PDA

View Full Version : Boredom and Intelligence



CChampeau
01-30-2012, 04:36 AM
When I was little and complained of being bored, I was told that "if you're bored, it just means that you're boring!"

On a similar note, the most intelligent person I believe I have ever met said, "...only dumb people get bored. Intelligent people have far too much to think about."

On the other hand, there is substantial evidence that highly intelligent children underperform or even begin to misbehave precisely because they are bored.

Thoughts on what is going on here....?

tmesis
01-30-2012, 04:56 AM
Thoughts on what is going on here....?

In my experience, the bright ones act up when they find the topic too easy, while the less academic ones act up when they find the topic too hard. I used to tutor 'troubled' kids between 16 and 18 who, for various reasons, did not achieve GCSEs. There weren't enough of them to split them into sets based on ability, and there was only one of me. It was a nightmare, to be honest. Thankfully, the course has since been redesigned.

Ambrosia
01-30-2012, 04:59 AM
The people who say negative things about people who get bored are likely trying to motivate them to find something to do so they are no longer bored. That would be my guess. Or they are just being jerks.

I personally think highly intelligent people have a greater likelihood of becoming bored because their minds need to be engaged, and so much of everyday life doesn't engage a person's brain.

Silver King
01-30-2012, 06:04 AM
...I personally think highly intelligent people have a greater likelihood of becoming bored...
I must be dumb as a stump, as I can't recall ever being bored in my life. No kidding. I've read boring books and seen boring films and known boring people and stuff, but I've never been actively bored. I'm not even sure what it's supposed to feel like.

My mind wanders a good deal, though, perhaps as a mechanism to stave off boredom, so I remain entertained most of the time, regardless of my surroundings.

It's worth noting that on the opposite end, I'm rarely excited about anything and have no idea why people become ecstatic about what appears to be the most trivial things I can think of...

My old man told me once, "You never seem to run hot or cold, Son. You're just tepid."

I think he was right.

milly
01-30-2012, 06:07 AM
I must be dumb as a stump

*saved, archived in folder with blackmail pics*

Cliff Face
01-30-2012, 06:08 AM
I tend to think of the "bard" approach. (I coined that just then.)

A bard, in Dungeons And Dragons, is a jack-of-all-trades - has ability in loads of things, but doesn't necessarily specialise in any one thing.

So, to me, I try to be like a bard with multiple specialisations.

I write, I play music, I (try to) draw, I'm interested in physics, I'll be studying philosophy, I want to work in retail while I study, I want to be organised and clean, I love fashion, I love shopping.

However, I can usually only do 1 of those things at a time, and usually for only a short period of time. If I focus on one thing too much, I get sick of it.

So when I get bored, it's almost always the in-between moments. When I've finished writing for the day, and don't know what I want to do next. So I just sit there, or pace, and convince myself that everything is boring because I'm already bored.

So to me, boredom is simply what happens when you don't feel like doing something that could relieve the boredom. If I do none of my interests, I get bored.

I don't think it has anything to do with intelligence or whether you're a boring person.

mccardey
01-30-2012, 06:10 AM
The thing about children is that their environment is often at the mercy of adults. I think it's fair to say that bright kids - like less-bright kids, like creative kids and less-creative kids - can get bored in a classroom, depending on who is running it. In my experience though, bright kids tend to be rarely bored outside of the classroom. (On the other hand the same can be said for less-bright but highly-motivated kids of all kinds, and for the younger members of the criminal classes as well, who are probably out swiping hubcaps or selling stocks and bonds or whatever it is young criminals do these days...)

Generalisations only tend to hold in a very general sense. ;)

Cliff Face
01-30-2012, 06:11 AM
I should add that I think a lot, but not all thoughts are equally entertaining.

