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Gravity
12-21-2011, 12:03 AM
I'll start: Ladder 49, with Joaquin Phoenix and John Travolta. SPOILERS AHEAD












A rookie fireman, trapped in a burning warehouse, reflects on his life while his fellow firefighters effect his rescue. At the end they fail, and he burns to death.

I think it had a Christmas season release too, which is absolutely amazing. At any rate, I would imagine it had audiences cheering (not).

Okay, next. :evil

ETA: fixed the spoiler, because I'm too much of Luddite to know how to hide it with white space :cry:

Calla Lily
12-21-2011, 12:11 AM
WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD!








City of Angels (the Ryan/Cage remake of the original German film).

It starts out with a mother frantically trying to save her daughter's life, as the daughter's fever rises and rises. The daughter dies.

I literally closed my eyes, plugged my ears, and hummed softly when I realized where this scene was going. Hey, filmmakers: DON'T DO THIS without a warning to parents.

Then, after Cage becomes human for Ryan, the director chose to have her GET HIT BY A TRUCK AND DIE. Supposedly the end of the film where Cage runs into the surf and frolics (erm... note to Cage: Don't frolic. Ever.) indicates that he's okay being human and bereft of everything he gave up angelhood for--and also is no longer an angel.

:Headbang:

At least in the (grim) original, the ex-angel and his circus ballerina live on together.


Next?

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 12:12 AM
I'd say The Mist. I'm still not sure if that ending is meaningful, or just cruel for no reason (which life itself can be, so maybe that's gives the ending its meaning, and on goes the internal debate).

Maryn
12-21-2011, 12:26 AM
Oh, an easy question for me: Testament, with William Devane and Jane Alexander as the parents of a family in northern California. He's just left a message he's on his way home from the city when a nuclear device hits. Communications fail, and he never arrives and is presumed dead. There are apparently retaliatory strikes, and fallout slowly reaches the town. The mom watches her kids die one by one because radiation poisoning is quicker on smaller bodies, and there is no hope for any of the good and decent people who try to help one another.

Oddly, it was an excellent movie, but the most depressing one I've ever seen.

Maryn, who remembers it far too vividly

scarletpeaches
12-21-2011, 12:30 AM
I agree with Ladder 49 and City of Angels.

CoA was a stonking great deus-ex-machina which made me want to put my foot through the telly.

Ladder 49 had the advantage of Joaquin Phoenix, in uniform, and in his pre-batshit hairy hobo days.

SP, suggesting a spoiler warning for the thread title or individual posts, perhaps?

Calla Lily
12-21-2011, 12:32 AM
Maryn, I forgot about Testament. God, yes, what a slit-yer-wrists movie.

Jcomp, The ending of the Mist was stolen from an older short or 2, which annoys me. Why didn't they just end it like the novella? Grr.

scarlet, I agree. *runs to post "spoiler" warning*

Camilla Delvalle
12-21-2011, 12:58 AM
What's the name of that movie with aliens that is made up entirely of news broadcasts?

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 12:59 AM
I kinda think the thread title is sort of its own spoiler warning, but I suppose adding one couldn't hurt.

Camilla Delvalle
12-21-2011, 01:02 AM
Without Warning. Found it on Google finally. That movie is fully depressing. It made me cranky with my boyfriend for showing it to me.

scarletpeaches
12-21-2011, 01:14 AM
I kinda think the thread title is sort of its own spoiler warning, but I suppose adding one couldn't hurt.Yeah, bit difficult to work these things out.

I'm one of those people who's sucked in my a spoiler warning, sometimes. Someone could post "I'm about to discuss [insert film title here] so scroll past this post if you haven't seen it," and I'll swither about reading the post to save on the cost of the DVD. :D

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 01:22 AM
Yeah, bit difficult to work these things out.

I'm one of those people who's sucked in my a spoiler warning, sometimes. Someone could post "I'm about to discuss [insert film title here] so scroll past this post if you haven't seen it," and I'll swither about reading the post to save on the cost of the DVD. :D

Oh I know the feeling... hell, I'm a recovering spoiler junkie.

Dave Hardy
12-21-2011, 01:43 AM
The Whole Wide World will wring a manly tear from me. Vincent D'Onofrio as Robert E. Howard & Renee Zellwegger as Novalyne Price. It's a kind of life-goes-on moment, which was Novalyne's answer to Bob's suicide. The only answer you can really give I suppose.

*SPOILER*
Closely Watched Trains doesn't have exactly the same ride-into-the-sunset-with-a-tear feel, but Milos's death while sabotaging a German ammo train, while it's not exactly pointless, is such a waste of life at the moment it blooms.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
12-21-2011, 01:47 AM
Oh, an easy question for me: Testament, with William Devane and Jane Alexander as the parents of a family in northern California. He's just left a message he's on his way home from the city when a nuclear device hits. Communications fail, and he never arrives and is presumed dead. There are apparently retaliatory strikes, and fallout slowly reaches the town. The mom watches her kids die one by one because radiation poisoning is quicker on smaller bodies, and there is no hope for any of the good and decent people who try to help one another.

Oddly, it was an excellent movie, but the most depressing one I've ever seen.

Maryn, who remembers it far too vividly

I agree with this one... saw it years ago and cried for days. Celebrating one of the neighborhood boy's birthdays with crackers... and knowing he's going to die... sheesh!!!

Ladder 49 runs a close second, though.

scarletpeaches
12-21-2011, 01:58 AM
Oh, hey Ol' Bag...nice signature! Guess who's pootling around Amazon looking to spend some ?

Okay people, nothing to see here...back on topic, please.

robjvargas
12-21-2011, 02:01 AM
I have two. Grifters with Annette Bening, John Cusack, Angelica Huston. No one in that movie is likable, they are all cons and make no bones about, and then

<SPOILER>







John Cusak dies at the end, Bening's character is already dead. And the mother cries an awful cry before getting away with Cusack's stash of cash. I needed a shower after watching that movie, even though I thought it an excellent movie. Well made, ugly movie.

Going farther back, Silent Running, Sci Fi flick in the 70's. Old enough that I won't alert on the spoiler. Bruce Dern on one of three ships harboring the last existing forests in the solar system when the earth government closes the project. Bruce fights, basically loses, and launches one of the forest pods before blowing up. One little knee-high robot to caretake a couple of acres of forest drifting out beyond Saturn (yes, there were artificial lights). I was 10 when I saw it, and bawled the night away.

ChaosTitan
12-21-2011, 02:10 AM
Definitely agree with both Ladder 49 and City of Angels.

And I'll add another Joaquin Phoenix movie to the mix: Return to Paradise.

Now, I love this movie for a lot of reasons: great actors, well written, well-acted, and I didn't want to punch Anne Heche in the face even once.

The basic story is about three American men who met and partied in Malaysia. Two went back to the States, but the third man was arrested and charged with being a drug dealer because he was found with a huge amount of hash on him. Because of very strict laws, the sentence was death. The only way to avoid a death sentence was for the other two men to return to Malaysia, take responsibility for their share of the drugs, and serve three years in a Malaysian prison. The bulk of the story is Vince Vaughn's character trying to decide if he's willing to give up three years of his life for a man (Joaquin Phoenix) he doesn't really know.



SPOILERS

VV and the other guy decide to go back, only the other guy changes his mind at the last minute. So VV bravely steps up and will serve six years to save Joaquin's life. Only at the sentencing, the judge hears about a news article printed by a mouthy, obnoxious reporter who trashes the Malaysian judicial system. It pisses off the judge, who decides to make an example out of Joaquin and has him executed anyway. So VV is stuck in a crappy third world prison for the next six years for nothing*, and he watches as Joaquin is led to the gallows.

I was bawling by the end of this movie. Such a downer.

*Although technically not for nothing, because dude did buy a crapload of illegal drugs....

firedrake
12-21-2011, 02:17 AM
Heh. Just exchanging emails with a friend about the same thing.

The last ten minutes of Gallipoli kills me every time.

The end of Miracle Mile is a total downer.

aadams73
12-21-2011, 02:19 AM
Leaving Las Vegas.

I hate that movie.

ohthatmomagain
12-21-2011, 02:27 AM
The Departed

*Spoiler*

Everyone (well most everyone) died. It was like.. what was the point?

Jake Barnes
12-21-2011, 02:44 AM
Surprised it took to post 18 to get "Leaving Las Vegas."

ChaosTitan
12-21-2011, 02:57 AM
I don't know. While "Leaving Las Vegas" was definitely a sad film, did anyone really expect otherwise?




SPOILERS

I mean, you know from the outset that Nic Cage is going to Vegas to drink himself to death. Did anyone watching that movie actually expect the whole "hooker with the heart of gold" to change his mind and save him?




I guess for me, a true downer ending has to come with some element of surprise to it.

Gravity
12-21-2011, 03:28 AM
I'll second whoever mentioned Silent Running. I was searching the kitchen drawers for a sharp knife when that one was over.

On another note, back in the fifties my mom somehow convinced my hardcore Army colonel dad to take us all to the drive-in for a pleasant little diversion called All Mine to Give. Umm ... yeah. I'm surprised when we got home Pop didn't pull the car in the garage with all of us still in it and close the door while it was running.

Gadzooks, what a blow-your-head-off film.

shawkins
12-21-2011, 03:46 AM
Requiem For a Dream - Very well done, but perhaps not unduly burdened with good cheer.

stormie
12-21-2011, 04:02 AM
Back in the '60s (wa-y-y before I was born and I know this by osmosis or something ;) ), there was a station that had old movies on boring Sunday afternoons and it was called the Million Dollar Movies. My father was watching an old '40s movie where at the end of this particular movie, the wife had died and the father (w/ a little girl maybe?) stood near the ocean's edge on a moonlit night, picturing his wife. There was a song, either "Til We Meet Again" or "Beautiful Dreamer." (My father loved those songs.) Anyway, I remember my father's eyes were misty, which wasn't like him, and I felt very sad. Don't know what movie it was, but it stuck with me for it's downer ending.

aadams73
12-21-2011, 04:06 AM
I don't know. While "Leaving Las Vegas" was definitely a sad film, did anyone really expect otherwise?



I guess I was hopeful, as I generally am when I start watching a movie (or reading a book). No matter how bad things seem, I hope that the characters can overcome their obstacles and hurts, and show that they're effective and worth having their stories told.

Leaving Las Vegas, to me, was just one giant spiral o' doom and gloom. And to be fair, I hated it from the get-go. I wanted both characters to die so I could leave the movie theater and go home and never see them again. :D

Gravity
12-21-2011, 04:39 AM
Gee, isn't everyone thrilled beyond reason I started this thread only five days before Christmas? :evil

stormie
12-21-2011, 05:02 AM
Gee, isn't everyone thrilled beyond reason I started this thread only five days before Christmas? :evil
And now I'm going to be up all night trying to find what that depressing movie was I saw as a little kid. It was the first time I ever realized that movies could be downers at the end. Here I was used to just Bambi's mother getting killed but having Thumper and all the forest animals to liven things up, and along comes an old black and white movie where the ending is bleak. But at least it was at the ocean....:)

Okay. Continue.

Elaine Margarett
12-21-2011, 05:10 AM
Open Water. I had seen the news coverage of the actual couple who were left at sea while scuba diving. Their story was compelling and I saw how a couple of years later they wrote a movie based on their experience.

Well, it was only loosely based on their experience. In real life they lived (obviously) in the last five minute of the movie, they didn't. It was awful. <shudders> I kept waiting, and waiting for them to be rescued. Had I known I would have never watched it.

