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Windcutter
01-25-2012, 06:31 AM
Loving the idea of being a writer vs loving writing itself.

I keep seeing this in different discussions, but I never quite grasped the meaning, and it seems different people mean different things when they say it. Is there a universal concept behind this? Maybe the source of the original quote. What do you think about it? Do you also notice the difference?

scarletpeaches
01-25-2012, 06:34 AM
I would think the thread title says it all. Some people like the idea of being a writer because an idea is all in their head. It doesn't take any work to think about being a writer, to talk about being a writer, to wish you were a writer.

The work comes in when you realise books don't write themselves. You're required to get off your arse and do something. Or rather, sit said arse down and get your fingers on the keyboard.

Me, personally? I can sort of relate. I love writing. Of course I do. But the feeling of having written? My God, you can't beat it.

Polenth
01-25-2012, 07:35 AM
Loving the idea of being a writer means not writing. You talk about the stories you're going to write and the things you want to do (from book signings to being a bestseller). You join writing communities and spend time getting to know people. But you don't write anything. There's always an excuse. From writer's block to the dog needing to go to the vet, there's never enough time to write something.

If someone suggests you ought to write, you may even get angry with them for not understanding that your life is a billion times more difficult than theirs (obviously, no one else ever gets busy with stuff). Suggestions of cutting down on community time to make writing time are also met with resistance.

I don't think a writer needs to love the process of writing, but they do need to actually write stuff.

MJNL
01-25-2012, 07:39 AM
Sometimes I go to a coffee shop to write. When I'm there I'm working. One day I met another writer there--he went on and on and on and on about writing, made a big show of having his laptop out and his blank word file open and his nice little notebook at his side. I'd say we had a long conversation about writing, but really it was a lot of him gushing about how being writers put us on this "other intellectual level" and me politely nodding. Eventually I had to stop him and politely told him that I only had another hour and I really had to get my word count in. He grudgingly left me alone, and when I left he had a game open next to his blank page. In the two hours I was there I wrote 2,000 words. He wrote zero.

True story.

I'm biased, but which of us do you think enjoys writing and which enjoys the idea of being writerly?

lastlittlebird
01-25-2012, 07:39 AM
It makes me happy to daydream about being a writer.
Not just any writer, of course. Not someone who knocks out a mid-lister a year and eventually builds up enough royalties to scrape by without a second job (or stay comfortable with a part-time job on top of the writing).

No, I dream about being A Writer. A tortured soul who probably smokes (maybe even a pipe) and drinks heavily and writes Deep and Meaningful words which only a handful of people understand (until, of course, I die and then somehow the world will realize my greatness).

Or A Bestseller who also smokes, but lights that pipe with $50 bills and drinks vodka that's been filtered through diamonds (That is actually a thing. Diamond filtered vodka. Drunk from a crystal skull. Look it up if you don't believe me!)

I do love the idea of being those kinds of writers. I also love the idea of being an astronaut.
I don't much like the thought of going through decades of military training to get myself into space, though.

While I do like the act of putting words on to paper.

Only time will tell whether I'm going to end up in space or drinking diamond vodka I suppose...

Al Stevens
01-25-2012, 07:44 AM
People who want to be writers don't always want to become writers.

Filigree
01-25-2012, 08:01 AM
I am reminded of the lyrics to Rush's 'Limelight', in particular this stanza:

'Living in the Limelight,
The universal dream
For those who wish to seem.
Those who wish to be
Must put aside the alienation,
Get on with the fascination,
The real relation,
The underlying theme.'

Love the act, the joy of writing and spinning stories out of your head. Learn your craft. As the artist Louise Nevelson once said, 'Do your work.' Only then will you be able to really write stories that mean anything to anyone else.