"Normal" life, the day-to-day stuff, is more likely to bore me if that's all I'm thinking about. Again, it's when I don't focus on my specialisations that I get bored.

rhymegirl
01-30-2012, 06:25 AM
I personally think highly intelligent people have a greater likelihood of becoming bored because their minds need to be engaged, and so much of everyday life doesn't engage a person's brain.

I agree with this.


Kathy, a highly intelligent person who gets bored frequently

mccardey
01-30-2012, 06:26 AM
I agree with this.


Kathy, a highly intelligent person who gets bored frequently

Yeah - but - surely if they're bright, they can find things to engage their brains?

rhymegirl
01-30-2012, 06:29 AM
Yeah - but - surely if they're bright, they can find things to engage their brains?

Hmm. Well, I could mastermind a plan to take over the world.

Ari Meermans
01-30-2012, 06:33 AM
I have the attention span of a goldfish and am easily bored, except when plotting (dire deeds and stories) or reading. School was sheer misery. Sixteen years of bored-out-of-my-skull misery.

mccardey
01-30-2012, 06:34 AM
Hmm. Well, I could mastermind a plan to take over the world.

Well - I was thinking more along the lines of a cryptic crossword, but hell yeah! Yay for world domination!! :hooray:

mccardey
01-30-2012, 06:36 AM
I have the attention span of a goldfish and am easily bored, except when plotting (dire deeds and stories) or reading. School was sheer misery. Sixteen years of bored-out-of-my-skull misery.

Yeah - I didn't finish. They would have expelled me, but I wasn't there often enough. I loved the library though.

rhymegirl
01-30-2012, 06:39 AM
It's worth noting that on the opposite end, I'm rarely excited about anything

Oh really? What about half-naked women?

Ari Meermans
01-30-2012, 06:41 AM
Yeah - I didn't finish. They would have expelled me, but I wasn't there often enough. I loved the library though.

:ROFL:

Silver King
01-30-2012, 06:42 AM
*saved, archived in folder with blackmail pics*
See? That comment alone will keep me from ever being bored...

Ari Meermans
01-30-2012, 06:47 AM
I just wanna go on record as saying for the umpteenth time: You people ain't right. Carry on.

Cliff Face
01-30-2012, 07:33 AM
Perhaps boredom is the feeling you get when you feel you're not allowed to enjoy some down-time doing nothing?

I mean, yesterday was the first day in 5 months where I haven't had a job. I finished up on Saturday. So naturally, on Sunday mum started in with questions like, "So, what are you going to do this week?" in that tone that means, "You better do something productive, because doing nothing, even if it's only briefly, isn't allowed."

It's comments like that that have made me incapable (in recent years) of enjoying a day of doing nothing.

So I feel bored, and strangely guilty instead.

backslashbaby
01-30-2012, 09:31 PM
I got so damned bored in class I could hardly stand it (not all my classes). The thing was, we weren't allowed to read, write, stare at the wall, or anything but give full attention to the teacher. When the teacher explains the same thing for 45 minutes. Aaaaaarrrghh!

Do y'all ever have someone explaining something to you, and they stop and repeat it way too quickly, but you have to keep listening?

BSB, this right here is called a mouse. You move it like this. Or this. Or even this. There. Did you see how that worked? It's a mouse, and it moves all these ways. Did you try moving it yet? Go on. Move the mouse. We really need to get this down before we can move on. Do these 10 questions about how mice move, OK?

Arrrrgghhhh!!!

RemusShepherd
01-30-2012, 09:47 PM
On a similar note, the most intelligent person I believe I have ever met said, "...only dumb people get bored. Intelligent people have far too much to think about."

On the other hand, there is substantial evidence that highly intelligent children underperform or even begin to misbehave precisely because they are bored.

Thoughts on what is going on here....?

Children are forced to pay attention in school. If that content bores them, they underperform or misbehave.

Adults aren't forced to do anything. If they start to get bored, they have the freedom to think about something else. (Although if you look in meeting rooms around the corporate world, you will find lots of smart people who are bored and probably misbehaving; doodling, mostly.)

