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Christyp
01-22-2012, 09:19 AM
I've always said we have to have a form of multiple personality disorder, or even schitzophrenia to write a character well. Well, a couple of nights ago I sat down to work on the revisions I still haven't finished. As I typed away I suddenly realized another page had been opened and 900 words of a completely new story was being written. What? How the H-E-Double hockey sticks did that happen?

Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge? Now, obviously, I was somewhat aware of writing, but the new story was so far removed from the story I was working on, and I don't remember actually thinking about any new story ideas....maybe I should think about seeing my shrink. Lol

profen4
01-22-2012, 09:42 AM
As I typed away I suddenly realized another page had been opened and 900 words of a completely new story was being written. What? How the H-E-Double hockey sticks did that happen?

Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge?
do lot triumph ha noi (http://doxinh.com/danh-muc/thuong-hieu-do-lot/hang-triumph/) ao lot nu (http://doxinh.com.vn/danh-muc/do-lot-nu/ao-lot-nu/) do so sinh loai khac cho be (http://doxinh.vn/danh-muc/do-so-sinh-cho-be/do-so-sinh-khac/) vest cong so (http://trangbanbuon.com/danh-muc/thoi-trang-cong-so/vest-cong-so/) chan vay cong so (http://trangbanbuon.vn/danh-muc/thoi-trang-cong-so/chan-vay-cong-so/) chup anh cho be (http://roses.vn/studio/chup-anh-studio/chup-anh-cho-be/)
um ... nope ... *creeps over to foyer and locks doors*

BenPanced
01-22-2012, 10:03 AM
Concentration is a mental disorder?

Susan Littlefield
01-22-2012, 10:23 AM
Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge?

No.

jjdebenedictis
01-22-2012, 11:20 AM
No, but my brother--who was never a strong student--once put his head down on the desk during an exam and, as far as he could tell, fell asleep.

When the teacher called for everyone to hand in their tests, he lifted his head and found his exam completed.

The questions he remembered answering, he got wrong. The questions completed after he went to "sleep", he got right.

When he asked his teacher about it, she said he'd put his head down for a minute, then sat back up and finished his test, then put his head back down again until the end of the period.

Maybe something like this happened to you?

Drachen Jager
01-22-2012, 12:11 PM
Writers spend thousands of hours working on something which will in all likelihood be rejected several hundred times without chance of acceptance, and when that rejection is finalized, they turn around and begin the cycle anew.

You needed more proof of mental disorder than that?

backslashbaby
01-22-2012, 04:39 PM
I write fiction from a completely different part of my brain. I do; there's no other way to describe it :) And when I do math or similar tasks, I have to take a second to switch to that part of the ole noggin (and physically look up, usually).

I know I'm a kook, though. Are you just now learning this about yourself, too? :D :D

Cyia
01-22-2012, 05:15 PM
Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge?


You might want to read The Dark Half...

ChaosTitan
01-22-2012, 06:54 PM
When did imagination and creativity become a mental disorder?

<----confused

randi.lee
01-22-2012, 06:58 PM
I have an account on writing.com that I started in 2005 and have not touched since. Recently, on a whim, I decided to look at my portfolio; there are four poems/short stories in the portfolio that I do NOT remember writing!

Susan Littlefield
01-22-2012, 10:02 PM
And, to say that one's experience is proof that writers have a mental disorder is a pretty broad statement. ;)

People express their creativity and imagination in different ways. Some just get it out so fast that they swear others wrote it, and other get it out slow and conscious of every word and sentence structure.

Jamesaritchie
01-22-2012, 10:37 PM
I've always said we have to have a form of multiple personality disorder, or even schitzophrenia to write a character well. Well, a couple of nights ago I sat down to work on the revisions I still haven't finished. As I typed away I suddenly realized another page had been opened and 900 words of a completely new story was being written. What? How the H-E-Double hockey sticks did that happen?

Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge? Now, obviously, I was somewhat aware of writing, but the new story was so far removed from the story I was working on, and I don't remember actually thinking about any new story ideas....maybe I should think about seeing my shrink. Lol


Well, no. I don't have another personality. I'm in here all alone. I write other characters well because I know other people in real life, not because I make them up in my head.

kuwisdelu
01-22-2012, 10:42 PM
I thought everyone knew writers are crazy.

veinglory
01-22-2012, 10:55 PM
Imagination and dedication are mental function, not mental disorders.

Alitriona
01-22-2012, 10:59 PM
I'm another who finds writing I don't remember.

mscelina
01-22-2012, 11:01 PM
Let me see. What goes into creating a good book?

