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Sea Witch
02-02-2012, 08:33 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the impression that most of the writers here at AW write fantasy and/or SF and/or YA.

Why is that? Do those genres sell more books that other genres? Is it that younger writers are more drawn to those genres, and those writers are more active on forums?

ladyleeona
02-02-2012, 08:59 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the impression that most of the writers here at AW write fantasy and/or SF and/or YA.

Why is that? Do those genres sell more books that other genres? Is it that younger writers are more drawn to those genres, and those writers are more active on forums?


The sheer number of YA and SciFi/Fantasy writers could be due to the subject matter (or readership, in the case of YA). Most scifi writers are really into techie stuff, so it makes sense that they're going to have active online presences. I think some SF/F writers on here could attest to the fact that most agents/publishers of scifi stuff are *really* into keeping with the times (not that other genre people aren't, but to me it seems more this way with SF/F people). Same for YA people--basically, young people now have never lived in a time without cell phones, internet, etc. so if you're going to write for them, you'd better be able to keep up.

(FWIW, I write mainly adult UF and contemporary YA. And I'm relatively young and unfortunately always on the computer, LOL.)

Richard White
02-02-2012, 09:06 AM
I was actually under the impression there were more romance (and erotica) writers here than any other genre.

Sea Witch
02-02-2012, 09:24 AM
I hadn't considered the need to keep up with technology for SF. That's a good point.

And Richard White, I don't know what's going on with the erotica writers because I don't venture into that forum. Is it super busy?





I write mainly adult UF

What is "adult UF"?

ladyleeona
02-02-2012, 09:32 AM
I hadn't considered the need to keep up with technology for SF. That's a good point.

And Richard White, I don't know what's going on with the erotica writers because I don't venture into that forum. Is it super busy?




What is "adult UF"?

You could say that ;)

And UF is urban fantasy.

KellyAssauer
02-02-2012, 09:49 AM
Not that this is an indicator... but looking at membership numbers in a specific writing social group here at AW, here's the breakdown:
Fantasy with 239,
Literary with 115,
YA 104,
SciFi/Fantasy SpecFic(w/Horror) 74,
MiddleGrade 81,
Mystery 64,
Romance 55

Noting that members can belong to more than one... and how the actual post numbers in SYW might fall, may reveal an entirely different pattern!

=)

pfinucan
02-02-2012, 10:15 AM
Does anyone know what genre sold the most books last year? Not exactly the same question but maybe it affects what people write.

Drachen Jager
02-02-2012, 10:37 AM
Here are the top 10 requested genres by literary agents on QueryTracker. That ought to be as accurate a representation of what's selling (or likely to sell soon) as any.

1 Young Adult
2 Fantasy
3 Literary Fiction
4 Thrillers/Suspense
5 Women's Fiction
6 Romance
7 Middle Grade
8 Commercial Fiction
9 Mystery
10 Historical Fiction

Sirion
02-02-2012, 11:17 AM
I think it's because fantasy and scifi are such huge encompassing genres that it just seems that way.

Rhoda Nightingale
02-02-2012, 02:57 PM
Just for the record, horror does have its own social group outside of the spec-fic group, and there are 98 of us.

To answer the OP--I think a lot of sub-genres wind up getting shelved under the SF/F umbrella that could be very well at home elsewhere, which is what makes it seem like such a huge sub-genre itself. Things like paranormal romance, certain categories of horror, a big chunk of YA, magical realism, etc. Keep in mind as well that "fantasy" and "science fiction," while they might draw similar readerships and take up the same space in bookstores, really aren't the same thing, so the forum here is two genres in one place, with many sub-categories.

I was under the impression that YA was the biggest seller right now, neck-and-neck with romance, but the only thing I know for sure is that horror seems to come in dead last no matter who's tallying the numbers.

Puma
02-02-2012, 06:23 PM
Writing good historical fiction, real original-type westerns, actual science based fiction, even good mysteries and mainstream novels takes a lot of research and demands a high degree of accuracy. They're not as easy to write and that may contribute to their lesser interest here. Puma

Toothpaste
02-02-2012, 06:38 PM
I think we need to be careful before we draw the conclusion "more people write a certain genre because it's easier".