If you lose yourself in the daydream, all you will ever have is the daydream. After all, it's much easier to dream than *do*. Plus, the reality is never quite what you think it will be. It can thrilling and wonderful without the diamond vodka. I know too many 'artists' who are hipsters in love with the idea of being an artist, but they will never put in the work to earn their chops. Also, the myth of being a 'tortured artist' is complete bullshit: trust me, life will throw enough drama at you without you trying to add to it, in the belief that it will somehow inspire you.

lwallace
01-25-2012, 08:13 AM
I thoroughly endorse what Polenth and MJNL said--they are really on point. There is some cachet with being a writer and whatever romantic, artistic, devil-may-care notions go along with that. An unsuccessful, unpublished writer can easily be a serious writer because he or she is devoted to writing, caring about character and story, caring about making the writing as good as possible. One who is only in love with the idea of writing (and being a writer) probably doesn't do much writing for any extended period of time, but instead does a lot of thinking about writing and a lot of talking about writing. Real writers write--whatever their levels of success. Writers who are posers don't do much writing, or they give up easily and don't work at the craft.

COchick
01-25-2012, 08:18 AM
I think the "idea" of doing many things is attractive to people. For example, I know of a woman who was in love with the idea of being a mother...until the baby was born. Now all I ever hear is how much she hates all of it. (Which is incredibly sad, but don't even get me started on that.)

I think writing is a lot like that. The "idea" (for me) involves these romantic ideals of a cabin in the snowy woods with a cup of coffee, pounding out all these fantastic stories that everyone loves. But the reality is a lot different. It's work. Hard work. And some people aren't prepared to make that sort of commitment.

Mr. Anonymous
01-25-2012, 09:12 AM
George R. R. Martin once said that he likes writing when it's going well, but he LOVES having written.

For me, it's similar, though when writing is really going well, I think in a lot of cases you don't even notice/think about it.

CharacterInWhite
01-25-2012, 09:19 AM
Loving the idea of being a writer: thinking about that gushing fan in line at your book signing.

Loving writing itself: thinking about what you're going to write for your next scene, while you're still writing it.

CrastersBabies
01-25-2012, 09:57 AM
For me, I daydream of being able to support myself fully with writing. Not much more than that.

It's an aspiration and of course I'm going to ponder it. It's a goal. It keeps me going when my muse stops talking to me.

Filigree
01-25-2012, 11:01 AM
Maurice Sendak had some pithy things to say about book signings and fans tonight, during an interview with Stephen Colbert. Basically, that they're not thrilling.

Jonathan Figaro
01-25-2012, 12:27 PM
So true! Some people like the idea of being a writer like anything else. But when they realize they have to really put in the time and effort, for what it really takes to achieve a dream. Then, Darwin's theory truly comes into place. Survival of the fittest B-otch!

- J. Nova

shaldna
01-25-2012, 02:23 PM
Loving the idea of being a writer vs loving writing itself.

I keep seeing this in different discussions, but I never quite grasped the meaning, and it seems different people mean different things when they say it. Is there a universal concept behind this? Maybe the source of the original quote. What do you think about it? Do you also notice the difference?

I've found that there are folks who like the idea of being 'a writer' mostly because they have an urge to be seen as creative or special and because it sounds like an exotic and interesting job that immediately marks them out as being interesting and intelligent. And they think we all hang around coffee shops all day, wear a lot of black and make millions.

Then there are teh people who just like to write. Those people who would continue to scribble out their stories with passion, even if they knew that not a single one of them would ever make it into print.

seun
01-25-2012, 05:37 PM
I've run into a few people who fit the first half of the thread title. They talk about what writers are like, they tell me their plot ideas...they don't write a feckin word.

They're no more writers than I'm a great athlete.

Mutive
01-25-2012, 06:19 PM
I'm going to add that there are a lot of people, too, who like the idea of being a writer. (And fantasizing about who is going to play their characters in movies, etc.) Some of them even write. But a lot don't really go to the kind of work it'll take for most people to get published (i.e. finding people to critique their work, taking the critiques seriously, learning a bit about the business, finishing what they've started, editing their work, setting time aside most days to write, etc.)

There's a huge difference between taking writing seriously (i.e. dedicating time to it and genuinely trying to improve) vs. fantasizing it and popping out a story once in a long while.

