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Willowwriter
12-29-2011, 04:11 PM
This is a new publisher i saw on Twitter. I didn't see a thread yet for them so wanted to start one.
Looks like this is their webpage
http://www.inkspellpublishing.com/

Barbara R.
12-29-2011, 05:22 PM
They say nothing at all about themselves, not even names, which leads me to guess this is an offshoot of a self-pubishing venture. If the publisher had any experience, surely he or she would flaunt it.

profen4
12-29-2011, 05:42 PM
They say nothing at all about themselves, not even names, which leads me to guess this is an offshoot of a self-pubishing venture. If the publisher had any experience, surely he or she would flaunt it.

I see all their names - they hid them under the "about us" tab ;)

Terie
12-29-2011, 06:06 PM
From the About Us page, it looks as if none of the current staff has meaningful publishing industry experience. Melissa Keir did some editing for Midnight Magic Press (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230032), which hardly counts as real industry experience.

Although the website is clearly geared toward readers rather than writers (a tick in the plus column), it still looks like yet another start-up e-press that one would be well-advised to wait a few years to see how it does before considering as a possible market.

aliceshortcake
12-29-2011, 06:07 PM
More info has now been added to Inkspell's site: http://www.inkspellpublishing.com/about-us.html

Founder and Acquisitions editor is Shilpa Mudiganti:


Shilpa Mudiganti grew up making up stories in her head. She thought life would be all about her stories until she completed her technical degree. Security of an IT job lured her leaving her stories to continue to brew up in her head. Yet soon she had to fall in step with what fate had planned for her and she penned her first romance novella, Always You. But after getting burnt twice by publishers, she decided to self-publish.
Yet she realized, her real passion was to get the wonderful books out there irrespective of who wrote giving the authors a fair and professional deal in the process which she sorely missed. And Inkspell Publishing was born. There has been no looking back since then. Inkspell Publishing has added some marvelous team members and still growing as they enter the world of publishing.

Editor is Melissa Keir:


Words have always had a special place in Melissa Keir's life, so it was no surprise that she works in publishing with the many fine people at Inkspell Publishing. Melissa has worked as a freelance editor and for the Midnight Magic Press Publishing House. She has also worked as a book reviewer for the last six months and has over 160 reviews written and published. A few years ago she wrote, designed, and edited a million dollar Federal Grant infusing character traits with American History and American Literature for teachers.

I'm not quite sure what 'infusing character traits with American History and American Literature for teachers' is supposed to mean...

Publicist is Majanka Verstraete:


Majanka Verstraete is a young adult paranormal romance, fantasy and horror author. She also blogs about books on a daily basis and writes reviews for books in a wide range of genres. In 2011, she opened Enchanted Book Promotions, a website where she offers extensive book promotions for fiction authors.

Majanka is indeed young - she's 21.

Publicist is Aparajita Basu:



Book Hoarder, e-junkie and animation crazy – fine words that define Aparajita. Born 30th September, 1992 to parents Kamal and Kavita in India, Aparajita is a very simple girl who always looks towards the brighter side of life. She loves to read and write, comes with being the only child; she always looks to new things to do to keep herself busy.




Her literary knowledge began with fairytales and upgraded leaps and bounds with J K Rowling’s “Harry Potter” books with so much that as she finishes one book, she starts another without wait. As far as her animation crazy goes, she has always been fascinated by the effects applied to live action cinema and cartoons but most of all she loves Japanese animation and all of its creativity.




So - a 19 year old publicist...



Designer is Najla Qamber:






Once called the Junior Jujitso Jap Rock Loving Ninja, Najla or “Naj” is kicking Photoshop’s ass into next week. She’s been working with photoshop since she was 11 years old and this landed her an intern job at Middle East’s most successful branding studio at 16. Now, 3 years later she’s even more active in design as InkSpell Publishing’s official designer!




...and a 19 year old designer.






The fact that the blurbs for Inkspell's books are as poorly-edited as the staff bios doesn't fill me with confidence.

Momento Mori
12-29-2011, 06:27 PM
Inskpell Website:
We are a new publishing company of romance, YA and fantasy fiction.

It's good that they're focusing on only a couple of genres because it means that they can be more effective with their marketing budget. I'm guessing that by YA they mean romance and fantasy within YA because otherwise YA covers too many genres.


Inskpell Website:
And we consider the author the star of this show. An author creates the magic through their words that allow us to enter those magical worlds. At Inkspell Publishing, we ensure that the author is given the right support to build the best story he/she can.

Authors are obviously important but as a publisher, Inkspell should know that they'll need to have final say over key things like marketing, distribution, pricing etc. In addition, I'd be more comfortable if Inkspell were helping authors to release the best story they could as ideally, books should already be polished and completed before submission.


Inskpell Website:
High quality editorial support: Our editors are experienced and well-versed to provide excellent editorial services to our authors. We are always on look out for more talented editors too.

I'll come back to this later but I couldn't see anything on the team page that suggested the editors had commercial editing experience. Instead they all seem to be previously self-published authors. There's nothing wrong with self-publishing, but just editing and releasing your own books doesn't equate to professional experience unless you can demonstrate that your self-published books have been commercially successful (i.e. selling more than 5,000 copies).


Inskpell Website:
Print and Digital book release: Almost every full-length book goes in both print and digital release unless otherwise notified. We are huge book snugglers and cannot think of a world without physical books.

Unless Inkspell has a deal in place to get books into stores (and it seems that they don't) there's little point in their taking print rights. As an aside, I like printed books too but as a business start-up, it makes more sense to focus on electronic books as a starting point. I'd be more comfortable if they could cite a commercial reason for taking print rights other than their inability to imagine a world without the physically printed word.


Inskpell Website:
Dedicated publicist for each author: We are strong believers of advertising and hence, every book and every author with Inkspell is supported by a publicist who ensures that the book reaches the readers. From grooming the author's profile to exhaustive blog tours, Inkspell will stand with the author in every step.

According to the team page, Inkspell has 2 publicists, neither of whom seems to have any experience in professional PR. There's little point in having a dedicated publicist if that person is having to learn as they go.


Inskpell Website:
Impressive book covers: Book covers sell. There is no argument there and we have that covered. Inkspell Publishing books will be adorned by high-quality, impressive book covers that is bound to attract readers.

Yes, covers are important. This is why it's a little worrying to see that Inkspell has one designer whose qualifications appear to be limited to knowledge of Photoshop.


Inskpell Website:
High royalties:We offer 40% royalties on digital copies and 8% on print copies, higher than most of the publishers of today.