It has been my experience that every genre comes with its own unique challenges, and what one person might find easy another might find difficult and vice versa.

OnlyStones
02-02-2012, 07:14 PM
I was actually under the impression there were more romance (and erotica) writers here than any other genre.

Which requires a whole 'nother kind of "keeping up" to be good at it.

Amadan
02-02-2012, 07:32 PM
I think we need to be careful before we draw the conclusion "more people write a certain genre because it's easier".

It has been my experience that every genre comes with its own unique challenges, and what one person might find easy another might find difficult and vice versa.

I take your point, but I think Puma was not wrong. I see a lot of would-be SF&F authors (and way too many published ones :( ) who take a "It's fantasy! I can just make shit up!" attitude toward their novels, which does not encourage the same sort of discipline required for stories grounded in the real world.

Note that SF&F is my genre, before anyone accuses me of bashing it.

veinglory
02-02-2012, 07:35 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the impression that most of the writers here at AW write fantasy and/or SF and/or YA.

I can't say I had that impression. It seems to me like romance and mainstream is best represented--but I guess that is subjective (we could take a poll).

Toothpaste
02-02-2012, 07:59 PM
Amadan - I just don't see it as being only SF/Fantasy authors who have easy excuses. When I was young I remember very distinctly choosing not to write fantasy because then I'd have to do all that work Tolkien did, make up entire languages, draw maps etc. So I chose to write stories about kids my age, living in my city, and going to my school etc - or close approximations of that - because it was easier. In my mind.

There are also people who find a blank canvas totally intimidating, and the idea of making EVERYTHING up impossible, but doing something set in a particular historical period? Well you know, they watch BBC historicals all the time, how hard could it be?

I think we get familiar with the excuses within our own genres, but there are people copping out all over the place. :)

OnlyStones
02-02-2012, 08:02 PM
Writing good historical fiction, real original-type westerns, actual science based fiction, even good mysteries and mainstream novels takes a lot of research and demands a high degree of accuracy. They're not as easy to write and that may contribute to their lesser interest here. Puma


I think we need to be careful before we draw the conclusion "more people write a certain genre because it's easier".

It has been my experience that every genre comes with its own unique challenges, and what one person might find easy another might find difficult and vice versa.

I think Toothpaste is right; writing a good story is a difficult process regardless of the genre.

I also think Puma is right; it's much more of a chore for me to find out who the first civilian Indian agent was at the Red Cloud agency after the surrender of Crazy Horse, then it is for me to determine who was the first inter-galactic emissary to the Freon colony after the moon exploded.

LJD
02-02-2012, 08:04 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the impression that most of the writers here at AW write fantasy and/or SF and/or YA.

Why is that? Do those genres sell more books that other genres? Is it that younger writers are more drawn to those genres, and those writers are more active on forums?

From QLH, I certainly have that impression, too.
But I'm not sure it's true overall on AW.

You might find this interesting:
http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/04/book-genres-and-blog-stats/
Rachelle Gardner is an agent and she doesn't even rep sci fi and fantasy. But 26% of the writers reading her blog are writing those genres, even though only 6% of the deals on Publisher's Marketplace fall into these categories. She was thinking that perhaps there is a disproprotionate number of writers in these genres....

Anyways, interesting.

ios
02-02-2012, 08:07 PM
Does anyone know what genre sold the most books last year? Not exactly the same question but maybe it affects what people write.

ETA: I just posted the same link as someone else, lol. Doh. But I'll leave the post as is.

Here's a link to an informal poll: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/04/book-genres-and-blog-stats/

The results are surprising, because I assumed for years that it was given that romance was the biggest seller year after year.

Jodi

ETA: Some older facts:


In North America, romance novels are the most popular genre in modern literature, comprising almost 55% of all paperback books sold in 2004. - Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_novel)


In North America, romance novels are the most popular genre in modern literature, comprising almost 55% of all paperback books sold in 2008. - Perkins (http://www.perkins.org/community-programs/btbl/publications/rita.html)

Bubastes
02-02-2012, 08:11 PM
Another data point, FWIW: on my local NaNoWriMo forum, I'd guess around 85% of the participants write SF&F. I'm the only one who writes romance/women's fiction. I think there may be one or two mystery writers and one horror writer in there. I can't remember if any of them write YA.

