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Darkshore
11-24-2011, 01:57 AM
Just something I wondered about today. Do you read your hardcovers with the dust jackets on or off? Personally I take them off and place them back on once I'm done reading, but I've heard others keep them on. What do you do?

LindaJeanne
11-24-2011, 02:28 AM
I take them off. Otherwise, they get in my way, half-fall off, and inevitably get messed up. Easier hold one item while reading (the book) rather than two (book, jacket) or three (book, jacket, bookmark)

SummerSurf57
11-24-2011, 02:30 AM
I take them off, because otherwise they fall off, crease, slide, lay at an angle, and are just an overall nuisence.

mirandashell
11-24-2011, 02:34 AM
I take them off as well. For pretty much the same reasons

Archerbird
11-24-2011, 02:38 AM
Off.

Alessandra Kelley
11-24-2011, 02:55 AM
Um, on.

I didn't even realize off was an option. I mean, by choice rather than the dust jacket got lost or shredded.

I don't know if it's over-fastidiousness, but I hate the feeling of my fingers sticking to one of those glue-finished fabric covers. Also, books without jackets just seem to get gungier, and you can never get them clean again.

Alessandra Kelley
11-24-2011, 02:58 AM
This is going to sound pathetic, but I got so discombobulated by the question, I think I checked the wrong box on the poll and I can't seem to undo it. It was supposed to be "on."

DancingMaenid
11-24-2011, 02:59 AM
On. To be honest, I never really considered doing it any other way, except in cases (like with my dictionary) where the jacket has gotten beaten up over the years.

mscelina
11-24-2011, 03:10 AM
As a rare and antique book collector, I know the value of an unsullied dust jacket. Therefore, when I start to read a book with a dust jacket, the jacket goes into the desk drawer to be replaced with I've finished the book.

Darkshore
11-24-2011, 03:20 AM
As a rare and antique book collector, I know the value of an unsullied dust jacket. Therefore, when I start to read a book with a dust jacket, the jacket goes into the desk drawer to be replaced with I've finished the book.

This is how I feel. I don't want to mess up the jacket and it just feels slick to my hands....I tend to read for long periods of time and this gets to be a problem hehe.

Paul
11-24-2011, 03:30 AM
unless it's glued on, it's off.

head-wrecking they are.

mscelina
11-24-2011, 03:39 AM
This is how I feel. I don't want to mess up the jacket and it just feels slick to my hands....I tend to read for long periods of time and this gets to be a problem hehe.

Precisely. About...oh...seven years ago, I bought a box of books at auction that had a first American edition, first printing of Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca in the bottom--with a nearly fine dust jacket wrapped around the beautifully clean and unaged book. That $1 dollar purchase paid off in spades, however, and due to the dust jacket.

A very fine first edition of Rebecca without the dust jacket was worth about 350 bucks.

I sold the very fine first edition of Rebecca with the dust jacket for well over ten times that amount to an overseas buyer--around $5000 dollars not including insurance and shipping.

And THAT, my dears, is why you want to protect your books AND their dust jackets.

Paul
11-24-2011, 03:45 AM
Precisely. About...oh...seven years ago, I bought a box of books at auction that had a first American edition, first printing of Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca in the bottom--with a nearly fine dust jacket wrapped around the beautifully clean and unaged book. That $1 dollar purchase paid off in spades, however, and due to the dust jacket.

A very fine first edition of Rebecca without the dust jacket was worth about 350 bucks.

I sold the very fine first edition of Rebecca with the dust jacket for well over ten times that amount to an overseas buyer--around $5000 dollars not including insurance and shipping.

And THAT, my dears, is why you want to protect your books AND their dust jackets.
WOW.

for me it's the sticky icky-ness of it all.

but that ($5000) works too...

mscelina
11-24-2011, 03:48 AM
I'm greedy. Can't help it. And it's almost that 'bah, humbug!' time of the year.

Darkshore
11-24-2011, 04:19 AM
I never sell any of my books, in fact my bookshelf is close to overflowing. But I like to keep them in as nice of condition as I can, even my SFBC copies that are considered worthless to collectors hehe.

benbradley
11-24-2011, 04:32 AM
I keep the DJ's on while reading. If it's a "nice" book and it currently or I think will someday have some value, I'll put the DJ in a "Brodart" or equivalent DJ protective cover, then I'll still read it with the DJ on.