It doesn't say if the royalties are paid on net or cover price and it should do. Most ebook publishers pay on net in order to cover listing and third party charges. 40% is not an uncommon royalty rate for ebooks.

The 8% royalty rate on printed books is piss poor in my opinion given that it seems that Inkspell doesn't pay advances and doesn't seem to have any distribution in place to place books in stores.


Inskpell Website:
In return, we expect: Polished manuscripts of gripping tales, web presence and author's active involvement in each stage of publishing.
That is not much to ask, right?

It sounds to me as if authors are going to find that they're spending a lot of time doing the kinds of thing that Inkspell should actually be doing and yes, that is actually too much to ask.


Inskpell Website:
We plan to go slow. Rushing things with impatience wouldn't cast the spell that we want. In any case, don't they say, "Slow and steady wins the race"? and boy, what a race it is!

It's good that they plan to go slowly, but I'd like to know what they actually mean by that. Have they limited themselves to a set number of publishing slots in the year and allocated a budget accordingly or does it mean something else?


Inskpell Website:
Shilpa Mudiganti, Acquisitions Editor
Shilpa Mudiganti grew up making up stories in her head. She thought life would be all about her stories until she completed her technical degree. Security of an IT job lured her leaving her stories to continue to brew up in her head. Yet soon she had to fall in step with what fate had planned for her and she penned her first romance novella, Always You. But after getting burnt twice by publishers, she decided to self-publish.
Yet she realized, her real passion was to get the wonderful books out there irrespective of who wrote giving the authors a fair and professional deal in the process which she sorely missed. And Inkspell Publishing was born. There has been no looking back since then. Inkspell Publishing has added some marvelous team members and still growing as they enter the world of publishing.
Juggling her day job as an IT geek, she tries to put all her corporate learning in the company.
When she has time to breathe, she spends time blogging, connecting with her readers and spending time with her loving husband.

Shilpa's only experience is in self-publishing. There's nothing wrong with that, but unless she had personal success with it, I don't see how it qualifies her to publish other people's work.

In addition, Shilpa also seems to be an author for InkSpell. That raises the potential for there being a conflict of interest, e.g. when it comes to allocating resources and budgets for her titles. At the very least I'd want to know how InkSpell plans to manage that.

In addition (and speaking entirely personally), I had a quick look at the extract from her InkSpell book and there were a few grammatical errors and quite a few cliches in there, which makes me question the company's self-proclaimed editorial expertise.


Inskpell Website:
Melissa Keir, Editor
Words have always had a special place in Melissa Keir's life, so it was no surprise that she works in publishing with the many fine people at Inkspell Publishing. Melissa has worked as a freelance editor and for the Midnight Magic Press Publishing House. She has also worked as a book reviewer for the last six months and has over 160 reviews written and published. A few years ago she wrote, designed, and edited a million dollar Federal Grant infusing character traits with American History and American Literature for teachers. As a teacher for 13 years, Melissa has taught children of different ages to read, write and edit, as well as run her own school wide publishing center.

Again, Melissa doesn't appear to have any editing experience from commercial publishing.

Midnight Press rang a bell for me and sure enough, there's another thread on it here at AW:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230032

Basically it was another publisher that started off as a self-publishing venture (with Melissa apparently being one of its authors) but which closed its doors very quickly due to the classic "unforseen circumstances"). I wouldn't personally being citing it as a credential for my editorial expertise.


Inskpell Website:
Majanka Verstraete, Publicist
Majanka Verstraete is a young adult paranormal romance, fantasy and horror author. She also blogs about books on a daily basis and writes reviews for books in a wide range of genres. In 2011, she opened Enchanted Book Promotions, a website where she offers extensive book promotions for fiction authors. Next to virtual book tours and freelance publicist services, she also offers website design and book cover design. She loves working with authors and fellow book lovers, and she is very glad for the opportunity to work as a publicist at InkSpell Publishing.

Again, Majanka doesn't seem to have any previous experience in promotions or PR. I'd want to know what the relationship is (if any) between InkSpell and Enchanted Book Promotions and specifically whether InkSpell authors will be expected to use Enchanted Book's services because that would be a massive conflict of interest.


Inskpell Website:
Aparajita Basu, Publicist
Book Hoarder, e-junkie and animation crazy – fine words that define Aparajita. Born 30th September, 1992 to parents Kamal and Kavita in India, Aparajita is a very simple girl who always looks towards the brighter side of life. She loves to read and write, comes with being the
only child; she always looks to new things to do to keep herself busy.
Her literary knowledge began with fairytales and upgraded leaps and bounds with J K Rowling’s “Harry Potter” books with so much that as she finishes one book, she starts another without wait. As far as her animation crazy goes, she has always been fascinated by the effects applied to live action cinema and cartoons but most of all she loves Japanese animation and all of its creativity.

Another publicist with apparently no previous publicity or PR experience.


Inskpell Website:
Najla Qamber, Designer
Once called the Junior Jujitso Jap Rock Loving Ninja, Najla or “Naj” is kicking Photoshop’s ass into next week. She’s been working with photoshop since she was 11 years old and this landed her an intern job at Middle East’s most successful branding studio at 16. Now, 3 years later she’s even more active in design as InkSpell Publishing’s official designer!
Known for her quick responses to anyone’s emails, and designs, Naj has the philosophy that “Determination is greatness” and without that determination, and efficiency she wouldn’t be where she is now.


Again, no previous design experience.

All in all, I'm not seeing anything here that would make me want to submit and as usual, my advice would be to wait for 2 years to see if they're still in business and if so, what the average sales figures per title look like.

MM

BarbaraSheridan
12-29-2011, 07:12 PM
The website presentation is attractive.

The two covers shown are pretty good even if the designer is young, and they're definitely better than many I've seen from various e-presses. I do like the font choices. They don't look slapped on.

The blurbs point to a lack of solid editing.

aliceshortcake
12-29-2011, 09:58 PM
A Google search reveals that Shilpa Mudiganti is also known as Shilpa M Mirza. Last month she posted on www.coffeetimeromance.com (http://www.coffeetimeromance.com):

My debut novella, Memories Rustle, is to be published by Trestle Press this month.

There's a thread for Trestle Press here: http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=232879

Inkspell author Cecilia Robert has also been published by Trestle Press.

I can't find any evidence that Trestle actually published Memories Rustle - presumably this is because Shilpa was 'burnt twice by publishers'.

veinglory
12-29-2011, 10:05 PM
The covers are nice, I would agree that age is no obstacle for that designer.

priceless1
12-29-2011, 10:15 PM
Unless I'm blind, I can't find a catalog link where their upcoming releases are listed, along with the usual information - ISBN, price, page count, release date.