Toothpaste
02-02-2012, 08:23 PM
I think Toothpaste is right; writing a good story is a difficult process regardless of the genre.

I also think Puma is right; it's much more of a chore for me to find out who the first civilian Indian agent was at the Red Cloud agency after the surrender of Crazy Horse, then it is for me to determine who was the first inter-galactic emissary to the Freon colony after the moon exploded.

Why thank you :) .

Also what you say about it being a chore to do research is my point. For you it's a lot of work and you don't enjoy it. But for some they absolutely LOVE research, sometimes to the point where they prefer research over writing. You find it easy to determine the first inter-galactic emissary etc etc, but for me I'd find it tedious having to create that history in the first place.

Things are fun/easy for certain people and unpleasant/hard for others. I find writing for children, and getting inside their heads really effortless, others think I'm some kind of wizard to be able to do it. I loathe fantasy world building and find it really difficult to do, so I beyond admire people who can create such complex and believable universes. We all have strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes we seek out those genres etc that play to that which we find easier, other times we challenge ourselves by choosing the ones that don't. But to say there is a universally easier kind of genre is going down a dangerous path. Is my point.

Amadan
02-02-2012, 08:46 PM
But to say there is a universally easier kind of genre is going down a dangerous path. Is my point.


Oh, I agree that fantasy and science fiction isn't actually easier to write (well). My point was that it's perceived as easier, or at least, a lot of (mostly young) authors feel qualified to do so based on years of watching anime and Dr. Who, whereas very few of them think that they can write historicals or literary novels without doing some serious work and developing their writing chops.

Sea Witch
02-02-2012, 11:04 PM
I thank everyone for the thoughtful replies. I agree with much of what has been said but particularly with what Toothpaste said in a couple of posts.

What one writer finds easy, another finds hard. That's what makes horse races as my grandmother used to say.

Personally, I would find it impossible to write science fiction or fantasy. You might as well ask me to create a new language from scratch, with a new alphabet and new grammatical construction so far unknown.

I'm a non-fiction writer working on a first novel. It has come as a big surprise to me how difficult it is just to write a general fiction book. Aside from all the usual things like plot, character development etc. etc. etc., just getting my facts straight, the ages of my characters, the dates of events, and the facts pertaining certain events based on fact is proving much more difficult than I imagined, especially as I move further and further into the manuscript. Of course, I'm one of those writers who develops the story as I go and outlines as I go, which may add to that confusion. My own philosophy is to keep going and not become overly preoccupied with these details until after I finish the first draft. So just writing general fiction including topics that I know a lot about still requires much more research than I thought it would, and I have copious notes to myself throughout the manuscript to check this or check that.

That's why I'm so amazed at the number of SF and F writers here and everywhere. I don't know how you do it. I guess writers of every genre have things they're more or less comfortable with and their own set of challenges.

LindaJeanne
02-03-2012, 12:17 AM
But to say there is a universally easier kind of genre is going down a dangerous path. Is my point.
Agreed. Given the amount of research I'm doing for my wip (Bronze-age mining practices, Anglo-saxon blacksmithing, the psychological effects of being deep under-cover, cold-climate agriculture, the Inca empire, various other ancient culture, sanitation in ancient Rome, ancient China, and the Indus Valley, the history of agricultural technology...) I get incredibly annoyed when people claim "fantasy takes less research than historical fiction"

LindaJeanne
02-03-2012, 12:20 AM
You might as well ask me to create a new language from scratch, with a new alphabet and new grammatical construction so far unknown.
Actually, this is really fun :).
I've been working on three of them for my WIP, two closely related, one with different linguistic roots.

OnlyStones
02-03-2012, 12:30 AM
Why thank you :) .