1. An idea.
2. The development of said idea into concentrated, well-organized plot line.
3. The writing of said idea using correct grammar, spelling and punctuation.
4. The development and execution of character arcs.
5. The creation of conflict, obstacle and resolution of conflict.
6. Research for any element that needs to be corroborated.
7. Rewriting the first draft.
8. Rewriting the second draft.'
9. Rewriting the third draft and so forth until a final polished manuscript is obtained.
10. Formatting manuscript.
11. Researching likely publishers/agents.
12. Submitting manuscript according to guidelines.
13. Rinse and repeat.

Writing isn't some kind of mental disorder, because I certainly believe that anyone who completes the above list--and I left a lot of little things out of that list--has to be mentally and emotionally stable to subject themselves to the laundry list of minutiae that we go through. Your story isn't "proof" that writers have anything; it's an anecdotal incident that occurred to one writer. That's just like saying that because I'm a writer, all other writers will have serious problems with their backs. Or that if Stephen King stubs his toe, we're all going to limp.

When I sit down to write, everything that happens is a serious, deliberate consideration of choices, preferences, and fact. I certainly don't close my eyes and let my alternate personality take over.

I only do THAT when I'm editing.

kuwisdelu
01-22-2012, 11:07 PM
has to be mentally and emotionally stable to subject themselves to the laundry list of minutiae that we go through.

I'm still allowed to be mentally and emotionally unstable when I do the actual writing, though, right?

mscelina
01-22-2012, 11:21 PM
Sure, kuwi. If you want to be. I object to the equation of the creative process to a mental disorder for a number of reasons. Mainly? Because WRITING isn't a DISEASE. It's a process. For some of us it's a job. And there's certainly no proof offered--as per the OP and title of this thread--that writing is a form of mental disease.

The main reason I object to this is because too many writers give up responsibility for their work. If they can't write, it's the fault of the muse. If they can't write a particular kind of story, it's the fault of their particular voice. As writers, we need to be absolutely, 100% involved and committed to what we write. We don't have some sort of mystical visitation where some personality clad in tweeds pushes our consciousness out of the way and *poof!* creates a story for us!

And to condone that type of thinking is, to my mind, unfair to young writers who are now going to sit at their desks with their eyes closed and wait for their stories to write themselves.

swvaughn
01-23-2012, 12:40 AM
if Stephen King stubs his toe, we're all going to limp.

I'm thinking this right here could be a jump-off point for a really cool story... :D

mscelina
01-23-2012, 12:45 AM
Hmmm....maybe I should trademark that comment then...

swvaughn
01-23-2012, 12:48 AM
Curses! Foiled again. :tongue

Christyp
01-23-2012, 01:11 AM
Let me see. What goes into creating a good book?

1. An idea.
2. The development of said idea into concentrated, well-organized plot line.
3. The writing of said idea using correct grammar, spelling and punctuation.
4. The development and execution of character arcs.
5. The creation of conflict, obstacle and resolution of conflict.
6. Research for any element that needs to be corroborated.
7. Rewriting the first draft.
8. Rewriting the second draft.'
9. Rewriting the third draft and so forth until a final polished manuscript is obtained.
10. Formatting manuscript.
11. Researching likely publishers/agents.
12. Submitting manuscript according to guidelines.
13. Rinse and repeat.

Writing isn't some kind of mental disorder, because I certainly believe that anyone who completes the above list--and I left a lot of little things out of that list--has to be mentally and emotionally stable to subject themselves to the laundry list of minutiae that we go through. Your story isn't "proof" that writers have anything; it's an anecdotal incident that occurred to one writer. That's just like saying that because I'm a writer, all other writers will have serious problems with their backs. Or that if Stephen King stubs his toe, we're all going to limp.

When I sit down to write, everything that happens is a serious, deliberate consideration of choices, preferences, and fact. I certainly don't close my eyes and let my alternate personality take over.

I only do THAT when I'm editing.

Okay, obviously what I said was very tongue in cheek. I'm a writer/homemaker/crafter, not a psychiatrist. I just tease my family when they tell me how crazy I sound when I talking about my characters as if they were real, saying all writers have a form of multiple personality disorder.

If I offended anyone with my late written anecdote...no, actually I don't apologize. It was meant in fun...

Christyp
01-23-2012, 01:14 AM
Sure, kuwi. If you want to be. I object to the equation of the creative process to a mental disorder for a number of reasons. Mainly? Because WRITING isn't a DISEASE. It's a process. For some of us it's a job. And there's certainly no proof offered--as per the OP and title of this thread--that writing is a form of mental disease.