And where are those e-books going to sell? They don't have an online store, and Amazon doesn't list either title. So the site is sort of useless to a consumer. Few buyers will work that hard to hunt down where to buy a book.

veinglory
12-29-2011, 10:22 PM
The don't go live until March.

priceless1
12-29-2011, 10:25 PM
I realize this, but most publishers put their titles up in the online databases with their release date.

aliceshortcake
12-29-2011, 10:29 PM
I agree that the covers are vastly superior to the usual e-book fare, but the more I look at the two we've seen so far the more I'm convinced that they show the same couple - or at least the same man!

DreamWeaver
12-29-2011, 10:41 PM
I agree that the covers are vastly superior to the usual e-book fare, but the more I look at the two we've seen so far the more I'm convinced that they show the same couple - or at least the same man!That's not necessarily a bar to success. I remember browsing a bookstore in the 80s and realizing that at least 75% of the romance novels had Fabio on the cover :D. And I am *not* making that up. I was so flabbergasted that I searched for covers that didn't have him. :roll:

Toothpaste
12-29-2011, 10:52 PM
Then there's stuff like this, not the same publishers but the same image over and over and over again. It happens all the time: http://causticcovercritic.blogspot.com/2011/11/if-she-could-just-meet-man-by-fence.html

I agree about the quality of the covers for this site. But it's one of those wait and see situations. They haven't even launched yet.

BarbaraSheridan
12-29-2011, 11:05 PM
I agree about the quality of the covers for this site. But it's one of those wait and see situations. They haven't even launched yet.

If any of the management lurks about I hope they'll take note that more than one person has commented on the quality of editing in the blurbs (which indicates the same issues in the books themselves).

It would be a very wise decision to go over the launch titles one last time and make sure they're the best they can be.

aliceshortcake
12-29-2011, 11:08 PM
Oh, I realise that the same (or very similar) images crop up over and over again on book covers. And I'm old enough to remember the Golden Age of Fabio! I just found it a bit strange that there are only two books on the Inkspell site and both of them have covers showing what may be the same couple.

Toothpaste
12-29-2011, 11:19 PM
Still, even if they are the same couple then maybe they did one big photoshoot and took pics of different poses etc with the knowledge that they'd need many similar looking covers. Besides if they are the same couple (not confirmed) they did a nice job making sure that they cut the image where the hair was in one so that it isn't obvious that it's the same people. Shows some good sense and creativity in using the same people and making them seem different.

As to the blurbs, I didn't actually read them, but yes, I do too hope they edit them etc.

robjvargas
12-29-2011, 11:36 PM
That's not necessarily a bar to success. I remember browsing a bookstore in the 80s and realizing that at least 75% of the romance novels had Fabio on the cover :D. And I am *not* making that up. I was so flabbergasted that I searched for covers that didn't have him. :roll:
I wish I could laugh. That's his actual claim to fame (http://www.fabioinc.com/Fabio_bio.html).

AbbyRose
12-30-2011, 01:16 AM
The couple? Check out Romance Novel Covers. It's a site set up by model Jimmy Thomas and he sells over 1,000 images. I'm starting to see a lot of his pictures on covers now to the point I can recognize them. I think he's flooded the market. :)

IceCreamEmpress
12-30-2011, 05:51 AM
The grammar, syntax, punctuation, and capitalization issues on the website don't augur well for how well the books will be edited.

Since several of the principals seem to be people for whom English is a second or third language, I am going to cut them slack on that. Melissa Keir, however, purports to be a teacher of English, so I am just going to point out that this is not actually a coherent sentence: A few years ago she wrote, designed, and edited a million dollar Federal Grant infusing character traits with American History and American Literature for teachers.

The word "infusing" is used completely incorrectly. I don't know if she means "fusing", or if she means "illustrating character traits with passages from American history and literature," or what, but holy carp that's a mess. Not even mentioning the Random Capitalization.

michael_b
12-30-2011, 07:34 AM
Still, even if they are the same couple then maybe they did one big photoshoot and took pics of different poses etc with the knowledge that they'd need many similar looking covers.

Those are stock images off of one of the royalty free image sites. I've used one of those same images on a cover. This happens all the time in ebook publishing land because there are a limited number of useful images on those sites and a LOT of cover artists haunting them.

Toothpaste
12-30-2011, 07:46 AM
Even big publishers use stock images.

I guess my point is I think their covers, especially relative to other start ups I've seen in this part of AW, are quite strong, and I don't think, if there is anything to take issue with, that that's the right place to do it. Take issue with the writing on the site and on the blurbs etc. And possibly a lack of experience.

I just don't want people to start saying that since they use stock images they aren't up to snuff because, as I said, even the big six use stock images at times. It weakens the argument when there are actual possible valid concerns.

michael_b
12-30-2011, 08:24 AM
Even big publishers use stock images.

Yes they do as Veinglory can attest. She's posted covers from the big publishers where they've used images that are common on smaller publisher's covers.

michael_b
12-30-2011, 08:26 AM
The couple? Check out Romance Novel Covers. It's a site set up by model Jimmy Thomas and he sells over 1,000 images. I'm starting to see a lot of his pictures on covers now to the point I can recognize them. I think he's flooded the market. :)

Yes, he has, but you have to admit he does make rather nice eye-candy.

Now if people would just stop distorting the images in photoshop...

ShilpaMudiganti
12-30-2011, 08:45 AM
Hello everyone,

I am the founder of Inkspell Publishing. I saw this discussion today and would like to take this opportunity to answer to the questions that have been raised in this forum.

I understand all the concerns raised and have taken note of them. I am humbled by the attention that is given to all aspects of our offerings. We have not yet launched. As a company, we launch on 1st Jan, 2012 and release our first two book in March 2012. Thereafter, we plan to publish about 1-2 titles per month. We have a full publishing schedule that has allocated slots. Below are my replies to most of the questions I have raised. Please let me know if I missed something and I will answer them too.

Q - It's good that they're focusing on only a couple of genres because it means that they can be more effective with their marketing budget. I'm guessing that by YA they mean romance and fantasy within YA because otherwise YA covers too many genres. - Yes, YA romance and fantasy.

Q - Authors are obviously important but as a publisher, Inkspell should know that they'll need to have final say over key things like marketing, distribution, pricing etc. In addition, I'd be more comfortable if Inkspell were helping authors to release the best story they could as ideally, books should already be polished and completed before submission. - Yes, Inkspell has the final say in these matters. When we say support to the author, we mean polishing their completed manuscript, and extensive help in promotions. We accept only completed and polished manuscripts.