This is an example of a "nice" book:

Precisely. About...oh...seven years ago, I bought a box of books at auction that had a first American edition, first printing of Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca in the bottom--with a nearly fine dust jacket wrapped around the beautifully clean and unaged book. That $1 dollar purchase paid off in spades, however, and due to the dust jacket.

A very fine first edition of Rebecca without the dust jacket was worth about 350 bucks.

I sold the very fine first edition of Rebecca with the dust jacket for well over ten times that amount to an overseas buyer--around $5000 dollars not including insurance and shipping.

And THAT, my dears, is why you want to protect your books AND their dust jackets.
I have a first printing of "Atlas Shrugged" :-) but it has no DJ. :-( I paid 50 cents for it, and it's only worth about $50 to $200 depending on when I look at closed ebay auctions.

mscelina
11-24-2011, 04:35 AM
For a better rough estimate of how much your rare/antique books are worth, look them up on Alibris and Abebooks. That way you'll have a more accurate idea that also takes the condition of the book into account.

Filigree
11-24-2011, 04:37 AM
As part-time curator for a small private library, I cover most of the owner's new and used hardback books with archival plastic covers the day they come into the library. Only those with their own book-boxes are exempt, and they get their own level of care. Even hardback books without a dustjacket have a special heavy plastic clear-cover to protect them. Thus, my client's books and dustjackets are protected, easy to read, the jackets don't fall off, and the resale value is preserved.

Filigree
11-24-2011, 04:38 AM
Oh, yes, and some of his books are worth in the 2K to 6K range. He lets me borrow them for research. I have ample incentive to make sure they are happy books.

Nugus
11-24-2011, 04:42 AM
I prefer it off, but sometimes I have to have it on - depending on the condition. Sounds like my love life.

Darkshore
11-24-2011, 05:06 AM
What is that stuff they put over DJ's on library copies? I wouldn't mind keeping the DJ on if I could laminate them? or whatever it is they do exactly.

Filigree
11-24-2011, 05:12 AM
You'll have to have a business license to order from them, but go here and look at library dustjacket covers.

www.gaylord.com (One of the biggest archival storage suppliers in the U.S.)

Jupiter
11-24-2011, 05:50 AM
I'm a jacket on kind of girl. I'm all for keeping books, especially rare ones, in nice condition. There is a flip side to this though. I think that there is someting rather charming about a battered volume, regardless of age, whose continued existence is thanks only to the adhesive power of sticky tape. Someone thought highly enough of the book to want to preserve it in their own way. Page corners may bear the scars of have been folded over in various places, perhaps to mark a favourite passage or a place that a previous owner did not venture beyond.
I have lots of crisp, clean books with dust jackets present and intact. But then again, I also find something comforting and heartwarming about a much read and repaired edition that has passed through many hands before reaching mine. There are many of these on my bookshelves, and I find that they are the ones I return to the most.

Grace.

benbradley
11-24-2011, 06:24 AM
What is that stuff they put over DJ's on library copies? I wouldn't mind keeping the DJ on if I could laminate them? or whatever it is they do exactly.
The mylar covers as collectors and collectible booksellers use them are just folded over the DJ and are easily removable. Public libraries go a step or two further, gluing or taping the DJ cover to the book.

You'll have to have a business license to order from them, but go here and look at library dustjacket covers.

www.gaylord.com (http://www.gaylord.com) (One of the biggest archival storage suppliers in the U.S.)
There's also Brodart:
http://www.books.brodart.com/Content3.aspx?P=23
I don't know offhand if they sell to the general public either, but searching for Brodart on ebay finds lots of book jacket covers.

Alessandra Kelley
11-24-2011, 06:31 AM
I was going to say, what about those plastic sleeves that slip over dust jackets? I wouldn't laminate a dust jacket -- too destructive -- but a neat folding of protective plastic is a good protection. I have put them on some of our more valuable books.

That's right, not only do I leave the dust jackets on, I put another dust jacket over them.

Alessandra Kelley
11-24-2011, 06:32 AM
And does anyone have a good source for those mylar sleeves for those without a business license?

Darkshore
11-24-2011, 06:47 AM
I'll have to look into those. The only noticeable effect I've had on a book from reading it with the DJ off was with my signed copy of Ghost Story. I devoured it in one night and my hands were a bit sweaty I guess and the spine of the book is slightly indented from my fingers hehe.

OnlyStones
11-24-2011, 06:49 AM
And does anyone have a good source for those mylar sleeves for those without a business license?

