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Perks
01-11-2012, 05:32 PM
Holy hell.

I know language changes and that vernacular and slang grow all sorts of odd little mushrooms, but "inbox me" for "send me an email" or "send me a private message" just hurts my mind's ear.

Damn you, Facebook.

aruna
01-11-2012, 05:36 PM
ouch.

aadams73
01-11-2012, 06:21 PM
Ha! Someone said this to me just last week. I wanted to cry (and also hit them with a large, blunt object).

DeleyanLee
01-11-2012, 06:26 PM
Someone said that to me at my last job.

I asked if I should seal the box I'd be mailing them in and if they'd like breathing holes.

There are times when being a very literal Aspie is great fun. :D

Susan Littlefield
01-11-2012, 07:34 PM
Holy hell.

I know language changes and that vernacular and slang grow all sorts of odd little mushrooms, but "inbox me" for "send me an email" or "send me a private message" just hurts my mind's ear.

Damn you, Facebook.

I don't like it easier. I have images of putting people in boxes.

Stew21
01-11-2012, 07:54 PM
no one's ever said that to me. I hope no one ever does. uck.

Snowstorm
01-11-2012, 08:18 PM
Ick. Either slang is out of control or people are just getting too lazy. Or both.

regdog
01-11-2012, 09:04 PM
The gods of grammar weep bitter tears.

smoothseas
01-11-2012, 09:07 PM
The gods of grammar weep bitter tears.


qtf

scarletpeaches
01-11-2012, 10:08 PM
I say 'hole' a lot. "Cram it up my emailhole." Does this make me a bad person?

TamaraLynne
01-11-2012, 10:11 PM
I say 'hole' a lot. "Cram it up my emailhole." Does this make me a bad person?


yes...very bad :) I bet that opens doors to witty comments or looks :)

mirandashell
01-11-2012, 10:48 PM
When someone says something like that to me, I say, 'scuse me?'
They say it again.
I say 'What?'
They say what they actually mean in correct English.

Works a treat.

Flowerfairy
01-12-2012, 12:19 AM
One of my girlfriends say that's internet language for the quick minds. Boy! I need no extra NOS for my mind. Freak me out with clumsy lines, you get a simply question tag.

JoeEkaitis
01-12-2012, 12:33 AM
Would you feel better if I gifted you some chocolate?

(Which makes as much sense as saying "The waiter desserted us classic New York-style cheesecake.")

Medievalist
01-12-2012, 12:33 AM
Hey, I'm still struggling with people who want to "touch base" with me.

jjdebenedictis
01-12-2012, 01:02 AM
"Inbox me."
"What?"
"Email me."
"Oh; okay."

Language is supposed to communicate. The phrase "inbox me" fails to.

These Mean Streets
01-12-2012, 01:06 AM
I have no problem with it. But then again, I also end every sentence with "yo".

For real, yo.

Rise2theTop
01-12-2012, 01:19 AM
Sounds kinda naughty to me.....

BeatrixKiddo
01-12-2012, 02:19 AM
I say 'hole' a lot. "Cram it up my emailhole." Does this make me a bad person?

:ROFL:


Sounds kinda naughty to me.....


Exactly.

Silver King
01-12-2012, 04:33 AM
Sounds kinda naughty to me.....
"Outbox me" sounds even naughtier.

Cliff Face
01-12-2012, 10:10 AM
"Inbox me like the dirty font I am!" *slaps keyboard*

*gets banned*

Mac H.
01-12-2012, 11:01 AM
"Ship it to me" = "Put it on a ship and send it to me"

"Message me" = "Send me a message"

"SMS me" = "Send me a message via the SMS system"

"Inbox me" = "Put something in my inbox"

"Bin it" = "Put it in the bin"

"Plate the food" = "Put the food on a plate"

I think why "Inbox me" sounds so odd is that it is jumping two steps - it is the only example I could think of where it left out the subject (the message) by combining it with the destination (the inbox). Maybe 'Pint me' for 'Fill my Pint glass up with some beer'?

In a bizarrely complicated language like English there must be accepted examples. I just can't think of them.