Also what you say about it being a chore to do research is my point. For you it's a lot of work and you don't enjoy it. But for some they absolutely LOVE research, sometimes to the point where they prefer research over writing. You find it easy to determine the first inter-galactic emissary etc etc, but for me I'd find it tedious having to create that history in the first place.

Things are fun/easy for certain people and unpleasant/hard for others. I find writing for children, and getting inside their heads really effortless, others think I'm some kind of wizard to be able to do it. I loathe fantasy world building and find it really difficult to do, so I beyond admire people who can create such complex and believable universes. We all have strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes we seek out those genres etc that play to that which we find easier, other times we challenge ourselves by choosing the ones that don't. But to say there is a universally easier kind of genre is going down a dangerous path. Is my point.

Fraid it's a bit more complicated than that. I did say research was a chore but, I didn't say I didn't like doing chores. Research, as difficult and time consuming as it is, is one of my favorite things. I love digging down into something until my frontal lobes hurt. Fun doesn't necessarily mean easy.

Now, that said, I find it infinitely more challenging and rewarding to tell a story in historical fiction than in fantasy. Its like to trying to build a sky scraper in a grocery store parking lot versus attempting the same feat on a twenty-acre property. It's a difficult task either way, and both are great accomplishments, but the working space is quite a bit tighter in one. I like that challenge.

LindaJeanne
02-03-2012, 12:42 AM
Now, that said, I find it infinitely more challenging and rewarding to tell a story in historical fiction than in fantasy. Its like to trying to build a sky scraper in a grocery store parking lot versus attempting the same feat on a twenty-acre property. It's a difficult task either way, and both are great accomplishments, but the working space is quite a bit tighter in one. I like that challenge.
On the other hand, that only requires researching how things actually were, and only in that one time and place. :)

To realistically depict how things could have happened differently -- things being developed at different times relative to each other -- requires deeper and broader research to try to understand the connections and cause-and-effect between different developments, to try to reverse-engineer a different progression. Also to see the different ways things developed in different places and times, to have as many working examples as possible.

The challenges are different, but I don't think one can make a broad genre-based delineation of which is "harder"; it depends too much on the specifics of the story and the author's goal.

Cathy C
02-03-2012, 12:59 AM
We have writing social groups? :Huh:

Apparently, I need to wander down some of the side corridors here.


Not that this is an indicator... but looking at membership numbers in a specific writing social group here at AW, here's the breakdown:
Fantasy with 239,
Literary with 115,
YA 104,
SciFi/Fantasy SpecFic(w/Horror) 74,
MiddleGrade 81,
Mystery 64,
Romance 55

Noting that members can belong to more than one... and how the actual post numbers in SYW might fall, may reveal an entirely different pattern!

=)

OnlyStones
02-03-2012, 01:56 AM
On the other hand, that only requires researching how things actually were, and only in that one time and place. :)

To realistically depict how things could have happened differently -- things being developed at different times relative to each other -- requires deeper and broader research to try to understand the connections and cause-and-effect between different developments, to try to reverse-engineer a different progression. Also to see the different ways things developed in different places and times, to have as many working examples as possible.

The challenges are different, but I don't think one can make a broad genre-based delineation of which is "harder"; it depends too much on the specifics of the story and the author's goal.

True, but, I think there's a forgiveness, or "fudge factor" inherent in fantasy that invites imagination and, consequently, more writers.

Cyia
02-03-2012, 02:22 AM
There's also the referral effect.

"I'm writing a sci-fi novel, do you know where I can get help?"

"Well, I write sci-fi, and I've gotten a ton of information from AW."

[^ This applies to any genre you write in, btw]

Puma
02-03-2012, 02:25 AM
And that's the appeal of fantasy, regardless of what world - there's the fudge factor. It doesn't matter whether hair combs had been invented or whether the father of the MC's actual death doesn't fit the plot - it can be because it never was. Same with sci-fi - it's a created world so even if two elements won't actually combine to make something faster than a speeding bullet, they can. Or horror - you can put Aztec gods in Montana and it's all right.

When you deal with the real world you have to resolve those issues on the basis of fact, sometimes at the expense of hoped for plot. It's more tedious, but not necessarily less fun if you enjoy the research and getting it right (but then you always worry there's something else you missed.)

