to sharpen them often.

CrastersBabies
02-06-2012, 02:34 AM
Fountain pen. Fountain pens are sexy.

I luuurrrrve a good fountain pen. I had an awesome pen for the longest time. It didn't leak. It wrote "like butter." But, they stopped making the refills and I cried, softly, into my journal.

Recommendations would be great!

shaldna
02-06-2012, 02:41 AM
I wouldn't go too cheap with a fountain pen. This is one area where you usually get what you pay for. Cheap fountain pens just don't work well, write well, or last very long. A quality fountain pen is a joy to use, and lasts for many, many years. A cheap one is just a waste of money.


I do most of my writing nowadays with a low-end Sheaffer fountain pen that I've had for over 20 years.


My parents bought me a high end silver plated Scheaffer fountain pen when I graduated. I love it so much, it's certainly a case of getting what you pay for.

William Haskins
02-06-2012, 02:50 AM
Pilot G-2 (10) gel pen.

yep. that's the one.

bettielee
02-06-2012, 02:53 AM
The best, most loyal and amazing fountain pen is my purple marlbed Genius that I bought for about $3 on the ebay.

No cartridges for me - I use good ol' messy Private Reserve Ink from a bottle. I kick it old school.

Rhoda Nightingale
02-06-2012, 03:08 AM
@Kitty Pryde: Pilot makes a disposable "fountain" pen called Varsity that I quite like. It's probably not that great in the grand scheme of things, but my mom buys them by the fistful and gives them to me.

blacbird
02-06-2012, 07:01 AM
Uniball fine for me too. Primarily because I could steal a dozen or so of them from a state agency where I do volunteer work, and they had over-ordered pens a few years ago by at least an order of magnitude. They have enough to last until the sun gets big and red and fries the earth. But they are pretty good.

caw

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
02-06-2012, 07:18 AM
The old-fashioned blue Paper Mate ballpoints with the fat tips.

I HATE these newfangled gel marker types. They're messy, and my writing doesn't look as good with them.

Phaeal
02-06-2012, 05:17 PM
Ever since I stole my grandmother's robin's-egg blue Parker Jotter from her stationery drawer, the Jotter's been my love.

Which leads me to notice that some asshole has stolen one of my Jotters from my desk. Good thing I've got a few dozen more.

Sunnyside
02-06-2012, 07:30 PM
It cracks me up that there's a thread like this, because I am *always* getting crap for being so picky about the pen I use! Like many others, I LOVE fountain pens and keep several on hand (I love Mont Blanc, though even the fine nib is a bit too thick for me -- so for most everyday uses, I prefer almost any medium-range Waterman)---but let's just stick to regular, beat-em-up for everyday use pens...

Me, I prefer the granddaddy of gel pens, the Pentel Rolling Writer. The nib doesn't mash, the ink doesn't smudge, and the casing doesn't make my fingers hurt after using it for a long time.

jimbro
02-06-2012, 09:27 PM
Ever written a book with a squid, then?

Not a whole book. But they are perfect for writing limericks (and wall graffiti).

jimbro
02-06-2012, 09:35 PM
Shaeffer has kits that have different sized nibs and comes with a small box of ink cartridges. You can find them in any store that sells art supplies, fine pens, etc. A kit costs around $20??? I've had two kits for about 25 years and they work very nicely. I don't use them often since I have a very nice German Iridium point nib and blue stone grip that I adore using.

I endorse Snowstorm's recommendation. I am a fountain pen fanatic who started out with the Shaeffers. They are inexpensive, but reliable, and they write very well. There is something sensuous about the flow of the ink onto the paper. Shaeffer is fine to start out and experiment with. Eventually, you can work your way up to a Sailor with a Naginata Togi nib (save your pennies). :)

cornetto
02-07-2012, 03:56 AM
Bic Atlantis, or if I can find them, a razor-point gel pen. I also like to use Micron artist pens, .005, because the points are teeny tiny.

For refillables, I use Koh-I-Noor drawing pens (Rapidograph)

I had a set of Rapidograph pens back in college. Loved those pens. Made good money drawing graphs and such for grad students. There's a lot of my figures in forestry journals from the '80s, lol. But senior year I got replaced by a Hewlett Packard plotter with a really bad attitude. :sniff:

SaronaNalia
02-07-2012, 03:58 AM
Now I'm thinking I should try a fountain pen.

