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DragonBlaze
11-28-2011, 08:32 AM
First off, I would like to thank the posters on the Erotica forum for suggesting this being to more appropriate forum for this question/discussion and not flaming me to where I am a smoking pile of ashes! :tongue

This is a question I have often pondered and wonder how many professional authors that have found success may fall under this spectrum. I would really be interested in the opinions and feedback of the AW community on this. What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories? I know there are romance/erotica novelists here and mean no disrespect. I am simply pondering authors who've possibly found success in genres outside of this but have written erotica, porn, and so on on the side in secret or under different pen names.

To be truthful as far as my feelings, I don't think it would make that much of a difference. Erotic fiction is one of the genres that I will admit that I have read and personally don't find it distasteful (there are still forbidden lines though, I agree) because I believe this is a very sexually charged culture we live in to begin with. Naturally the Bible-nuts will beat their war drums of judgment and host yet more book burnings of said author. I am Christian myself but think their message of intolerance, denial, and smothering of sexuality is the wrong approach.

But what do you all personally think? Would you look down in disdain on that author? Support them? Be indifferent? Would you expect/demand an explanation from author if it were true or not and why? Would some answer be acceptable while others would not be?

Is there a line to be drawn between erotica as more acceptable than what is deemed porn?

While understanding the desire to not really want the public to know, should that author feel nervous or ashamed if they have done so?

Curious to see what this writers community thinks. :)

IceCreamEmpress
11-28-2011, 08:48 AM
I think it might be useful to write different genres under different pen names in general, so people know what they're getting (cf. Joyce Carol Oates/Rosamund Smith, Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine, Nora Roberts/J. D. Robb, and so on and so on). In most of those cases, the two names are linked either on the cover or on the jacket flap.

On the other hand, I think that Anne Rice chose her erotica pen names (Anne Rampling and A. N. Roquelaure) because there was a stronger bias against erotica in US publishing at the time she wrote her erotica titles; her books under those names were only linked with her main pen name* after she became a blockbuster best seller, if I recall correctly.

So I don't know whether it is the better part of valor for a newer writer to choose different pen names for different genres and let the publishers decide when/if to link them, or what.

As for not respecting people because they write erotica or porn, that's totally alien to my way of thinking, even though I'm not a big reader in either genre. And erotica is certainly not "taboo" for "professional authors," as there are lots of professional authors who write nothing but erotica!

Perhaps I failed to respond to your central question; sorry if so.




(*I know that "Anne" wasn't the author's original first name, but I don't know if it is her chosen name or a pen name. If I guessed wrong, I certainly don't mean to show disrespect for her choice.)

Medievalist
11-28-2011, 08:50 AM
What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

Samuel Delany
Piers Anthony

That's off the top of my head.

Notice that you've got a Freudian assumption that writing erotica is not professional?

Check that assumption. It's false.

The Lonely One
11-28-2011, 08:55 AM
Sex is the deepest, darkest, funniest, most humbling and honest thing about us. I find writers of sex to be the brave among us, to portray the "smut" lurking in the bowels of all our primitive minds.

It's revealing of humanity and at the same time shouldn't be taken without a hidden grin.

Although I should add that my personal taste in sex scenes leans toward realism (sex can be embarrassing, sticky and awkward in the light of day and most people aren't porn stars, just regular folks who aren't double-jointed). Porn-mimicking male-dominant face-defiling conquering Nordic warrior portrayals of "the act" certainly reveal something about what men want out of a sex fantasy (at least straight sex), but not what it actually turns out to be.

Admittedly I haven't read a ton of erotic fiction, and I guess people would prefer the fantasy versus reality out of that particular genre, so I don't know if my comments are valid here. I don't know, is it a genre that should be taken seriously? Or are its sales dependent on the fact everyone forcefully suspends their disbelief?

I might be the only one who wants to read an erotica story where the guy goes for the money shot and the girl beats the crap out of him and steals his wallet.

DragonBlaze
11-28-2011, 09:00 AM
Notice that you've got a Freudian assumption that writing erotica is not professional?

Check that assumption. It's false.

Actually that is something you are interpreting from your perspective. I do not assume or think it is unprofessional at all.

But that is the question I am asking here. Is it considered unprofessional? If not, is it merely frowned upon then? Just curious of people's feelings on the matter.

I have respect for all who attempt writing regardless of genre if you want a definitive answer.