Q - I'll come back to this later but I couldn't see anything on the team page that suggested the editors had commercial editing experience. Instead they all seem to be previously self-published authors. There's nothing wrong with self-publishing, but just editing and releasing your own books doesn't equate to professional experience unless you can demonstrate that your self-published books have been commercially successful (i.e. selling more than 5,000 copies). - We have one editor as of today, Melissa Keir. She is a freelance editor and has also worked at MMP which unfortunately closed. In the meantime, she had already edited two books but they never saw the light of the day. Her book is contracted by Rebel Ink Press. She is a lovely, hardworking woman who gives her best to all books she edits. We are also keen to add more experienced editors in the team.

Q - Unless Inkspell has a deal in place to get books into stores (and it seems that they don't) there's little point in their taking print rights. As an aside, I like printed books too but as a business start-up, it makes more sense to focus on electronic books as a starting point. I'd be more comfortable if they could cite a commercial reason for taking print rights other than their inability to imagine a world without the physically printed word. - Apologies for not being very clear on the printed books part. We intend to sell printed books only through Amazon. We are only a start up and we do not yet have a deal with stores. A print book contract is NOT offered to all authors and in fact, print books only make it more expensive for us as a start up. Yet, we do understand the thrill of having a physical copy in hand. That is the reason why we offer to publish print too. The authors at Inkspell have a say in that space and we are open to any suggestions.

Q - According to the team page, Inkspell has 2 publicists, neither of whom seems to have any experience in professional PR. There's little point in having a dedicated publicist if that person is having to learn as they go. - Both our publicists own blog tour organizing companies. They have already worked with multiple authors in the past year and are wonderful, enthusiastic individuals. They own their blog tour companies and are quite committed to the authors.

Q - Yes, covers are important. This is why it's a little worrying to see that Inkspell has one designer whose qualifications appear to be limited to knowledge of Photoshop. - Our cover pages, website are credentials for our designer. She has done several design projects for authors. Once again, her work can be seen on her website.

Q - It doesn't say if the royalties are paid on net or cover price and it should do. Most ebook publishers pay on net in order to cover listing and third party charges. 40% is not an uncommon royalty rate for ebooks. -It is net sales. We will update the website with this information.

Q - The 8% royalty rate on printed books is piss poor in my opinion given that it seems that Inkspell doesn't pay advances and doesn't seem to have any distribution in place to place books in stores. - Point noted. We hope to cover this aspect this year as the company grows.

Q - It sounds to me as if authors are going to find that they're spending a lot of time doing the kinds of thing that Inkspell should actually be doing and yes, that is actually too much to ask. - The very mission of Inkspell Publishing is to give the authors a fair deal and not make them go through the pain of "doing-it-all". We provide professional editing, high quality cover designs (author inputs for cover page is given major importance) and extensive promotion. We have a two month promotion plan for each book and this includes tying up with other blog tour companies, advertisements, ARCs and other means to spread the word. The author is free to do their own promotions but that is not a requirement to be contracted by us. In this age, it is imperative to have a good online presence for any profession and we expect our authors to participate in our promotions actively as book promotions are more interactive now than before. That is all we ask our authors to do and this, we feel is not too much to ask. :)

Q - It's good that they plan to go slowly, but I'd like to know what they actually mean by that. Have they limited themselves to a set number of publishing slots in the year and allocated a budget accordingly or does it mean something else?- Yes. We have limited our publishing slots. We would publishing only 20 titles in 2012 and each book is assigned equal budget because all are the same to us. We do not want to be just another e-publisher who has jumped on to the bandwagon because ebooks sell today. Inkspell Publishing has been started with one goal in mind - publish quality fiction titles and make the life of a author easier. All good intentions here.:)

Q - Shilpa's only experience is in self-publishing. There's nothing wrong with that, but unless she had personal success with it, I don't see how it qualifies her to publish other people's work. In addition, Shilpa also seems to be an author for InkSpell. That raises the potential for there being a conflict of interest, e.g. when it comes to allocating resources and budgets for her titles. At the very least I'd want to know how InkSpell plans to manage that. -No, my books do not get preference over the others. We already have 3 titles contracted (two are in the process of mailing the signed contract) and all receive the same budget, and the same attention as mine. In fact, considering that I am managing a lot more than just my book, it is slipping down the list quite fast. :) Since Cecilia is our first contracted author and her book release is in march as well, one can reach out to her for her experience. We will soon release information about our newly contracted authors

Q - In addition (and speaking entirely personally), I had a quick look at the extract from her InkSpell book and there were a few grammatical errors and quite a few cliches in there, which makes me question the company's self-proclaimed editorial expertise. - May I ask where did you find the extract? There is only one small excerpt of the book on my personal blog (www.smmirza.blogspot.com) posted pre-editing.

Q - Again, Melissa doesn't appear to have any editing experience from commercial publishing. - I have answered this above.

Q - Again, Majanka doesn't seem to have any previous experience in promotions or PR. I'd want to know what the relationship is (if any) between InkSpell and Enchanted Book Promotions and specifically whether InkSpell authors will be expected to use Enchanted Book's services because that would be a massive conflict of interest. - No. Enchanted book promotions is only one avenue. We would be working with other blog tour companies too for promotions. Authors are free to do their own promotions.

Q - Another publicist with apparently no previous publicity or PR experience. - Again, we have detailed promotion plans for each book and it is not restricted to the publicists own company.

Q - Again, no previous design experience. - Please see my reply above.


Q - I can't find any evidence that Trestle actually published Memories Rustle - presumably this is because Shilpa was 'burnt twice by publishers'. - No they didn't. i was contracted by them and due to unavoidable circumstances have decided to part ways. Unfortunately I did not get a chance to update the post in Coffee Time Romance. I will do it at the earliest.

Q - Unless I'm blind, I can't find a catalog link where their upcoming releases are listed, along with the usual information - ISBN, price, page count, release date. -We have not yet launched and in the process of putting up all the above mentioned information. You would soon find the link to the same on our website.

Q - And where are those e-books going to sell? They don't have an online store, and Amazon doesn't list either title. So the site is sort of useless to a consumer. Few buyers will work that hard to hunt down where to buy a book. - We are not launched yet. Our first books will release in March 2012.

Q - If any of the management lurks about I hope they'll take note that more than one person has commented on the quality of editing in the blurbs (which indicates the same issues in the books themselves).- Noted and thank you for the feedback.