Midian
02-07-2012, 04:23 AM
Currently that would be my stylus pen for my iPad. :D

I don't write much by hand anymore. I haven't in years. I tried to go back to handwriting but found that I couldn't write any where near as fast as I could type and I would lose chunks of thoughts to the ether. If I write by hand, it's strictly to write notes so I don't lose those thoughts when I'm unable to type. For that, I love the gel pens.

shakeysix
02-07-2012, 04:39 AM
I've written novels with Bic accountant fine point pens, blue or black ink. I can't always find them. Now days so I use Zebra F-701. I have to guard them with my life--my students love them and walk off with them. --s6

Snowstorm
02-07-2012, 05:12 AM
Now I'm thinking I should try a fountain pen.

You'll never go back. Oh, baby.

Cavalier
02-07-2012, 05:47 AM
As long as it isn't a ball-point pen, I'm happy. I have some disposable fountain pens given to me by a local professor at the liberal arts college in town that are fun to write with, yet I don't recommend putting them through the wash.

I like the uniball-type pens, where the ink flows, mainly because I never know when I'll stop writing and start drawing.

LadyA
02-07-2012, 01:30 PM
I am OBSESSED with Uniball Eye black pens - I have like 10 in my pencilcase. They're good for writing, drawing, everything, and you can write with less pressure as the ink flows.

Velma deSelby Bowen
02-07-2012, 10:50 PM
I luuurrrrve a good fountain pen. I had an awesome pen for the longest time. It didn't leak. It wrote "like butter." But, they stopped making the refills and I cried, softly, into my journal.

Recommendations would be great!

What model pen and refill is it? You do realize that you can refill a cartridge with a hypodermic needle, or even an eyedropper. (Also, I can look it up in various pengeek groups, and see if anyone has the refills, or converters.)

Velma deSelby Bowen
02-07-2012, 11:00 PM
Right now, I am going back and forth between a 1970s Sheaffer 330 Imperial with an extra fine nib, a Pelikan M200 with a customized tiny cursive italic nib, and a Parker Sonnet, also with a customized cursive italic nib, but I do my morning pages with a Sheaffer no Nonsense pen with a fine italic nib, and editorial notes with Pilot Hi-Tec C and Pentel Slicci gel pens (I have small handwriting, so I go for the 0.25/0.28 points).

While the current incarnation of the Sheaffer No Nonsense -- the Viewpoint -- is not that good a pen, older ones, like the classic No Nonsense pens, are sturdy workhorses. I've got some that I bought in the early 1980s that are still smooth and easy writers.

I am a fountain pen accumulator, for the record: I have *cough* about sixty or so, though I'm trying to cut back. My absolute favorites are the Sheaffer Legacy Heritage, the Pelikan M200, and vintage Sheaffer Balances. I think my oldest pen is a striated silver Balance from about 1938, and a striated roseglow from about 1943.

Sirion
02-07-2012, 11:16 PM
Those comically large pens you get at carnivals.

Snowstorm
02-08-2012, 12:06 AM
Right now, I am going back and forth between a 1970s Sheaffer 330 Imperial with an extra fine nib, a Pelikan M200 with a customized tiny cursive italic nib, and a Parker Sonnet, also with a customized cursive italic nib, but I do my morning pages with a Sheaffer no Nonsense pen with a fine italic nib, and editorial notes with Pilot Hi-Tec C and Pentel Slicci gel pens (I have small handwriting, so I go for the 0.25/0.28 points). ... I am a fountain pen accumulator, for the record: I have *cough* about sixty or so, though I'm trying to cut back. My absolute favorites are the Sheaffer Legacy Heritage, the Pelikan M200, and vintage Sheaffer Balances. I think my oldest pen is a striated silver Balance from about 1938, and a striated roseglow from about 1943.

:Hail:

Becky Black
02-08-2012, 01:52 PM
Uniball Vision Elite is my favourite for general note taking. It's so smooth. I like the Uniball Gel Impact when I'm brainstorming in a nice wide-line-spaced A4 notebook. My handwriting is big and messy. I'm fond of their Signos too. In fact I just love Uniball pens to death.

However I'm unfaithful to Uniball when it comes to pens for marking up for editing, where it's just gotta be a Pilot G-Tec-C4. Usually red, though I sometimes go nuts and mark up in green or purple.

And I have a few fountain pens, my current favourite being a nice Cross I got as a Christmas gift a couple of years ago. Writes a good broad line. Love it!