And Braveheart. I had to leave the room at the brutality of the ending.

Al Stevens
12-21-2011, 05:15 AM
I have two:

1. Thornton Wilder's "Our Town." The play has a beautiful ending. The 1940 movie adds a sequence that totally screws up the story by making Emily's death a dream sequence. She awakens to a happy ending.

2. The Hustler. In the book, Fast Eddie caves in to Bert's demands so he can keep hustling pool in the big leagues.

In the movie, Eddie's (Paul Newman) girlfriend Sarah (Piper Laurie) has shacked up with Bert (George C. Scott) and commits suicide, which is why Fast Eddie self-righteously tells them to shove it and walks out of the pool hall. None of that was in the book.

A bogus hollywood ending. Made me want to barf.

stormie
12-21-2011, 05:15 AM
And Braveheart. I had to leave the room at the brutality of the ending.
stormie shudders. As true might have been to the story line, that did it for me. The ending was depressing but also too graphic by just watching Mel Gibson's face. It took away from the emotional component by focusing a little too long on his facial contortions, leaving little to the imagination.

childeroland
12-21-2011, 05:20 AM
An American Crime. Also the answer to: what's the most downer movie you've ever seen?

Gravity
12-21-2011, 05:24 AM
My wife simply cannot take the last five minutes of Return of the King. So when the wedding is over, and the camera pulls back to show the map as the music swells, we shut it off. Movie-editing, homestyle. :D

movieman
12-21-2011, 08:12 AM
I'd say The Mist.

Yeah, the ending utterly destroyed that movie; although King's story didn't really have an ending, the one they wrote for the movie was laughably bad and completely out of character.

jennontheisland
12-21-2011, 08:26 AM
The Departed

*Spoiler*

Everyone (well most everyone) died. It was like.. what was the point?
Really? I kinda figured the title of that one gave it away.

I'm kind of a fan of stories where the pov character dies. I think it started with The Little Mermaid. There was an old anime one in the early 80s. I loved it. I hate the disneyfied version.

MamaStrong
12-21-2011, 08:32 AM
Up! yes it's a cartoon, but I felt the whole thing was both depressing and touching.

Lyra Jean
12-21-2011, 09:14 AM
Atonement

I think I actually threw something at my TV.

ohthatmomagain
12-21-2011, 09:17 AM
Really? I kinda figured the title of that one gave it away.

I'm kind of a fan of stories where the pov character dies. I think it started with The Little Mermaid. There was an old anime one in the early 80s. I loved it. I hate the disneyfied version.

Well, I figured someone died.. just not all of them ;)

bettielee
12-21-2011, 10:11 AM
oh, 'm being influenced by reading other posts! I would say On the Beach and The Road. Both apocolyptic tales.

Spoilers

On the Beach - people in Australia waiting for the nuclear fallout to get them

The Road - the father dies from what's probably lung cancer or pneumonia.

bettielee
12-21-2011, 10:36 AM
Atonement

I think I actually threw something at my TV.

I did, but for a different reason. That idiot director took an elegiac, beautiful (and yeah, heavy on the prosey) book and made it a ham-handed wankfest. And Keira Knightley's clavicle entering every scene two minutes before she did. Tuck that thing back. It doesn't take the place of boobies when you don't have them.

Manuel Royal
12-21-2011, 04:58 PM
I have two:

1. Thornton Wilder's "Our Town." The play has a beautiful ending. The 1940 movie adds a sequence that totally screws up the story by making Emily's death a dream sequence. She awakens to a happy ending.

2. The Hustler. In the book, Fast Eddie caves in to Bert's demands so he can keep hustling pool in the big leagues.

In the movie, Eddie's (Paul Newman) girlfriend Sarah (Piper Laurie) has shacked up with Bert (George C. Scott) and commits suicide, which is why Fast Eddie self-righteously tells them to shove it and walks out of the pool hall. None of that was in the book.

A bogus hollywood ending. Made me want to barf.Then, if you read Bernard Malamud's novel The Natural, I bet you weren't happy with the changes in the Robert Redford movie.

SPOILER

Downer ending? Check out the recent Buried. Excellent performance by Ryan Reynolds, who has to carry the movie every minute because he's trapped in a buried coffin, which is where the camera stays.

(By the end, see if you don't hate the company he works for, and especially the HR guy, a little more than you hate the kidnapper.)

Diana Hignutt
12-21-2011, 05:12 PM
I'd say The Mist. I'm still not sure if that ending is meaningful, or just cruel for no reason (which life itself can be, so maybe that's gives the ending its meaning, and on goes the internal debate).

Yep.

Vandal
12-21-2011, 05:14 PM
Das Boot

A double dose of depression to end that one.

CaroGirl
12-21-2011, 05:18 PM
Midnight Cowboy. So. Sad.

dolores haze
12-21-2011, 05:22 PM
Lars von Trier's Dancer In The Dark. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancer_in_the_Dark)

*starts to cry*

Grrarrgh
12-21-2011, 05:22 PM
...
SPOILER

Downer ending? Check out the recent Buried. Excellent performance by Ryan Reynolds, who has to carry the movie every minute because he's trapped in a buried coffin, which is where the camera stays.

(By the end, see if you don't hate his employer, and especially the HR guy, a little more than you hate the kidnapper.)


I was just going to post about this one. I watched it last weekend, and you're right on all accounts. I really couldn't decide which person I hated more by the end of that movie. But a fantastic performance by Ryan Reynolds.

Lyra Jean
12-21-2011, 05:25 PM
Das Boot

A double dose of depression to end that one.

It's the only time I rooted for Nazis. I forgot about this movie but it's still worth watching.

Diana Hignutt
12-21-2011, 05:43 PM
Melancholia. But the ending is not a surprise depression...it's coming the whole movie...

Dave Hardy
12-21-2011, 06:06 PM
Lars von Trier's Dancer In The Dark. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancer_in_the_Dark)

*starts to cry*


I saw Breaking the Waves in small theater in Prague when it came out. I was accompanying a friend who didn't want to go alone. Not my usual fare, I consider Reservoir Dogs the perfect date movie. Anyway, I was pretty absorbed despite the lack of gunfire and dismemberment. But when that ending hit, man the hankies came out in that theater. I have never heard anything like that before or since.

I don't know if Lars von Trier is a cinematic genius or a master manipulator or if there's a difference. But he owned that audience.

scarletpeaches
12-21-2011, 06:11 PM
I did, but for a different reason. That idiot director took an elegiac, beautiful (and yeah, heavy on the prosey) book and made it a ham-handed wankfest. And Keira Knightley's clavicle entering every scene two minutes before she did. Tuck that thing back. It doesn't take the place of boobies when you don't have them.I love you for this post, and I haven't even seen the film. I have the DVD and have read the book, though.

Keira Knightley. Ugh.

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 06:40 PM
SPOILER

Downer ending? Check out the recent Buried. Excellent performance by Ryan Reynolds, who has to carry the movie every minute because he's trapped in a buried coffin, which is where the camera stays.

(By the end, see if you don't hate his employer, and especially the HR guy, a little more than you hate the kidnapper.)

Can't believe I forgot about Buried. That one was brutal.

seun
12-21-2011, 06:51 PM
And Braveheart. I had to leave the room at the brutality of the ending.

I had to leave because of how terrible that film was.


I'd say The Mist


Yeah, the ending utterly destroyed that movie; although King's story didn't really have an ending, the one they wrote for the movie was laughably bad and completely out of character.

I loved the end to The Mist. It fit perfectly for me.

ChaosTitan
12-21-2011, 07:11 PM
Lars von Trier's Dancer In The Dark. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancer_in_the_Dark)

*starts to cry*

I can't believe I forgot that movie. I was a sobbing mess and so angry about the way it ended.



I loved the end to The Mist. It fit perfectly for me.

Me, too. The ending was cruel, but it was a horror film.

seun
12-21-2011, 07:19 PM
I loved the end to The Mist. It fit perfectly for me.



Me, too. The ending was cruel, but it was a horror film.

Too right. I think mainstream horror has been so watered down over the last ten years or so that when something actually horrible happens in a horror film, it takes a lot of people by surprise and they react negatively. Of course, they may just disagree with me.

I will allow this. ;)

ChaosTitan
12-21-2011, 07:23 PM
Too right. I think mainstream horror has been so watered down over the last ten years or so that when something actually horrible happens in a horror film, it takes a lot of people by surprise and they react negatively. Of course, they may just disagree with me.

I will allow this. ;)

I totally agree. It's nice to stumble onto a horror film that really horrifies me by the way it unfolds and ends. "Eden Lake" did a good job of that recently. I suppose it did have a "downer" ending, but it totally fit the movie.

dolores haze
12-21-2011, 07:25 PM
I saw Breaking the Waves in small theater in Prague when it came out. I was accompanying a friend who didn't want to go alone. Not my usual fare, I consider Reservoir Dogs the perfect date movie. Anyway, I was pretty absorbed despite the lack of gunfire and dismemberment. But when that ending hit, man the hankies came out in that theater. I have never heard anything like that before or since.

I don't know if Lars von Trier is a cinematic genius or a master manipulator or if there's a difference. But he owned that audience.

I cried like a frickin' baby at the end of Breaking the Waves. But, despite everything that had gone before, it was a strangely upbeat ending. 'Dancer in the Dark' was nowhere near as kind. I was in a depressed haze for days. And it was a musical!

I think von Trier is a genius, but I ain't watching another of his films unless I have a supply of valium on hand.

NewKidOldKid
12-21-2011, 07:58 PM
The ending of American History X makes me really sad. I love that movie, though.

And an oldie... Out of Africa. Especially sad because it's a true story and she spent the rest of her life alone, missing him.

seun
12-21-2011, 08:01 PM
I totally agree. It's nice to stumble onto a horror film that really horrifies me by the way it unfolds and ends. "Eden Lake" did a good job of that recently. I suppose it did have a "downer" ending, but it totally fit the movie.

If you liked Eden Lake, try a British film called F. I'll find a link for you in a sec.

Also, the French film Ils. Cracking film.

LINK: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1486670/

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 08:43 PM
Too right. I think mainstream horror has been so watered down over the last ten years or so that when something actually horrible happens in a horror film, it takes a lot of people by surprise and they react negatively.

I disagree. I think mainstream horror has kind of gone in the opposite direction. The Saw flicks, Hostel, Paranormal Activity, Final Destination, every lousy slasher flick where the killer comes back to life at the last second to show that it's not really over. All of these have downer endings galore, and these are the most profitable horror flicks to hit theaters over the last decade. I think mainstream horror is far too interested in making sure the ending isn't happy and something horrible happens that they ignore logic or the flow of the story. It's come to a point where the downer ending in a mainstream horror flick is woefully predictable. I saw the "twist" "downer ending" in [spoiler] Drag Me to Hell [spoiler] coming an hour away because of this trend (and because subtlety has never been one of the director's strong points).

My thing with the The Mist, I don't hate the ending, primarily because it's hard to come up with a satisfying ending for the story (evidenced, I think, by the fact that King himself ended his story originally with a sort of non-ending). At the same time, for me, The Mist's ending falls in line with other mainstream horror that just goes out of its way to come up with a supposedly "horrifying" ending just because that's what they think is supposed to happen. It doesn't feel natural. Again, it could be a commentary on the almost random cruelty of life, and that would save the ending. But at that point it's a matter of whether or not you want to give that much credit to the filmmaker that this was their intention. I'm still torn on it.