Jamesaritchie
01-25-2012, 06:44 PM
I suspect it goes back to the old saying, "Everyone wants to be a writer, but few want to actually sit down and write."

The difference is usually pretty obvious. Those who love to write sit down and write on a consistent basis. They write damned near every last day because there's nothing else they'd rather be doing with their time.

Those who love the idea of being a writer find excuses not to write, all sorts of excuses, or they take ten years to do something those who love writing routinely do in a few months.

They consider endless research writing, they pretend thinking about writing is writing, and talking about writing is, of course, the same as writing.

PulpDogg
01-25-2012, 07:13 PM
I think I at the moment I am more of the first half of the thread title, sadly. My biggest problem is to get myself to sit down and actually write. Put the procrastination on hold and just do it ...

Self discipline should be made into pills and sold in stores or something ...

KaiaSonderby
01-25-2012, 07:28 PM
I don't love the idea of being a writer, because to me being a writer means hours of work, of research, of hunting down every single typo in my MS, of worry, of thought--sometimes I can't sleep for the ideas in my head.

I think when people love the idea of being a writer, it's because they think being a writer means getting lots of gushing, adoring attention for doing an easy but still artistic job. Or I should say, some people.

heza
01-25-2012, 07:33 PM
There's a quote: "I hate writing. I love having written." I usually attribute it to Dorothy Parker, but I've seen it attributed to writers anywhere from Mark Twain to Dan Brown. Apparently, so many writers have said this or similar that Google has no idea where it started.

It seems to be a very common feeling. I do love to write, and I love the stories I want to tell. Now that I'm writing with an eye toward publication, I'm a bit disillusioned and less in love with the reality of birthing a novel.

I do love to drift off every once in a while and imagine how my "writer" life is going to be after I'm published and wildly successful and how great it's all going to be. But then I have to knock myself out of the daydreaming and focus on the work it's going to take to get there.

Filigree
01-25-2012, 07:35 PM
It may also come back to the trope of the creative person who can only create when 'inspired'. Bollocks. Good work habits and discipline can be learned in any creative field. They don't sully pure inspiration, they facilitate it.

Did anyone see the recent Simpsons episode 'The Book Job'? Lisa plays the dilettante writer who does everything but write. Bart and his focused team actually get the job done. A good moral lesson for those still dreaming of diamond vodka...

heza
01-25-2012, 07:44 PM
Did anyone see the recent Simpsons episode 'The Book Job'? Lisa plays the dilettante writer who does everything but write. Bart and his focused team actually get the job done. A good moral lesson for those still dreaming of diamond vodka...

I loved that one! I especially loved when she came up with the plot for The Little Mermaid.

Phaeal
01-25-2012, 07:49 PM
I think writing is singularly attractive to poseurs.

For example, I would love to think of myself as a ballerina, but such dreams are demonstrably absurd. I don't weigh ninety pounds, all muscle. Dance on my toes? Not happening. Wasn't ever happening.

However, anyone who can scratch words on paper or tap them onto a screen can set up as a writer. Quality's subjective, right? Maybe I'm a groundbreaking genius -- go ahead and DEMONSTRATE that I'm not. You're all just jealous, anyway. And so what if it's been ten years and I haven't finished that novel yet? It's because I'm not some hack that can spit out copy on demand. I'm a speshul snow -- I mean, sensitive soul dedicated to the exploration and explication of the deepest facets of the human psyche! These things take time and plenty of gazing off into space! I refuse to compromise my ideals! Barbarians, nobody understands....

Filigree
01-25-2012, 07:59 PM
<Snort>

I see your speshul snowflake and raise you the Blowtorch of Reality.