Mac

Cliff Face
01-12-2012, 11:22 AM
I've never heard "Plate the food"... That sounds like someone has some food, and they're about to hit it with a plate, or at least put the plate on top of it...

Or, and I think I prefer this one, "Nickel-Cadmium Plate the food."

It might not be edible, but it'd be worth more. ;)

Wayne K
01-12-2012, 12:10 PM
:popcorn:

poetinahat
01-12-2012, 12:16 PM
It seems that the world is in a mad stampede to coin new phrases or co-opt them - it's like the Great Land Rush of language. J-Lo, A-Rod, Brangelina, "inbox me", "24-7", "let's do <lunch, etc.>" - TV shows, films, so often it's painfully clear - and just painful - to see scripts fashioned around establishing some catchphrase. And we get a cavalcade of contrived cachet.

But the thing is: an epithet is only catchy and endearing if it's bestowed personally. All this contrived slang just seems so, well, contrived.

So says the guy with nearly 19,000 AW posts. *sigh*

Cliff Face
01-12-2012, 12:32 PM
We need some AW slang.

Like... Well, I don't know. I'm no good at inventing new words or phrases.

"I R riter wiv gud grammers and speling." (I stole that from other AWers. See? I'm a hack! A hack I tell you!!)

poetinahat
01-12-2012, 03:58 PM
Hark... what's that? It's the sound of... someone... VOLUNTEERING!

Cliff, you're so public-spirited to take on this project!

JoeEkaitis
01-12-2012, 09:57 PM
"How <blank> is that?" as in:

"How cool is that?"
"How tasty is that?"
"How wonderful is that?"

I don't know! What are you asking me for?!

rhymegirl
01-12-2012, 11:33 PM
I sometimes say, "Send me an e," when I want someone to send me an email.

*slinks off into the sunset*

Jcomp
01-13-2012, 12:33 AM
I've never heard this before. How peculiar. The strange thing about "inbox me" is that "email me" works just as well and was already in use. Same syllable and letter count and everything. "email" is even easier to type.

If it's supposed to be new, online "slang," it's awful. It doesn't shorten the term, it isn't catchy or cute. It's an abomination and all who use it should be wiped clean from the face of existence!

WriteMinded
01-13-2012, 12:52 AM
Oh. When I saw the title of the thread, I thought you were asking us to email you. I came here to get your address. :)

Perks
01-13-2012, 03:29 AM
Oh. When I saw the title of the thread, I thought you were asking us to email you. I came here to get your address. :)
Do it, then. I'm waiting. *foot tapping*

Perks
01-13-2012, 03:30 AM
If it's supposed to be new, online "slang," it's awful. It doesn't shorten the term, it isn't catchy or cute. It's an abomination and all who use it should be wiped clean from the face of existence!Every time I ask you to marry me, you say 'no'. I'm gonna stop asking one of these days.

Paul
01-13-2012, 03:40 AM
I say 'hole' a lot. "Cram it up my emailhole." Does this make me a bad person?
ship. sailed.

:D

Paul
01-13-2012, 03:42 AM
One of my girlfriends say that's internet language for the quick minds. Boy! I need no extra NOS for my mind. Freak me out with clumsy lines, you get a simply question tag.
hmmmm

1/ "email me"

or

2/ Inbox me"


toughy....

Paul
01-13-2012, 03:44 AM
Hey, I'm still struggling with people who want to "touch base" with me.
I've had 'touch' and 'base', but usually there's an added 'second' or 'third'

thothguard51
01-13-2012, 04:34 AM
Iis this a new pick up line...

"Hay babe, you wanna inbox me?"

Cliff Face
01-13-2012, 11:39 AM
What's next? Instead of asking, "Can I get your phone number?" I have to start saying, "Can I get your inbox?"

I can already see how people will actually hear, "Can I get in your box?"

It just isn't fair.

...

Okay, AW slang!

"I'm a PoC in P&CE my QUILTBAG Shorts, yo!"

(Note: this is an example only. I was pretending. Acting, if you will. For my next performance I'm going to rhyme FAQ while Basic Writing Questions. Don't ask me how.)