Though I have my favourites, I've got laods of other pens too. I love to try new ones. I browse the Cult Pens website just for fun.

shayla.mist
02-08-2012, 01:53 PM
The kind that writes with lead and has an eraser :D
I second that! pencils are my best friends. Although I love writing with a fountain pen, but I find myself having to scratch over words I don't like way too often so I have to settle for a pencil.

JSSchley
02-08-2012, 10:37 PM
Pentel RSVP.

I have black ones, blue ones, red ones (for manuscripts) and purple ones (for grading). They are the only ones I will use.

Shadow_Ferret
02-09-2012, 12:22 AM
For fiction, I only use a Rotring fountain pen (http://www.dalyspenshop.com/store2005/product_detail.asp?id=11842). It has a nice comfortable cushioned barrel.

Snowstorm
02-09-2012, 12:32 AM
For fiction, I only use a Rotring fountain pen (http://www.dalyspenshop.com/store2005/product_detail.asp?id=11842). It has a nice comfortable cushioned barrel.

Wow, thanks for posting that link. I had no idea they have fountain pens with a cushion!

Archerbird
02-09-2012, 12:54 AM
Strange, I've never owned anything else than regular ball point or gel pens. I used to drool everytime I walked past the fountain pen display-thingie in the bookstore though. They're so pretty! Does that count?

Jamesaritchie
02-09-2012, 02:10 AM
All due respect to JAR, but there are lower end pens that are durable, and great writers. The Lamy Safari (and Al-Star, which is a Safari with an aluminum body) is a workhorse of a pen. Kinda funky looking, these are great writers, durable as hell, and affordable. The Pelikan steno pen I'm using right now is fantastic - lightweight, a great writer, and a nice fine tip (which is essential for my scrawl). And one of my favourite pens is the Sailor Calligraphy (http://www.stylusfinepens.com/pens/sailor/sailor-calligraphy-pen/) pen, with a great, unique, variable nib that allows for all sorts of writing. Each of these pens is readily available under $50 -- some of them well under. I've got multiples of each, loaded with different colours.

It's possible, but I haven't found one that lasts with heavy use, such as writing novels.

The problem with cheaper fountain pens is that they're cheap for a reason. Never mind the material put in the other parts, they usually come with steel nibs, and paper wears steel down fast. A steel nib alone is a reason to avoid any pen you intend to use heavily, and for years.

This is why pens made when they were all steel nibbed always needed a new nib for a new user. The steel wears so fast that it won't fit another a different person after only a month or so of real use.

For light use, a steel nib is fine, but not for long term, heavy use. And just buying a new nib doesn't solve the problem. Fountain pens work best when the nib is exactly right, and you'll pay as much for a new steel nib every time you need one as for a good pen.

It may not matter as much if you write large, and aren't terribly neat, but cheap pens simply do not work well at all for small, neat writing.

I'm not against cheap, and I've tried quite a few cheaper fountain pens, but none held up through writing a novel.

Shadow_Ferret
02-09-2012, 03:42 AM
Wow, thanks for posting that link. I had no idea they have fountain pens with a cushion!

Wow. I didn't realize it was on sale. I paid $10 more for mine.

Schilcote
02-09-2012, 03:51 AM
I like the Pentel R.S.V.P.s, if only because they're the only brand I recognise. They have a nice "fat" look with the cap on the non-writing end.

I have this shiny metal pen that I keep around with me all the time. Doesn't write any more though.

readitnweep
02-09-2012, 04:32 AM
Not sure what they are - I get a packet of 12 for $3.79. They do last a long time and they write dark. For me: has to be blue ink, has to be thick around, easy to hold and must write dark.

Kitty Pryde
02-10-2012, 05:55 AM
Reporting back in to say that I picked up a three pack of Pilot Varsity fountain pens for $7 (black, blue, and purple). So far they are pretty pleasing, easy on my hand and I am not all inky after writing a few pages. Usually after any writing with a pen, I look like my hands lost a duel with an angry squid. Not sure what I'm gonna do with the purple pen as I am not a 12 year old girl.

I know it won't last too long, but on the other hand I'm pretty sure I will lose it, or my SO will swipe it and lose it, long before it wears out or gets emptied.

angeluscado
02-10-2012, 08:11 AM
The best pens I've ever used have been the cheap ball point stick pens. They're the perfect width for me and the majority of the time the ink flows the best. And hey, if I lose a few I'm not going to be heartbroken because they're not expensive to replace.

Reading this thread makes me want to go pen shopping now...