Margarita Skies
11-28-2011, 09:37 AM
I don't know about this being taboo because you'd classify what I write as soft-core porn. :ROFL: Used to be hard core back in 2005, I mean freshly twenty-four years old, wanted to try something different after being so romantic since I started writing novels at 18, and I found myself taking it way too far, so I toned it down. Now, it's something I can't avoid because almost everyone has sex, but I always tone it down and make it gray instead of all white or all black. I just don't want to make people vomit. That being said, I...whatever.


However, there are no limits as to what I read. That's how I learned not to be such a prude when writing. I'm still a major prude in real life, but in writing, it's just a whole bunch of words in a processor, so I am like whatever.

frimble3
11-28-2011, 12:20 PM
As a reader, I don't really care, although, as IceCreamEmpress says, it's nice if the author finds some way to give people a heads-up as to the nature of the book. Pen-names are a simple and traditional method.
Reading a fantasy series that turns to erotic fantasy after a few books, is as annoying as reading an erotic fantasy series that suddenly goes vanilla after a few books. It's all about the reader's expectations.

I wouldn't look down on the writer, or change my opinions of his/her other books. It would be like thinking less of Isaac Asimov's non-fiction, because he wrote those made-up robot stories.

gotchan
11-28-2011, 12:38 PM
Many of John Varley's works feature explicit and bizarre sex. In a few, sex is integral to the plot. While many call him "weird", he is firmly classified as an SF writer, not an erotica writer.

SPMiller
11-28-2011, 12:41 PM
Samuel Delany
Piers Anthony

That's off the top of my head.Delany had trouble getting his work published (e.g., Equinox in the UK, Nova in Analog magazine, and all works banned from Dalton Books stores in the USA). Hogg took decades to ever see publication. It was wrong for that to have happened, but it happened, and it wasn't very long ago. If anything, that's a statement on how far the civil rights movements have progressed.

In theory, pornography shouldn't be a dirty word. Lots of people consume porn, but lots of people also judge others for consuming or producing it.

gothicangel
11-28-2011, 12:45 PM
Notice that you've got a Freudian assumption that writing erotica is not professional?

Check that assumption. It's false.

You see, when I read that, my first instinct that the OP is a published author in another genre, who doesn't want his/her readers to know they also write erotica.

areteus
11-28-2011, 01:49 PM
I think this is an opinion from film making - a director or actor can find their career marked by involvement in a porn film (though in some cases it can help and, like writers, many directors and actors have to take whatever jobs they can to survive until they can make it big). However, like writers, actors and directors also have the option to be anonymous...

I personally wouldn't judge anyone's past writing. I was surprised that Ann Rice had done erotica but it did not bother me at all. You may as well say that Russel T Davies had no place being involved in Doctor Who because he was most famous at the time for Queer as Folk (which was considered controversial at the time for its depictions of M/M relationships). It doesn't follow. What I want to know is: is that person any good at writing what they write? If so, I don't care what they write. If they did bad erotica I might mock it but I would not consider them worthy of derision simply because they were writing it.

shaldna
11-28-2011, 03:22 PM
What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

I have no issue with it, there are a lot of authors who write erotica alongside other genres. Anne Rice, for instance, had massive commerical sucess writing horror, and she also wrote erotica under another name and is quite open about it.



Naturally the Bible-nuts will beat their war drums of judgment and host yet more book burnings of said author. I am Christian myself but think their message of intolerance, denial, and smothering of sexuality is the wrong approach.

I wouldn't use descriptions like 'Bible-nuts' because you never know who you are insulting or offending.



But what do you all personally think? Would you look down in disdain on that author? Support them? Be indifferent?

I think it's cool when an author enjoys success, be it in whatever genre.



Would you expect/demand an explanation from author if it were true or not and why?

Hell no. I'm not their mother so it's none of my business what they do. I mean, erotica is just another genre, and I wouldn't go up to my favourite sci-fi author and demand to know if it's true that they wrote a romance novel, would I?



Is there a line to be drawn between erotica as more acceptable than what is deemed porn?

Erotica and porn are quite different, and publishers have their own guidelines which writers adhere to. There are certain things that are no considered acceptable in erotica.



While understanding the desire to not really want the public to know, should that author feel nervous or ashamed if they have done so?

No.

shaldna
11-28-2011, 03:25 PM
(*I know that "Anne" wasn't the author's original first name, but I don't know if it is her chosen name or a pen name. If I guessed wrong, I certainly don't mean to show disrespect for her choice.)