These Mean Streets
01-13-2012, 05:14 PM
Today I told someone to voicemail me.

mirandashell
01-13-2012, 05:18 PM
So... do you often not answer your phone?

JimmyB27
01-13-2012, 05:26 PM
If 'inbox me' means 'send me an email', does 'doormat me' mean 'send me a letter'?

These Mean Streets
01-13-2012, 05:31 PM
So... do you often not answer your phone?Never. If it's important, they'll leave me a voicemail.

Especially today. It's Friday and I can't wait for my job to paycheck me.

WriteMinded
01-13-2012, 07:16 PM
Thanks guys. All the slang now sounds suggestive to me. Either that, or insulting.

Doormat me? I'd think you meant for me to come knocking at your door. Guess you'd be surprised to see me there, huh? Voicemail me? A brush off.

Cliff Face
01-14-2012, 03:36 AM
I would've thought "Doormat me" meant "Wipe your feet on me"...

JimmyB27
01-15-2012, 02:01 AM
I would've thought "Doormat me" meant "Wipe your feet on me"...
It occurred to me after I wrote that that there might be a cultural divide here. We don't have mailboxes here in the UK like you guys do in America. A mere slot in the door, such that all our mail lands on the doormat.

Cliff Face
01-15-2012, 03:51 AM
Okay, that must be a cultural divide...

Here's where I'm at right now.

America: Mail boxes.
UK: Holes in door. Doormats inside.
Australia: Mail boxes. Doormats outside.

Who knew things could be so complicated?

Mac H.
01-15-2012, 06:37 AM
I think the English language needs a word that means 'casually communicated via email'.

I often find my self using phrases like "I was chatting with some UK distributors who suggested ..." ... and then find myself having an urge to correct it - because technically the communication was via emails, messages etc.

There are plenty of alternatives but they all require moving the sentence around and none really have the casual 'this is not an official opinion' vibe that 'chatting' does.

Mac

mirandashell
01-15-2012, 04:00 PM
Never. If it's important, they'll leave me a voicemail.

Especially today. It's Friday and I can't wait for my job to paycheck me.


If I thought you couldn't be bothered to answer my call, I wouldn't bother calling you.

Voicemail me? Very rude

Snitchcat
01-15-2012, 07:23 PM
Heh, another new slang term replacing a perfectly acceptable and existing term. Is there a 'must be cool' thing going on somewhere? Did I miss the meme?

Btw, just throwing this one out there: in Cantonese, it's "'e' [it to] me" (aka, "email [it to] me").

Ambrosia
01-15-2012, 11:12 PM
I think the English language needs a word that means 'casually communicated via email'.

I often find my self using phrases like "I was chatting with some UK distributors who suggested ..." ... and then find myself having an urge to correct it - because technically the communication was via emails, messages etc.

There are plenty of alternatives but they all require moving the sentence around and none really have the casual 'this is not an official opinion' vibe that 'chatting' does.

Mac

e-chatting

(I think it will catch on!) ;)

Cliff Face
01-16-2012, 10:36 AM
Heavy breathing in an electronic box?

*steals own suggestion and uses it for a novel title*

bettielee
01-16-2012, 11:55 AM
you know this will become "box me" eventually, right?

Just want to prepare you. :)

Cliff Face
01-16-2012, 11:58 AM
*hands the fairy a cardboard box*

That's what you meant, right? ;)

Archerbird
01-16-2012, 12:45 PM
"I boxed some UK distributors who...." :D

kct webber
01-16-2012, 05:32 PM
you know this will become "box me" eventually, right?

Just want to prepare you. :)

<1940s fisticuffs stance> "Well, then... Put up your effing dukes!" </1940s fisticuffs stance>

Perks
01-16-2012, 06:15 PM
"I boxed some UK distributors who...." :DAnd then the day after Christmas will be all screwed up over there.

bettielee
01-16-2012, 10:22 PM
*hands the fairy a cardboard box*

That's what you meant, right? ;)

shur....

I could use an e-snuggle! :)

:e2arms:

Cliff Face
01-17-2012, 03:01 AM
*tries not to ruin the moment*