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Bird of Prey
12-03-2011, 05:30 PM
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/45524645/ns/today-entertainment/t/sound-music-star-calls-famed-role-awful-gooey/

I was reading a Christopher Plummer comment about his role in the Sound of Music and on the site, is a little block that invites the reader to look at photos of the most romantic movies ever of which Gone With the Wind is featured.

Why oh why is Gone With the Wind considered the ultimate in romance?? The relationship between the two main characters epitomizes sexism, corruption and selfishness. On top of it all - although irrelevant I suppose to the romantic angle - the film presents racism without even wincing as I recall at the horrors of slavery. I'll never understand why this film is considered so wonderfully romantic.

Anybody have any opinions??

aadams73
12-03-2011, 05:50 PM
Not really sure what this has to do with politics or current events, but I'm often mystified by the romantic label slapped on GWTW, too.

I can understand the nonchalant attitude towards slavery, though; at the time, slavery was commonplace, so why would the film show horror? Horror and judgment would have struck a false note, rendering viewers less willing to suspend disbelief for all those hours. I don't know what, or if, you write, since you only hang in this sub forum, but you have to give the audience a certain measure of truth, especially when it comes to history. People are sticklers for that.

Bird of Prey
12-03-2011, 06:24 PM
Not really sure what this has to do with politics or current events, but I'm often mystified by the romantic label slapped on GWTW, too.

I can understand the nonchalant attitude towards slavery, though; at the time, slavery was commonplace, so why would the film show horror? Horror and judgment would have struck a false note, rendering viewers less willing to suspend disbelief for all those hours. I don't know what, or if, you write, since you only hang in this sub forum, but you have to give the audience a certain measure of truth, especially when it comes to history. People are sticklers for that.


I think it's relevant to this forum because there's a continuation of a myth regarding Gone with the Wind that has some current cultural and artistic acceptance that I find odd and misplaced. It hasn't gone by the wayside the way so many other movies have in that it's still described as "romantic" as opposed to "dated."

In addition, although I wasn't there, I don't think that the movie has offered a "measure of truth" with regard to slavery. . . .

thebloodfiend
12-03-2011, 09:14 PM
Never read the book and never cared to read it. Most of that is due to the mammie character. Regardless of the time period it was written in, it's still blissfully unaware of its racism, unlike Huckleberry Finn, and not unlike The Help.

And, to answer your question -- why do people think GWTW, Twilight, Wuthering Heights, and Romeo+Juliet are romantic? Two words -- wish fulfillment.

Shadow_Ferret
12-03-2011, 09:26 PM
I thought it was cuz the womens liked Clark Gable.

mscelina
12-03-2011, 09:32 PM
Fortunately, Margaret Mitchell doesn't have to deal with this kind of stuff anymore.

The movie was romantic; the book was not. The book was a historical epic about the Civil War and there is little to no romance in the book at all, which is why the subjects of race and sexism seem so alien to us now. GWTW is a reflection of the family history of Margaret Mitchell, and deals with the Civil War on a personal, intimate level from the point of view of the South. The movie doesn't follow the book and is basically a separate intellectual property.

But of course, it's always easy to condemn a book you've never read. Please continue. Did you guys need some lighter fluid and matches for the book burning? Because by all means, let's endeavor to have literature that's always politically correct and is whitewashed past the point of credibility.

thebloodfiend
12-03-2011, 09:32 PM
I thought it was cuz the womens liked Clark Gable.

I dunno. I think he's kind of fugly. Like Rpattz.

Bird of Prey
12-03-2011, 09:45 PM
Fortunately, Margaret Mitchell doesn't have to deal with this kind of stuff anymore.

The movie was romantic; the book was not. The book was a historical epic about the Civil War and there is little to no romance in the book at all, which is why the subjects of race and sexism seem so alien to us now. GWTW is a reflection of the family history of Margaret Mitchell, and deals with the Civil War on a personal, intimate level from the point of view of the South. The movie doesn't follow the book and is basically a separate intellectual property.