Q - It would be a very wise decision to go over the launch titles one last time and make sure they're the best they can be. - Definitely, will do.

Q - The grammar, syntax, punctuation, and capitalization issues on the website don't augur well for how well the books will be edited. - This is great feedback which we will look in to at the earliest.

This is indeed a great forum for these discussions and I thank you all for taking the time to discuss about Inkspell. We hope to do our best and have a very hardworking, enthusiastic team in place that work together to give the best to our readers and authors. All your positive and constructive feedback here would help us be better in the future. Please feel free to reach out to me for more queries. My personal email id is mudiganti.shilpa@gmail.com if you want to email me.

Thank you.
Best regards,
Shilpa

Cece N
12-30-2011, 09:41 AM
Hi!
I just happened to see this thread and wanted to post a quick reply. I'm a member at Absolute Write (though not very active at the moment as much as I would like to...urgh.. too much going on) and yes, My name is Cecilia. I met Shilpa on her blog a while back, even before getting published through Trestle. I will be publishing my novella Truly Madly through Inkspell, and I have to say so far my experience with Inkspell has been wonderful. Yes, I admit I am among their first clients. The good thing is they haven't lumped their desks with manuscripts from other authors. They are publishing a few books at a time, which I think is good, given that some pub. companies take on alot of clients, then don't know what to do with them and end up closing shop, or neglecting them.
On the other hand, I am very glad Absolute Write discusses about new companies, the Dos and DON'Ts,creating awareness, and I have benefited from this advice time and time again. :)
My experience so far with Inkspell is pretty good.

MysteryRiter
12-30-2011, 09:55 AM
Shilpa, I just want to thank you for coming here, handling this very professionally and actually answering our questions! You'd be amazed by some of the other recent threads here where everyone from the company comes to scream at us but does not answer a single question we ask them. And yes, I'm referring to one in particular. :)

Momento Mori
12-30-2011, 02:54 PM
Hi, Shilpa, and welcome to AW. Like MysteryRiter, I'd like to add a thank you for taking the time to come and answer the points raised here and also for the professionalism you've shown in your response.

I just wanted to come back on a couple of things in your response.


ShilpaMudiganti:
Apologies for not being very clear on the printed books part. We intend to sell printed books only through Amazon. We are only a start up and we do not yet have a deal with stores. A print book contract is NOT offered to all authors and in fact, print books only make it more expensive for us as a start up. Yet, we do understand the thrill of having a physical copy in hand. That is the reason why we offer to publish print too. The authors at Inkspell have a say in that space and we are open to any suggestions.

It's good to know that you're not automatically going to take print rights and thank you for being open about where print books will be available from.

If I may offer you some advice, given that you are a start-up I'd recommend that you stick with ebooks for the first couple of years or so until you get established in your markets. The reason for this is that as a start-up I'm presuming that you won't have the warehousing or capital for print runs (which are needed to bring down cover prices), which will mean any printed book will have to come from POD. POD's a valid publishing method, but it does result in high cover prices and depending on who you're using, can result in a long delay between order and receipt of the book - particularly if you're using a third party seller like Amazon.

Authors and readers do like having a physical book to hold but romance and fantasy are particularly friendly towards ebooks, which means you can legitimately focus on ebooks as a way of establishing Inkspell's reputation.

In addition, as an author I'd be really turned off by the 8% royalty you're offering on print. I note that this is something you propose addressing this over the course of the year, but from what I've seen many POD royalty-only publishers find it difficult to establish a decent royalty rate that is good for authors but also covers the business costs.


ShilpaMudiganti:
May I ask where did you find the extract? There is only one small excerpt of the book on my personal blog (www.smmirza.blogspot.com (http://www.smmirza.blogspot.com/)) posted pre-editing

I clicked through the links on the Inkspell website - one of them offered an advance peek. If the extract was pre-editing then that's fair enough, but you might want to take a look at your website to make sure the link comes down until the extract is edited.

Best of luck with the company.

MM

Terie
12-30-2011, 03:57 PM
I, too, would like to weigh in to thank Shilpa for her professional approach both to this thread and, more importantly, to her business. It's lovely to see in someone so young, and I hope it leads to success.

ShilpaMudiganti
12-30-2011, 04:56 PM
Thank you Momento, Terri and MysterWriter for your responses and support. Thank you Cecilia for stopping by and replying.

Thank you Momento for the advice on print books. This is some good information that we will give a serious consideration to. I am relieved that we had not made it mandatory in our plan of things. So, it makes it easier to dis-entangle that whenever required.

This forum is a great place to get some solid advice and I am once again humbled by the details that go in here. Please do get in touch with me for any further questions. I will try my best to answer them.

profen4
12-30-2011, 06:28 PM
It's good to know that you're not automatically going to take print rights and thank you for being open about where print books will be available from.

If I may offer you some advice, given that you are a start-up I'd recommend that you stick with ebooks for the first couple of years or so until you get established in your markets. The reason for this is that as a start-up I'm presuming that you won't have the warehousing or capital for print runs (which are needed to bring down cover prices), which will mean any printed book will have to come from POD. POD's a valid publishing method, but it does result in high cover prices and depending on who you're using, can result in a long delay between order and receipt of the book - particularly if you're using a third party seller like Amazon.


MM


MM - You offered some great points, as always, but I'm not sure about this one.

There are quite a few small presses out there who use POD/eBook technology for their titles. Some of them don't have higher than industry standard paper-back prices and they generate good (in the thousands of units) sales without in-store sales.

Criticizing a press for taking print rights, when they don't have in-store distribution is, imo, not a valid criticism. Yes, they're cut off from about 70% of the market (since most sales still occur in stores) - but a savvy publisher can utilize that 30% market share effectively. And as long as they're transparent to their authors in that regard, I see no issue whatsoever.

priceless1
12-30-2011, 07:05 PM
MM -
There are quite a few small presses out there who use POD/eBook technology for their titles. Some of them don't have higher than industry standard paper-back prices and they generate good (in the thousands of units) sales without in-store sales.
Digital printing is a clearer term to use than POD because it separates the technology from the business model. Depending on how many units you print up via the digital process, and whom you use to print those books, the cost differences between web based printing (offset) and digital can be pretty competitive. Small presses that exclusively use digital (and not offset) printing are getting a smaller profit margin in order to keep their books competitively priced. It's smart business because few will pay $25 for a 135 page book.