Gaylord handles them - you don't need any special connections to order from them.

http://www.gaylord.com/listing.asp?H=7&PCI=128317

These are great for rare books but otherwise, I likes my books nekid. I voted off.

LJD
11-24-2011, 08:13 AM
I take them off.
But I honestly can't remember the last time I read a hardcover book.

gothicangel
11-24-2011, 01:23 PM
On.

Isn't that the point of dust-jackets, to protect the book? Just sayin'.

Scribe4264
11-24-2011, 02:22 PM
First thing I do when I get home with my new book is to remove the dust jacket and banish it to its grisly fate in the trash can.

Can't stand them, refuse to keep them and, since I don't sell my books, it won't matter to me what the value is or isn't without those infernal wastes of material.

KTC
11-24-2011, 04:19 PM
OFF. I don't like wrinkles or smudges!

Darkshore
11-24-2011, 05:23 PM
Wow. Some people toss them? Yikes. I might dislike the feel of them while reading the book, but I keep them pristine to put on while it's on the shelf hehe.

Xelebes
11-24-2011, 07:09 PM
I throw away the dust jacket. I simply have no use for them.

Shadow_Ferret
11-24-2011, 07:14 PM
On. I like to look at the artwork and that way others can see what the book is without having to come over my shoulder to look forcing me to kill them.

Plus, the flap acts as a bookmark.

Alessandra Kelley
11-24-2011, 09:11 PM
I don't mean to overreact here, but ... throw away a dust jacket?

As a bibliophile who has also painted cover art, I find that ... disappointing.

Archerbird
11-24-2011, 09:19 PM
I don't mean to overreact here, but ... throw away a dust jacket?

As a bibliophile who has also painted cover art, I find that ... disappointing.

It would solve the problem if someone could get someone to print the cover on ....the cover.

Instead of just adding more paper.

I know they can do that, because I have several books with cover art on both the cover itself AND the dust jacket.

Filigree
11-24-2011, 11:21 PM
Newer binding standards allow for that. Older ones, not so much.

Whether I'm planning on selling the books or not, I try to take care of my hardbacks. They're expensive, some cannot be replaced, and I want them to last. An example: back in the early 80's I picked up a set of gorgeous, glossy-stock 'Treasures of the World' hardbacks, showcasing the decorative arts and ornaments of major world cultures. They were covered in gold-stamped satin, with intaglio prints inlaid on the front covers. All three exposed edges of the text block were gilt, to minimize browning. The slipcase, also satin and gold, died within two years. I use these books in research and design, and I re-cover them in clear archival plastic every ten years or so. I could sell them now for serious money. But more importantly, they're still intact.

I'm a technical book-geek. I know the reason why hardbacks come with dustcovers, and I choose to augment those jackets. I just like the feel of a covered book, too.

mirandashell
11-25-2011, 12:17 AM
I would never throw the dj away! Once I've finished reading, it goes back on the book.

Scribe4264
11-25-2011, 05:20 AM
It would solve the problem if someone could get someone to print the cover on ....the cover.

Instead of just adding more paper.

I know they can do that, because I have several books with cover art on both the cover itself AND the dust jacket.

You mean, like they used to? DJs are a waste of paper that bring nothing to the story inside. If I want to see art I'll go to a museum. I pick up a book to read the words printed within.

Xelebes
11-25-2011, 05:46 AM
Personally, I loathe cover art. That's one of the big reasons why the dust jackets go. The cover art does not add anything to the story for me and I often pass by books when browsing that keept their cover art busy or the centrepiece. The other big factor is that the cover art is almost always never targeted towards me, even if the book is.

mccardey
11-25-2011, 05:51 AM
Personally, I loathe cover art. That's one of the big reasons why the dust jackets go. The cover art does not add anything to the story for me and I often pass by books when browsing that keept their cover art busy or the centrepiece. The other big factor is that the cover art is almost always never targeted towards me, even if the book is.


I'm shocked! I love a good cover. I especially love good dust jackets.

cmi0616
11-25-2011, 05:55 AM
I always leave them on. The flaps make for awesome bookmarks!

Darkshore
11-25-2011, 06:58 AM
There's an odd bit of reasoning to this it seems. There are those that take off the DJ while reading to preserve it and those that keep it on while reading to preserve the book. Boggles the mind. But I'm 100% guilty of judging books by cover art...it's hard not to unless I know or have heard that the book is good even if it's cover art is awful.