In short, I don't mind cruelty and horrible things happening in horror, obviously, but it has to make sense within the context of the story and the preceding events.

seun
12-21-2011, 08:54 PM
I disagree. I think mainstream horror has kind of gone in the opposite direction. The Saw flicks, Hostel, Paranormal Activity, Final Destination, every lousy slasher flick where the killer comes back to life at the last second to show that it's not really over. All of these have downer endings galore, and these are the most profitable horror flicks to hit theaters over the last decade.

I think we're talking about slightly different issues. When I say mainstream horror, I'm not referring specifically to the endings of horror films but the films as a whole. And I can't take a lot of recent horror seriously - the endless Saw sequels, the mind numbingly repetitive Final Destinations, the boring as hell Paranormal Activity 1 & 2 (I didn't bother with the third one).

I'm with you on the downer endings issue, though. I watched....SPOILERS....John Carpenter's The Ward a few weeks back. The film itself wasn't anything special but the ending was a cheap scare that felt tacked on because that's what we supposedly want.

Jcomp
12-21-2011, 09:03 PM
I think we're talking about slightly different issues. When I say mainstream horror, I'm not referring specifically to the endings of horror films but the films as a whole. And I can't take a lot of recent horror seriously - the endless Saw sequels, the mind numbingly repetitive Final Destinations, the boring as hell Paranormal Activity 1 & 2 (I didn't bother with the third one).

I sort of see what you mean (although I actually liked the first PA and didn't care for the other two), but to me, those flicks still qualify as films where "something actually horrible happens." In fact, I think the FD's and Saw's of the world exist solely to put horrible happenings on the screen, to a point where it becomes boring. The shock factor of The Mist's ending is fairly effective, it got people talking, but the question for me is within the context is it there solely for shock value of making something horrible happen, or is it defensible as a fitting end to what preceded it. Again, I'm torn.

An example of a flick that I think had a brilliantly executed, absolutely sensible and properly foreshadowed downer ending is Fallen with Denzel Washington. The movie overall isn't all that great, but I thought the execution of the ending was outstanding.

Jake Barnes
12-21-2011, 09:47 PM
The big plot twist in "Atonement" doesn't work in a film. Atonement is all about POV and how different POVs alter a story. In a movie there is only one POV, the camera's.

Maryn
12-21-2011, 09:50 PM
Back in the '60s (wa-y-y before I was born and I know this by osmosis or something ;) ), there was a station that had old movies on boring Sunday afternoons and it was called the Million Dollar Movies. My father was watching an old '40s movie where at the end of this particular movie, the wife had died and the father (w/ a little girl maybe?) stood near the ocean's edge on a moonlit night, picturing his wife. There was a song, either "Til We Meet Again" or "Beautiful Dreamer." (My father loved those songs.) Anyway, I remember my father's eyes were misty, which wasn't like him, and I felt very sad. Don't know what movie it was, but it stuck with me for it's downer ending.Two people at the site where I asked suggested it was most likely "Sentimental Journey." Here's the IMDb summary: An actress becomes taken with Hitty, a young orphan prone to dreaming. Julie soon finds out that she is ill and has only a short time to live. She decides to adopt the child so that her husband Bill will not be alone when she dies. Unfortunately, Bill is not charmed by Hitty. After Julie dies. Bill is so grief stricken, he shuts out everyone in his life, especially Hitty. Hitty begins to receive imaginary visits from Julie who offers Hitty advice on how to make Bill happy. Bill does not believe she's seen Julie and decides to send her back to the orphanage. Rather than go back, Hitty runs away. After Bill hears a record Julie recorded before she died, he finally realizes he must move on with his life and find Hitty.

Maryn, hoping that's it

seun
12-21-2011, 10:46 PM
. The shock factor of The Mist's ending is fairly effective, it got people talking, but the question for me is within the context is it there solely for shock value of making something horrible happen, or is it defensible as a fitting end to what preceded it. Again, I'm torn.

An example of a flick that I think had a brilliantly executed, absolutely sensible and properly foreshadowed downer ending is Fallen with Denzel Washington. The movie overall isn't all that great, but I thought the execution of the ending was outstanding.

I can see the split between which side the end of The Mist goes with - shock for the sake of it or fitting the film. I go with fitting. Same with, for example, the end of Seven. It fit the film.
And thanks for the reminder about Fallen. Watched it a few years back and enjoyed it quite a bit.

Dave Hardy
12-21-2011, 11:28 PM
I cried like a frickin' baby at the end of Breaking the Waves. But, despite everything that had gone before, it was a strangely upbeat ending. 'Dancer in the Dark' was nowhere near as kind. I was in a depressed haze for days. And it was a musical!

I think von Trier is a genius, but I ain't watching another of his films unless I have a supply of valium on hand.

Very true what you say about Breaking the Waves, the ending is about spiritual redemption. Tragic, but not a downer. Bess wins, God personally validates her sacrifice.

I didn't get that from Dancer in the Dark, though I was rather more distant from that one (watched it on TV while exchanging comments with the missus). Von Trier is polarizing in his unwavering commitment to beautiful, delicate, heroines who are brutally smashed by a hateful world yet persevere with personal strength. Makes some critics plum bonkers.

scarletpeaches
12-21-2011, 11:35 PM
An example of a flick that I think had a brilliantly executed, absolutely sensible and properly foreshadowed downer ending is Fallen with Denzel Washington. The movie overall isn't all that great, but I thought the execution of the ending was outstanding.My cousin and I had a DVD night years back, and that was one of the films we watched. As he left, I said, "Call me when you get home so I know you're safe."

About half an hour later, the phone goes and I pick it up to hear...

"Ti-i-i-ime is on our side, YES IT IS!"

And the fucker hung up. :rant:

seun
12-21-2011, 11:40 PM
My cousin and I had a DVD night years back, and that was one of the films we watched. As he left, I said, "Call me when you get home so I know you're safe."

About half an hour later, the phone goes and I pick it up to hear...

"Ti-i-i-ime is on our side, YES IT IS!"

And the fucker hung up. :rant:

A few years back, our local cinema showed Ringu at Halloween. Although we'd already seen it, I talked my wife into coming with me and a couple of mates. After the film finished, she went to the loo while I waited in the foyer. There were a few phones in there, so I dialled one of them from my mobile and timed it perfectly.

It started to ring as she came out of the toilet. :D

Calla Lily
12-21-2011, 11:52 PM
seun, that is evil and excellent.

When Mr. Lily and I were engaged, I went to see him in a local theater production on Halloween. Afterwards, we went to his dressing room so he could change. The door had a faulty lock, and we realized after everyone left that we were locked in.

In the sub-basement of a civic center. On Halloween. The intercom which could receive and not send, allowed us to listen to the horror movie marathon.

Ever just *listen* to the original Night of the Living Dead? Alone? Thinking you're trapped there till someone shows up the next morning?

Long after the movie ended, we heard the elevator and then, miraculously, footsteps coming down the hall. We banged on the door and shouted, "We're locked in room 223! Help! Let us out!"

The footsteps stopped, and then we heard in a trembling voice, "Jesus Christ!"

The door opened and I jumped out and kissed a total stranger. He said that he was the movie projectionist and had just finished running 5 horror movies back to back. He was making the last round of the building for the night and thought he was alone. Then he heard us shouting and banging. Poor guy was white as a sheet.

That being said, the ending of the original NotLD was unexpected and quite good.

seun
12-22-2011, 12:27 AM
seun, that is evil and excellent.

I know. And she still married me.


When Mr. Lily and I were engaged, I went to see him in a local theater production on Halloween. Afterwards, we went to his dressing room so he could change. The door had a faulty lock, and we realized after everyone left that we were locked in.

In the sub-basement of a civic center. On Halloween. The intercom which could receive and not send, allowed us to listen to the horror movie marathon.

Ever just *listen* to the original Night of the Living Dead? Alone? Thinking you're trapped there till someone shows up the next morning?

Long after the movie ended, we heard the elevator and then, miraculously, footsteps coming down the hall. We banged on the door and shouted, "We're locked in room 223! Help! Let us out!"

The footsteps stopped, and then we heard in a trembling voice, "Jesus Christ!"

The door opened and I jumped out and kissed a total stranger. He said that he was the movie projectionist and had just finished running 5 horror movies back to back. He was making the last round of the building for the night and thought he was alone. Then he heard us shouting and banging. Poor guy was white as a sheet.

That is a great story. Love it.


How about the end to John Carpenter's The Thing for a downer?

Jess Haines
12-22-2011, 12:41 AM
I haven't seen it, but just hearing second-hand about the ending to Grave of the Fireflies makes me want to commit seppuku. :e2cry:

Jcomp
12-22-2011, 01:43 AM
Jess, pretty much the entirety of Grave of the Fireflies is pretty damn depressing. Another, similarly grim anime is Barefoot Gen.

And to scarlet, seun & lily... great stories. Reminds me of the horror-movie-related prank war that I waged with my best friend around the time Scream 2 came out.

Gravity
12-22-2011, 02:30 AM
I can't believe I started a thread that's actually gone more than two pages. Over three thousand posts here, and that's a first.

With that, "I'd to thank the Academy for this award, which I accept with a humble and grateful heart. And I'd especially like to thank all the little, unsung people who've made this magical night such an honor for me. Thank you. Thank you all. No lie, I really mean it, thanks. Yes, you in the back, yes, I see that hand frantically waving, yes, thank you too ..."

movieman
12-22-2011, 03:52 AM
Too right. I think mainstream horror has been so watered down over the last ten years or so that when something actually horrible happens in a horror film, it takes a lot of people by surprise and they react negatively.

Warning: spoilers ahead.

But it wasn't horrible; it was laughable.

It completely violated the personality of the characters as set up earlier in the movie and expected the audience to believe that those characters could miss the fact that half of the US military was moving down the road a hundred yards behind them.

I honestly don't know how anyone can take that ending seriously. If they'd all been eaten by monsters, that would be one thing. But the ending in the movie is barely above Ed Wood's level of screenwriting.

Lyra Jean
12-22-2011, 04:10 AM
Warning: spoilers ahead.

But it wasn't horrible; it was laughable.

It completely violated the personality of the characters as set up earlier in the movie and expected the audience to believe that those characters could miss the fact that half of the US military was moving down the road a hundred yards behind them.

I honestly don't know how anyone can take that ending seriously. If they'd all been eaten by monsters, that would be one thing. But the ending in the movie is barely above Ed Wood's level of screenwriting.

The ending was horrible. Hubby and I are like, we'd totally wait until the car was being attacked.

ceenindee
12-22-2011, 04:11 AM
Buried had probably the most depressing ending I've seen.

stormie
12-22-2011, 04:44 AM
Two people at the site where I asked suggested it was most likely "Sentimental Journey." Maryn, hoping that's it
Yes! That's it! Now I remember, and the song, something like "I'm gonna take/ a sentimental journey...." My father loved that song too. Now even though it's the holidays, I've got to find the dvd. :) And get out the tissues.

Reps for you, Maryn! Thanks!

nighttimer
12-22-2011, 04:50 AM
Requiem For a Dream - Very well done, but perhaps not unduly burdened with good cheer.

Definitely Requiem For A Dream. Never has the phrase "ass to ass" been so unsexy and the final fate of the characters leaves a sour taste in the mouth, but first it screws with your eyes and mind.

Watching Irreversible will always be one of the most unpleasant experiences I've ever had, but I can't forget it.