Anne Rice's real first name is Howard. The story goes that when she started school a nun asked her name and she was embarassed and said Anne, and her mother didn't correct her, so Anne stuck and became her 'real' name.

NeuroFizz
11-28-2011, 03:51 PM
Do they write damn good stories? We detect no ill winds for people who write damn good stories about murder and mayhem, but pull out a penis instead of a machete and people get all twitchy. Erotica is not my preferred read, but an engaging story of any genre is a pleasure for its readers and a quality accomplishment for its author.

scarletpeaches
11-28-2011, 04:38 PM
I wouldn't use descriptions like 'Bible-nuts' because you never know who you are insulting or offending.And the OP's making some pretty big assumptions about who's writing the erotica they're reading.

ShadowFox
11-28-2011, 05:01 PM
known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

Quite a huge chunk of Science fiction / fantasy authors have written erotica with nary an effect on their career.

It's only good business sense to use pseudonyms, because booksellers order books depending on numbers of books sold. What might be great sales for a SF book could be very poor sales for an erotic book. You don't want the fact you write books in small genres to reduce the number of books ordered in larger genres. Plus, as a general rule, it is best to write books under several names since if publishers make a mistake with one name (i.e. publishing a book dead, etc) the other names still have careers. It smooths out the oddities of the business.

Manuel Royal
11-28-2011, 05:07 PM
Many of John Varley's works feature explicit and bizarre sex. In a few, sex is integral to the plot. While many call him "weird", he is firmly classified as an SF writer, not an erotica writer.Same for Philip Jose Farmer.

I can't think it'd be much of a problem these days. Once an author is well-known and has a readership, if it comes out that she's published erotica under a different name, I suppose it might lose her a few readers, but it would probably gain her more.

Wayne K
11-28-2011, 05:18 PM
Should we be ashamed of writing about murder, rape, arson, hate? No

Why sex? What is so horrible about writing sex that people should hide their heads in the sand about it?

People are backward. I have great respect for people who write good sex scenes

The media shows people with their heads blown off, their legs blown off, but holy fuck if they show a pair of tits

Our heads are up our asss if you ask me

Stacia Kane
11-28-2011, 05:49 PM
*shrug* I certainly wouldn't call myself "well known" in fantasy, but I got my start writing erotica/erotic romance and have never felt any sort of bias or shame or anything; I don't hide it and I'm not embarrassed, and no one has ever said anything about it to me, so...

scarletpeaches
11-28-2011, 05:52 PM
Although I use a pen name, that's not because I'm ashamed or embarrassed about writing erotica. I plan to keep the same pen name for whatever genres I branch into.

It'd be different if I wrote YA, but I don't plan to, so...*shrugs with Stacia*

Ruth2
11-28-2011, 05:58 PM
It takes just as much skill to craft a well written work of erotica as it does to write literary fiction. Why look down on that?

shaldna
11-28-2011, 06:03 PM
The more I think about this thread the more something about it is annoying me. I think it's the title:



Erotica taboo for a professional author?

Which is suggesting that erotica writers aren't 'professional'

There are several professional writers on this board who write primarily erotica.

In fact, there are a lot of references to 'professional' that I think need addressed.



This is a question I have often pondered and wonder how many professional authors that have found success may fall under this spectrum.

Suggesting that they didn't find sucess at writing erotica....?


What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

I think it's the use of the word 'dabble' here that annoys me most. This, paired with the above comments on 'professional' writers makes it sound, whether you are aware of it or not, that you consider erotica writers to be somehow beneath other writers. In that they are not professional and are merely amusing themselves by dabbling in erotica.


In fact, there are a lot of assumptions made in the original post. And the comment about 'Bible-nuts' is still grating on me.

I am a deeply devout Christian and I read and enjoy erotica, I wouldn't 'beat their war drums of judgment and host yet more book burnings of said author.' and I don't know anyone else who would.

I also feel that you are making more big assumptions and sweeping generalisations with the following:



I am Christian myself but think their message of intolerance, denial, and smothering of sexuality is the wrong approach.

Just because someone is a Christian does not mean they are a frigid prude with such delicate sensibilities that they would fall into a horror induced coma if someone dared mention the word 'penis'.

There are some people who are more strict than others and would object, but don't lump everyone in together.

In addition, the entire basis of Christianity is about tolerance and acceptance.

In general the whole question troubles me in it's generalisations and assumptions.

bearilou
11-28-2011, 06:07 PM
It would be like thinking less of Isaac Asimov's non-fiction, because he wrote those made-up robot stories.