But, I suspect some writers and manuscripts start out in the "real world genres" but then cross over when the writers discover insurmountable glitches in fact versus plot. It's a matter of how to salvage the story. My opinion, nothing more. Puma

LJD
02-03-2012, 03:14 AM
ETA: I just posted the same link as someone else, lol. Doh. But I'll leave the post as is.

Here's a link to an informal poll: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/04/book-genres-and-blog-stats/

The results are surprising, because I assumed for years that it was given that romance was the biggest seller year after year.


Those stats are just the % of deals on PM, not the total number of books sold. I think romance still is the biggest seller, certainly in paperback.

juniper
02-03-2012, 08:38 AM
We have writing social groups? :Huh:

Apparently, I need to wander down some of the side corridors here.

Yeah, I haven't figured out the social groups thing here either.

KellyAssauer
02-03-2012, 03:19 PM
Yeah, I haven't figured out the social groups thing here either.

At the top of the page in the blue banner that says 'User CP' the next says 'FAQ' and the third says 'Community' - this one has a drop down menu listing 'Social Groups' 'Contact' and 'Member List' - obviously you want the Social Groups.

When the page opens to Social groups, the top left window will say 'Categories' - you want to click on the 'View All Categories' on the right of the boxes top banner - this will give you a list of group categories: 'party in progress' 'writing groups' and 'reading groups'.

If you find a group you wish to join, the top blue banner will say 'social group' on the left and 'join group' on the right... which is too obvious for me to explain. ;)

The one nice thing about the groups is that they can become a more specifically narrowed clearing house for information about what is going on in that subsection of writing, and they help to create more community. I can think of several instances where I've stopped and done a crit simply because the poster was in our group... I'd have to say that so far, the group has been a help!

Cathy C
02-03-2012, 04:02 PM
Cool! Thanks, KellyAssauer!

I think there's an attitude among those who want to write, but who have never actually written that there are some "easy" genres (and I use that term loosely) to write to get their feet wet. SF/F, romance, children's and erotica seem to be the targets of choice. I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "Hey, I have two weeks off. I think I'll write a romance & sell it for big bucks!". :ROFL: Same w/children's. Wannabes seldom even bother to check out their chosen genre by reading one. But I suppose the same is true with other things too. I lived near Aspen, Colorado for years & the visitors who proclaimed the most loudly that they'd never even put on a pair of skis but were looking forward to going down "those double diamond runs" made me want to go buy stock in crutches manufacturers! LOL

Jamesaritchie
02-03-2012, 08:55 PM
Does anyone know what genre sold the most books last year? Not exactly the same question but maybe it affects what people write.

For adult fiction, romance is more than forty percent of the market. If you lump romance and general women's fiction, it hits just about fifty percent. Mystery is another twenty-seven percent or so.

Despite it's popularity on every writing forum, SF and fantasy are pretty low in percentage of total sales. Usually not more than about eight percent.

MG and YA aren't genres, they're categories, and each has many genres within the category. YA romance tends to sell better than anything else under the YA umbrella, though the Stephanie Meyer type of fantasy is right up there with it. and,right now, MG fantasy is also pretty hot.

Jonathan Dalar
02-03-2012, 09:18 PM
For adult fiction, romance is more than forty percent of the market. If you lump romance and general women's fiction, it hits just about fifty percent. Mystery is another twenty-seven percent or so.

Despite it's popularity on every writing forum, SF and fantasy are pretty low in percentage of total sales. Usually not more than about eight percent.

MG and YA aren't genres, they're categories, and each has many genres within the category. YA romance tends to sell better than anything else under the YA umbrella, though the Stephanie Meyer type of fantasy is right up there with it. and,right now, MG fantasy is also pretty hot.

That's pretty much what I've heard as well. Fairly accurate snapshot of a somewhat movable metric. YA and MG are on the uptick right now, exploding with far more popularity than ever before. A number of reasons for this, but one of the things to remember is that categories and genres tend to wax and wane as fads and interests come and go.