Toothpaste
01-25-2012, 08:03 PM
How's that novel you've been working on? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dNkf6uFZIs)

Jersey Chick
01-25-2012, 08:32 PM
Some days, I love being a writer - when the words flow easily and I can find whatever it is I'm looking up without tearing my hair out. I especially love it that day when the box of books with my name on the spine arrives at the door. :D

Some days, though, I hate being a writer. Like when a rejection arrives on something I was fairly sure would sell. Or when I get halfway into a project and the story just derails. Or when I'm doing the umpteenth revision and I hate the characters so much by then that I wish they'd just die already and leave me in peace.

And the difference between being in love with the idea of being a writer and loving writing is that I don't use the sucky days as an excuse to not write anything. I just keep swimming. :D

CrastersBabies
01-25-2012, 08:32 PM
I suspect it goes back to the old saying, "Everyone wants to be a writer, but few want to actually sit down and write."

The difference is usually pretty obvious. Those who love to write sit down and write on a consistent basis. They write damned near every last day because there's nothing else they'd rather be doing with their time.

Those who love the idea of being a writer find excuses not to write, all sorts of excuses, or they take ten years to do something those who love writing routinely do in a few months.

They consider endless research writing, they pretend thinking about writing is writing, and talking about writing is, of course, the same as writing.

This reminds me of the George Lucas interview I watched last night on the OWN network. Now, before you start in about Oprah, hey, it's George Lucas! Love him or hate him, he broke some ground!

Anyway . . .

George is definitely on the "do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life" team.

He said something along the lines of, "if you wake up in the morning and tell yourself you'll eat lunch after you finish X_project and you look up and realize it's 7pm, you're doing something you love."

(sorry, bad paraphrasing)

But, I was happy to hear that. There have been days when everything took a backseat to writing, when you realize how long you've been at it.

I do agree, there is a love there. I used to talk to people who got drunk or high (or used whatever drug they wanted) to write, and I would think, "why? Is writing really that bad that you need to get wasted to do it?"

quicklime
01-25-2012, 09:12 PM
Loving the idea of being a writer vs loving writing itself.

I keep seeing this in different discussions, but I never quite grasped the meaning, and it seems different people mean different things when they say it. Is there a universal concept behind this? Maybe the source of the original quote. What do you think about it? Do you also notice the difference?


Loving "being a writer" means you're drawn to the image of what the writing life is like, rather than the actual work behind it.

That's a doubly bad cut, because the life you imagine, if you tend to avoid considering the actual work, is probably nothing like the real life of most writers (very few have jets like Grisham or signings like King's; most just plain work, in relative near-obscurity for less than they'd have made if they went to business school or whatever else--if you don't like the work, this isn't the place to be for the riches and adoration)

Filigree
01-25-2012, 09:54 PM
Real-life writing: canceled series, deadlines, marketing committees, market research, strung-out and/or hostile fans, remaindered books, plagiarized books, accounting, editing and revising, publishers going out of business, agents dying or leaving the business, crummy or no advances, terrible royalties, book signings where nobody but you shows up, parties where people hear you're a writer and assume you are wealthy as Stephen King or Nora Roberts, eternal doubts about your skill level, family members who don't grasp that when you're sitting in front of the keyboard you are *working*, family members or strangers who want you to ghostwrite their Incredibly Important Life Story...

This life takes a masochist to accept all that, in exchange for the sheer joy of writing.

Al Stevens
01-25-2012, 10:24 PM
Real-life writing: canceled series, deadlines, marketing committees, market research, strung-out and/or hostile fans, remaindered books, plagiarized books, accounting, editing and revising, publishers going out of business, agents dying or leaving the business, crummy or no advances, terrible royalties, book signings where nobody but you shows up, parties where people hear you're a writer and assume you are wealthy as Stephen King or Nora Roberts, eternal doubts about your skill level, family members who don't grasp that when you're sitting in front of the keyboard you are *working*, family members or strangers who want you to ghostwrite their Incredibly Important Life Story...
And that's the good part.

scarletpeaches
01-25-2012, 10:56 PM
You know what? I have to say my worst day writing is still better than my best day of being someone else's wageslave.

Bubastes
01-25-2012, 10:56 PM
You know what? I have to say my worst day writing is still better than my best day of being someone else's wageslave.