It's all about what is age-appropriate. Doodling is a sign that a child lacks focus, but is also a sign that an adult has an active imagination. What used to be misbehaviour becomes a virtue when you get older. The underlying psychology doesn't change. The social acceptability of the mis-behavior changes.

Lucas
01-30-2012, 10:41 PM
When I was little and complained of being bored, I was told that "if you're bored, it just means that you're boring!"

On a similar note, the most intelligent person I believe I have ever met said, "...only dumb people get bored. Intelligent people have far too much to think about."

On the other hand, there is substantial evidence that highly intelligent children underperform or even begin to misbehave precisely because they are bored.

Thoughts on what is going on here....?

Intelligent people get more easily bored, as well as tired of human interaction in general. People who are more medium-intelligent are probably happier, since they seldom doubt things.

Shadow_Ferret
01-30-2012, 10:51 PM
I must be dumb as a stump, as I can't recall ever being bored in my life. No kidding. I've read boring books and seen boring films and known boring people and stuff, but I've never been actively bored. I'm not even sure what it's supposed to feel like.


It feels like your brain is stuffed with cold oatmeal. There's a pressure behind your eyes and a deep sadness. At least that's how I felt on rainy Sunday's as a kid. No one to play with and nothing on tv.

JimmyB27
01-30-2012, 11:31 PM
I only skimmed through this thread - it's kind of boring...

;)

I don't normally get bored, I just do something more interesting if I'm not enjoying whatever it is I am doing. However, I have had jobs before where the level of attention required was just high enough that I couldn't let my mind wander, but just low enough that it didn't interest me. Glad I'm out of that now.

Archerbird
01-30-2012, 11:38 PM
"...only dumb people get bored. Intelligent people have far too much to think about."


Oh boy. That's right up there with "only stupid people work in factories".

Shadow_Ferret
01-31-2012, 12:45 AM
Oh boy. That's right up there with "only stupid people work in factories".

And...?

Archerbird
01-31-2012, 12:48 AM
And...?

And I don't agree?

Boredom to me is not having the motivation to pay attention to anything, even though you have lots of things to do. Or maybe something just loses it's novelty or...something. I don't think it has all that much to do with intelligence.

bettielee
01-31-2012, 04:02 AM
I'm a fairly simple creature, and I never get bored. I always have something to putter around with.

I have too many innerests.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b40/bettieleetwo/relevant_to_my_interests1.jpg

mccardey
01-31-2012, 04:05 AM
Also - boredom is not always a bad thing. It can just be a chance to reflect and recharge.

rugcat
01-31-2012, 04:31 AM
My old man told me once, "You never seem to run hot or cold, Son. You're just tepid."No, no. Just think of it as being in balance with the universe.

People who spend much of their lives outdoors seldom get bored. I've been bored in management meetings. Actually, bored isn't quite the right word. More like, kill me now.

I've also spent a lot of time in the mountains. I've never been been bored while out in nature. Not ever. I often find other people boring, though, I must admit.

Cliff Face
01-31-2012, 08:53 AM
I've been bored while being driven through scenic places. Very bored. Scenery does nothing for me.

And when I've walked through woodland areas (usually for school) the only reason I haven't been totally bored is because I was also exhausted.

tjwriter
01-31-2012, 06:38 PM
It's all about what is age-appropriate. Doodling is a sign that a child lacks focus, but is also a sign that an adult has an active imagination. What used to be misbehaviour becomes a virtue when you get older. The underlying psychology doesn't change. The social acceptability of the mis-behavior changes.

Actually doodling is a scientifically proven information processing technique. It was nice to feel validated when that study came out. :) I was always doodling the margin of my notes while listening to lectures. It seems that was helping me process what I was hearing and retain the information better than if not.