But of course, it's always easy to condemn a book you've never read. Please continue. Did you guys need some lighter fluid and matches for the book burning? Because by all means, let's endeavor to have literature that's always politically correct and is whitewashed past the point of credibility.


I think it was very clear that the OP was opening a discussion about the movie. The book wasn't mentioned at all in the OP, nor was Margaret Mitchell. . . .

Celia Cyanide
12-03-2011, 09:49 PM
And, to answer your question -- why do people think GWTW, Twilight, Wuthering Heights, and Romeo+Juliet are romantic? Two words -- wish fulfillment.

Two teenagers commiting suicide is wish fulfillment?

thebloodfiend
12-03-2011, 09:50 PM
I think it was very clear that the OP was opening a discussion about the movie. The book wasn't mentioned at all in the OP, nor was Margaret Mitchell. . . .

I said book. My bad. But my comments about the romance in the movie still stand. For a modern woman to pin up that weird romance as the love to end all love is kind odd.

thebloodfiend
12-03-2011, 09:53 PM
Two teenagers committing suicide is wish fulfillment?

Two teenagers being so in love that they'd die for each is wish fulfillment. I don't fault Shakespeare, though. I'm under the impression that he wrote it as a satire. This is solely on the people who interpret it as a romance. FTR, I like Wuthering Heights, but I've never been able to understand why some people say Heathcliff and Cathy are the best couple ever. It's disturbing.

Gretad08
12-03-2011, 11:02 PM
How funny that this thread was started, as I watched the movie yesterday, and am reading the book right now for the second time. Mscelina, excellent post BTW.

I see romance in the movie. Quite a bit of it. The relationship between Scarlet and Rhett is volatile, but he stays and tries to give her happiness in any way he can. At one point he tells her she's throwing happiness away with both hands (him), and reaching for something that will never make her happy (Ashley), and he's right. He loves her, sees what is right for her, and tries to give it to her, despite her unwillingness to cooperate. That's romantic, imo, to have a man love you enough to put up with all the nonsense that Scarlet generously dumps in his lap.

The volatility of the relationship is realistic, imo. It's about the passion between all the characters, as well as the good and bad human characteristics they represent.

Also, there's Tara. Scarlet's willingness to do anything for her home and her family highlights her strengths as well as her weaknesses. Her passion for her home is quite romantic. Not many people are tied to something so strongly that they would do the things she did in order to keep it. I enjoy seeing strong characters behave in a way I'd like to think I would if I were in any such situation.

Sorry BoP, I'm a GWTW fan, both the book and the movie. The context of both works is certainly out of place in today's world, but I find it a valuable way to understand that period of history.

Williebee
12-03-2011, 11:15 PM
Mod Note: Shifting this to a more appropriate locale. Please stand by...

ETA: Annd Scene.

Stlight
12-05-2011, 02:50 AM
I see romance in the movie. Quite a bit of it. The relationship between Scarlet and Rhett is volatile, but he stays and tries to give her happiness in any way he can. At one point he tells her she's throwing happiness away with both hands (him), and reaching for something that will never make her happy (Ashley), and he's right. He loves her, sees what is right for her, and tries to give it to her, despite her unwillingness to cooperate. That's romantic, imo, to have a man love you enough to put up with all the nonsense that Scarlet generously dumps in his lap.

.

When I read it I saw her attempts to push Rhett away as attempts to save herself. I never felt that she loved him. If half the couple isn't in love the other half can't make them happy, only annoy the hell out of them. His constant I-am-right-I-know-what-is-best-for-you-and-what-you-want-and-you-don't was why I felt she was lucky when he left and she was finally free to get on with her life.

Ed Panther
12-09-2011, 01:47 AM
I agree. I gave seen probably 200 classic movies in the past 3 years. Gone with the wind I felt fell short of my expectations more than any other.