Criticizing a press for taking print rights, when they don't have in-store distribution is, imo, not a valid criticism. A publisher who hasn't proven they have the ability to get books out to the marketplace shouldn't tie up those rights. Initially, authors may be fine only having their physical books available through Amazon, but they'll get feedback from potential customers who would rather find a book in a physical bookstore, a library, or B&N. That entire market is cut out of the picture, thus affecting potential sales.


a savvy publisher can utilize that 30% market share effectively.
Possibly, but this is a new company with very limited publishing experience, and they haven't yet discovered how difficult it is to sell physical books - or market and promote e-books, for that matter. I think they have their hearts in the right place, they're transparent about what they can and can't do - which is always a plus. But when you get into physical books, you have a much larger cash outlay, something that few new start-ups can afford. Better to stay e-book only, and then consider print books at a later date, once they have their financial feet firmly on the ground.

Terie
12-30-2011, 07:40 PM
Possibly, but this is a new company with very limited publishing experience, and they haven't yet discovered how difficult it is to sell physical books - or market and promote e-books, for that matter. I think they have their hearts in the right place, they're transparent about what they can and can't do - which is always a plus. But when you get into physical books, you have a much larger cash outlay, something that few new start-ups can afford. Better to stay e-book only, and then consider print books at a later date, once they have their financial feet firmly on the ground.

QFT. And in this case, SERIOUSLY consider the source. As a publisher herself, Priceless1 has been down this road and her advice about it is invaluable.

Momento Mori
12-30-2011, 08:08 PM
swhibs123:
There are quite a few small presses out there who use POD/eBook technology for their titles. Some of them don't have higher than industry standard paper-back prices and they generate good (in the thousands of units) sales without in-store sales.

Criticizing a press for taking print rights, when they don't have in-store distribution is, imo, not a valid criticism. Yes, they're cut off from about 70% of the market (since most sales still occur in stores) - but a savvy publisher can utilize that 30% market share effectively. And as long as they're transparent to their authors in that regard, I see no issue whatsoever.

I take the point, but my reasoning for the criticism ties in with what priceless1 says in her post.

One of the reasons I'm not laying into Inkspell as much as I do to other new publishers is precisely because they're being very open about their experience and what they can and cannot do. They also seem to have their eyes open about the difficulties ahead. I'd still give my usual caveats about waiting for 2 years and seeing if Inkspell are still in business (and if so, what the average sales figures are like), but if I was an author in those genres and I'd tried other avenues of publication before getting to Inkspell, then I wouldn't have an issue with trying them on the ebook front, but would want to hold back the print rights until I see some proof of their being able to exploit them effectively. I don't say this to be disrespectful of Inkspell, but more as a way of authors being prudent if they decide to go down that path.

MM

profen4
12-30-2011, 08:25 PM
Digital printing is a clearer term to use than POD because it separates the technology from the business model. Depending on how many units you print up via the digital process, and whom you use to print those books, the cost differences between web based printing (offset) and digital can be pretty competitive. Small presses that exclusively use digital (and not offset) printing are getting a smaller profit margin in order to keep their books competitively priced. It's smart business because few will pay $25 for a 135 page book.


I think this is disingenuous - $25 for a 135 page book? It appears, perhaps just to me, that you're insinuating that that's what the cost has to be for POD when I suspect you know that's not the case. I've seen POD books twice as many pages, have a list price of half as much.



A publisher who hasn't proven they have the ability to get books out to the marketplace shouldn't tie up those rights. Initially, authors may be fine only having their physical books available through Amazon, but they'll get feedback from potential customers who would rather find a book in a physical bookstore, a library, or B&N. That entire market is cut out of the picture, thus affecting potential sales.


I might be confused. Are you saying that authors should only pursue traditional publishing options, and presses who don't offer their titles for sale in bookstores should not take print rights?



Possibly, but this is a new company with very limited publishing experience, and they haven't yet discovered how difficult it is to sell physical books - or market and promote e-books, for that matter.


They've indicated that they, in fact, do have experience with book promotion. And getting physical books listed on online marketplaces is not a steep cost.




I think they have their hearts in the right place, they're transparent about what they can and can't do - which is always a plus. But when you get into physical books, you have a much larger cash outlay, something that few new start-ups can afford. Better to stay e-book only, and then consider print books at a later date, once they have their financial feet firmly on the ground.

Yes - you do have a larger cash outlay with physical books when you use POD technology. I believe Createspace or Amazon Advantage is a $40 set up fee. Which is a lot more than zero, but not exactly bank-breaking.

I'm not saying anything about this press in particular (I know nothing about them other than what I've read here and seen on their site), but it seems they're getting slapped with a double-standard. I could point to a couple presses on AW who get rave reviews by members here, yet those presses employ the same business model as this press.

profen4
12-30-2011, 08:29 PM
I take the point, but my reasoning for the criticism ties in with what priceless1 says in her post.

One of the reasons I'm not laying into Inkspell as much as I do to other new publishers is precisely because they're being very open about their experience and what they can and cannot do. They also seem to have their eyes open about the difficulties ahead. I'd still give my usual caveats about waiting for 2 years and seeing if Inkspell are still in business (and if so, what the average sales figures are like), but if I was an author in those genres and I'd tried other avenues of publication before getting to Inkspell, then I wouldn't have an issue with trying them on the ebook front, but would want to hold back the print rights until I see some proof of their being able to exploit them effectively. I don't say this to be disrespectful of Inkspell, but more as a way of authors being prudent if they decide to go down that path.

MM

I see your point, and I agree. Always wait and see. Always start at the top. It was the perceived (perhaps in my own eyes) double standard that this press was getting slapped with that I thought inappropriate.

cheers

priceless1
12-30-2011, 08:50 PM
I think this is disingenuous - $25 for a 135 page book? It appears, perhaps just to me, that you're insinuating that that's what the cost has to be for POD when I suspect you know that's not the case. I've seen POD books twice as many pages, have a list price of half as much that are POD.
I think you misunderstood. My example may have been over the top, but I was trying to highlight the point that I've seen POD publishers who charge a higher retail price to offset the higher digital printing costs. Conversely, as I said in my previous post, I've seen many POD publishers who keep their retail pricing competitive because it's smart business - even though they're paying higher printing costs and, therefore, reducing their profit margin.

For instance, it costs me .85 to print a 350 page book for a 10k unit print run (web based). That same book would cost me around $3.50-ish for a 200 unit digital print run.

And please...may I suggest that you could probably accuse me of a lot of things, but disingenuous isn't one of them.