The biggest reason for me to get bored was to be stuck in a classroom where we were covering a task I had mastered and be left with nothing else I was allowed to do. In most of my classes, if I finished an assignment early (I nearly always did), then I was allowed to read for the remainder of the working time. That was a wonderful thing for me.

As an adult, the internet has been awesome for an information seeker like me. I am always looking up new topics and possibilities are endless. It makes me feel very happy.

Shadow_Ferret
01-31-2012, 08:29 PM
And I don't agree?
.

Ok. I wasn't sure if you were using your statement to validate or dispute the other.

M.Charles
01-31-2012, 08:34 PM
I've heard the whole intelligence/bored thing before.

Implication being that if I was so smart, I'd figure out something to do.

*eyeroll*

As far as kids being bored in school, that's one of the many reasons we homeschool.

Kids being forced into repetitive work b/c other kids in the class need the practice, when they've already grasped the concept is a big problem. Of *course* they're going to be bored! And bored kids can lead to discipline issues.

tjwriter
01-31-2012, 08:44 PM
In first grade I was almost sent to the principal's office because I was so bored I was putting Elmer's glue on my hands, waiting for it to dry and then peeling it off. (My hands made pretty patterns. :D)

Rather than give me something stimulating to do in the meantime, I was threatened with discipline. That part makes me sad.

ETA: So yes, I "cured" my own boredom, but not in an educationally appropriate manner, according to my teacher.

JimmyB27
01-31-2012, 08:47 PM
But did you ask Elmer's permission before using his glue? Maybe that was what they objected to.

Wicked
01-31-2012, 10:34 PM
My husband laughs at me when I say, "I'm bored, there's nothing on the internet."

What this really should translate to, is "I've got to get outside, I'm climbing the walls." I never get bored outside. Outside is endlessly engaging.

Inside I have a time limit. No matter how many hobbies I have, and I have a lot, sooner or later the walls are going to close in on me. Oddly enough I'll get bored faster when I'm inside with people, than when I am by myself.

My grade school was so small I was the only one in my class, so I went at my own pace. We were never bored. All the grades in the room were included in projects no matter what grade level the material was for.

High School was a different story. Jumped from a two room school house, to a school with more than a thousand kids. That was a major culture shock.

My first year of American Lit I would take the book home, read it that night, and come back the next day ready to take the test. The rest of the kids were moaning and begging the teacher to extend the one week deadline to two. Fortunately the teacher liked me, and took pity on me, so she would hand me as many books as I could read and ask me to do a book report, just to keep me busy.

The second year of advanced American Lit was another story. That teacher hated me. She would make me just sit there and do nothing if I finished ahead of everyone. When she wanted groups, I would do the assignment on my own, so she docked my grade. She treated me like, "You think you're so smart? I'm going to show you."
I was resentful and bored. When I confronted her about the grade, she made it clear that she didn't like people who weren't "team players".
Lady, this is Lit class, not football.
Ok, in her defense, it probably didn't help that I told her I could pass her class in my sleep.
Yeah, we got along like fire and gasoline.

Archerbird
01-31-2012, 10:34 PM
Ok. I wasn't sure if you were using your statement to validate or dispute the other.

Sorry about that. :)

Arclight
01-31-2012, 11:27 PM
In first grade I was almost sent to the principal's office because I was so bored I was putting Elmer's glue on my hands, waiting for it to dry and then peeling it off. (My hands made pretty patterns. :D)

Rather than give me something stimulating to do in the meantime, I was threatened with discipline. That part makes me sad.

ETA: So yes, I "cured" my own boredom, but not in an educationally appropriate manner, according to my teacher.

This made me laugh, since I did the same thing as a kid. :) I was never a troublemaker, but I did stupid things when I was bored, like burying myself up to the neck in snow or coloring my hands with marker. In high school, I nearly went crazy when we read Shakespeare and the teacher explained EVERY SINGLE LINE. It's a shame that more teachers and professors don't use class activities and discussions instead of lectures; they're fun, they're engaging, and the students are far more likely to remember the material.