I would also say Star 80, Bob Fosse's depiction of the Dorothy Stratten story, the Playboy Playmate of the Year that was gruesomely murdered by her insane ex-husband.

The A.V. Club's list of 24 Great Films Too Painful to Watch Twice (http://www.avclub.com/articles/not-again-24-great-films-too-painful-to-watch-twic,2048/) includes some movies that once you've seen you won't want to again for a long time.

thebloodfiend
12-22-2011, 05:32 AM
Jess, pretty much the entirety of Grave of the Fireflies is pretty damn depressing.

Definitely. It's probably the saddest movie I've ever seen. I hate when bad things happen to little kids. A close second is Dancer in the Dark.

mellymel
12-22-2011, 05:56 AM
Leaving Las Vegas.

I hate that movie.

ditto.

Manuel Royal
12-22-2011, 05:57 AM
Last Night (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0156729/) is one of my favorite movies. Oddly enough, I don't find the ending depressing, even though the world ends. (Not really a spoiler; it's the premise of the movie.)

Same with On the Beach (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053137/).

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
12-22-2011, 06:14 AM
Nighttimer, I knew Come and See would be on that list. Turns out I was right. I'm still scarred from watching that years ago.

When I think of Russia at war, that's the first thing I think of. There is a scene where a woman is raped (I think gang raped...it's been a few years), and the director shows her almost catatonic, standing there with blood running down her legs. Few films have compared to that for me.

SirOtter
12-22-2011, 07:47 AM
Watching Irreversible will always be one of the most unpleasant experiences I've ever had, but I can't forget it.

The A.V. Club's list of 24 Great Films Too Painful to Watch Twice (http://www.avclub.com/articles/not-again-24-great-films-too-painful-to-watch-twic,2048/) includes some movies that once you've seen you won't want to again for a long time.

I had the same reaction to Irreversible.

Interesting list. I love they included the last great film of the silent era (though not the last great silent film), The Passion of Joan of Arc. Falconetti's performance is devastating in its subdued power, and yes, difficult to watch twice. But it's such a gorgeous piece of film.

I'd include Fellini's Nights of Cabiria and Lewis Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front. And Bicycle Thieves.

maxmordon
12-22-2011, 07:52 AM
I second Requiem For a Dream, it still gives me the shivers.

Cinema Paradiso: The Director's Cut. Especially when they demolish the old cinema, it's like the death of Bambi's mom transplanted to an entire building!

seun
12-22-2011, 12:57 PM
But it wasn't horrible; it was laughable.


A guy having to shoot his son and his friends only to find rescue was minutes away isn't horrible?

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 04:58 PM
Of that list, i've only seen 2: Joan of Arc and When the Wind Blows. I've heard of all of them and had no trouble staying away.

They forgot one: I Spit on Your Grave.

SPOILERS:

Along the lines of Last house on the Left, the MC is gang-raped, escapes (naked), and as she's running through the woods they catch her... and gang-rape her again. The director shows us her reactions and their reactions. Multiple times.

The rest of the movie is about her revenge. She tracks down all of them and kills them messily. If the director was trying to have the audience feel a sense of justice and triumph, he failed. The MC kills all of them and the last scene, IIRC, is of her chatting up a gas station attendant who's filling up her car, only moments after she tortured and killed the last rapist. She comes across, sort of, as sultry and confident, yet the reaction I got was that she was irrecovably warped by the events and had become as evil and twisted as the rapists.

Brain bleach required.

seun
12-22-2011, 05:09 PM
They forgot one: I Spit on Your Grave.


Original or remake? Not that it matters too much in the UK. Both our versions are cut extensively.

night-flyer
12-22-2011, 05:13 PM
Nice...movies to add to my must see list...I may watch them all in one sitting. I'm in the mood for self-torture.

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 05:23 PM
Original or remake? Not that it matters too much in the UK. Both our versions are cut extensively.

They... REMADE... it?

:e2thud:

I saw the original, from the 1970s. I rented it because I thought is was a horror movie--the fun horror kind, with monsters and vampires etc. Silly me.

seun
12-22-2011, 05:29 PM
Link to the remake:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1242432/

Link to the UK cuts:

http://www.bbfc.co.uk/BFF271143/

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 05:30 PM
Um... no. Just no.

Dear Hollywood: There are thousands of screenwriters with clever, marketable scrips in your town MAKE A NEW MOVIE. Please.

dolores haze
12-22-2011, 05:39 PM
I didn't get that from Dancer in the Dark, though I was rather more distant from that one (watched it on TV while exchanging comments with the missus). Von Trier is polarizing in his unwavering commitment to beautiful, delicate, heroines who are brutally smashed by a hateful world yet persevere with personal strength. Makes some critics plum bonkers.

I saw Dancer in an almost empty theater in LA. I was sitting very close to the front. At the end, it was like being a member of the group that *spoiler*
had gathered to witness poor Selma's execution.

Von Trier has amazing roles for actresses. Still can't believe Emily Watson didn't get the Oscar for Breaking the Waves. Between her and Brenda Blethyn (Secrets and Lies) that year, I was on tenterhooks to see who would win. Frances McDormand got it for Fargo. She did a great job, but REALLY? Bjork didn't even get a nod for Dancer, though her unfortunate swan dress got lots of attention.


The A.V. Club's list of 24 Great Films Too Painful to Watch Twice (http://www.avclub.com/articles/not-again-24-great-films-too-painful-to-watch-twic,2048/) includes some movies that once you've seen you won't want to again for a long time.

This list contains one of two films I've found so upsetting I had to turn them off. Don't know how it ended, but 'Nil By Mouth" was unrelentingly miserable. The other I couldn't bear to watch was a Canadian film called Leolo. I so wish I could bleach my brain. Certain scenes are still entrenched in there, much to my distress.

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 05:50 PM
Just to inject a slightly-less-downer feel: Has anyone seen Bergman's The Seventh Seal? A painfully young Max Sydow returns from the Crusades to a plague-ridden homeland with a snarky squire. This is the movie where he plays chess with Death. It's brilliant, truly. And because Bergman adds some black humor and two innocent characters, the movie isn't as slit-yer-wrists as it could be. I've watched it several times, so it doesn't fit the bill here.


And how is it possible that no one's yet mentioned Mel Gibson's snuff film--aka The Passion of the Christ? I saw that opening night in the theater. People were sobbing. When the credits rolled, I realized that Ihad been gripping the armrests of my seat and had pushed myself back into the chair in a futile effort to get away from this 2-hour torture-pron fest.

[Potentially offensive statement follows. Disclaimer: I'm a former nun, so Ive been on the inside of this particular religion]

Some excellent acting and FX could not possibly redeem (hah!) this movie, not when the source material was a series of visions by a nun who apparently reveled in torture-pron. Because, yanno, it's okay to revel in it when it's Jesus. :Wha:

maggi90w1
12-22-2011, 07:31 PM
What about 1984? I think the book had a bigger impact on me, but the movies ending was pretty depressing as well.

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 07:34 PM
God, yes. I actually saw that movie on a date. :Wha:

seun
12-22-2011, 07:37 PM
I watched 1984 last year while my wife fell asleep next to me. She woke up during a scene when Suzanna Hamilton was naked. She mumbled:

"She's got a really big bush."

Then she fell asleep again.

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 07:39 PM
:roll:

stormie
12-22-2011, 07:42 PM
And how is it possible that no one's yet mentioned Mel Gibson's snuff film--aka The Passion of the Christ? I saw that opening night in the theater. People were sobbing. When the credits rolled, I realized that Ihad been gripping the armrests of my seat and had pushed myself back into the chair in a futile effort to get away from this 2-hour torture-pron fest.

[Potentially offensive statement follows. Disclaimer: I'm a former nun, so Ive been on the inside of this particular religion]

Some excellent acting and FX could not possibly redeem (hah!) this movie, not when the source material was a series of visions by a nun who apparently reveled in torture-pron. Because, yanno, it's okay to revel in it when it's Jesus. :Wha:
I refused to see it--The Passion Of Christ-- because of after seeing Braveheart's ending with Mel Gibson's facial contortions, and also not liking graphic gore. But my mother-in-law adored it. She has a "wearing of the hairshirt and self-flagelation and mea culpa" type of personality. She prefers Holy Week (Holy Thursday and Good Friday) over Easter Sunday or Christmas.

maxmordon
12-22-2011, 07:53 PM
Just to inject a slightly-less-downer feel: Has anyone seen Bergman's The Seventh Seal? A painfully young Max Sydow returns from the Crusades to a plague-ridden homeland with a snarky squire. This is the movie where he plays chess with Death. It's brilliant, truly. And because Bergman adds some black humor and two innocent characters, the movie isn't as slit-yer-wrists as it could be. I've watched it several times, so it doesn't fit the bill here.


Yeah, it was because of those two character's fate that I did not mentioned it here on the list.

Lyra Jean
12-22-2011, 07:55 PM
Just to inject a slightly-less-downer feel: Has anyone seen Bergman's The Seventh Seal? A painfully young Max Sydow returns from the Crusades to a plague-ridden homeland with a snarky squire. This is the movie where he plays chess with Death. It's brilliant, truly. And because Bergman adds some black humor and two innocent characters, the movie isn't as slit-yer-wrists as it could be. I've watched it several times, so it doesn't fit the bill here.


And how is it possible that no one's yet mentioned Mel Gibson's snuff film--aka The Passion of the Christ? I saw that opening night in the theater. People were sobbing. When the credits rolled, I realized that Ihad been gripping the armrests of my seat and had pushed myself back into the chair in a futile effort to get away from this 2-hour torture-pron fest.

[Potentially offensive statement follows. Disclaimer: I'm a former nun, so Ive been on the inside of this particular religion]

Some excellent acting and FX could not possibly redeem (hah!) this movie, not when the source material was a series of visions by a nun who apparently reveled in torture-pron. Because, yanno, it's okay to revel in it when it's Jesus. :Wha:

I've actually been accused of either not being a good Christian or flat out not being a Christian at all because I did not like this movie.

One viewing was enough for me and yes I bawled like a baby, but I also cried during the movie Transformers when they captured Bumblebee too.

seun
12-22-2011, 07:58 PM
It's interesting to hear reactions to films in relation to faith. I have no faith and POTC didn't do anything for me at all.

shakeysix
12-22-2011, 08:25 PM
The Unbearable Lightness of Being. I can't put my finger on it, because on the surface it seems like a good plot and a good story but I hate the whole movie. Maybe because my mother's family is pure Czech and this is SO them on a Sunday afternoon--talk, talk, talk--life is shit and then you die, pass the bundta please.

a doctor and one of his many and confusing mistresses flee the Russian tanks in 1968--not exciting--kind of a boring escape. You'd think an escape from Russian tanks would be less talky. They make it to safety but then leave Switzerland because it is too bright and comfortable--so my family: if life is not dreary and depressing it's not worth living. And then, just as the doctor and his wife seem to be happy with a good life on a Czech farm they are killed in a car accident coming home from a dance. I hate that ending. It seems only to serve the purpose of giving them each a tombstone with a catchy epitaph. I had an old aunt who used to bless her children with holy water before they went out on a Saturday night. Now she would have liked this ending--s6

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 08:25 PM
[WARNING: Another potentially offensive remark follows]

I nearly laughed out loud at the Resurrection scene when the grave cloths deflated exactly like a bouncy house at a kids' party. Since everyone else in the theater was crying, it's probably a good thing I kept that in.

Also, when Caviezel is Tebowing on the rock floor, looks up, then stands up? All I thought was: Jesus is back, and he is pissed.