HE DID?!? [goes to burn his essays]


And the OP's making some pretty big assumptions about who's writing the erotica they're reading.

Just what I was thinking.


Should we be ashamed of writing about murder, rape, arson, hate? No

Why sex? What is so horrible about writing sex that people should hide their heads in the sand about it?

People are backward. I have great respect for people who write good sex scenes

The media shows people with their heads blown off, their legs blown off, but holy fuck if they show a pair of tits

Our heads are up our asss if you ask me

Oh...Wayne. [pats him] Don't you get it? We can have [whispers] sex but we're never, ever supposed to enjoy it!

...why is it so dark in here...


IOW everything he said.

edit: ...and everything shaldna said, too.

firedrake
11-28-2011, 06:14 PM
Yeah, I'll chime in with everyone else. The thread title could be better worded. I'm a Professional writer of erotic romance and definitely not dabbling. My writing is helping, in a small way, to put food on our table.

I sure as hell am not ashamed of what I write, in fact I'm pretty bloody proud. Like SP, I'd probably keep the same pen name for writing in another genre, if I decide to head that way.

Sex has been around since our ancestors flittered about in the primordial ooze. It's part and parcel of life and shouldn't be considered some seedy little sideline.

Stacia Kane
11-28-2011, 06:14 PM
ETA: I wrote a blog series (now available as a book in paperback and on Kindle, Nook, etc.) on writing effective sex scenes, under this pen name, and it's pretty successful. I used excerpts from my romances & erotic romances in it. It's right there when someone looks me up online.

Not remotely embarrassed by it. Especially not considering the extremely positive reviews it has or the emails I still get thanking me for writing it and saying how helpful the writer found it.

Isabella Amaris
11-28-2011, 07:14 PM
As demeaning/disrespectful as the thread's title question might be to many of us, have to say the answer can differ drastically depending on where you are in the world... I have no doubt such taboo-ness continues to exist in full glory today in many quarters, including among writers ...

Me, personally, I have no issues; good writing is good writing, period. I suspect though that writers are not exactly representative of readers' views on matters like this, so... though the OP is asking for our views, not readers' views ...

Hmmmm, I'm very glad pseudonyms exist...

ETA: must say, the way the post is worded is beginning to bug me a little... And calling a section of the population with diverse views of their own 'Bible-nuts' is probably not the way to go ... IMO...

Oh, and what IceCreamEmpress said:) hehe sorry, IceCreamExpress, I mistakenly referred to you as 'IcePrincess' just now. Sorry!:)

Susan Littlefield
11-28-2011, 08:38 PM
To be truthful as far as my feelings, I don't think it would make that much of a difference. Erotic fiction is one of the genres that I will admit that I have read and personally don't find it distasteful (there are still forbidden lines though, I agree) because I believe this is a very sexually charged culture we live in to begin with.

Erotica is just another genre out there. Many people enjoy writing it and many enjoy reading it. Just as many want neither to write nor read it. I don't read erotica because I don't enjoy it, therefore you would never find me writing it (principle being write what you enjoy reading the most). However, there are many people at AW who do write erotica and are quote professional and successful.


Naturally the Bible-nuts will beat their war drums of judgment and host yet more book burnings of said author. I am Christian myself but think their message of intolerance, denial, and smothering of sexuality is the wrong approach.

This is a pretty wide-spread assumption. Some people who are not christian might react the same way to erotica as someone who is religious, as you have demonstraed in your statement above (in bold). ;) Whether or not to read or write erotica is an individual choice.


But what do you all personally think? Would you look down in disdain on that author? Support them? Be indifferent? Would you expect/demand an explanation from author if it were true or not and why? Would some answer be acceptable while others would not be?

I don't hold judgments on people for what they write. Erotica is a genre just as literary, westerns, mystery, and paranormal are. I am an advocate of writing what you are most passionate about. If it's erotica, excellent. If not, excellent too. Why should there be any judgement on a person for what they write?


Is there a line to be drawn between erotica as more acceptable than what is deemed porn?

That would depend on your perspective.


While understanding the desire to not really want the public to know, should that author feel nervous or ashamed if they have done so?

Of course not. Why should they?

KimJo
11-28-2011, 08:42 PM
I don't have much to add, other than agreeing with what others have said.

I am a professional author. I write erotic romance under a pen name.

I also write young adult fiction, under a different name.