I honestly don't think boredom has anything to do with intelligence. It probably has a lot more to do with temperment. I'm naturally very high-strung - I laugh or cry easily, I get excited or angry over small things, and I get bored easily. Writing is one of the few things I can do for hours without ever getting bored. It doesn't matter how much I enjoy something; there's always a point where I get bored and restless. When I get bored, I don't feel down or apathetic, I feel like I need to get out outside before I chew my own arm off.

Susan Littlefield
02-01-2012, 12:51 AM
When I was little and complained of being bored, I was told that "if you're bored, it just means that you're boring!"

On a similar note, the most intelligent person I believe I have ever met said, "...only dumb people get bored. Intelligent people have far too much to think about."

On the other hand, there is substantial evidence that highly intelligent children underperform or even begin to misbehave precisely because they are bored.

Thoughts on what is going on here....?

In my opinion, just generalizations that hold no truth.

Boredom and intelligence, or lack thereof as to both, come on a broad spectrum.

M.Charles
02-01-2012, 02:28 AM
I remember the glue trick!

We had a girl in my gr 5-6 class that broke down in complete hysterics if ppl did that...we'd do a zombie moan..."Skiiiiiin...SkiiIIIIIiiiiiin" while peeling chunks of it off, and she'd lose her ever lovin' mind.

Course, once she did that ONCE, guys would deliberately do it and chase her around...

Cliff Face
02-01-2012, 03:41 AM
Yeah, we had the glue trick at my school too. Nobody really got freaked out by it.

Then there were the people who stuck staples or pins through the tips of their fingers... I could never bring myself to try that. They said that if you just went shallow across the tip, it didn't hurt. Thanks, but no thanks.

randi.lee
02-01-2012, 03:53 AM
This is a good thread to come across today. I just spent 9 hours in project management training. The content was extremely easy to digest and I figure I could have studied the manual for an hour and gotten the same amount of worth out of it. Needless to say, I was bored out of my mind. Does having such a good grasp on the provided information that I barely needed to pay attention make me boring?

Actually, I like to think that I'm rather fun!

scarletpeaches
02-01-2012, 04:07 AM
I think that people who pick things up and learn easily, also get bored easily. While others would have to study the same thing endlessly, if you have a 'photographic memory' so to speak, you're bound to get bored while waiting for other people to catch up. That's why the brighter kids in school often get told off for slacking, when in actual fact they've already read the chapter/answered the question/finished the exam.

M.Charles
02-01-2012, 04:11 AM
Yeah, we had the glue trick at my school too. Nobody really got freaked out by it.

Then there were the people who stuck staples or pins through the tips of their fingers... I could never bring myself to try that. They said that if you just went shallow across the tip, it didn't hurt. Thanks, but no thanks.
Yup, remember that too!

Ken
02-01-2012, 04:25 AM
... when it comes to misbehaving, I haven't seen that. I used to substitute teach and when I covered the top classes the kids were well behaved and almost even saintly. The classes on the lower end of the spectrum, by contrast, were abominable. Whether that was due to boredom or not I couldn't say.

rhymegirl
02-01-2012, 04:25 AM
I'm getting bored right now.

Where's Silver King so I can cause some problems?

Silver King
02-01-2012, 04:33 AM
He's admiring your new avatar and thinks you've made a wise choice to bet on that team.

rhymegirl
02-01-2012, 04:57 AM
He's admiring your new avatar and thinks you've made a wise choice to bet on that team.

Well, I'm not betting, but I do support them. My husband loves them.

Stlight
02-01-2012, 05:42 AM
When I was little and complained of being bored, I was told that "if you're bored, it just means that you're boring!"

Thoughts on what is going on here....?

I think people tell kids that when they're afraid the kids want them to play. Tell the kid it's his/her fault he's bored and you don't have to interact or even suggest anything for him to do.