I might be confused. Are you saying that authors should only pursue traditional publishing options, and presses who don't offer their titles for sale in bookstores should not take print rights.
I wasn't suggesting anything. I was merely stating how the industry works and what choices authors have in order to make decisions that will positively impact their literary careers. The publisher we're discussing on this thread is an e-publisher. They're new and won't be selling physical books on any other venue than Amazon, so I suggested that they shouldn't tie up those print rights for the reasons I stated in my previous post. You might be trying to lump my statements about this particular company with POD, and that's not at all what I was suggesting.

Getting back to POD, there are times when a POD publisher makes perfect sense, but authors need to be aware of what a POD can and can't do for them so they know exactly what they're getting into, and what they'll need to do to garner sales. If an author is keen to get national distribution, then I would make the case that a POD publisher probably isn't the best choice.


They've indicated that they, in fact, do have experience with book promotion. And getting physical books listed on online marketplaces is not a steep cost. Their experience appears to be blog/online based. There is a lot more to promotion than the internet. Additionally, it takes a long to establish an online presence, so this new company has its work cut out for itself. I always recommend authors wait a couple years to see how a new publisher performs because it takes about that long to run out of money.

veinglory
12-30-2011, 10:57 PM
A good example of what can be done with digital printing would be Samhain (incl. making presence in chain bookstores and some mainstream best-seller lists). There is a wide range of pricing and distribution that can be acheived with this technology. The top end being not too far short of what you can do with an offset print run IMHO. The cover price is still a tad higher and the discount a tad more shallow--but it can work pretty well.

priceless1
12-30-2011, 11:47 PM
A good example of what can be done with digital printing would be Samhain
Exactly who I was thinking of. They've been very smart about their business model, and I take my hat off to them.

Sara Lou
07-08-2012, 04:53 AM
If only Samhain published YA. Sigh.

Willowwriter
07-25-2012, 05:34 PM
Anyone have any additional experience with them?

Terie
07-30-2012, 09:56 AM
I am a junior-publicist with Inkspell and their experience is wonderful.

The authors do get quality editorial support. A new editor Rie is wonderful and with the editors union. They are currently acquiring new publicists.

If you look at the recent titles of their covers are wonderful and their most successful novels are The Carny and Want. The authors also get a say in how they would like their covers to be designed. The authors are given five paper copies of their novel, and e-copies for giveaways.

The author presence online, basically the authors help support the other authors who have been published by Inkspell to help every novel succeed. When a new cover is revealed for an upcoming book, there is a small giveaway of bookmarks or key rings.


Hope this helps.

Actually, not much. 'Wonderful' is a subjective description. This entire post is heavy on hype (and the word 'wonderful') and light on objective fact. It doesn't provide any information at all about the things writers need to know when looking for a publisher.

Writers considering where to submit their books aren't (or at least shouldn't be) looking for feel-good rhetoric. They're lookinig for facts about the publisher's industry experience, sales, and so on.

Providing author loops and allowing authors to provide input about their covers aren't things that help sell books to readers.

Also? A publicist's job is to sell books to readers, not to sell the publisher to writers.

eternalised
07-30-2012, 01:52 PM
My book, Fractured, is contracted with InkSpell. If you have any questions about InkSpell, feel free to PM me.

Kastil
07-30-2012, 08:33 PM
My book, Fractured, is contracted with InkSpell. If you have any questions about InkSpell, feel free to PM me.So, by your tagline in your signature, your book isn't out yet.

I would be interested in someone's experience after the book launch and how much support was given. I have a completed YA manuscript out to a few beta readers and haven't decided to shop it around yet. Personally, I've seen better than 8% from other YA companies so I'm wondering about the support after the release.

Granted, I know from the other things I have published that the author has to do promos (per most of my contracts) but the publisher also puts their best foot forward.

triceretops
07-31-2012, 02:54 AM
"Granted, I know from the other things I have published that the author has to do promos (per most of my contracts) but the publisher also puts their best foot forward."

And at other times, a publisher's best foot forward kicks the author in the ass and tells them to get out there and sell books...

Just like a recent publisher just told me to do, upon a new release.

I take and took great offense to that comment and, frankly, am getting fed-up with hearing these push/shove tactics from small press. I've had my share of grief from these amateurs, and have delighted in tearing up more contracts than I've signed in the past seven years. Eleven total.

A free sales force is the most enticing aspect of why small mom and pop publishers go into business in the first place. A love of books and respect for their authors come second, IMO. There are exceptions, but the fine lines are still there.

tri

Kastil
07-31-2012, 03:29 PM
"Granted, I know from the other things I have published that the author has to do promos (per most of my contracts) but the publisher also puts their best foot forward."

And at other times, a publisher's best foot forward kicks the author in the ass and tells them to get out there and sell books...

Just like a recent publisher just told me to do, upon a new release.

I take and took great offense to that comment and, frankly, am getting fed-up with hearing these push/shove tactics from small press. I've had my share of grief from these amateurs, and have delighted in tearing up more contracts than I've signed in the past seven years. Eleven total.

A free sales force is the most enticing aspect of why small mom and pop publishers go into business in the first place. A love of books and respect for their authors come second, IMO. There are exceptions, but the fine lines are still there.

triSorry to hear about your experience but it hasn't been mine with the publishers I'm with. They promote as much as I do.

JulianaHaygert
07-31-2012, 06:42 PM
I have to say, their covers are pretty good ...

triceretops
07-31-2012, 08:58 PM
Sorry to hear about your experience but it hasn't been mine with the publishers I'm with. They promote as much as I do.

Didn't mean to paint with such a broad brush. I do have some very involved and effective publishers who really know what they're doing. But you have to watch out for the others and perform due diligence during research. It took me a while to spot the lazy ones by carefully reading their mission statements. Any excessive author promo advice or declarations that appears in a publisher's mission statement is enough for me to back off and seriously reconsider. I'm talking above the normal expectations of what an author is expected to do.

If you're asked to compile a friends and family list with email addresses--run like hell

If you get bombarded with instructional emails on how and where to market and promote your book--run like hell.

If you're asked to contribute financially to a group ad for the publisher so your book can be included--run like hell.

If you're asked for a comprehensive marketing plan and budget--run like hell.

If you are required to do book signings on your own dime and you must perform a certain amount of signings within any type of a time frame--run like hell.

If you can see that the publisher sells exclusively from their website, with little or no penetration into the other online retail stores or lists--run like hell.

Sorry, very passionate about this. That's why I'm a Guerrilla fighter for the writers.

tri

brianm
08-01-2012, 04:04 AM
People have been saying 8% royalties on a print book is low... <snip>

It is when it is calculated on net.