Lyra Jean
11-25-2011, 07:00 AM
On. I like to look at the artwork and that way others can see what the book is without having to come over my shoulder to look forcing me to kill them.

Plus, the flap acts as a bookmark.

This ^^

Alessandra Kelley
11-25-2011, 07:37 AM
I'm shocked! I love a good cover. I especially love good dust jackets.

Oh, thank you and bless you!

scarletpeaches
11-25-2011, 02:43 PM
On. Taking them off never occurs to me.

If I were a book collector like mscelina, I'd reconsider but when you buy a book that's sold by the hundred-thousand, there's hardly any value in having a pristine first edition.

I'm more careful with my author-signed books.

Dr.Gonzo
11-25-2011, 03:00 PM
Off, and they stay off. Ripped up and in the bin. Hate them. Even when they're just on your shelf, they start riding up. Same thing with those cardboard sleeves over DVDs and Blu-rays that are over the actual cover. Tear them them up. Don't want them.

mccardey
11-25-2011, 03:11 PM
Off, and they stay off. Ripped up and in the bin. Hate them. Even when they're just on your shelf, they start riding up. Same thing with those cardboard sleeves over DVDs and Blu-rays that are over the actual cover. Tear them them up. Don't want them.


:cry:

Dr.Gonzo
11-25-2011, 03:20 PM
:cry:

I know. Unless it's a collectable like my first edition Slaughterhouse 5. Otherwise, bye bye.

Lillie
11-25-2011, 06:46 PM
On. I never think to take them off, and I like cover art.

But they do fall off while I'm reading, and then they get messed up and creased and they drive me mad.

But I still never think about taking them off.

I use rizlas for book marks. And when I run out I raid my books for skins. They taste of dust and words.

MoLoLu
11-25-2011, 08:04 PM
Wow, interesting question.

Can't comment for myself as my collection of hardbacks is zero but my dad collects a number of hard covers and, in particular, older books. Up until recently he left them off but embarked on an odysee to return all the dust covers to the books to prevent damage & fading.

I'd support the 'on' category for reasons of preserving the work. My paperbacks never fare well during reading and the hypothetical hardcover would do no better.

Darkshore
11-25-2011, 09:36 PM
I think a lot of posters are missing the actual question. It isn't for when they are on the shelf, in storage, display, etc. It's specifically when you are holding the books in your hands to read them.

Phaeal
11-25-2011, 09:53 PM
If it's a freaking huge book, I might take the jacket off, as I find jackets fall off freaking huge books more often. Besides, I like to use freaking huge books as missiles, and missile duty's very hard on covers.

It varies, though. The nice matte dust cover on War and Peace never fell off, whereas the shiny embossed dust cover on my omnibus Alan Lee-illustrated Lord of the Rings is downright treacherous.

For the most part, I like using the dust cover flaps for bookmarks.

Scribe4264
11-26-2011, 01:05 AM
Off, and they stay off. Ripped up and in the bin. Hate them. Even when they're just on your shelf, they start riding up. Same thing with those cardboard sleeves over DVDs and Blu-rays that are over the actual cover. Tear them them up. Don't want them.

:hooray:

Although I have to admit that I take the DVD covers and toss them too. All of my DVDs and CDs are in binders with page sleeves that hold 8 to a page, divided by category and cataloged. So instead of hundreds of those space consuming plastic holders I have my entire collection in 10 binders on one 2-foot long shelf.

kuwisdelu
11-26-2011, 01:13 AM
Dust jackets? Are those like sleeves or cases for your ereader or tablet or something? I had a protective skin on my iPad for a while, but I didn't like it, so I took it off.

Dr.Gonzo
11-26-2011, 01:16 AM
Dust jackets? Are those like sleeves or cases for your ereader or tablet or something? I had a protective skin on my iPad for a while, but I didn't like it, so I took it off.

I have the first draft of a social commentary about the digital age that this post screams to be in. :)

kuwisdelu
11-26-2011, 01:17 AM
I have the first draft of a social commentary about the digital age that this post screams to be in. :)

I do my best.

Darkshore
11-26-2011, 08:10 AM
I'm oldschool I guess. Though I have both a tablet and a kindle...I can't resist filling a bookshelf with my favourites...

shaldna
11-26-2011, 12:19 PM
I take them off, lay them flat in a drawer and put them back on when I am done.