Probably if it were found out that I write both, there might be issues with some of the people who've read my YA stuff, or with the parents of some of those people. That's mainly because of the "we must protect the children" factor; regardless of the fact that my YA books contain virtually no sexual content at all (and what little does appear is so closed-door sometimes *I* can't even tell whether the characters had sex or not), some parents, teachers, etc. would not want teens reading something by an author who also writes teh smexy stuff.

That's their problem, not mine. I am just as professional an author under my erotic romance pen name as I am under my YA name.

DragonBlaze
11-28-2011, 08:47 PM
First of all, let me say I appreciate everyone's response. I am sorry but I believe some people are misinterpreting or taking offense to what I am not intending to mean in my post at all.

To the erotica novelists, I am in no way suggesting they are unprofessional. I have the utmost respect for anyone who attempts writing. What I meant by the title and the original post was if some author that writes fiction, sci-fi, or whatever was found out under a different name to have written erotica or porn in novels, magazines, or online sex sites. I was merely asking if you all as readers felt that was a bad thing, good thing, or simply didn't matter to you.

Just as you all have pointed out with Anne Rice, I can see how the reactions have been for a famous author. But for any new or established authors here who've had a past such as this, I was wondering how their feelings must be.

As for the whole Bible reference, I am sorry. Poor choice in words, yes but I was merely thinking of the religious extremists that don't hesitate burning people's books and condemning them to all to Hell and what not. Such actions always anger me. I am deeply faithful myself and that is simply what I meant by the bad choice of words in that they are misguided in their beliefs and/or feelings (just my opinion of course). But this is a different topic/debate that would derail this one.

Again, I apologize.

scarletpeaches
11-28-2011, 08:50 PM
If I find out a favourite author (or, hell, not a favourite) also writes erotica under a different name, I would say "Meh," and move on.

It is true that violence is accepted but ZOMG PEEN THINK OF TEH CHEELDRENS is a common reaction to two (or more) consenting adults making each other feel good, which is a shame.

DragonBlaze
11-28-2011, 08:52 PM
Some people who are not christian might react the same way to erotica as someone who is religious, as you have demonstraed in your statement above (in bold). ;) Whether or not to read or write erotica is an individual choice.

Very true and a great statement. I have studied philosophy as well as theology and there are belief systems of people that involve morals without the presence of a deity that could react in the same way.

The Lonely One
11-28-2011, 08:54 PM
Do they write damn good stories? We detect no ill winds for people who write damn good stories about murder and mayhem, but pull out a penis instead of a machete and people get all twitchy. Erotica is not my preferred read, but an engaging story of any genre is a pleasure for its readers and a quality accomplishment for its author.


If I find out a favourite author (or, hell, not a favourite) also writes erotica under a different name, I would say "Meh," and move on.

It is true that violence is accepted but ZOMG PEEN THINK OF TEH CHEELDRENS is a common reaction to two (or more) consenting adults making each other feel good, which is a shame.

All you have to do is look at the way the MPAA rates films.

Although as one poster pointed out, erotica/young adult probably shouldn't appear under the same pen name for obvious reasons ;)

Susan Littlefield
11-28-2011, 09:02 PM
First of all, let me say I appreciate everyone's response. I am sorry but I believe some people are misinterpreting or taking offense to what I am not intending to mean in my post at all.

As for the whole Bible reference, I am sorry. Poor choice in words, yes but I was merely thinking of the religious extremists that don't hesitate burning people's books and condemning them to all to Hell and what not. Such actions always anger me. I am deeply faithful myself and that is simply what I meant by the bad choice of words in that they are misguided in their beliefs and/or feelings (just my opinion of course). But this is a different topic/debate that would derail this one.

Again, I apologize.

I didn't take offense to anything you wrote, nor do I believe I misinterpreted. :) In fact, I think this discussion is very interesting.

That's nice of you to apologize, but in my perception it is not necessary.

DragonBlaze
11-28-2011, 09:08 PM
I didn't take offense to anything you wrote, nor do I believe I misinterpreted. :) In fact, I think this discussion is very interesting.

That's nice of you to apologize, but in my perception it is not necessary.

Others seem to have taken some slight or offense though about it, so I felt the need to apologize still. I've actually been told by some friends I am too apologetic but that is just the person I am as I try to be polite and respectful to everyone. Although, sometimes like this I seem goof up on that. hehe :e2smack:

Manuel Royal
11-28-2011, 09:17 PM
I've had one erotica story published (under the name M. Roncevaux). I'm only embarrassed that it's not a better story.