The main reason I object to this is because too many writers give up responsibility for their work. If they can't write, it's the fault of the muse. If they can't write a particular kind of story, it's the fault of their particular voice. As writers, we need to be absolutely, 100% involved and committed to what we write. We don't have some sort of mystical visitation where some personality clad in tweeds pushes our consciousness out of the way and *poof!* creates a story for us!

And to condone that type of thinking is, to my mind, unfair to young writers who are now going to sit at their desks with their eyes closed and wait for their stories to write themselves.

I got to say, if writing ever becomes this technical, planned out, and...well, boring, I will most definitely stop. I love the fact that for a few hours I become a completely different person, or how vividly I can see the scenes in my head. I love how when I'm really in the writing mode I can actually hear the tone of the characters voice.

Again, I say, if you really thought I was coming in as some kind of psychiatrist you obviously didn't read the post closely. Sounds like you skimmed through it.

happywritermom
01-23-2012, 01:43 AM
I believe the OP was simply venting in a very tongue-in-cheek way.

I'm suprised some took it so seriously.

I'm more surprised no one took offense to the light treatment of mental disorders. Now, there's something to be mad about! what's wrong you people? Geez!

(Sorry, Christy! I don't mean to send more grief your way and I hope no one does jump on that, but I really am amazed that if there are to be negative reactions, these are the reactions you got.)

Kitty27
01-23-2012, 01:46 AM
I understand,OP.

When we are doing the basic meat of writing,yes,we are quite sane. But to come up with wild stories,characters,and most of the stuff we write,I firmly believe that there is a bit of the kooky afoot

Well with me,there is. A LOT of kooky. I have been nutty for a long time!

Polenth
01-23-2012, 03:09 AM
I'm more surprised no one took offense to the light treatment of mental disorders.

The mental disorders bit bothered me when the thread started (it had no replies at the time). But commenting on that usually gets a response that boils down to: "It was a joke and I found it funny. I don't care if it hurt you, made you cry or otherwise upset you. I found it funny, and that's the most important thing. Your feelings aren't important."

So it's not a surprise if people decide they'd rather just go be sad about it somewhere quietly.

But I would ask when someone tells a joke to consider why. Is it to make other people laugh? Because if it is, and the target walks away looking unhappy, something went wrong. Sometimes it's nice to ask "What's wrong?" rather than say, "Lighten up! Get a sense of humour."

happywritermom
01-23-2012, 03:21 AM
I come from a family full of mentally disordered people all of whom have some incredible gifts. One of my children has some issues as well.

Yet, still, I find myself saying things like, "This is driving me crazy" or "You're nuts" or "Are you insane". They find themselves using the same vocabulary.
It's a tough one.
I am not bothered by comments like the OP's. Heck, maybe it is a mental disorder. Maybe she unknowingly writes from a different persona.
You never know.
I am bother by comments that show a dangerous lack of compassion and understanding for mental illness, like those who insinuate that all bipolars are potentially violent, or those who think OCD is a neatness thing.
Those people need a serious education.

KellyAssauer
01-23-2012, 03:21 AM
Or that if Stephen King stubs his toe, we're all going to limp.

*wistfully unloads revolver*

.
.
.:sarcasm

Susan Littlefield
01-23-2012, 04:19 AM
*wistfully unloads revolver*

Oh dear, Kelly, you promised not to do that anymore...:D

KellyAssauer
01-23-2012, 05:08 AM
In all honesty, I have written things that I've forgotten about. I woke up once and found six pages in my journal and have no memory of writing them. However, I write all the time, anywhere, everywhere. Someday's it's all I can do to keep up with the ideas. Other days it's single-track mind on accomplishing a goal, and even then odd little notes surface from that. So, with so many ideas and scenes, I can see where it might be somewhat easy to loose track of a few. Does it mean I'm a little off? I don't know. I can't say. I'm not a psychologist. In my case, however, it might be a little like asking which came first, the chicken or egg...

bearilou
01-23-2012, 04:38 PM
I am bother by comments that show a dangerous lack of compassion and understanding for mental illness, like those who insinuate that all bipolars are potentially violent, or those who think OCD is a neatness thing.
Those people need a serious education.

I guess this is why the op's original statement bothered me. It's the cavalier 'ohoh tee heee aren't we writers all just a CRAAAAZY bunch of people to talk to the imaginary people in our heads. we're just mentally deficient to do this to ourselves every day teehee teehee' attitude that contributes to the misunderstandings about true mental illnesses.