AMEN!

Filigree
01-25-2012, 10:58 PM
Amen, sister.

I write because I can't NOT write, same as doing some form of art every day. If I'm diligent and lucky enough to spot opportunities to make money at this game, all the better.

CalebJMalcom
01-25-2012, 11:30 PM
I can't imagine a day without writing something. Be it a snippet on a napkin in the back of a bar while barely legal to drink people make out drunkenly around me or sitting at home with a cup of coffee and working on one of my WIP. The thought of not writing something drives me crazy and days I don't write send me to bed like a child without his supper.

CharacterInWhite
01-26-2012, 12:24 AM
You know what? I have to say my worst day writing is still better than my best day of being someone else's wageslave.

I feel compelled to insert a .gif of clapping here, but will refrain from doing so.

Filigree
01-26-2012, 12:26 AM
Well, at age 46, I've had time to understand that if I don't do something creative every day - write, make art or jewelry, cook something fun, whatever - I can go a little strange in the head. Ten days, and I'm twitchy. A month, and Bad Filigree comes out. Not safe. I'd rather make stuff than trouble.

Ken
01-26-2012, 12:52 AM
... when I first started writing I loved the idea of writing, under the false impression that it was a joyful and rather effortless affair. All one had to do was sit down, write a book, and in six months time huge royalties would roll in and one could retire to a seaside cottage and all.

Reality set in and swept that concept out to sea.

Now I just write. At times I love it; at times I cuss it.

LStein
01-26-2012, 01:04 AM
Real-life writing: canceled series, deadlines, marketing committees, market research, strung-out and/or hostile fans, remaindered books, plagiarized books, accounting, editing and revising, publishers going out of business, agents dying or leaving the business, crummy or no advances, terrible royalties, book signings where nobody but you shows up, parties where people hear you're a writer and assume you are wealthy as Stephen King or Nora Roberts, eternal doubts about your skill level, family members who don't grasp that when you're sitting in front of the keyboard you are *working*, family members or strangers who want you to ghostwrite their Incredibly Important Life Story...

This life takes a masochist to accept all that, in exchange for the sheer joy of writing.


Still sounds pretty good.

I do love writing when the story's going well, when readers like a story more than I expected, when I get a great idea...

I also love having written. The 200 pages of my WIP make me really happy even though I know revising's going to be a bitch.

And...I do fantasize. I know I shouldn't as often as I do, but it's nice to dream.

scarletpeaches
01-26-2012, 01:13 AM
I feel compelled to insert a .gif of clapping here, but will refrain from doing so.It's not often I say things other people want to cheer!

There are many, many people who are all about the talking about writing. Some even on this site. The internet fairly pulls them out of the woodwork.

Writing's hard work. A simple activity, but sometimes not easy. But even at its hardest, it's still a piece of piss compared to deadlines on processing invoices or having to get ten cages of stock out on the shop floor in one work shift.

bearilou
01-26-2012, 01:30 AM
However, anyone who can scratch words on paper or tap them onto a screen can set up as a writer. Quality's subjective, right? Maybe I'm a groundbreaking genius -- go ahead and DEMONSTRATE that I'm not. You're all just jealous, anyway. And so what if it's been ten years and I haven't finished that novel yet? It's because I'm not some hack that can spit out copy on demand. I'm a speshul snow -- I mean, sensitive soul dedicated to the exploration and explication of the deepest facets of the human psyche! These things take time and plenty of gazing off into space! I refuse to compromise my ideals! Barbarians, nobody understands....

Wow. You're good....

Windcutter
01-26-2012, 02:05 AM
Thanks, people, I finally got it. I had previously been thinking along the lines of "calling yourself a writer without having written anything" which didn't quite fit.