The Lonely One
11-28-2011, 09:19 PM
Yeah if people read your other posts beyond the OP they'd see you have been trying to make your ideas more specific and clear.

I get where you are coming from, and it's a brave question to ask. I think erotic entertainment in general is in some sense taboo, and not accepted as 'professional' in all cultural aspects of society. Now, I have no issue with erotica writers or erotic entertainment that is consensual to all parties, and I think sex is as human as the tortured souls blood-lusting in other novels. Why not explore it as a significant niche of storytelling? I think even that an argument could be made for non-consensual make-believe erotica (which is still in actuality consensual), for the purposes of one's fantasy (male or female)--like I said upstream sex is deep in the dark crevices of the human psyche--but I'm DEFINITELY not going there, don't want to have a debate on consent/non-consent in erotica.

All I'm saying is, while broadly worded in perhaps some uncareful phrasing, I got the idea of your post and didn't think you were purposefully being insulting. I also think it's a topic worth exploring.

Phaeal
11-28-2011, 10:01 PM
It's been done. Nicholson Baker's House of Holes.

Or as the NYT reviewer wrote:



Baker’s new novel, “House of Holes".... has the apt subtitle “A Book of Raunch” and is dirtier than “Vox” and “The Fermata” combined. It’s a series of loosely linked vignettes set in a sexual theme park where the attractions include Masturboats; the Porndecahedron, a 12-screen planetarium showing nonstop blue movies; and the Velvet Room, where the Russian composers Borodin and Rimsky-Korsakov use their genitals to give foot massages. One visitor to the House of Holes temporarily surrenders his right arm in exchange for a larger penis, while the arm enjoys a happy sex life of its own. Another voluntarily submits to head detachment and becomes a walking pair of gonads. The book coins dozens of new terms for the male member, like “thundertube,” “seedstick” and the “Malcolm Gladwell,” and near the end there is a sort of Joycean explosion, an “Atlas-shrug shudderation of arrival” that makes a young woman named Shandee “shiver her way through the seven, eight, nine, twelve seconds of worldwide interplanetary flux of orgasmic strobing happy unmatched tired coughing ebbing thrilled spent ecstasy.”


Or maybe not so erotic after all?

Dr.Gonzo
11-28-2011, 10:06 PM
House of Holes. Love it. Followed next year by Every Hole is a Goal.

Phaeal
11-28-2011, 10:12 PM
This, paired with the above comments on 'professional' writers makes it sound, whether you are aware of it or not, that you consider erotica writers to be somehow beneath other writers.

Well, that's just silly. I'm here to tell you that most erotica writers are adamant TOPS.

Phaeal
11-28-2011, 10:22 PM
House of Holes. Love it. Followed next year by Every Hole is a Goal.

I think that's a golfing manual.

scarletpeaches
11-28-2011, 10:25 PM
Written by Tiger Woods, one assumes.

bearilou
11-28-2011, 10:32 PM
Written by Tiger Woods, one assumes.

*grumps at SP and wipes off the keyboard...and the screen...and the desk area behind the laptop...*

Polenth
11-28-2011, 11:06 PM
As a reader, I'd be indifferent. It has no bearing on the author's other books. I'm sure there are people who'd complain about it, but there are also people who want to ban Winnie the Pooh. If you want to write in a genre, don't be put off by the worry that someone else might not like it.

Ken
11-28-2011, 11:24 PM
... on a related note, Shel Silverstein was a cartoonist for Playboy. Among other things, he went on to become a popular children's book author. And that was some decades back.

Manuel Royal
11-28-2011, 11:50 PM
It's been done. Nicholson Baker's House of Holes.I should have thought of Baker as an example. The Fermata is essentially a book-length sexual fantasy. Kind of brilliant, really.

Ruth2
11-28-2011, 11:56 PM
DragonBlaze, are you worried about writing erotica and not having a pseudonym?

Libbie
11-29-2011, 12:04 AM
I like sex. I like a good sex story. If it became known that a writer I liked wrote erotica, I'd buy their erotica and read it.

No problem here.

The Lonely One
11-29-2011, 01:37 AM
... on a related note, Shel Silverstein was a cartoonist for Playboy. Among other things, he went on to become a popular children's book author. And that was some decades back.

Not super familiar with Playboy's format, but were the cartoons sexual in nature? I know Playboy has been a venue for various famous authors, is Silverstein of a similar vein? Was it under a different name?