Yeah, it can be argued that we're all writers here and should know it's not serious...

...except I have witnessed conversations on this very board that indicated that many writers (especially young ones) that make it sound as if this very kind of thing is some badge of honor. It is still a harmful attitude for those who truly suffer from illnesses, to use it like a coat that can be taken on and off at whim because 'TOTALLY NOT SRS GAIZ'.

People who do not write witness these discussions and I wonder what sort of image they come away with of writers. Do they now not value our creativity? Do they now look at what we do and place a lower value upon our hard work? It's this kind of thing that makes me wonder if it's why so many don't understand this job/pursuit that we do called writing.


But I would ask when someone tells a joke to consider why. Is it to make other people laugh? Because if it is, and the target walks away looking unhappy, something went wrong. Sometimes it's nice to ask "What's wrong?" rather than say, "Lighten up! Get a sense of humour."

Agreed. And I can't imagine that saying 'lighten up and get a sense of humor' is in any way helpful or shows any degree of compassion for anyone if they actually do come away from a 'joke' not laughing. It certainly shows a certain lack of empathy for others and comes across as defensive on the teller's part (or for those who laughed and then realized that not everyone in the room is laughing with them).

KTC
01-23-2012, 04:52 PM
I have a mental disorder.

crunchyblanket
01-23-2012, 06:05 PM
Agreed. And I can't imagine that saying 'lighten up and get a sense of humor' is in any way helpful or shows any degree of compassion for anyone if they actually do come away from a 'joke' not laughing.

And perhaps more than that, implies that it's the fault of the offended person if they're hurt or put out by a 'joke'.

Literateparakeet
01-23-2012, 06:40 PM
As I typed away I suddenly realized another page had been opened and 900 words of a completely new story was being written. . .
Do you find sometimes your other personality takes over and starts writing without your knowledge?

Though I realize Christy was joking, there is an element of truth here, as is often the case in humor.

Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) has been renamed as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID).

Dissociation is something we all do. How much we dissociate can vary to a great degree. If you think of a spectrum, daydreaming, highway hypnosis (things everyone does) are at one end of the spectrum, and DID is at the other end of the spectrum, with many shades and variations in between. Even persons with DID (and it is much more common than most people realize), can differ widely in the severity the dissociation.

So, actually what Christy experienced was a form of dissociation. Whether that puts her on the disorder end of the spectrum would depend on how frequently it happens and if it disrupts her normal life, etc. For most people (probably Christy too) the answer to that would be no.

DID is really NOT like what you see portrayed in television and the movies. Robert Oxnam, a world renowned expert on China has DID. He wrote a memoir about it called, A Fractured Mind. His business associates had no idea that he had this disorder. Some people with DID can even hide it from their spouses and children.

My final point and then I will step down and let the next speaker use the soap box...DID is generally caused by severe childhood abuse.

Taylor V
01-23-2012, 08:43 PM
Regarding the OP, it could actually be possible (though unlikely) that she wrote it in her sleep. Some people who talk in their sleep can actually have normal (if strange) conversations they don't remember, and sleepwalkers can perform surprisingly complex tasks. I think that some sleep medications can make this more likely (the FDA's linked Ambien to sleep-driving for example).

Creative_Solitude
01-23-2012, 08:56 PM
I do admit that sometimes I go back and look at some of the writing I've done, both recently and in the past, and am floored that I even wrote certain phrases, paragraphs etc. I scratch my head thinking, geez, I wrote that, and have little to no recollection of it. But nothing to the degree the original poster is talking about.

A lot of the times it's some of the better stuff I've written too. I could be because I'm getting older and my memory is starting to fail...certainly hope not!

backslashbaby
01-23-2012, 11:04 PM
Imho, there's not always a huge wall between sad crazy and funny crazy. There's no need to make mental disorder more stigmatized than it is, so the wall is unnecessary.

Yes, the OP was kinda crazy. I have been much crazier, and it was very sad, because it was that crazy. Unless it gets to a distressing point, I'm going to laugh while I can nowadays :D

OTOH, if you find yourself losing a lot of time or if it gets distressing, do go see someone, OP :) Really. Literateparakeet makes a lot of sense above. I used to have PTSD, so I get what s/he's saying, for sure.

Theo81
01-24-2012, 12:21 AM
And perhaps more than that, implies that it's the fault of the offended person if they're hurt or put out by a 'joke'.

This, plus what Bearilou, Mscelina and Polenth said.

Yeah, I get the OP was joking. I don't think it was funny and I don't think it was true. I would have said what that lot said.