Stephen King triggered a large horror movement; horror is now not a very salable genre. Harry Potter boosted fantasy and YA, but an incline now may not be an indication of what's hot years from now.

Romance has always been one of the best sellers. Fantasy and Sci fi not so much, but are more popular now than before. Essentially like the stock market, there are up and down trends, and key movers and shakers that will always make up a large chunk of the market.

Silver-Midnight
02-03-2012, 09:25 PM
My point was that it's perceived as easier, or at least, a lot of (mostly young) authors feel qualified to do so based on years of watching anime and Dr. Who, whereas very few of them think that they can write historicals or literary novels without doing some serious work and developing their writing chops.

Well, I'm technically a young writer, and I love anime. It was one the many things that got me interested in the Fantasy genre(especially Urban Fantasy with romantic elements) along with Romance and Erotica. Not because I thought it was easy to write entirely, but because I thought it was cool (and that's probably putting it mildly. Haha). I was interested it. However, I have been reading the genres, all of the ones that I'm interested in, especially Urban Fantasy, to get a feel for them.


You know, I wonder if people who cross genres, like doing some Romance and some Fantasy affected the results.

EDIT: I also like mystery novels. Although, I don't write for that genre as of yet.

Amadan
02-03-2012, 10:00 PM
However, I have been reading the genres, all of the ones that I'm interested in, especially Urban Fantasy, to get a feel for them.


But do you read anything else?

Silver-Midnight
02-04-2012, 01:47 AM
But do you read anything else?

No, but that could have a lot to do with my lack of time more than anything else though.

Amadan
02-04-2012, 02:59 AM
No, but that could have a lot to do with my lack of time more than anything else though.


Well, if you want to be qualified to write well, you need to read more than just the narrow category of books you intend to write.

Drachen Jager
02-04-2012, 03:47 AM
Stats from 2006.

# of published titles:


40% category/series romance
17% historical
16% contemporary
9% paranormal
7% romantic suspense
6% inspirational
5% other (includes chick lit, young adult, erotic romance, women’s fiction).

Sales figures (USA):


Romance $1.37 billion (21%)
Religious/Inspirational (including the bible) $1.68 billion
Science fiction/fantasy $495 million
Classic literary fiction $448 million
Mystery $422 million
Graphic novels $128 million



http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/romance-books-comprise-21-of-the-631b-book-industry

Silver-Midnight
02-04-2012, 07:09 AM
Well, if you want to be qualified to write well, you need to read more than just the narrow category of books you intend to write.

That's probably true, but I wanted to read a little bit more of fantasy before I started reading other things. Simply because I guess I like to make sure that I'm actually interested in a genre. However, you are right, I do need to branch out outside of my genre(s). I mean I've read a lot of short stories that are out of my genre, and short stories/novelletes/novellas are what I write truthfully.


Stats from 2006.

# of published titles:


40% category/series romance
17% historical
16% contemporary
9% paranormal
7% romantic suspense
6% inspirational
5% other (includes chick lit, young adult, erotic romance, women’s fiction).

Sales figures (USA):


Romance $1.37 billion (21%)
Religious/Inspirational (including the bible) $1.68 billion
Science fiction/fantasy $495 million
Classic literary fiction $448 million
Mystery $422 million
Graphic novels $128 million



http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/romance-books-comprise-21-of-the-631b-book-industry

Wow. I'm surprised erotic romance is so low on the first list, and it doesn't even appear on the second. I'm shocked; I thought it would be a lot more popular than that.

Jamesaritchie
02-04-2012, 08:09 PM
Stats from 2006.

# of published titles:


40% category/series romance
17% historical
16% contemporary
9% paranormal
7% romantic suspense
6% inspirational
5% other (includes chick lit, young adult, erotic romance, women’s fiction).
Sales figures (USA):


Romance $1.37 billion (21%)
Religious/Inspirational (including the bible) $1.68 billion
Science fiction/fantasy $495 million
Classic literary fiction $448 million
Mystery $422 million
Graphic novels $128 million


http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/romance-books-comprise-21-of-the-631b-book-industry

Those numbers, or at least some of them, are waaayyyy off.