Rhoda Nightingale
11-26-2011, 08:35 PM
For the most part, I like using the dust cover flaps for bookmarks.
My mom does this. It drives me absolutely bonkers, especially when it's one of my books, because then the covers get all bendy and never sit flat and nice on the books anymore. Every time I see her fold the flap about halfway into a huge book, I cringe and want to say, "Stop, you're hurting it!"

I keep them on when I'm reading though. They just look so naked and boring without their covers.

AlishaS
11-27-2011, 03:21 AM
I take them off to read the novel, keep them in a place where they won't get damaged, and then, when I'm done reading the go back on and the novel get's put on my imaginary shelf (boxes because I don't have book shelfs :O )

Howvever I do not under any circumstances discard them!! Every! They are an important part of the book. I know people who take them off and throw them away!!! That is just abuse, plain and simple.

Kathleen_
11-27-2011, 05:25 AM
I take them off because they anoy me when I'm reading. Hopefully I remember to put them back on when I'm done because otherwise they can get pretty beat up lying around.
That said, not many of my books have dust jackets these days.

Filigree
11-27-2011, 08:17 AM
If they're plastic-covered and the flaps taped down, they don't get in the way at all. And I've had certain books survive an accidental splash of tea, because I'd covered the dust jacket.

Jamesaritchie
11-27-2011, 08:52 PM
First thing I do when I get home with my new book is to remove the dust jacket and banish it to its grisly fate in the trash can.

Can't stand them, refuse to keep them and, since I don't sell my books, it won't matter to me what the value is or isn't without those infernal wastes of material.

To me, that's almost sacrilegious. It's like drawing a mustache on the Mona Lisa.

On the other hand, readers like you are why books with dust jackets are so valuable. Your books will deteriorate much faster without those jackets, which also makes books with good dust jackets much more valuable.

I've made a lot of money over the years by buying and selling first editions, and rarity of good dust jackets makes all the difference.

I'd also add that the material you talk about is only wasted if you throw it away. Keep it, and it isn't a waste, it is, in a real way, the most important part of the book as an object. Value aside, it goes a long, long way in keeping the book itself from deteriorating.

Filigree
11-27-2011, 09:40 PM
Even if you never plan to sell your hardbacks, making them last longer will help your finances. I've worn out two sets, in two different printings, of Tanith Lee novels. Next year when I have a little more money, I'm splurging on a beautiful new set in hardback from an indie press, with Lee's own art inside and her husband's cover art. And before I crack one spine to read them, I'll be covering their jackets.

Hiroko
11-29-2011, 10:02 PM
I leave dust jackets on as I read. I just like them for whatever reason.

Tasmin21
11-29-2011, 10:07 PM
I read with the dust jacket on, but my hubby takes the dust jacket off. And we go 'round and 'round about it. ;)

kuwisdelu
11-29-2011, 10:16 PM
While I can understand the attachment in principle to the physical object of a book, it's difficult for me to feel it in the same way I might with, for example, an album.

I think part of it, for me, is that unlike an album, which generally retains the same cover art no matter how many years later you buy it, with books, lots of times the cover art can completely change in later editions.

Perhaps if authors worked much more closely with the cover artist this would change, but I just don't feel the same way about cover art (and therefore, things such as dust jackets) with books as I do with albums.

KTC
11-29-2011, 10:21 PM
I read with the dust jacket on, but my hubby takes the dust jacket off. And we go 'round and 'round about it. ;)


funny, my wife is an uncultured heathen too! (-:

DUST. JACKET. OFF. Lest we wrinkle the poor thing.

ShamanDrum
11-30-2011, 04:21 AM
Always on.

Don't know why.

Alessandra Kelley
11-30-2011, 04:39 AM
(U)nlike an album, which generally retains the same cover art no matter how many years later you buy it, with books, lots of times the cover art can completely change in later editions.

I wonder why that is. Book cover artists are generally paid a flat fee for specified reproduction rights. Is that how it is with album cover artists?

The Lonely One
11-30-2011, 05:04 AM
Um, on.

I didn't even realize off was an option.

:roll: God I had the same reaction...

Sunnyside
11-30-2011, 06:01 AM
I throw away the dust jacket. I simply have no use for them.

*has heart attack*

Whuh whuh what?? Given how much work goes into them (dollar to donuts that EVERYONE here has fussed over their cover) I can't imagine having such a cavalier attitude about the dust jacket! Ouch!

I'm a "take it off" guy all the way. I read with it off, then put it back on to store on the shelf. And I've managed to pass on to my 15-year-old daughter my annoying habit.