Just, put a bit of thought in, 'k? You don't need DID or Schizophrenia to write a convincing character, you need the compassion and empathy to understand those conditions and what it's like for those affected (not just those with, those who have to watch the people they love destroyed by them.).

elindsen
01-24-2012, 12:51 AM
I'm also confused. It isn't a mental disorder. It's called passion and devotion

KellyAssauer
01-24-2012, 04:38 AM
Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) has been renamed as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID).

... Even persons with DID (and it is much more common than most people realize), can differ widely in the severity the dissociation.

...DID is generally caused by severe childhood abuse.

DID is a redefinition of several of the aspects of what the DSM previously classified as MPD. However... there was considerable debate about it's inclusion, as there was debate about MPD.

In some circles either of these classifications have been called the "American" disease because of fact that reported cases of MPD/DID outside of the U.S. are very, very rare.

Documented DID cases in the U.S. (although the number has gone up since the reclassification) are not 'common'. And DID is generally -believed to be- caused by severe childhood abuse, but is not limited to that as it's only factor.

All that aside... there are a host of other scenarios -real and imagined- which might cause one to write a piece and not immediately recall having done so... some of which I'm sure rules out needing to see a psychologist!

and besides, I already knows I'm crazy. ;)

kuwisdelu
01-24-2012, 04:44 AM
You definitely don't need to have DID to have a dissociative experience, and there are more dissociative disorders than DID.

Literateparakeet
01-24-2012, 12:57 PM
DID is a redefinition of several of the aspects of what the DSM previously classified as MPD. However... there was considerable debate about it's inclusion, as there was debate about MPD.

Yes, 'tis true. There is also considerable debate about whether or not there is a God and if so what He or She is like...there always will be. The fact that someone disagrees with you doesn't make YOU the one who is wrong. :)

Until there are scientific methods to prove DID (if ever there are), people will debate the issue.


In some circles either of these classifications have been called the "American" disease because of fact that reported cases of MPD/DID outside of the U.S. are very, very rare.

I don't know what your definition of 'very rare' is, but it has been reported in several other countries.

http://www.sidran.org/sub.cfm?contentID=105&sectionid=4

http://www.pods-online.org.uk/stats-did.html


Documented DID cases in the U.S. (although the number has gone up since the reclassification) are not 'common'.

I didn't say it is "common"; I said it is more common than people realize. And it is. Here is a quote from the Sidran Institute:



Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) (known in the past as Multiple Personality Disorder-MPD) and other Dissociative Disorders are now understood to be fairly common effects of severe trauma in early childhood. http://www.sidran.org/sub.cfm?contentID=75&sectionid=4


And DID is generally -believed to be- caused by severe childhood abuse, but is not limited to that as it's only factor.

I agree. That is why I was careful to say "generally caused". However, the percentage is high. Again from Sidran:



As many as 99% of people who develop Dissociative Disorders have documented histories of repetitive, overwhelming, and often life-threatening trauma at a sensitive developmental stage of childhood (usually before the age of nine). http://www.sidran.org/sub.cfm?contentID=75&sectionid=4



You definitely don't need to have DID to have a dissociative experience, and there are more dissociative disorders than DID.

I know. I mentioned DID specifically because the OP mentioned other personalities. Notice I said that Dissociation happens on a spectrum with DID being at one end, daydreaming on the other end, which leaves many possiblities inbetween.

Archerbird
01-24-2012, 01:27 PM
The mental disorders bit bothered me when the thread started (it had no replies at the time). But commenting on that usually gets a response that boils down to: "It was a joke and I found it funny. I don't care if it hurt you, made you cry or otherwise upset you. I found it funny, and that's the most important thing. Your feelings aren't important."





Agreed. And I can't imagine that saying 'lighten up and get a sense of humor' is in any way helpful or shows any degree of compassion for anyone if they actually do come away from a 'joke' not laughing. It certainly shows a certain lack of empathy for others and comes across as defensive on the teller's part (or for those who laughed and then realized that not everyone in the room is laughing with them).

It's not that I don't agree, it's that I think the motivation of the joke should be taken into consideration.

There's a huge difference between ridiculing someone and call it a "joke" when someone gets offended, and making an actual joke. Sometimes people just don't have that sense of humour, and I don't think it's fair that someone should have to apologize for making a joke when that joke includes the joker themselves.

Like someone else in the thread said, I'm surprised people took this so seriously.

Just MHO.

Theo81
01-24-2012, 01:40 PM
Archerbird, a joke was made. Several people have said it is inappropriate, offensive and perpetuates negative stigmatisation of a serious range of conditions.