KellyAssauer
02-04-2012, 08:33 PM
Those numbers, or at least some of them, are waaayyyy off.

Drachen Jager went to some time and trouble to find and post those stats - and to include the source of the information - Thank you Drachen Jager!

Unless you can refute those findings with a proven and factual rebuttal, any personal opinion as to there validity is just that: an unsubstantiated opinion bordering ever so close to disrespectful to the person who took the time and trouble to find a source and post it here.

Please, give me a proven & reliable source so I can formulate my own conclusions.

KathleenD
02-04-2012, 08:39 PM
Here are the top 10 requested genres by literary agents on QueryTracker. That ought to be as accurate a representation of what's selling (or likely to sell soon) as any.


I could be wrong, but I have the sense that romance isn't usually agented, unless we're talking about the fancy foil cover single title variety. So that list is more representative of what agents want/sell... which is not quite the same as what sells, as we saw later in the thread.


We have writing social groups? :Huh:

Apparently, I need to wander down some of the side corridors here.

Me too!



Wow. I'm surprised erotic romance is so low on the first list, and it doesn't even appear on the second. I'm shocked; I thought it would be a lot more popular than that.

I think erotic romance is a big seller in e-book, not print book. That list looks like a break down of print sales.

writerinthenorth
02-04-2012, 08:58 PM
I found writing my (factually-based) historical fiction novel Mr Stephenson's Regret (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mr-Stephensons-Regret-David-Williams/dp/1907954201/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1328374574&sr=1-1)much more difficult to write than my contemporary thriller 11:59 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/11-59-David-Williams/dp/0956373356/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1328374621&sr=1-1). The thriller took me about ten months, the HF nearer three years. Research was the obvious difference (though I had to do a certain amount of research for the thriller too) but the hardest part was getting the diction right for the Regency/Victorian setting of 'Regret'. While trying to avoid 'faux-Victorian' I had to make my characters sound plausible for their time; and in some cases I was using their actual speeches, so the real and the invented had to work together. The narrative too had to work with the dialogue. All in all, it proved a challenge that I hope I managed to get approximately right by the time of the final draft.

Silver-Midnight
02-04-2012, 09:21 PM
I think erotic romance is a big seller in e-book, not print book. That list looks like a break down of print sales.

That makes a lot of sense.

shaldna
02-05-2012, 12:09 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have the impression that most of the writers here at AW write fantasy and/or SF and/or YA.

Hmm.

On some boards there is a higher percentage of certain genre writers than others. Yes, there's a lot of YA writers here, and a lot of sci-fi and fantasy writers, but there are also a lot of romance writers and non fic peeps, and all the folks from the western board.

I think it's more a case of individual writers being more active in certain boards.

jaksen
02-05-2012, 12:27 AM
Hmm.

On some boards there is a higher percentage of certain genre writers than others. Yes, there's a lot of YA writers here, and a lot of sci-fi and fantasy writers, but there are also a lot of romance writers and non fic peeps, and all the folks from the western board.

I think it's more a case of individual writers being more active in certain boards.

What she says...

Some of us hang out at different forums. I write mystery short fiction but most of my posts are in novels.

Go figure.

AJ Valliant
02-05-2012, 04:06 AM
Just for the record, horror does have its own social group outside of the spec-fic group, and there are 98 of us.

To answer the OP--I think a lot of sub-genres wind up getting shelved under the SF/F umbrella that could be very well at home elsewhere, which is what makes it seem like such a huge sub-genre itself. Things like paranormal romance, certain categories of horror, a big chunk of YA, magical realism, etc. Keep in mind as well that "fantasy" and "science fiction," while they might draw similar readerships and take up the same space in bookstores, really aren't the same thing, so the forum here is two genres in one place, with many sub-categories.
.

Yep. Fantasy does seem to be the catch all dumping ground for anything with a fantastical plot element, regardless of the other themes, settings, and structural elements at play. So I suppouse it's more of a categorical issue than a popularity one.

kuwisdelu
02-05-2012, 05:18 AM
The idea that magical realism is just literary fantasy is a major pet peeve of mine.