It may also come back to the trope of the creative person who can only create when 'inspired'. Bollocks. Good work habits and discipline can be learned in any creative field. They don't sully pure inspiration, they facilitate it.
Maybe that's because some writers only enjoy writing when it's inspired, and for the rest of the time it's just work? So you have to convince others that you don't need to work when it's just work. XD

Libbie
01-26-2012, 06:59 AM
Everybody needs to watch the documentary "Bad Writing." It's awesome, and it goes on a pretty heavy exploration on the desire to "be a writer" versus the reality of actually trying to write well for an audience.

Has this already been mentioned in this thread? I hope not. I'm too lazy today to read the whole thing (all two pages of it) and also my sloppy joes are almost ready.

rugcat
01-26-2012, 08:01 AM
I think part of it, for many people, is the cachet of being a writer -- the respect it engenders. Especially if you're lucky enough to be published. Wow! you're a writer? How cool.

You belong to a special club -- one filled with creative, interesting people. It gives you a place in life. I work in finance. I work at an auto shop.

But, I am a writer. It's something that defines you, who you are at your core.

Whether you enjoy the actual process of writing is another matter. Another famous quote is "Everybody wants to have written. Nobody wants to write."

I find a great deal of satisfaction in having written books. I can't say I enjoy writing. Right now I'm on my fourth or fifth or whatever round of revisions on a ms that I'm desperately trying to make right -- or at least as good as I can make it. Am I having fun? Kill me now.

So why do I keep doing it? Damned if I know.


ETA: Found the exact Dorothy Parker quote:

“I hate writing, I love having written."

lastlittlebird
01-26-2012, 10:09 AM
That's a doubly bad cut, because the life you imagine, if you tend to avoid considering the actual work, is probably nothing like the real life of most writers (very few have jets like Grisham or signings like King's; most just plain work, in relative near-obscurity for less than they'd have made if they went to business school or whatever else--if you don't like the work, this isn't the place to be for the riches and adoration)

Grisham has multiple jets?? Wow.

I'll bet diamond vodka tastes pretty good on your own jet.
Of course, I wouldn't get more than one... don't want to come across as pretentious.

PulpDogg
01-26-2012, 12:22 PM
To kick that wannabe writer in me in the butt, I sat down yesterday and wrote a flash fiction piece ... feels good to have written :).

Now I need to do that again today ...

Nimeni
01-26-2012, 04:30 PM
Well, at age 46, I've had time to understand that if I don't do something creative every day - write, make art or jewelry, cook something fun, whatever - I can go a little strange in the head. Ten days, and I'm twitchy. A month, and Bad Filigree comes out. Not safe. I'd rather make stuff than trouble.

This so much. I have a triple major, so it's extra hard to fit in some time to write, but damn the satisfaction I get when I've written something is totally worth it.

aadams73
01-26-2012, 04:59 PM
There's no shame in having written. It means I did my job that day.

Phaeal
01-26-2012, 07:01 PM
I find that no matter how cranky I am about sitting down to write, if I keep at it for five-fifteen minutes, I build up the critical momentum and interest that will get me through my session without further growling.

randi.lee
01-26-2012, 07:09 PM
I went to my mother. who gave me this book called Letters To A Young Poet. Rainer Maria Rilke. He's a fabulous writer. A fellow

used to write to him and say: "I want to be a writer.

Please read my stuff." And Rilke says to this guy: "Don't ask me

about being a writer. lf. When you wake up in the morning.

you can think of nothing but writing... then you're a writer."

----Sister Act

Stacia Kane
01-26-2012, 08:25 PM
I went to my mother. who gave me this book called Letters To A Young Poet. Rainer Maria Rilke. He's a fabulous writer. A fellow

used to write to him and say: "I want to be a writer.

Please read my stuff." And Rilke says to this guy: "Don't ask me

about being a writer. lf. When you wake up in the morning.

you can think of nothing but writing... then you're a writer."

----Sister Act


Sweet, but I disagree. Being a writer means you write. Not you think about writing all the time, not you dream of writing all the time, but you actually do the work.

I certainly don't think of nothing but writing; there would never be groceries in my house if I did and my marriage would have dissolved ages ago. :) But I think I can safely call myself a writer at this point in my life, and that's because I write.