At the moment, you post advocates "getting a sense of humour" over raising the OPs conciousness of this issue.

Is this actually what you mean to do?

Archerbird
01-24-2012, 01:44 PM
Archerbird, a joke was made. Several people have said it is inappropriate, offensive and perpetuates negative stigmatisation of a serious range of conditions.

At the moment, you post advocates "getting a sense of humour" over raising the OPs conciousness of this issue.

Is this actually what you mean to do?

No, it wasn't, and no, I don't think it does (I wouldn't have if someone else had written it either, but that is my opinion).

And just to be clear, I don't think the OP was funny either.

Susan Littlefield
01-24-2012, 07:58 PM
I did not think the OP's joke was funny either, but I also don't believe there was any ill will intended. We all have done that unconscious joking before. I think this is a good thread that people are voicing their truths.

Also, there have been many serious discussions at AW about writers having mental disabilities, as if a disability is a prerequisite to be a writer. So, when I saw this thread, I thought, "Oh no, not another thread about...."

Someone else said it best- just because someone has an experience of disassociation during a writing session (or any other time) does not point to a mental disability. Maybe it simply means that the writer landed in a zone of unleashed creativity and word empowerment. :D

Christyp
01-24-2012, 09:26 PM
Okay, I don't know how to quote several posts, so I'm going to try to answer as many complaints/concerns/extremely interesting points as possible.

Yes, it was said tongue in cheek. No, I am in no way undermining true mental disorders. I am clinically depressed and have been since childhood, and take meds to control both that and my severe anxiety. I have three adopted children, one of whom as mental retardation, one of whom was born with FAS. Do you think I take these disorders as hilarious? Really? But, I'm not going to go around and wag my finger at every person who calls someone retarded, or a retard, nor making light about short yellow bus. (Yes, I have seen those used on this board.)

What interested me through this conversation, however, is a few people actually nailed it on the head. I was completely unaware of writing it, nor the ideas that flowed onto the page. I was in the middle of revisions for a publisher, so obviously I was in deep concentration. I find it very interesting that I may have been asleep, or even experienced DID. (I have cleaned in the past, or rearranged things without remembering doing it). While I didn't experience severe child abuse, I did experience watching my mother abused by my alcoholic father, and later was abused by an alcoholic husband. Perhaps this triggered the instances of DID? I can say I've never felt my life was interrupted by any of these instances, rather I've found I was quite productive in these short instances.

Okay, did I address everything? Anyone else have any questions? I've been on this board long enough for some of you to realize I am compassionate to a fault (I get sick to my stomach and suffer "heartbreak syndrome" when someone else is in pain. Yeah, I'm kind of a mess, but a rock star mess!).

Again, any more questions or concerns about my posting this conversation?

Jonathan Figaro
01-24-2012, 09:34 PM
I just desire to achieve greatness. That is all. If that's a mental disorder than I'm clinically insane and out of my membrane!

backslashbaby
01-24-2012, 09:36 PM
I have very, very strange abilities when asleep. Not unheard of, just not common at all. I do wonder sometimes if that is related to the dissociation issues I've had in my mental health history.

I don't know. But suffice it to say, if I lie my butt of to you in my sleep, you'll call it kooky and laugh as hard as I do, I hope :D

[The way we work around it is I have to do hard math problems, because those wake me up. Otherwise, I really may be asleep and talking 'normally' on the phone, yeah!] Dunno. Odd stuff doesn't surprise me much, really.

Christyp
01-24-2012, 09:39 PM
I have very, very strange abilities when asleep. Not unheard of, just not common at all. I do wonder sometimes if that is related to the dissociation issues I've had in my mental health history.

I don't know. But suffice it to say, if I lie my butt of to you in my sleep, you'll call it kooky and laugh as hard as I do, I hope :D

[The way we work around it is I have to do hard math problems, because those wake me up. Otherwise, I really may be asleep and talking 'normally' on the phone, yeah!] Dunno. Odd stuff doesn't surprise me much, really.

My mom actually has some of the best ideas, creatively and otherwise, in her sleep. She'll call me half-asleep to tell me, then call the next morning to add to it. Maybe it's hereditary.

I constantly laugh at my oddities. If I took everything so seriously, I'd end up suicidal again. Humor has saved my life and made everything seem so much more fun and beautiful!

Literateparakeet
01-24-2012, 10:05 PM
Humor has saved my life and made everything seem so much more fun and beautiful!

Humor has been a valuable coping skill for me too!

Phaeal
01-24-2012, 10:42 PM
I'm at my sanest when I write.