Of course adults are the ones who decide what kids can and can't do at home as well as school. So they decide whether or not kids will be bored.

Sometimes, I think kids say they're bored when they want adults to play with them.

Silver King
02-01-2012, 05:44 AM
Well, I'm not betting, but I do support them. My husband loves them.
I don't like or dislike them, but I've bet heavily that they will win, far more than I probably should have.

But you know what they say: Life is boring unless you take risks!

Silver King
02-01-2012, 07:26 AM
...Sometimes, I think kids say they're bored when they want adults to play with them.
I believe this is true also. When I was growing up, though, my folks were never considered playmates. Nor would they have wanted to help me and my siblings occupy our time to avoid boredom. At the earliest signs of restlessness, we were ushered outdoors and told not to return until we were either tired or hungry or both.

As long as we stayed out of trouble and made it home before dark, we were free to roam whatever distant vistas appealed to us.

During that time we played sports, usually baseball, and rode our bikes all over hell's creation, sometimes pedaling up to ten miles from home. When I was twelve, the captain of a charter boat hired me on to bait hooks and tidy the vessel and otherwise keep his clients happy, all for five dollars per day. It was a king's ransom at the time, and my parents never knew that I sailed twenty-five miles into the Gulf of Mexico nearly every day during that summer.

Of course that was before cell phones were invented, and online games and hand held devices existed, which tend to keep many kids closer to home these days.

Perhaps recent technology has helped to enhance boredom, especially among younger folks, who may not feel entirely engaged unless they are connected to something or other in some way.

tjwriter
02-01-2012, 06:50 PM
There's also that stigma where if you don't keep your child close and well guarded all the time, you are a bad parent and neglectful.

So parents don't let their children run all over creation for fear of a CPS call.

I was everywhere as a child. My parents had a vague idea of where I might be found or who I might be with and I had to check in every once in awhile, but many summer was spent riding my bike all over town and playing sports.

M.Charles
02-01-2012, 10:37 PM
Honestly, parents are pretty screwed no matter what they do.

If they keep a close eye on their kids, they're labelled 'helicopter parents', and they're kids are being stifled, and will never be able to cope on their own.

If you give your kid some freedom, you're careless, neglectful, etc.

And then there's the Mommy wars...

*sigh*

backslashbaby
02-01-2012, 10:41 PM
OMG. My mother would shoo us outside, and we did all kinds of dangerous things that parents today don't allow. My grandfather could throw a knife well, for instance, so ummm... :D We only got in trouble for using her steak knives, not for playing with knives!

The one that freaked them out was when I was 6 and came back home with a baby water moccasin in a jar. They let us keep him for a few days in an aquarium.

This was in the suburbs at the time :ROFL: It was a small creek, really.

kenthepen
02-01-2012, 10:50 PM
I'm Dad of four, from 8-21. Over the years my goal became: Just get them to adulthood without f***ing them up too badly. And try to help them realize and find the beginning of the path they wanted to travel in life.

Jury's still out.

M.Charles
02-01-2012, 10:56 PM
I'm Dad of four, from 8-21. Over the years my goal became: Just get them to adulthood without f***ing them up too badly. And try to help them realize and find the beginning of the path they wanted to travel in life.

Jury's still out.
I hear you.

My kids don't have college funds. They have therapy accounts.

JimmyB27
02-02-2012, 12:19 AM
OMG. My mother would shoo us outside, and we did all kinds of dangerous things that parents today don't allow. My grandfather could throw a knife well, for instance, so ummm... :D We only got in trouble for using her steak knives, not for playing with knives!

The one that freaked them out was when I was 6 and came back home with a baby water moccasin in a jar. They let us keep him for a few days in an aquarium.