OtterFactory
01-26-2012, 08:34 PM
Actually, Rilke said to ask yourself "...must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple "I must", then build your life in accordance with this necessity..."

I think he agrees with Ms. Kane!

randi.lee
01-26-2012, 08:37 PM
Actually, Rilke said to ask yourself "...must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple "I must", then build your life in accordance with this necessity..."

I think he agrees with Ms. Kane!

:-)

Manuel Royal
01-26-2012, 09:13 PM
I love having written -- for a very short time after finishing a piece. And when I come across something I did years ago, read it, and find that it's not too bad, it feels good.

But, if I go more than a couple of days without getting new words down, I feel useless. It's only when I'm actually putting words down, adding to a story or starting a new one, working out the plot problems and finding the words -- that's the only time I feel like a writer, and feel worthwhile.

I guess we all live for those moments. For me, it's writing (with whatever mediocre talent I have), or one of the only two other natural abilities I have. Of those, writing takes the most mental effort, but in the long run is probably the most rewarding.

elindsen
01-26-2012, 09:14 PM
I do think that once you start writing, and I mean an amount and not 500 words or so, you do start fantasizing about being a writing. Everyone thinks their ideas and such are the BEST! BESTSELLER! Of course only the lucky few and celebs get that status. But we all daydream about the stranger who sees our book, reads an excerpt and just has to buy ASAP. We love when a stranger friends us on Facebook because of our work. It is okay to love the idea of being a writer, as long as you Are a writer :)

elindsen
01-26-2012, 09:17 PM
How's that novel you've been working on? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dNkf6uFZIs)
Not to correct you Toothpaste, but he did finish it. :) Any it was a flop. Sorry, I watch a lot of Family Guy lol.

Phaeal
01-26-2012, 10:00 PM
When you wake up in the morning, you can think of nothing but writing... then you're a writer.


When I wake up in the morning, I think:

1. What day is it? Do I have to go to work?

2. Is it really 7 am?

3. Why am I lying on this damn sharp-cornered book?

4. Nobody else better be in the bathroom.

5. And it better not be freaking snowing.

KaiaSonderby
01-26-2012, 10:02 PM
I keep seeing people say they love "having written." Surely I'm not the only one who loves writing. Having written is nice and all, but writing itself is the fun part.

Isn't it?

scarletpeaches
01-26-2012, 10:08 PM
The first thing I think of in the morning is "Oh fu..."

Then I do a "How long can I stay in bed and not be late?" calculation.

Dr.Gonzo
01-26-2012, 10:28 PM
Posing bastards. If I wanted to pose, I would not go into a bar with fingerguns and start trying to pick up chicks with lines like, 'Hey baby, guess how long my latest chapter is.' I've mixed with a few of that type. Talking in pubs about writerly bullshit. No one cares. No one wants to hear your plot points or your subtle little theme that you're so proud about you may just make yourself go blind by fapping yourself raw. If you're that enthused about it, go and write some more and leave the rest of us in the pubs to talk about something interesting.

Don't waste that energy on me. Go and write if you're a writer. I don't care about your shit while it's in your head. If it's good I'll read it when it's released.

Manuel Royal
01-27-2012, 12:25 AM
Not to correct you Toothpaste, but he did finish it. And it was a flop. Sorry, I watch a lot of Family Guy lol.Wasn't that novel called Faster Than the Speed of Love?

Manuel Royal
01-27-2012, 12:26 AM
Go and write if you're a writer. I don't care about your shit while it's in your head.Most of us need to hear that at some point.

Shadow_Ferret
01-27-2012, 03:35 AM
Loving the idea of being a writer vs loving writing itself.


I guess I don't understand what it means to love the idea of being a writer. I guess once I become a writer, then yes, I'll love the idea of being one. But until that time, I'm just a wannabe writer and I'm not loving the idea of being a wannabe.

And really, I don't love writing itself. I love having written.