If anyone insinuates that this isn't saying much, I'll send Six after him. Because Six is really really real, really.

Christyp
01-24-2012, 10:47 PM
I'm at my sanest when I write.

If anyone insinuates that this isn't saying much, I'll send Six after him. Because Six is really really real, really.

That you would send Six says a lot about our relationship!

Diana_Rajchel
01-24-2012, 10:57 PM
Stuff like this often makes me wonder if many writers just want to have a disorder/disease. You're already a writer, so you've had your serving of special snowflake. Now take those histrionics and wrestle them on the page where they belong. You can have chocolate and a bubble bath after.

MJNL
01-24-2012, 11:00 PM
Sorry, further derail--

I also use humor as a coping mechanism. I've had two grandparents die from Alzheimer’s, and I have one left who is living with it. Sometimes you have to laugh at the things that happen to them, or the things they do, otherwise you'd just cry. Using humor to look at major problems isn't always done by people who are insensitive or don't understand the real issue. Sometimes it's used by people who are incredibly familiar and embroiled in the issue. It can be a way to take a very tragic event and turn it into a good memory.

End derail.

RemusShepherd
01-24-2012, 11:18 PM
I've always said we have to have a form of multiple personality disorder, or even schitzophrenia to write a character well. Well, a couple of nights ago I sat down to work on the revisions I still haven't finished. As I typed away I suddenly realized another page had been opened and 900 words of a completely new story was being written. What? How the H-E-Double hockey sticks did that happen?

What you're describing is a dissociative fugue. That could be a mental disorder, but if so it's a very mild one. More likely, you just have the ability to focus very, very strongly and shut out all distractions. You're Zen, not Cuckoo. :)

I *have* mental disorders, and I even have a nice letter from the FBI detailing what they are. They're not fun in general and they don't help me write. Writing, if anything, promotes sanity, as a writer has to be able to go to the edge with a character, while formulating a logical plot and simultaneously making sense of the world around them, and then come back. Anyone who can do that over and over again is unlikely to lose their sanity. (But very likely to become eccentric. Nothing wrong with that.)

Christyp
01-24-2012, 11:23 PM
What you're describing is a dissociative fugue. That could be a mental disorder, but if so it's a very mild one. More likely, you just have the ability to focus very, very strongly and shut out all distractions. You're Zen, not Cuckoo. :)

I *have* mental disorders, and I even have a nice letter from the FBI detailing what they are. They're not fun in general and they don't help me write. Writing, if anything, promotes sanity, as a writer has to be able to go to the edge with a character, while formulating a logical plot and simultaneously making sense of the world around them, and then come back. Anyone who can do that over and over again is unlikely to lose their sanity. (But very likely to become eccentric. Nothing wrong with that.)

I wonder, then, if we can do this on purpose. I've tried to become hyper focused before to no avail. Yet, when I was super focused on revisions, I discover this other story being written. If only I could figure out how to tap it on purpose!

RemusShepherd
01-24-2012, 11:44 PM
I wonder, then, if we can do this on purpose. I've tried to become hyper focused before to no avail. Yet, when I was super focused on revisions, I discover this other story being written. If only I could figure out how to tap it on purpose!

Intentionally Going into a Zen state might take a lifetime of training, grasshopper. I can't do it myself. But if you figure it out, please give all of us tips. :)

If you really want to explore this ability, you might study meditation. I don't know what other advice to give you. Remember that I'm cuckoo, not Zen.

Gaslight
01-25-2012, 01:13 AM
@Drachen Jager: couldn't agree more! I found your post very healing.

Atlantis
01-25-2012, 08:56 AM
There's a qoute somewhere that says writing is the only socially acceptable mental illness. It's true. Think about it we spend a lot of time in isolation entertaining ourselves with the thoughts and images in our heads. The only difference is we know the people in our head are not real :)

backslashbaby
01-25-2012, 08:40 PM
Stuff like this often makes me wonder if many writers just want to have a disorder/disease. You're already a writer, so you've had your serving of special snowflake. Now take those histrionics and wrestle them on the page where they belong. You can have chocolate and a bubble bath after.

Did you read the whole thread?

Ah, well, Christy, if you ever do figure out how to harness it, let me know. The best utility I can think of for my odd altered states abilities is a lounge act, maybe ;)

At least I no longer get up and eat all the chocolate in the house in my sleep. That's progress! And cheaper, too.