Entangled... Same with their main line for Adult fiction, 40% digital and 8% print.Entangled pays 9% of cover for print. (http://www.entangledpublishing.com/about-us/)

You pay 8% of net.

There's a big difference and the industry norm for digital is calculated on cover.

~brianm~

JulianaHaygert
09-06-2012, 09:04 PM
Submission calls: Valentine Day's stories.
http://www.inkspellpublishing.com/submission.html

Undercover
09-11-2013, 11:51 PM
Any more on these guys?

veinglory
09-11-2013, 11:56 PM
I notice that they conflate gay with explicit. Which is not unusual but still annoying.

Undercover
09-12-2013, 12:06 AM
Their Amazon rankings aren't so hot either. I still love those covers though.

April Marie
06-26-2014, 04:30 PM
Has anyone signed with Inkspell? If so, what was your experience like?

celoise
02-25-2015, 01:17 AM
I haven't published with them, but I sent in a MSS, and someone responded within a couple of weeks to say she loved my story but it wasn't right for their line. She also directed me to other publishers that were more appropriate for me. So, they seem very nice, for what it's worth.

oceansoul
04-05-2015, 12:25 AM
I submitted a manuscript to these guys and was told that my book could not be "sweet" romance because it featured two gay characters. The manuscript in question WAS, in fact, a sweet gay YA romance with no explicit sex or even really suggested sex.

They have nice covers, I'll give them that. But I think they should reevaluate some things.

Tricksie-ish
03-26-2016, 07:10 AM
Anyone else have things to add here? They've just offered me a contract for my book. I'm still waiting on a couple of other publishers who have fulls...

Filigree
03-26-2016, 08:18 PM
Just from Oceansoul's post, I wouldn't deal with them...I suspect their worldview and mine are too far apart.

pinkbowvintage
03-26-2016, 08:43 PM
I submitted a manuscript to these guys and was told that my book could not be "sweet" romance because it featured two gay characters. The manuscript in question WAS, in fact, a sweet gay YA romance with no explicit sex or even really suggested sex.

They have nice covers, I'll give them that. But I think they should reevaluate some things.

I hate to say it but I'm getting some homophobic vibes. I didn't find any LGBT books on their site either. I really hope I'm wrong.

beguilingzoey
04-10-2016, 12:17 AM
I hate to say it but I'm getting some homophobic vibes. I didn't find any LGBT books on their site either. I really hope I'm wrong.

As the acquisitions editor, I find this very disturbing. Inkspell doesn't accept Christian romance either but that doesn't make them Satanic. And as a parent of a LGBT child, I am hurt that one person's rejection makes the whole company homophobic.

Tavia
04-10-2016, 01:23 AM
I notice that they conflate gay with explicit. Which is not unusual but still annoying.


I submitted a manuscript to these guys and was told that my book could not be "sweet" romance because it featured two gay characters. The manuscript in question WAS, in fact, a sweet gay YA romance with no explicit sex or even really suggested sex.

They have nice covers, I'll give them that. But I think they should reevaluate some things.


As the acquisitions editor, I find this very disturbing. Inkspell doesn't accept Christian romance either but that doesn't make them Satanic. And as a parent of a LGBT child, I am hurt that one person's rejection makes the whole company homophobic.

beguilingzoey, it's more than "one person's rejection." Take a look at the submissions page, where for one of their lines they list a requirement as:



Steamy sex but not erotic (ménage, m/m, etc.)


http://www.inkspellpublishing.com/submission.html

Inkspell clearly equates m/m to a higher level of graphic content. The editor who rejected oceansoul was clearly doing so according to the company's philosophy as a whole. If that is *not* the company's philosophy, then A) the submissions page needs to be updated immediately, and B) anyone responding to submissions needs some training on how not to say BS like "m/m can't be sweet romance" to authors like oceansoul.

akaria
04-10-2016, 01:43 AM
beguilingzoey, it's more than "one person's rejection." Take a look at the submissions page, where for one of their lines they list a requirement as:



Steamy sex but not erotic (ménage, m/m, etc.)


http://www.inkspellpublishing.com/submission.html

Inkspell clearly equates m/m to a higher level of graphic content. The editor who rejected oceansoul was clearly doing so according to the company's philosophy as a whole. If that is *not* the company's philosophy, then A) the submissions page needs to be updated immediately, and B) anyone responding to submissions needs some training on how not to say BS like "m/m can't be sweet romance" to authors like oceansoul.

Erotic usually means frequent graphic sex. Two gay teens making googly eyes over each other is not erotic. I suppose you could even have a sweet menage where all three characters hold hands and cuddle.

beguilingzoey
04-10-2016, 12:38 PM
Thank you Tavia for pointing out the submission's page. That wording has been taken down and is in the process of being changed. But I want to address the way we handle ALL submissions.

Each manuscript submitted is read through fully and then discussed as far as Writing Quality, Author's Presence and Marketability. After careful consideration, we make a decision. Sometimes asking for a re-write/re-submit or a denial. Often with a denial, if the writing is still very good, we suggest other avenues such as other publishing companies with a proven marketing or story brand that is a better fit for that author/manuscript. We value each author and their work too much to take on a story that we feel we wouldn't be able to sell/market effectively based on our readership demographics (which we continue to analyze). Inkspell has a wonderful relationship with other publishing houses and have often suggested specific authors to them and they to us.

I have copies of emails in which we have said to authors, much like Oceansoul, that the story isn't a good fit for our readership for whatever reason and we suggest that they submit their story to publisher X, Y, or Z. Never once have we told an author that their story isn't a sweet romance because it contains male/male or female/female characters. This is the same way we handle historicals and more erotic manuscripts which we have found unable to meet sales goals on. It wouldn't be good business sense for us or to the author to publish a book which we can't effectively sell or market to our proven reader base.

Tavia
04-10-2016, 08:10 PM
Thank you Tavia for pointing out the submission's page. That wording has been taken down and is in the process of being changed.

I'm going to mostly step back out of the conversation (since obviously I don't have any insight into Inkspell's acquisitions emails, heh). But I wanted to thank you for moving to update the submissions page so quickly.

JustWonderin
02-20-2017, 07:47 PM
Anything new on these guys? The covers alone make me want to sub.

KrisA09
02-21-2017, 07:55 PM
I just submitted to them. They are nice and reply to your email quickly.

Lee Ann Ward Books
04-04-2017, 08:10 AM
I just signed a contract with Inkspell for my YA romance. Super excited to work with them! My book is slated for a December 2017 release date.