InfiniteDreamer
02-14-2012, 11:16 AM
Papermate or Pilot, Black ink for me :)

Becky Black
02-14-2012, 02:08 PM
I'm currently playing with an Ohto Fude Ball 1.5 roller ball. Yep, that's a 1.5mm tip. Even fatter lines than the Uniball Gel Impact. It writes beautifully smoothly, though it's a slow drier, so it would not be good for left-handers. Really black, dense ink too. Lovely.

I signed my recent author copies of my first print release with it. It's fantastic for autographs! Much better than some skinny ballpoint. If you carry around an autograph book for all those celebrities you run into, keep one of these with it. :D

Becky Black
02-14-2012, 02:12 PM
Not sure what I'm gonna do with the purple pen as I am not a 12 year old girl.

Heh, I must still be a 12 year old girl at heart as I like writing with purple ink. Usually just in my notebook, since nobody else has to see that.

The other day I ended up writing - well marking up for editing - in pink! Mostly because I'd grabbed the wrong pen in poor light thinking it was red. But, hey, I've marked up for editing it loads of different colours before.

SaronaNalia
02-14-2012, 06:20 PM
Not sure what I'm gonna do with the purple pen as I am not a 12 year old girl.

I edit in purple.

tengraceapples
02-16-2012, 09:56 AM
First,how great is it that you guys have a thread for pens!!
It's a ritual for me to buy a nice New pen when I start a new book.
I'm in love with fine point,jet black ball point:)

Xelebes
02-16-2012, 10:01 AM
Sanford Uni-ball Roller 0.5 mm black

tengraceapples
02-17-2012, 08:56 AM
Nice....

KTC
02-17-2012, 04:25 PM
Sorry, but what's a pen?

Devil Ledbetter
02-17-2012, 05:31 PM
Sorry, but what's a pen?It's that thing I use to scribble "Who wrote this?" "You call yourself a writer?" "Sista, please." and "She did NOT say that!" all over my printed manuscripts.

My weapon of choice is the Uni-Ball Gel Grip.

Becky Black
02-17-2012, 07:49 PM
If I don't get to try those Papermate Inkjoy pens I keep hearing about, but don't seem to be available in the UK, I may go MAD!
:gaah

Question
02-18-2012, 08:01 AM
A BIC medium or a Paper Mate FlexGrip Ultra 1.0M. I haven't used Paper Mates in a while but I do remember them being really smooth. BICs aren't perfect but they write well, they're comfortable, they're relatively cheap and they don't smudge often (sometimes they smudge if the weather is too hot, but that's very rare).

kenthepen
02-18-2012, 08:03 AM
Pilot G2 07. Blue.

muravyets
02-18-2012, 08:20 AM
My parents bought me a high end silver plated Scheaffer fountain pen when I graduated. I love it so much, it's certainly a case of getting what you pay for.
I think I paid maybe $15 for mine, but that was twenty or so years ago. I've gotten mileage and pleasure out of the old dear, and she's still going.

muravyets
02-18-2012, 08:24 AM
@Kitty Pryde: Pilot makes a disposable "fountain" pen called Varsity that I quite like. It's probably not that great in the grand scheme of things, but my mom buys them by the fistful and gives them to me.
How disposable are they? Is it just a matter of them not being refillable? Are the nibs sturdy? I have a friend who is a calligrapher who disassembles pens and mounts dip-pen nibs onto fountain pen bodies so he can get long, smooth ink flow with a greater variety of nib types. If I could get a half-way decent pen for cheap, I'd do a little customizing myself, too.

FranOnTheEdge
02-18-2012, 05:10 PM
I have 6 or 7 soup pots full of pens, and two, no 3 pencil cases, one full one with things other than just pens in it (2 mice and a receiver/charger for headphones, and my painkillers) and one was recently used as a washbag for a stay in an hotel, so currently has 1 pen in it.
On my desk I have 3 Pentel e-sharp propelling pencils and a couple of 'Progresso' 'Koh-i-noor' 6B graphite sticks, a zebra Jimnie Gel Rollerball pen – 0.7 in bright fluorescent pink, a Pentel EnerGel 0.7 pen in red and in my handbag among a few bits and bobs I have a new bulky pen with a rocketships/asteroids/stars design and TEN different coloured pen options, which is nice if you are trying to highlight different things happening or things relating to different characters or events, but it's just biros not an actual highlighter.

I most prefer scribbling notes with a 2B or darker pencil, or a black pen, but a particular mood can have me hunting for a particular purple, lilac, blue, green or whatever coloured pen at any time.