Yeah, I know. My bags are already packed for Hell. :e2shrug:

scarletpeaches
12-22-2011, 08:27 PM
I don't know why people are talking about Braveheart having a downer ending -- Wallace being HD&Q wasn't the end. Were overseas versions edited differently? Over here it ends with the beginning of Bannockburn.

Calla Lily
12-22-2011, 08:32 PM
Working Girl. No, really. She's a faceless grunt in a faceless job in a faceless building in a city of faceless buildings. She gets an idea, snags the hot guy, sticks it to her evil boss, IOW, shows she's different. Her reward: She's a faceless middle manager in a different faceless building in the same faceless city. I know she calls her peeps in the typing pool and they cheer for her like she's achieved what they all dream of. But the last scene, where the camera pulls away from her, to the window outside, then back to show the faceless buildings... it depressed the hell out of me.

maxmordon
12-22-2011, 08:37 PM
Mary Poppins. I couldn't stop thinking "that kid is going to die in The Ardennes."

NewKidOldKid
12-22-2011, 08:49 PM
A Serbian Film (yes, that's the title)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1273235/

Not only the most disturbing film I've ever seen, but such a sad ending.

seun
12-22-2011, 08:53 PM
A Serbian Film (yes, that's the title)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1273235/

Not only the most disturbing film I've ever seen, but such a sad ending.

We had quite a debate about that here a little while ago.

Jess Haines
12-23-2011, 12:41 AM
Jess, pretty much the entirety of Grave of the Fireflies is pretty damn depressing. Another, similarly grim anime is Barefoot Gen.

I haven't seen or heard of Barefoot Gen. I was thinking of sneaking in Grave of the Fireflies tomorrow since I'm taking the day off from work for my birthday. Curious to see what the fuss is all about. Maybe if I brace myself, I won't turn into a sobbing mess at the end. ;)

stormie
12-23-2011, 01:25 AM
I don't know why people are talking about Braveheart having a downer ending -- Wallace being HD&Q wasn't the end. Were overseas versions edited differently? Over here it ends with the beginning of Bannockburn.
Only one person said that. Whatever discussion there was, was more about Mel Gibson's over-the-top acting. I guess it was a little off-topic.

richcapo
12-23-2011, 02:03 AM
Kids. Ends with a shot of a young, lonely homeless boy. It looks very, very real.

richcapo
12-23-2011, 02:13 AM
A Serbian Film (yes, that's the title)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1273235/

Not only the most disturbing film I've ever seen, but such a sad ending.Good lord, you watched that? The second I read the words "newborn _ _ _ _," I promised I'd never see that thing.

Question if you know: Is it harder to watch than the August Underground films? I've only seen a bit of the second one -- heard it's unbelievably brutal.

JeffyFive
12-23-2011, 03:34 AM
The original ending to First Blood where John Rambo kills himself.

nighttimer
12-23-2011, 10:17 AM
Can't believe I forgot about Buried. That one was brutal.

Ever see The Vanishing? The original, not the crappy Hollywood remake by the same director, but a horrid happy ending written in?


Of that list, i've only seen 2: Joan of Arc and When the Wind Blows. I've heard of all of them and had no trouble staying away.

They forgot one: I Spit on Your Grave.

SPOILERS:

Along the lines of Last house on the Left, the MC is gang-raped, escapes (naked), and as she's running through the woods they catch her... and gang-rape her again. The director shows us her reactions and their reactions. Multiple times.

The rest of the movie is about her revenge. She tracks down all of them and kills them messily. If the director was trying to have the audience feel a sense of justice and triumph, he failed. The MC kills all of them and the last scene, IIRC, is of her chatting up a gas station attendant who's filling up her car, only moments after she tortured and killed the last rapist. She comes across, sort of, as sultry and confident, yet the reaction I got was that she was irrecovably warped by the events and had become as evil and twisted as the rapists.

Brain bleach required.

I've seen the original I Spit On Your Grave and totally agree you'll need to soak your brain in Clorox afterwards.

However, because it's such a Grade-Z flick with no production values, high school drama class acting and a director who has no idea how to shoot a scene, Spit doesn't seem much more to me than just a really bad movie that Siskel and Ebert made infamous by ripping into it with such fury (not that it doesn't richly deserve to be spat upon).

But there's never been a rape scene like the nearly ten-minute long scene where the beautiful Monica Bellucci is raped, sodomized and beaten in Irreversible and the graphic murder at The Rectum, the Gay Bar from the Seventh Circle of Hell in the beginning (the story is told from ending to beginning) is almost as cringe-worthy.

I'd never want to buy a copy of the movie, but there's a part of me that almost wants to watch it again to see if I'd squirm in the chair as much as the last time.

Another one that slipped my mind for the sheer unpleasantness of it was Man Bites Dog (http://www.avclub.com/articles/man-bites-dog,37588/), where a camera crew films a chatty hitman as he goes about his rounds murdering people and eventually joins in on the killing.

Not for the sensitive or the squeamish. :(

Night_Writer
12-23-2011, 11:39 AM
Brokeback Mountain. Anybody mention this yet? Poor guy, by the end of the flick he's lost it all, everything that ever mattered to him. Now that was a downer movie.

blacbird
12-23-2011, 11:47 AM
Two "classics" from the 1970s, one famous, one not so much, both brilliant:

Chinatown
Sorcerer

caw

Calla Lily
12-23-2011, 04:39 PM
nighttimer, I read a synop of Irreversible and knew that I'd never watch it even under threat of death.

I did watch A Clockwork Orange. What a sick, twisted piece of film. Very well done--but still sick. [pukes]

Jcomp
12-23-2011, 06:39 PM
Ever see The Vanishing? The original, not the crappy Hollywood remake by the same director, but a horrid happy ending written in?


Yeah, the original The Vanishing is excellent and absolutely cold-blooded.

SirOtter
12-23-2011, 09:56 PM
Another one that slipped my mind for the sheer unpleasantness of it was Man Bites Dog (http://www.avclub.com/articles/man-bites-dog,37588/), where a camera crew films a chatty hitman as he goes about his rounds murdering people and eventually joins in on the killing.

Not for the sensitive or the squeamish. :(

I saw that not long ago. Very disturbing, reminded me a bit of Natural Born Killers, had it been done with a fraction of the money and several times the imagination.

In the genre of sympathetic hitmen who come to bad ends, I recommend This Gun for Hire, Le Samurai and Ghost Dog. There's also an interesting Belgian film called Memory of a Killer, in which the hitman is developing Alzheimer's.

dolores haze
12-23-2011, 10:20 PM
Yeah, the original The Vanishing is excellent and absolutely cold-blooded.

That was a great movie.

Even more cold-blooded, though. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. *shudder*

SirOtter
12-23-2011, 11:10 PM
Most of the proto-noirs Jean Gabin made in France before WWII have seriously downer endings. Quai des Brumes, Pepe le Moko, Le Jour se Leve, La Bete Humaine, Ladykiller, etc.

Mr Flibble
12-24-2011, 12:54 AM
Going farther back, Silent Running, Sci Fi flick in the 70's.

Man, I cried so hard when the little robot 'died'. *sniff*




The last ten minutes of Gallipoli kills me every time.



Oh gods yes.


Atonement


I don't dare watch he film. I finished the book and cried so hard my husband asked if I was having a bipolar moment. And I wailed 'BUT IT'S JUST SOOO SAAAAAD!!' And then swore at the book, telling to TAKE THAT LAST CHAPTER BACK DAMMIT.

Other downer endings:

My husband, bless, chokes at the end of Wrath of Khan every time.

A film that wasn't released in the US, I think, called The Brave with Johnny Depp. I just stared at the screen for ages after. I read the book too, and that ending was even worse.

Million Dollar Baby.

Scum - crap, that depressed the hell out of me.

Invasion of the Bodysnatchers

AI

Easy Rider

The Green Mile...


Man, I feel depressed now.

scarletpeaches
12-24-2011, 01:53 AM
Million Dollar Baby had a downer ending, yes of course it did...but I'm not sure I gave a damn.

It was just one tragedy after another and by the end I was thinking...

SPOILER!
"Clint, once you've put her out of her misery, how about you do the same for me? I can't take this any more."
END SPOILER!

firedrake
12-24-2011, 02:04 AM
Scum - crap, that depressed the hell out of me.


Oh, lordy, I'd forgotten about 'Scum'. It's been years since I saw that and, yes. that was so depressing.

thorjansen
12-24-2011, 02:05 AM
Back in the '80s there was a TV movie called The Day After (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_After), with Jason Robards and many others. Along with Testament (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testament_(film)), they were pretty big downers of their time. Not sure which one was more depressing, though. Been far too long I guess.

thorjansen
12-24-2011, 02:07 AM
Gosh, I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Twilight films, whose endings are so depressing because you know there's gonna be a sequel real soon now. Nyuk nyuk nyuk.

Jess Haines
12-24-2011, 02:08 AM
Oh, I'd nearly forgotten. There's also Seven Pounds (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0814314/) with Will Smith.

Talk about a tearjerker.... :( I thought I might never stop crying after I saw that one.

Wayne K
12-24-2011, 02:22 AM
JFK had kind of a downer ending

Calla Lily
12-24-2011, 02:32 AM
I saw The Day After in a college dorm rec room. About 40 of us, spellbound, silent, freaked out. Ah, the days of Reagan and Gorbachev playing chicken with the planet. :rolleyes: Afterward, my roommate called her brother in Kansas City (where the movie took place). Just because. Yeah, we were that freaked out.

I've never seen the movie, but I saw the play: 'Night, Mother.

SPOILERS: A woman with something semi-debilitating (CF? Seizures? Can't remember) announces to her mother that at the end of the evening she's going to shoot herself. The play is about her giving instructions to her mother after she does the deed: Call her brother and have him call the cops and come over, wash the pan that she just made cocoa in. As the play progresses, they fight, they reminisce, etc. Then the daughter, having said everything she wants to say, says, " 'Night, mother," goes into her room and locks the door. The mother, who's mostly been passive for the play, freaks. She pounds on the door, screaming and begging.

BANG.

The mother slides down the door, huddling in a heap on the floor, sobbing. After a moment (forever on stage--just forever) she gets up, calls her son, and goes to the sink to wash the cocoa pan.


The audience sat in stunned silence when the stage went black. Nobody moved. Not until the actors peeked out from the wings did anyone start to applaud.

KILL ME if anyone brings that movie near me. KILL ME.

Mr Flibble
12-24-2011, 03:30 AM
Million Dollar Baby had a downer ending, yes of course it did...but I'm not sure I gave a damn.

It was just one tragedy after another and by the end I was thinking...

SPOILER!
"Clint, once you've put her out of her misery, how about you do the same for me? I can't take this any more."
END SPOILER!

Harsh, woman, you are HARSH!!!

scarletpeaches
12-24-2011, 03:42 AM
I have been accused of harshness on many an occasion, yes. :D

Camilla Delvalle
12-24-2011, 03:58 AM
I was thinking of sneaking in Grave of the Fireflies tomorrow since I'm taking the day off from work for my birthday. Curious to see what the fuss is all about. Maybe if I brace myself, I won't turn into a sobbing mess at the end. ;)
How did it go?

childeroland
12-24-2011, 04:50 AM
Forgot to mention Lilya 4-Ever. A beautiful movie that makes you wonder if humanity has any hope at all.

seun
12-24-2011, 04:16 PM
Back in the '80s there was a TV movie called The Day After (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_After), with Jason Robards and many others. Along with Testament (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testament_%28film%29), they were pretty big downers of their time. Not sure which one was more depressing, though. Been far too long I guess.