This was in the suburbs at the time :ROFL: It was a small creek, really.
A baby moccasin?

http://i.imgur.com/mxcin.jpg

backslashbaby
02-02-2012, 12:36 AM
A baby moccasin?

http://i.imgur.com/mxcin.jpg


:ROFL:

No, this kind, silly:

http://knottsislandonline.com/nature/reptiles&amphibians/cottonmouth/cottonmouth.jpg

rhymegirl
02-02-2012, 04:44 AM
As long as we stayed out of trouble and made it home before dark, we were free to roam whatever distant vistas appealed to us.

We used to do this, too. Of course, this was many moons ago. I can recall my youngest sister taking off, visiting friends-- and my mom would not know where she was. She'd say, "One of you girls get on a bike and go look for Rose."


Of course that was before cell phones were invented, and online games and hand held devices existed, which tend to keep many kids closer to home these days.
Perhaps recent technology has helped to enhance boredom, especially among younger folks, who may not feel entirely engaged unless they are connected to something or other in some way.

Very true. We lost our power during the hurricane last year for at least a day. My kids were bored silly. No computer, Internet, video games.

We ended up getting out a deck of cards and playing cards.

kayleamay
02-02-2012, 05:53 AM
My three boys are outside shooting each other other with Air Soft rifles right now. They're wearing protective gear, but I'm sure it will still end with one crying, one yelling and one swearing he hates the other two. They are not bored. However, the fact that they do this over and over again and expect a different result may say something about their intelligence.

M.Charles
02-02-2012, 07:48 AM
My three boys are outside shooting each other other with Air Soft rifles right now. They're wearing protective gear, but I'm sure it will still end with one crying, one yelling and one swearing he hates the other two. They are not bored. However, the fact that they do this over and over again and expect a different result may speak to their intelligence.
*snicker*
No, it simply says they're sibs.

kenthepen
02-02-2012, 08:11 AM
I've been told that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results........ but maybe that's just the definition of childhood. My stepson keeps snowboarding, even though he gets hurt often.

CChampeau
03-06-2012, 09:57 PM
Children are forced to pay attention in school. If that content bores them, they underperform or misbehave.

Adults aren't forced to do anything. If they start to get bored, they have the freedom to think about something else. (Although if you look in meeting rooms around the corporate world, you will find lots of smart people who are bored and probably misbehaving; doodling, mostly.)

It's all about what is age-appropriate. Doodling is a sign that a child lacks focus, but is also a sign that an adult has an active imagination. What used to be misbehaviour becomes a virtue when you get older. The underlying psychology doesn't change. The social acceptability of the mis-behavior changes.

Very insightful!

CChampeau
03-06-2012, 10:04 PM
Oh boy. That's right up there with "only stupid people work in factories".

Lol! All too true - and I would add that this "super-smart" guy was also super stuck-up. ;) I tend to think that he had just "hit his stride" at that time in his life, since he was very active in something he enjoyed and cared about.

I'm happier when something interests me and sad when I get bored...likewise, being depressed makes everything way less interesting and therefore boring.

tiny
03-06-2012, 10:25 PM
Dang, when I was little and complained about being bored I was told to clean my room. Lesson learned. I didn't get bored often and my room was a pit.

Archerbird
03-07-2012, 04:34 PM
Lol! All too true - and I would add that this "super-smart" guy was also super stuck-up. ;) I tend to think that he had just "hit his stride" at that time in his life, since he was very active in something he enjoyed and cared about.

I'm happier when something interests me and sad when I get bored...likewise, being depressed makes everything way less interesting and therefore boring.

Oh yeah, depression is one of those big things that really messes with your motivation. What a brilliant thing it is to tell someone who is depressed that they're only bored because they're not smart enough to find something to do.

You get a lot of really "good" quotes from people who consider themselves geniuses. The factory-thing I got from a guy who worked at a course for unemployed people.

"You are too smart to work in a factory" or something similar. I don't consider myself particularly smart, and I tried really hard not to retort with "well, if I'm so clever, how come me can't think of something to say to that without making you cry, you dumb f*".

:roll:

Good times, that.