If something occurs to me, I'd prefer to write with a darkish – aka easily visible pen or pencil, but something that makes a mark is all that's necessary – quick before you forget what you wanted to say or remind yourself or just what you were thinking about...
Most of my actual writing is done with a keyboard, some – especially transcribing notes written in a café or late at night in the bedroom – are transferred to the PC with a microphone and Dragon Naturally Speaking, but that still makes so many mistakes that I can't be creative with Dragon, so it's keyboard, paper or if desperate a lecture/notes/conference digital voice recorder if my hands ache so that I can't write any other way.

But if I spend an hour hunting for a particular pen or pencil, there's no way I'll remember what I'd thought of by the time I find it. So that's just silly.

My husband just got back from doing some overtime and talking about this to him he came up with this excellent thought, I agree with it thoroughly, it's so good I'm stealing it:

My favourite 'pen' in the penultimate word in my finished novel.

Lexxie
02-20-2012, 01:28 PM
I love the Pilot friXion pens - and prefer purple ink... the frixion pen can be erased, which is always helpful when I am writing.

Kitty Pryde
02-20-2012, 09:59 PM
How disposable are they? Is it just a matter of them not being refillable? Are the nibs sturdy? I have a friend who is a calligrapher who disassembles pens and mounts dip-pen nibs onto fountain pen bodies so he can get long, smooth ink flow with a greater variety of nib types. If I could get a half-way decent pen for cheap, I'd do a little customizing myself, too.

-not refillable
-made of cheapy plastic like a regular rollerball pen
-the clippy part of the cap could be easily snapped off by gnawing whilst writing a particularly tense scene
-I presume the nib is not designed to last for years

muravyets
02-20-2012, 10:32 PM
-not refillable
-made of cheapy plastic like a regular rollerball pen
-the clippy part of the cap could be easily snapped off by gnawing whilst writing a particularly tense scene
-I presume the nib is not designed to last for years
Cool, thanks. I might check them out. For the price, they could be worth experimenting with.

Velma deSelby Bowen
02-20-2012, 11:29 PM
How disposable are they? Is it just a matter of them not being refillable? Are the nibs sturdy? I have a friend who is a calligrapher who disassembles pens and mounts dip-pen nibs onto fountain pen bodies so he can get long, smooth ink flow with a greater variety of nib types. If I could get a half-way decent pen for cheap, I'd do a little customizing myself, too.

If you google "refilling Pilot Varsity pens," you will find a number of sites that explain how it can be done. I would recommend the Fountain Pen Network (fountainpennetwork.com) for some really well tested techniques.

robjvargas
02-21-2012, 12:15 AM
I think this is more about the ink than the pen, but is there a pen anyone would recommend for a left hander?

I've never had good experiences with fountain pens, I presume because of my left-handedness.

quicklime
02-21-2012, 02:08 AM
smooth-writing, and swiped.....

HoneyBadger
02-21-2012, 02:32 AM
The Faulkner, though I wouldn't say no to a Malamud.

Detri Redmond
02-21-2012, 02:38 AM
uni-ball's are good when they're new but I would have to say hands down to an ole' regular BIC black ink. In it's simplicity it's smooth and reliable. I would actually rather write with a BIC than to type but have to type it up later anyway.


...hmmm BIC...butt in chair...

muravyets
02-21-2012, 02:41 AM
If you google "refilling Pilot Varsity pens," you will find a number of sites that explain how it can be done. I would recommend the Fountain Pen Network (fountainpennetwork.com) for some really well tested techniques.
Thanks. Enjoying google-hunt now. Fountain Pen Network came up first hit with a very useful older thread. :)

Velma deSelby Bowen
02-27-2012, 10:51 PM
I think this is more about the ink than the pen, but is there a pen anyone would recommend for a left hander?

I've never had good experiences with fountain pens, I presume because of my left-handedness.

You probably want a fine to extra-fine nib, so that there will be less ink to smear, to start. The Lamy Safari fountain pen comes in extra-fine, if memory serves, and is a good solid pen. Or... Okay, this is my current love, the vintage Sheaffer 330s and 440 (available from Peyton Street Pens, and I am just a very very satisfied customer) can have extra fine nibs, are smooth writers, and just wonderful in the hand. (Inlaid nibs, too, so pretty as all get out.)

Winterturn
02-28-2012, 01:16 AM
Pilot V5 Hi-Tecpoint, black or blue. I've used them for decades and converted my hubby to them before we were married. Now we buy them by the dozen so we've always got extras in the house.