One word.

Threads.

firedrake
12-24-2011, 04:20 PM
One word.

Threads.

Yes.
More realistic and so damn depressing.

Threads (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads)

Camilla Delvalle
12-24-2011, 07:25 PM
:2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel: :2angel:
:2angel:All the angels from------------:2angel:
:2angel:Neon Genesis Evangelion -----:2angel:
:2angel:wish you a merry Christmas---:2angel:
:2angel:and a happy ending! ---------:2angel:
:2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel::2angel: :2angel:

Graz
12-24-2011, 09:36 PM
Sunday
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120244/

regdog
12-25-2011, 05:25 PM
Where the Red Fern Grows


Also since it's Christmas-The Little Matchstick Girl.
Spoiler Orphan freezes to death on Christmas Eve.

NewKidOldKid
12-25-2011, 07:16 PM
Good lord, you watched that? The second I read the words "newborn _ _ _ _," I promised I'd never see that thing.

Question if you know: Is it harder to watch than the August Underground films? I've only seen a bit of the second one -- heard it's unbelievably brutal.

Actually, that wasn't the most disturbing part of the film. If you have a strong stomach, I recommend watching this film. I think it's a great film. Just dark and sad, full of misery, but really well done. It's not about torture, like Hostel or August Underground. A Serbian Film is about how people break down and how sad and miserable life is.

Ok, so it's a really depressing film. No surprise there.

Gravity's Rainbow
12-26-2011, 01:04 PM
I'm relatively emotionless person but... jesus, I don't think I could sit through any of these movies

thorjansen
12-27-2011, 01:52 AM
Hmm, I wonder if Threads is on DVD somewhere? I'm in the mood for a wee bit of depression ...

Camilla Delvalle
12-27-2011, 03:02 AM
The Hours? Not only when it comes to deaths. The one good thing that happened in one story turned out to be the cause of another character's brokenness in another story. Pretty bleak.

Jess Haines
12-28-2011, 12:40 AM
How did it go?

My weekend did not go as planned at all. I didn't have a chance to watch it. However! Another long weekend doth approach...

Victoria
12-28-2011, 05:36 AM
Brokeback Mountain. Anybody mention this yet? Poor guy, by the end of the flick he's lost it all, everything that ever mattered to him. Now that was a downer movie.

Yes, it was a downer. Still, we should all be so lucky to find the kind of passion those two shared. That's what I took away from that film.

Quills was utterly depressing for me. I love it, though.

triceretops
12-28-2011, 06:00 AM
Heartbreakers:

The Mist
The Perfect Storm
Braveheart (still cannot watch the end)
The first King Kong, then Son of Kong
Pitch Black (when the gal gets it--Oh why?)
The Elephant Man (it was inevitible, though)
I Robot
Bicentennial Man
Of Mice and Men
Old Yeller

From the less than steller movie list
District 9
Silent Hill (kind of a double whammy)

Lyra Jean
12-28-2011, 05:55 PM
Road to Teribithia

brainstrains
12-28-2011, 08:09 PM
I would have to say:

Changeling
Seven
The Last American Virgin

aadams73
12-28-2011, 08:17 PM
Glitter.

I can't believe Mariah Carey lived. And sang.

*Sobs in horror and despair*

regdog
12-28-2011, 08:24 PM
:roll:

stormie
12-29-2011, 12:10 AM
The Perfect Storm

Forgot about The Perfect Storm. Even though from the very beginning most people know how it ends, it still is very depressing. For me it was also sad because I remember standing on the beach (a little dicey w/ the waves hitting the sand with extreme force), watching the storm out at sea that day, with not a clue what was happening just northeast of me.

crunchyblanket
12-29-2011, 05:51 PM
Grave Of The Fireflies.

FrankiiGii
12-29-2011, 10:23 PM
The Lamb, Pay it Forward, Romeo and Juliet (1968)

Diana Hignutt
01-01-2012, 03:41 AM
Brazil.

stormie
01-03-2012, 05:41 PM
Pay it Forward
Forgot about that one. We had rented it for a friend's birthday right after it was released, not knowing the ending, so it came as a shock. We were all crying. What a great way to celebrate a person's birthday.

Killgore
01-03-2012, 09:48 PM
I'd say The Mist. I'm still not sure if that ending is meaningful, or just cruel for no reason (which life itself can be, so maybe that's gives the ending its meaning, and on goes the internal debate).

The ending was completely unearned. There is no way in hell any father is going to shoot his son without exhausting all other possibilities. Had they sat in the sweltering car, dehydrating for days Cujo style, then maybe, perhaps there might be a slim chance. But he gave into it all too easy. "Welp, we ran out of gas, and havent seen a monster for 100 miles, nothing is attacking, and we could look for gas, but ah screw it, lets just kill ourselves." Its illogical nihilism.

Killgore
01-03-2012, 09:54 PM
The most depressing movie I've ever seen though has to be Grave of the Fireflies.

FrankiiGii
01-04-2012, 12:07 AM
Forgot about that one. We had rented it for a friend's birthday right after it was released, not knowing the ending, so it came as a shock. We were all crying. What a great way to celebrate a person's birthday.

Haha, yeah I was not pleased :Wha:

AVS
01-04-2012, 01:17 AM
Independence Day, I cried when all the aliens were wiped out. Rocky 2, poor old Apollo Creed losing his world title. The Wizard of Oz, nobody should melt a poor old woman.

When I'm not through the looking glass, movies that conjure tears can never be seen again.

I echo the sentiments on Silent Running, those little robots, so cute, so bleak.
The Elephant Man, too painful.
Awakenings when De Niro's character starts to zone out once more.
Million Dollar Baby... Rocky takes deep deep downers.

Marian Perera
01-04-2012, 02:09 AM
Operation Daybreak. I hadn't read up about the military operation that was based on, but at some point it dawned on me that no, the Czech paratroopers were not going to make it, no matter how hard they fought.

Veronica Guerin. The scene where her little boy kissed the coffin made me tear up.

Even the ending of Terminator 2 made me sad.

robjvargas
01-04-2012, 07:01 PM
Brazil.

The only reason I wasn't "downed" by the ending of Brazil was that I was still trying to catch up to the story. :flag:

Marian Perera
01-05-2012, 03:55 AM
Another incredibly depressing ending? The Grey Zone. I'll just let the little girl's voiceover in the end speak for itself.

"After the revolt, half the ovens remain, and we are carried to them together. I catch fire quickly. The first part of me rises in dense smoke that mingles with the smoke of others. Then there are the bones, which settle in ash, and these are swept up to be carried to the river. And last, bits of our dust, that simply float there, in air, around the working of the new group. These bits of dust are grey. We settle on their shoes, and on their faces, and in their lungs. And they become so used to us that soon they don't cough and they don't brush us away. At this point they are just moving, breathing and moving, like anyone else still alive in that place. And this is how the work continues."

Calla Lily
01-05-2012, 04:05 AM
Good Heavens, Queen. *makes note to avoid this movie forever*

Filigree
01-05-2012, 04:18 AM
'Fallen'. Denzel Washington just cannot win, not against an enemy that devious and powerful. To this day, my SO and I cringe a little whenever we hear 'Time Is On My Side'.

'Brazil' pissed me off so much I will not watch it again.

Pacze Moj
01-05-2012, 06:59 AM
...Dumont's Twentynine Palms (2003).

Silver-Midnight
01-05-2012, 08:42 AM
City of Angels and Beaches.

Since a lot of people have talked about City of Angels, I'll talk about Beaches. I saw this film when I was younger, and the more I saw it as I got older, the better and sadder it got. This is one of Bette Midler's best movies.

Spoiler Alert!!

Beaches is about two girls who were friends as a little girls during the summer, but as they aged, they lost touch. One friend went on to get married and have a daughter, and the other, Bette Midler's character, became a singer/Broadway star. The other friend finds out that she has a life threatening disease and is going to die. I'll stop here so, I won't spoil so much. However, one of the saddest moments I think is at the end when Bette Midler is singing "The Glory of Love".

FrankiiGii
01-05-2012, 09:30 AM
Has anyone seen Nobody Knows? Broke my heart.

stormie
01-05-2012, 06:48 PM
Spoiler Alert!!

Beaches is about two girls who were friends as a little girls during the summer, but as they aged, they lost touch. One friend went on to get married and have a daughter, and the other, Bette Midler's character, became a singer/Broadway star. The other friend finds out that she has a life threatening disease and is going to die. I'll stop here so, I won't spoil so much. However, one of the saddest moments I think is at the end when Bette Midler is singing "The Glory of Love".
SPOILER ALERT again:
For me the saddest part of Beaches was near the end when the two friends are sitting side-by-side on chairs on the beach, Bette Midler is holding her dying friend's hand, and Wind Beneath My Wings is being sung as a voice-over. You don't see the dying friend (Barbara Hershey) but you do see Bette's eyes widen a little as she looks at her friend, then you see a person on horseback riding along the shoreline into the sunset and you know the friend died. Sounds corny maybe, but it got me crying.

Camilla Delvalle
01-05-2012, 09:51 PM
The most depressing movie I've ever seen though has to be Grave of the Fireflies.
Yes, that one really lowered my mood. Not only because of what happened but also because I was angry. I think that what happened was the boy's own fault, because he could easily have avoided it. Nevertheless I was supposed to feel sorry for him. That made me angry.

Winterwind
01-07-2012, 12:19 AM
Pay it Forward. Definitely.

TamaraLynne
01-07-2012, 12:26 AM
I'd say The Mist. I'm still not sure if that ending is meaningful, or just cruel for no reason (which life itself can be, so maybe that's gives the ending its meaning, and on goes the internal debate).

I agree...this movie had me feeling very down...the ending was very cruel.

FrankiiGii
01-07-2012, 04:45 AM
Mean Creek, but the whole movie is a downer.

cmi0616
01-07-2012, 08:19 AM
The Departed has got to be up there on the list. Everyone is basically killed lol.

Silver-Midnight
01-07-2012, 11:42 AM
SPOILER ALERT again:
For me the saddest part of Beaches was near the end when the two friends are sitting side-by-side on chairs on the beach, Bette Midler is holding her dying friend's hand, and Wind Beneath My Wings is being sung as a voice-over. You don't see the dying friend (Barbara Hershey) but you do see Bette's eyes widen a little as she looks at her friend, then you see a person on horseback riding along the shoreline into the sunset and you know the friend died. Sounds corny maybe, but it got me crying.

That was another sad part for me.

Killgore
01-08-2012, 11:10 PM
Yes, that one really lowered my mood. Not only because of what happened but also because I was angry. I think that what happened was the boy's own fault, because he could easily have avoided it. Nevertheless I was supposed to feel sorry for him. That made me angry.

Maybe it was his fault to an extent, by leaving his auntie's house, and he takes some responsibility, but I thought it was a metaphor for the relationship between he and his sister. He was supposed to be taking care of her, and she was unable to care for herself -- the same way that the parents, and to a larger level, the state, should have been caring for him. And as a result of the caregiver's negligence, they suffered.

Lhipenwhe
01-08-2012, 11:42 PM
Rurouni Kenshin: Trust & Betrayal had a soul-crushing ending. I read the manga series before it and knew what would happen, but it still hit like a truck.

Oddly enough, Amadeus got to me. The final scenes involving all of the characters, as well as the death of one of the most ingenious musicians of all time, was fairly depressing. Knowing Mozart lives on through his music made it a bit easier to withstand, though.