The Lonely One
01-27-2012, 08:01 AM
It's pretty impractical to want to be a writer for the fame or money. For the idea of being a writer, sure, it's romantic to some.

Is it one or the other? I don't know that it is. I don't love the act of writing, not all the time. Rarely. But I usually find the finished product worth the work.

Luciamaria
01-27-2012, 11:00 AM
I love the idea of being a writer. I also love writing, and have been enthusiastically writing since childhood.

shayla.mist
01-27-2012, 01:21 PM
I love having written -- for a very short time after finishing a piece. And when I come across something I did years ago, read it, and find that it's not too bad, it feels good.

But, if I go more than a couple of days without getting new words down, I feel useless. It's only when I'm actually putting words down, adding to a story or starting a new one, working out the plot problems and finding the words -- that's the only time I feel like a writer, and feel worthwhile.

I guess we all live for those moments. For me, it's writing (with whatever mediocre talent I have), or one of the only two other natural abilities I have. Of those, writing takes the most mental effort, but in the long run is probably the most rewarding.



That's exactly how I feel. When I have writer's block I always dig in the pile of my old notebooks and read some unfinished piece that at that time I had considered crap and it immediately makes me feel so much better because I realize that , hey, I wasn't so bad after all, but I can also see how much I've improved Throughout the years and it makes me feel even better.
If I go a few days without writing, even though I do it by choice because I sometimes feel that I really need a break. It still makes me feel totally useless and angsty so, in the end, I give up on procrastinating and start working again.
When I go without writing because I don't have time for it or I'm away from home, but I crave to write, it's even more frustrating so I got into the habit of squeezing a notebook in my luggage every time I go on a trip.

On the other hand, I do think that i love the idea of being a writer more than I love writing. However I think that's normal for the majority of us. No writer, whether they're professional or amateur, enjoys those moments when you feel like strangling yourself because you can't figure out where your plot is going or those moments when you're so frustrated because you come home from work, dead tired and your conscience is eating at you to go sit down at your desk and write when all you want to do is sleep or surf the net or watch a nice comedy show. It's only normal to hate those moments.

Stacia Kane
01-27-2012, 04:35 PM
I keep seeing people say they love "having written." Surely I'm not the only one who loves writing. Having written is nice and all, but writing itself is the fun part.

Isn't it?

I always love "having written," but I usually love the actual writing, too. :) So no, you're not the only one.

scarletpeaches
01-27-2012, 04:44 PM
I love writing when I'm in the zone. Strictly speaking, I don't believe in the muse or writer's block. What I believe in is faking it 'til I make it. I make myself write until it becomes fun, and when I'm in the zone it stops being something I ought to do, and becomes something I want to. Those are the times writing, as well as having written, is a good thing.

zahra
01-28-2012, 12:01 AM
I love writing. Being a writer seems like a pain in the arse, though - promos and contracts and worrying about sales and all that bejammins. I still want to be published, don't get me wrong, but it seems like the fun is in writing the damn book.

DoomBunny
01-28-2012, 01:46 AM
I've been in the zone this week. I've only got a few hours I can use, after everyone has gone to bed. But I'm getting down a couple thousand words a night some nights, and the more I stay in the habit the better it is. I like having written, I like having produced something, but I love the act of writing, the time I spend actually doing it. Sometimes it feels like giving birth to a watermelon but I love it all the same.

Filigree
01-28-2012, 02:28 AM
Bingo, DoomBunny.

There is just something so *right* about those moments when the story is happening almost faster than you can type. When you've extrapolated the characters and their world so well they surprise you with a plot change that works better than you'd guessed. Right then, it's worth all the hassles of daily life, rejection, and faking enthusiasm for your work. It's like opening a tap. And the cool thing? That kind of inspiration can be trained. Maybe not to happen on cue, but to arrive more easily and stick around more often.

It is one of the best highs around, far more interesting than daydreams about fame and fortune.

Windcutter
02-09-2012, 12:28 AM
I guess that's what inspiration is. :) The zone.