Perks
01-25-2012, 08:42 PM
At least I no longer get up and eat all the chocolate in the house in my sleep. That's progress! And cheaper, too.Do you still scream at the ceiling in your sleep, though? Conquer that hurdle and I'll room with you again. ;)

backslashbaby
01-25-2012, 09:15 PM
Do you still scream at the ceiling in your sleep, though? Conquer that hurdle and I'll room with you again. ;)

:ROFL: I'm sure I do on occasion! And I'm so glad you have nerves of steel cos that had to be a weird night on your side of things :ROFL:

But I'm not an axe murderer, so I didn't lie. Just a Banshee, apparently :D

Perks
01-25-2012, 09:25 PM
:ROFL: I'm sure I do on occasion! And I'm so glad you have nerves of steel cos that had to be a weird night on your side of things :ROFL:

And yet, I still love you.

backslashbaby
01-25-2012, 09:43 PM
:) I love you, too! And I'm very glad I didn't really give you a heart attack. That would have sucked :ROFL:

Perks
01-25-2012, 09:54 PM
:) I love you, too! And I'm very glad I didn't really give you a heart attack. That would have sucked :ROFL:Well, you did, but I just channeled that energy/damage into my writing. Now I have a character who randomly screams in her sleep. She gets killed in chapter three in a freak soundwave-bouncing-off-the-light-fixture accident. It's like 'To Kill A Mockingbird' meets 'Final Destination'.

Christyp
01-25-2012, 11:43 PM
Well, you did, but I just channeled that energy/damage into my writing. Now I have a character who randomly screams in her sleep. She gets killed in chapter three in a freak soundwave-bouncing-off-the-light-fixture accident. It's like 'To Kill A Mockingbird' meets 'Final Destination'.

Remind me to splurge on a room of my own at the next conference! I have no urge to wake up swinging...oh wait, I already to that in my sleep. My hubby's learned to sleep with a pillow between us.

backslashbaby
01-26-2012, 05:37 AM
We could room together, Christy! I bet I could totally take you in my sleep :ROFL: That, or I'd shriek, then offer you chocolates, I guess :D

bettielee
01-26-2012, 05:42 AM
I have an account on writing.com that I started in 2005 and have not touched since. Recently, on a whim, I decided to look at my portfolio; there are four poems/short stories in the portfolio that I do NOT remember writing!

This happens to me and freaks me out.

I can understand forgetting the words of a poem you wrote,but to forget the act of creation, the impetus behind a whole poem? and the one I found that I lost was like 42 lines!! It was good. I like when that happens.

bettielee
01-26-2012, 05:43 AM
Do you still scream at the ceiling in your sleep, though? Conquer that hurdle and I'll room with you again. ;)

total off topic - I had a room mate who used to shout in her sleep.

scared the HELL out of me.

Eli Hinze
01-26-2012, 06:01 AM
Writers spend thousands of hours working on something which will in all likelihood be rejected several hundred times without chance of acceptance, and when that rejection is finalized, they turn around and begin the cycle anew.

You needed more proof of mental disorder than that?


I can't really think of any better way to state it. That's some hardcore proof for you.

Susan Littlefield
01-26-2012, 06:19 AM
My cousin used to have night terrors and call 911 in her sleep. Yes, literally call 911. They would arrive and she would not remember calling them. She has not done this in years, but I'm sure it was scary for her.

backslashbaby
01-26-2012, 10:49 PM
My cousin used to have night terrors and call 911 in her sleep. Yes, literally call 911. They would arrive and she would not remember calling them. She has not done this in years, but I'm sure it was scary for her.

OMG! This, I've never thought of! Fortunately, I really just pick up the phone when it's ringing, so I don't actually dial out. Wow!

Christyp
01-26-2012, 11:27 PM
My cousin used to have night terrors and call 911 in her sleep. Yes, literally call 911. They would arrive and she would not remember calling them. She has not done this in years, but I'm sure it was scary for her.

How scary! The worst I've done is swinging on my husband, held full conversations, gotten out of bed to write ideas on my dry erase board (they never make sense), and yelling at my brothers or kids. Luckily, I don't think I've ever actually dialed out, just answered the phone.

I really don't think I was asleep when I wrote that piece, but I can't figure out what else it could be (other than what someone else suggest, the DID). Either way, what I wrote wasn't all that bad!

Susan Littlefield
01-27-2012, 12:52 AM
People sleep walk, so why can't they do other things while asleep? That would explain doing something and not remembering it. :)

Dr.Gonzo
01-27-2012, 01:05 AM
I had the place to myself the other day. Kind of. I looked at the clock and realised I'd been talking to myself for about an hour. Not about killing or anything.