ChaosTitan
01-09-2012, 12:13 AM
Pay it Forward. Definitely.

OMG, how could I forget this one? I wanted to throttle the people who made this movie! Gah!

Gouge my heart out with a spork, why don't you? :(

DavidBrett
01-10-2012, 07:10 PM
Twilight - When I suddenly realised I'd never get the time, or my money, back ever again. Bummer, man...

crunchyblanket
01-10-2012, 07:30 PM
Oh, thinking about it, Reservoir Dogs. That last bit with Mr White and Mr Orange was pretty depressing.

Lyra Jean
01-11-2012, 06:06 AM
Das Boot

cornetto
01-15-2012, 12:48 AM
Pan's Labyrinth
The Deer Hunter
HP and the Half Blood Prince
HP and the Deathly Hallows pt 1

Diana Hignutt
01-17-2012, 04:45 PM
'Brazil' pissed me off so much I will not watch it again.

Agree.

robeiae
01-17-2012, 05:04 PM
Requiem For a Dream - Very well done, but perhaps not unduly burdened with good cheer.
Yes.

In that same vein, Once Were Warriors.

Also, the downer ending that just had to be: John Carpenter's The Thing.

Maverick914
01-18-2012, 12:25 AM
I have a few: The Departed, Skyline (sucked completely), Repo Men (ultimately sucked as well), Being John Malkovich, and most every ending of every horror film.

Lady MacBeth
01-18-2012, 03:14 AM
Pan's Labyrinth


That one upset me for days. Also, True Grit.

Eternal
01-18-2012, 03:19 AM
Twilight, I was inconsolable when it got to the end and they survived.

CharlesL83
01-18-2012, 04:51 AM
Night of the Living Dead

It's like WTF?, I think it was truly designed to piss people off. Well at least I learned the proper method to nail-up boards.

Defendor

One of Woody Harrelson's best films that you probably never heard about.

gothicangel
01-18-2012, 12:55 PM
Finding Neverland.

I rarely cry at films, this one made me cry in public!

DreamWeaver
01-18-2012, 10:23 PM
I second everyone who said Pan's Labyrinth. Lovely movie, never want to see it again.

Gallipoli. Lovely movie, put together like a poem. Have watched it multiple times.

Cyia
01-18-2012, 11:01 PM
An older one, but: City of Angels.

I love the song that came out of that movie, but HATE, HATE, HATE the ending.

scarletpeaches
01-18-2012, 11:05 PM
An older one, but: City of Angels.

I love the song that came out of that movie, but HATE, HATE, HATE the ending.Yup.

Not only a downer but the biggest, clunking great deus ex machina I can remember in a long while.

Alvah
01-18-2012, 11:38 PM
The Boost, with James Woods.

The main character has a wife who adores him, and she is pregnant
with their first child. He has a great job with a high income.

He loses everything because of addiction to drugs. His wife gets knocked down some stairs and has a miscarriage; after that she leaves him. He gets fired from his job, too.

Mclesh
01-18-2012, 11:41 PM
Das Boot

That ending just about killed me.

And Brazil. That too. (Ugh.)

Dr.Gonzo
01-18-2012, 11:41 PM
Planes, Trains and Automobiles.

mThink I've said this before in another thread: makes me cry. So he hasn't got a home or a wife. He should stay for turkey and after the cameras stop rolling he blocks the toilet and Neil kicks him out. That's what happens in my head when the credits roll. Poor Mr Candy, out on his arse.

Mclesh
01-19-2012, 12:17 AM
Planes, Trains and Automobiles.

mThink I've said this before in another thread: makes me cry. So he hasn't got a home or a wife. He should stay for turkey and after the cameras stop rolling he blocks the toilet and Neil kicks him out. That's what happens in my head when the credits roll. Poor Mr Candy, out on his arse.

I cried while watching this too. John Candy was great. Really, a fine actor.

Ed Panther
02-05-2012, 11:14 AM
Peeping Tom. Lenny. Paths of Glory.

Rhoda Nightingale
02-05-2012, 03:12 PM
The Mist.

Possibly the only movie I've seen that upset me so much I never want to see it again.

Gilead
02-05-2012, 03:44 PM
Eden Lake. The movie itself was relentlessly unpleasant, and the ending somehow managed to make everything that had gone before even worse in retrospect. So, so depressing.

'I'm never watching this again, ever' was my thought even while I was still in the cinema.

randi.lee
02-05-2012, 05:38 PM
Cold Mountain

Swannington
02-08-2012, 05:07 AM
The Mist and Million Dollar Baby.

Lyra Jean
02-08-2012, 06:49 PM
Evangelion, it's an anime, I think I spelled it correctly.
Cowboy Bebop, another anime. The manga is a lot more upbeat.

Actually a lot of anime have downer endings.

zahra
02-08-2012, 10:23 PM
The Perfect Storm. Wept enough to sink the damn ship all over again. Let Him Have It - poor Derek Bentley, what a horrible injustice, and brilliant acting from Christopher Eccleston, such an under-rated film. The fact that both movies are based on true stories is definitely a major downer factor.

There was a recent zombie film set in Africa, very measured and well-done, about a guy trying to find his son in the midst of the outbreak and a white guy trying to get to safety, who team up. The ending hurt.

nicolethegeek
03-03-2012, 06:21 PM
The Perfect Storm. Wept enough to sink the damn ship all over again.

I'm with you on that one. When I was watching the final scenes, I simply sat there, gobsmacked.

I had a similar reaction to Ladder 49. My DH was so upset by the sad ending, that he wouldn't allow me to buy the DVD when it was released.

Manuel Royal
03-03-2012, 09:47 PM
I can't understand the problems with Brazil. Perfect ending; really the only ending for that movie. What else would you have?

Aggy B.
03-03-2012, 09:52 PM
Salo
Amen
Come and See
Old Boy

TumbleHome
03-03-2012, 10:06 PM
Requiem for a Dream makes me want to slowly walk of the roof of a high-rise. Brilliant; but rips my soul out pretty effectively.

Cacophony
03-03-2012, 10:09 PM
In recent memory, probably Blue Valentine.

angeluscado
03-03-2012, 10:16 PM
Simon Birch, My Girl and A Walk to Remember all had me bawling by the end of them.

triceretops
03-03-2012, 10:18 PM
Oh, it's gonna be Million Dollar Baby and the Mist, for as long as I live.

ViolettaVane
03-03-2012, 10:23 PM
Happiness by Todd Solondz.

That's the kind of movie that makes you want to throw up and then kill someone and then kill yourself. I shiver just at the very idea of watching that movie again.

It's hard to explain the ending, or maybe I JUST DON'T WANT TO AND YOU CAN'T MAKE ME ARRGH NEVERMIND.

micahcannibal
03-03-2012, 11:00 PM
The boy with the striped pajamas



WARNING! SPOILERS AHEAD




This was such a beautiful movie about the young 8 year old son of a Nazi soldier who befriended a boy who was in one of the concentration camps. They played with each other through the fence and talked that way.

Well the boy in the concentration camp's father disappeared(presumably he was sent to be killed) and the son of the nazi soldier decided he wanted to help him look for his father. Childhood innocence made the boy sneak into the concentration camp(he thought the boy was wearing pajamas hence the title instead of realizing it twas a prison outfit)

Anyway, the movie ends with all the jews(incluing both boys) being forced into a gas chamber and killed.

Brought me to tears. Such a great movie.

Lyra Jean
03-04-2012, 07:31 AM
In recent memory, probably Blue Valentine.

Do not watch this movie if you are having problems in your relationship. It will not help you.

Cacophony
03-04-2012, 09:30 AM
True story. I had no idea what it was when I went into it. It's enjoyable enough; the acting is great and the story is good, though it is sort of hipster chic as far as the overall look and feel. Still... damn sad.

zahra
03-05-2012, 02:48 AM
Happiness by Todd Solondz.

That's the kind of movie that makes you want to throw up and then kill someone and then kill yourself. I shiver just at the very idea of watching that movie again.

It's hard to explain the ending, or maybe I JUST DON'T WANT TO AND YOU CAN'T MAKE ME ARRGH NEVERMIND.
Agreed.

Tinman
05-22-2012, 08:02 AM
Spoiler alert***

The end of The Mist, when the main POV character kills the other survivors, then the mist clears and the military shows up.

Lol@Rhoda...sorry.

Rhoda Nightingale
05-22-2012, 05:21 PM
^DUDE. Spoiler warnings! It's only polite.

shakeysix
05-22-2012, 05:35 PM
All Mine to Give--This one is older than dirt but it is still the saddest ending I have ever seen: The oldest boy in a recently orphaned family has to give his brothers and sisters away. On Christmas Eve. In the last scene he is walking into a Canadian blizzard, hauling his baby sister on a sled. Oh, God--I'm tearing up! --s6

starbirdy66
05-22-2012, 05:45 PM
The ghost movie, Dark Water.

***spoiler alert*** mom drowns in end to save her daughter from the girl ghost that wants a mommy.

AnnikaHTDC
05-23-2012, 03:56 PM
Palindromes - a very interesting movie, where the same character is played by multiple actors throughout the course of the film, none of which look the same. The message of the film was basically no matter what you do, you will always end up back in the same awful place you started. There is no hope, no escape. Very unsettling.

Raventongue
06-17-2012, 11:33 PM
Really, no one's mentioned Synechdoche, New York yet? That's about as depressing as they come, and it's not particularly obscure or anything.

Just very, very F'd up.

pandaponies
06-18-2012, 06:30 AM
I vote for Grave of the Fireflies. People look at it and are all, "Oh, it's a cartoon, how depressing could it possibly be?"

...........

BenPanced
06-18-2012, 07:06 AM
The original Night of the Living Dead (not mentioning the remake because I've never seen it, so I don't know how faithful it is to the original). Invisible spoiler ahead: Ben, the guy who's supposed to be THE HERO, fergodssakes!, gets killed and burned with the zombies! I mean, HE. GETS. KILLED. The hero DIES.

Also, the ending of the anime series The Big O. I really like it because it's not your standard giant fighting mecha-bot story, but the ending had me questioning the validity of my own memories. I wasn't just crying in your standard "oh, what a sad ending" manner. I'm talking outright sobbing like somebody'd just told me my mother had died. I rented it from Netflix and later bought it, but I haven't been able to bring myself to watch it again. Mostly from the effect the ending had on me, mostly because it's a re-release with new titles and a new theme that suck green galactic moose.

Gravity
06-18-2012, 08:28 AM
Okay, got a new one to add to my "blow-your-brains-out" list: The Grey (or maybe its The Gray; either way it's BAD)

JoNightshade
06-18-2012, 08:48 AM
I vote for Grave of the Fireflies. People look at it and are all, "Oh, it's a cartoon, how depressing could it possibly be?"

...........

Yeah. This one. Phenomenal movie, but I watched it over a decade ago and I still can't shake it. I wouldn't even contemplate watching it again now that I have children of my own.

pandaponies
06-18-2012, 09:29 AM
^Yes. I saw it once, was scarred for life, told myself I never wanted to see it again. It's been years. x.x

bearilou
06-18-2012, 02:51 PM
The original Night of the Living Dead (not mentioning the remake because I've never seen it, so I don't know how faithful it is to the original).

I am SO glad I was not the only one who sat there screaming at the screen OH NOE U DI'INT!

