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View Full Version : Tying Up Loose-Ends - Or Not? [Article]



gothicangel
11-19-2011, 06:17 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/nov/18/fiction-unsolved-mysteries

Filigree
11-19-2011, 06:58 PM
I like the unsolved mysteries. They add as much flavor to a book as throwaway plot twists and background information. Yes, they might not resolve the central plot, but they contribute to the atmosphere.

I suspect, in this age of MBA graduates, hedge-funds, Twitterfeeds, and various desperate school reforms, that our fiction has become as stripped-down and ruthlessly practical as our lives. If it doesn't make immediate profit, we don't fund it. If a story doesn't move swiftly to an easily-grasped resolution we won't read it. And because of that, many of us miss the deeper rewards of a more-involved book.

profen4
11-19-2011, 08:04 PM
I like the unsolved mysteries. They add as much flavor to a book as throwaway plot twists and background information. Yes, they might not resolve the central plot, but they contribute to the atmosphere.

I suspect, in this age of MBA graduates, hedge-funds, Twitterfeeds, and various desperate school reforms, that our fiction has become as stripped-down and ruthlessly practical as our lives. If it doesn't make immediate profit, we don't fund it. If a story doesn't move swiftly to an easily-grasped resolution we won't read it. And because of that, many of us miss the deeper rewards of a more-involved book.

Why do you want to see me cry??

Filigree
11-19-2011, 10:40 PM
I don't, really. I'm just clarifying what I've seen of American reading habits changing over the last 20 something years.

I work with young business professionals who:
1) can't write very well on their own, and
2) when they bother to read for pleasure at all, can't handle paragraphs longer than two or three sentences. Any names more complicated than Bill, Ted, or Mary turn into a fog of confusing letters for them. They like their fiction and non-fiction to mirror their lives, so anything outside of that becomes too hard to grasp. These are smart people still burdened by tons of crippling student debt. They never had the chance to 'find themselves', only a job or two that pays those bills. And now, five or ten years down the line, it's become habit

This is the larger market, across nearly every genre. I'm not saying everyone reads like this, or that it won't change in the future.

Am I going to start writing like James Patterson, just to meet this market? Nope. I can't. But at least I know what I'm up against.

profen4
11-19-2011, 10:48 PM
Am I going to start writing like James Patterson, just to meet this market? Nope. I can't. But at least I know what I'm up against.

You're going to need a team of writers if you do that :) Does he even write half the stuff under his name?