Like I said I don't know what kind of cartoons are in playboy, I'd imagine comical sexual situations, but maybe not extremely raunchy like some other magazines. Maybe someone could elaborate on that.

SIDE NOTE: what's going on with AW? It's loading like I'm on dial-up...

bearilou
11-29-2011, 02:43 AM
SIDE NOTE: what's going on with AW? It's loading like I'm on dial-up...

Hm! I thought it was just me. I'm already on crappy satellite speeds and figured it was the bad weather we're having.

scarletpeaches
11-29-2011, 02:50 AM
Same here. Slow as molasses. :(

IceCreamEmpress
11-29-2011, 03:46 AM
Not super familiar with Playboy's format, but were the cartoons sexual in nature?

Racy, for sure.


I know Playboy has been a venue for various famous authors, is Silverstein of a similar vein? Was it under a different name?

The racy cartoons, poems, etc. were his first claim to fame, and he used his own name. His next claim to fame was writing the Johnny Cash hit "A Boy Named Sue," which was inspired by his and his friend and fellow writer Mr. Jean Shepherd's experience of having gender-ambiguous first names.

Then came his fame as a writer for children. He was a multifaceted person, for sure.

Jamesaritchie
11-29-2011, 07:00 PM
It's more a personal matter than a professional one. I don't read it, and I wouldn't write it, but some of my favorite writers have. Lawrence Block started writing "erotica", though back then what he wrote usually had the word porn attached to it. It certainly didn't hurt his career.

It really depends on what else you write. If you write children's fiction, also writing erotica under another name could come back to bite you. The same would be true if you write Christian fiction. Other than this, I can't see where writing anything you want would harm your career, other than by taking time away from whatever it is you're making more money by writing.

Medievalist
11-29-2011, 08:28 PM
Actually that is something you are interpreting from your perspective. I do not assume or think it is unprofessional at all.

Dude, you made the distinction between a "professional writer" and a writer of erotica in your very first post.

Look at your language.


What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

You've set up a hierarchy in your language.

shaldna
11-30-2011, 02:28 AM
I do think, on reflection, that perhaps the OP wasn't aware of the wording and the way that came across.

I guess we all have preconceptions about some things, whether we realise it or not.

Margarita Skies
11-30-2011, 02:44 AM
Suddenly this got weird at page 2. Then bizarre at page 3, until it got so bad that a mod had to intervene. I better get out of here because I don't want to make things worse. In an attempt for clarification the OP created weirdness and confusion, man. I'm so sorry since I participated. Out of this thread.

scarletpeaches
11-30-2011, 02:53 AM
Hey, no thread is officially 'weird' until someone brings out the kitteh pics, another member Godwins the thread, I ask Soccer Mom if I can post a photo of Dick, someone cites Rule 34, then dpaterso locks the thread and sends us all to bed without any tea.

bearilou
11-30-2011, 03:01 AM
Suddenly this got weird at page 2. Then bizarre at page 3, until it got so bad that a mod had to intervene. I better get out of here because I don't want to make things worse. In an attempt for clarification the OP created weirdness and confusion, man. I'm so sorry since I participated. Out of this thread.

*wonders if we were reading the same thread*


Hey, no thread is officially 'weird' until someone brings out the kitteh pics, another member Godwins the thread, I ask Soccer Mom if I can post a photo of Dick, someone cites Rule 34, then dpaterso locks the thread and sends us all to bed without any tea.

Can we skip to the pic of Dick and hold there?

scarletpeaches
11-30-2011, 03:08 AM
Maybe we should wait until Soccer Mom okays it. She's the final arbiter regarding Dickpics. It's in her job description.

ETA: I forgot to clarify: by 'Dick' I mean Richard Armitage. This isn't the Erotica forum, all right? :D

The Lonely One
11-30-2011, 03:23 AM
Suddenly this got weird at page 2. Then bizarre at page 3, until it got so bad that a mod had to intervene. I better get out of here because I don't want to make things worse. In an attempt for clarification the OP created weirdness and confusion, man. I'm so sorry since I participated. Out of this thread.

Really? I tried really hard to make it weird on page one. :mad:

DragonBlaze
11-30-2011, 05:44 AM
Thanks again to everyone for their responses! :Hug2:

bearilou
11-30-2011, 06:41 AM
Maybe we should wait until Soccer Mom okays it. She's the final arbiter regarding Dickpics. It's in her job description.