Well, you may not have been screaming but at least I know I wasn't the only one boggled by that. I was traumatized for days afterwards and it wasn't the zombies that did it to me this time.

fireluxlou
06-18-2012, 02:53 PM
The end of Telstar: the Joe Meek story

I don't know how to get the image out of my brain.

BigWords
06-18-2012, 04:05 PM
I watched it again recently as it was brought up in a long discussion with a friend (in which the use of memories and subjective reality in films was discussed) and I found Perfect Blue to be even more depressing than I remembered - more than just the fate of the MC, but the tone and handling of the scenes. There really was no hope spot there at all.

The Mist, as mentioned by others, is another film which will probably take me a while to go back to. Has anyone mentioned White Heat yet? The ending is soooo depressing, but given the rest of the film...

DavidBrett
06-19-2012, 05:51 AM
Also, the downer ending that just had to be: John Carpenter's The Thing.

You mean it 'just had to be' because the ending is given away five minutes into the movie for everyone who speaks Norwegian? I wish I was joking...

http://www.cracked.com/article_19210_7-insane-easter-eggs-hidden-in-movies-tv-shows.html

Back on subject, a movie with a downer ending? Hmm... Oh! Knowing! What the hell kind of absurdist 180 'twist' was that?!

The ending to the original Night of the Living Dead was surprising, but hardly a downer IMO. It was supposed to be symbolic/metaphoric about the state of race relations, or something... The only thing depressing about it for me that it created the awful 'black guy always dies (first)' horror movie cliche. So predictable...

Zoombie
06-19-2012, 10:02 AM
Um...I think you have it backwards, DB. Night of the Living Dead was so landmark because Ben was A) black and B) the HERO, while the white family man was the huge douchebag of the film? Ben survives where everyone else dies horribly...which is a reversal of the normal trend in horror movies that the black guy dies first.

And then he dies too. Because Night of the Living Dead remains one of the most astoundingly tight, awesomely directed and written horror films ever made. Seriously, I could talk for hours about how much I love it.

Now...for me, the most downer film ending ever would be the ending of this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZqrG1bdGtg&ob=av3e). (Warning, violent and sad with blood and zombies)

Which is, ironically, the beginning of the video! Now, you might say, "Pff, that's not a movie, that's an ad for a video game!"

To which I rejoinder by saying...

A) It tells a cohesive story in a short format. Films can do this.

B) It was made by a completely different set of people than those who made the game.

C) It has almost NOTHING TO DO WITH THE GAME IT WAS MADE FOR.

So, while it is a terrible trailer (well, it's a good trailer, but a dishonest one), it is also the best short zombie film ever made.

Yes, even better than the one at the end of Super 8.

Archerbird
06-19-2012, 11:18 AM
House of Sand and Fog, wtf. That's seriously depressing.

I've never read the book and now I'm pretty sure I won't ever.

DavidBrett
06-19-2012, 02:12 PM
Um...I think you have it backwards, DB. Night of the Living Dead was so landmark because Ben was A) black and B) the HERO, while the white family man was the huge douchebag of the film? Ben survives where everyone else dies horribly...which is a reversal of the normal trend in horror movies that the black guy dies first.

And then he dies too. Because Night of the Living Dead remains one of the most astoundingly tight, awesomely directed and written horror films ever made. Seriously, I could talk for hours about how much I love it.

Maybe I am wrong - my Film Studies tutor had a LOT if weird ideas regarding movies...

Katrina S. Forest
06-19-2012, 03:50 PM
I vote for Grave of the Fireflies. People look at it and are all, "Oh, it's a cartoon, how depressing could it possibly be?"

...........

Oh, gosh, that movie is depressing. There isn't a speck of hope in it. It's just a downward spiral of sad things. There isn't even a real villain to hate. It's an excellent movie, I strongly recommend it, but I can never watch it again. (I can't even look at the "drop" candy whenever I see it an Asian candy store. Seriously, that candy company should be able to sue for lost sales.)

I've heard the anime Now and Then, Here and There compared to Grave of the Fireflies, but in my mind, at least Now and Then makes you feel like things *might* get better. Actually, I recommend that above Grave of the Fireflies. You'll leave without hating humanity.

comped
06-19-2012, 04:33 PM
Nah. THE most depressing film endings are in this order:

1. the anime of the books based off the US atomic bombing in Japan.
2. Les Miserables (EVERYONE (minus two kinda main characters, and 2 villeins) DIES!

comped

DidiBlue
06-20-2012, 10:49 AM
Two of the most depressing ones I can think of for me are Open Water and Revenge (with Kevin Costner). I'm sure there are some more, but they've probably already been mentioned. Sorry if these ones already have.

pandaponies
06-20-2012, 01:16 PM
Nah. THE most depressing film endings are in this order:

1. the anime of the books based off the US atomic bombing in Japan
Do you have a title for this? Because it sounds like it might actually be Grave of the Fireflies, what Katrina S. and I are talking about.

Katrina - Thanks for the recommendation, might look that up, because YEP, Grave of the Fireflies pretty much obliterates all will to live. /wrists

I'm pretty sure I just stared at the screen in shock and horror for like five minutes after it ended. I don't intend to ever watch it again either. Don't want to subject my already fragile psyche to it again. :P

Katrina S. Forest
06-20-2012, 03:51 PM
If you're in the US, you can watch all 13 episodes of Now and Then on Hulu:
http://www.hulu.com/now-and-then-here-and-there

A ton of crap still happens to the characters, and it's not all warm and fuzzy in the end, but like I said, there's hope. I think I scared my anime club when I recommended it, as I was kind of known for watching magical girl anime and nothing else. ^_^

I still haven't seen Les Miserables. Actually, now that I think about it, there's a lot of iconic films I haven't seen. (Runs off to go be more cultured.)

thebloodfiend
06-20-2012, 04:22 PM
My sister wouldn't let me finish watching Now and Then. We got to episode 5 before she forbade me from ever playing it again. I might finish watching on my own time.

Grave of the Fireflies is probably the saddest movie I've ever watched. Les Mis was entertaining, but I didn't think it was particularly sad.

bearilou
06-20-2012, 04:33 PM
My sister wouldn't let me finish watching Now and Then. We got to episode 5 before she forbade me from ever playing it again. I might finish watching on my own time.

I didn't even get as far as episode 5 before I quietly put it back on the shelf, never to be viewed by me again.

Alexys
06-20-2012, 04:51 PM
I believe there is at least one other anime that qualifies as "based on a book about the US atomic bombing in Japan": Barefoot Gen (which I admit I've never actually seen, only heard of).

Grave of the Fireflies, though . . . yeah. Only movie that's ever caused me to cry hysterically. For half an hour after it was done. And I don't even like kids.

Now and Then, Here and There's ending is positively upbeat by comparison.

comped
06-23-2012, 03:57 AM
I believe there is at least one other anime that qualifies as "based on a book about the US atomic bombing in Japan": Barefoot Gen (which I admit I've never actually seen, only heard of).

YES! that was the books/movies that I was thinking of!

comped

Calla Lily
06-23-2012, 04:17 AM
I don't know if the movie is as horrifically wrist-slitting as the play, but 'Night, Mother. It's a 2-character play and I saw it in a small theater. The author has the MC tell the other MC how she will end the evening. The play progresses through family angst, arguments, reminiscences, etc. MASSIVE AND COMPLETE SPOILER: The MC, the daughter, says at the beginning that she's going to kill herself. She lives with her mother, and tells her mother what to do and who to contact after she does it. [insert 90 minutes of drama, during which the mother disbelieves, then argues, then continues on as tho everything will be all right in the morning] At the end, the daughter says "'Night, Mother," runs into her room and locks the door. The mother leaps into action, screaming, banging on the door, freaking out. Then: BANG! Then silence. The entire small theater sat there in the same stunned silence. The mother, leaning against the door, sinks down on the floor, sobbing. After a minute, she gets up and does exactly what her daughter told her to do: Call her son and wash out the pan they'd made hot cocoa in. Then the stage went black. Nobody applauded. We just sat there, horrified and drained. The lights came up and the woman playing the mother looked out at us, puzzled. The daughter came out from behind the door, the same expression on her face. Finally someone started to clap, then slowly the rest of us stood and applauded for several minutes.

If the movie is half as powerful and you can handle the intensity, I recommend it. But watch it on a sunny day or with your best friend--anything to counteract it.

BigWords
06-23-2012, 04:19 AM
The Barefoot Gen manga is much, much worse than the movie. The images get stuck in your head, no matter how hard you try to shake them... There's one edition with a very descriptive foreword which will keep you awake for days - a massively important text, but one which really ought to come with a warning.

Calla Lily
06-23-2012, 04:29 AM
Thanks, everyone, BTW. I like my manga and anime to be action-filled and violent, often horrifying, with a touch of humor and romance if possible. BUT with non-wrist-slitting endings. I still remember reading the graphic novel When the Wind Blows and being depressed for days. That was about 15 years ago.

I've heard Grave and Barefoot are brilliant, but I won't be seeing them.

dclary
06-25-2012, 04:32 AM
Biggest downer ending ever: The Mission with Jeremy Irons and Robert DeNiro. Quite literally everybody dies in the end.

reiver33
06-25-2012, 05:17 AM
Murphy's War (1971) - Peter O'Toole. I'd read the book and the film has a radically different ending (everybody dies) - which came as a real shock.

J.S.F.
06-26-2012, 08:28 AM
I don't know if anyone's mentioned it, but Se7en had to have the most horrifying and depressing, yet absurdly logical, ending I've seen. I've never been a Brad Pitt fan but when he wants/doesn't want to look in the box and knows (or is pretty sure) what's in there, it really spooked me. A good movie--sick--but good.

RudyValentina
07-01-2012, 10:51 AM
I have to agree with City of Angels, very depressing at the end. Also, Forest Gump was a bummer ending for me, after all the years he yeared to be with Jenny she goes and dies months after they get married and he's alone again ( ok, with son, but still depression ).

night-flyer
07-01-2012, 10:57 AM
A.I. Artificial Intelligence. I never thought I'd feel so sad over a robot...

BigWords
07-01-2012, 06:23 PM
A.I. Artificial Intelligence. I never thought I'd feel so sad over a robot...

Watch the full first season of Ghost In The Shell: Stand Alone Complex, then try and tell me you didn't feel a tug at your heart when the shit hits the fan - [massive, massive spoilers] the moment when the Tachikoma which has been reassigned to the old folks home, rushes into battle with a dud missile taken from one of the former soldiers, and is promptly torn apart by the massive mech's superior firepower, anyone who has even the slightest emotional attachment to them from the preceding events should be utterly distraught. It stands as one of the most effective scenes with robots ever filmed, and even though it is "just a cartoon" it is a moment which is more powerful than any other SF I have seen on television. There are other robots which I would have thought were more skillfully handled than the overly-mawkish and sentimental Spielberg kid, but it seems popular elsewhere as well...

FWIW, I'm still annoyed that Kubrick went and died before he could have shot AI himself, leaving the abysmal Eyes Wide Shut as his final film. Ugh.

night-flyer
07-02-2012, 07:50 AM
The robot kid was very sad, BW :P

Okay, I'll try to find the one you're talking about, I rarely watch cartoons, but if you say it's sad, then I'll check it out. I have faith in your judgement, most of the time. :D

abbie in wonderland
07-09-2012, 02:57 AM
Radio flyer. I didn't get the ending as a kid but now...too sad.

CatharsisChild
07-09-2012, 03:22 AM
To Live and Die in L.A. anyone?

"You're working for me now."