Moooooooooom! SP won't post her Dick pictures!



ETA: I forgot to clarify: by 'Dick' I mean Richard Armitage. This isn't the Erotica forum, all right? :D

My mind was pristine when this conversation started. I knew what you were talking about! :D

Susan Littlefield
11-30-2011, 06:48 AM
I clearly missed something along the way...which seems to happen often.

dangerousbill
11-30-2011, 07:27 AM
Is there a line to be drawn between erotica as more acceptable than what is deemed porn?

While understanding the desire to not really want the public to know, should that author feel nervous or ashamed if they have done so?

I imagine to a suitably judgmental person, there's no distinction between erotica and porn. Sex is sex, and it's all the work of the Devil.

I keep my identity secret, not out of guilt, but to avoid judgment by friends and relatives. The same folks who equate porn with erotica may also associate adult sexual romps with perversion. They certainly won't ask you to babysit for them.

On an erotica forum a couple of years ago, one of the regular members always published under her own name. A born-again coworker Googled her writing and outed her in front of her boss and colleagues. She had to stop writing erotica or risk losing her job.

mscelina
11-30-2011, 07:29 AM
I clearly missed something along the way...which seems to happen often.

Probably a massive portage of posts to the nebulous undersides of the AW server, where the mods will poke sticks at it until it squirms its last and finally dies.

That being said--a lot of very good authors write a lot of erotica and pay their bills with the royalties they make from erotica while waiting for their quarterly royalty checks to appear from trade publishers. Some write under pseudonyms; some don't. And as publishing tentacles extend from trade publishing to electronic publishing, my guess is that the lines between what is perceived as *real* writing and *hobby* erotica writing will be blurred.

As a young publisher, and an editor who's worked with erotic and non-erotic authors both over the past decade, I can tell you this: in order for an erotica to get published by a legitimate publisher, the books go through the same processes, the same procedures and the same scrutiny that a historical fiction or a murder mystery do. Because at the end, they're all BOOKS and a publisher's primary concern is to turn out a quality book that fans will love and flock to their site to buy.

And for every erotica book that sells 200 copies in its first weekend, the publisher has a bit more breathing room that enables them to give some other "real" book a chance. In many ways, the financial foundation of small independent publishers is laid brick by brick with erotic/sensual romance books.

Filigree
11-30-2011, 10:06 AM
My pen name will be traceable to my real name, for these reasons:

1) I have a rockin' real name. People think my name is fake all the time. I can get instant street cred from horror movie fans, metal music fans, and soap opera fans without even trying. I long ago had the choice to hide my name, or grin wickedly and claim it.

2) I've spent 20 years cultivating an art career under that name, and since the art and writing are often linked, why not?

3) I'm not working with children, or corporations that would have a problem with me writing either SF&F or erotica.

4) If anyone in my family or hometown has a problem with me writing what I write, I refer them back to reason #1.

James D. Macdonald
11-30-2011, 07:06 PM
This is a question I have often pondered and wonder how many professional authors that have found success may fall under this spectrum. I would really be interested in the opinions and feedback of the AW community on this. What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories?

Erotica? Heck, a good number of SFF authors wrote out-and-out porn. Who ... well, if you're in the community you know who. Hang out in the bar, get to know some folks, and ask "What's your porn connection?" Once upon a time it was fast, easy money, a way to pay the rent in between your better-known under-your-real-name books.

I'm sure the same is true of other genres, but since I'm not in their communities I don't know exactly who.

WriteMinded
11-30-2011, 07:29 PM
What would you all think or how would you react if it became known that a well known professional author (fiction, SFF, etc.) previously/currently dabble into the writing of sex stories? I know there are romance/erotica novelists here and mean no disrespect. I am simply pondering authors who've possibly found success in genres outside of this but have written erotica, porn, and so on on the side in secret or under different pen names. Why would I care?



But what do you all personally think? Would you look down in disdain on that author? Support them? Be indifferent? Would you expect/demand an explanation from author if it were true or not and why? Would some answer be acceptable while others would not be? I'd think, hmm multi-talented. If it was a favorite author, I'd have only one question: "Where can I purchase your porn?"


Is there a line to be drawn between erotica as more acceptable than what is deemed porn? I hate lines.


While understanding the desire to not really want the public to know, should that author feel nervous or ashamed if they have done so? Using a different pen name does not indicate shame or secrecy. Lots of authors use different names for different genres. It is not up to me to decide what people should feel about anything.