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Sam Best
11-17-2011, 02:01 AM
Does anyone out there have any experience with getting a book reviewed a month or more before it was published? If so, was this clearly beneficial to getting the early word out or was it a negligible difference? Thanks!

ether
11-17-2011, 02:22 AM
Since e-ARCs started going out for my book, my number of website hits, GoodReads adds, followers, etc, has been climbing quite nicely. But most of the bigger reviewers are waiting until a few days before my release date to post their reviews.

Are you self-publishing? I'd suggest going around to the book bloggers/reviewers and submitting a request for them to review the book. Generally it's smarter to start more than a month in advance, in case they're backed up or need time to read or whatever, but it couldn't hurt. Landing yourself guest posts and interviews and all that on blogs is good, too.

James D. Macdonald
11-17-2011, 03:04 AM
The right time to publish a review is a day or so before the book is available. That way, if someone reads the review and wants the book they'll be able to get it.

Sam Best
11-17-2011, 03:19 AM
Thanks to the both of you. I'll try to contact some reviewers to see how long it would take.

Giraffe
11-18-2011, 04:58 AM
I sent galleys of my book to the major prepublication reviewers. It was reviewed by Library Journal two months before publication and that review was enormously important for me; it was the main driver of sales. A month or two before publication I sent ARCs to specialized journals that would have a particular interest in the subject matter. That resulted in a few reviews, also, but they didn't come out until long after publication. In retrospect, I wish I had sent galleys at six months before publication to them also.

Sam Best
11-18-2011, 08:06 AM
A month or two before publication I sent ARCs to specialized journals that would have a particular interest in the subject matter.

Is there a specific online resource I could be searching to find the specialized journals? My Google searches for reviewers aren't yielding great results. I'll mess around with my search phrases and see if it gets any better. Thanks a lot for that info regardless.

Dawn Schaefer
11-18-2011, 08:08 AM
Since e-ARCs started going out for my book, my number of website hits, GoodReads adds, followers, etc, has been climbing quite nicely. But most of the bigger reviewers are waiting until a few days before my release date to post their reviews.

Are you self-publishing? I'd suggest going around to the book bloggers/reviewers and submitting a request for them to review the book. Generally it's smarter to start more than a month in advance, in case they're backed up or need time to read or whatever, but it couldn't hurt. Landing yourself guest posts and interviews and all that on blogs is good, too.

We reviewed your book yesterday :D I didn't know you were an AWer!

ether
11-18-2011, 08:59 AM
We reviewed your book yesterday :D I didn't know you were an AWer!

INDEED, you did!! :D I'm a quiet AWer. I pop around and lurk a lot!

Giraffe
11-18-2011, 11:04 PM
Is there a specific online resource I could be searching to find the specialized journals? My Google searches for reviewers aren't yielding great results. I'll mess around with my search phrases and see if it gets any better. Thanks a lot for that info regardless.

Specialized publications may be less relevant for you, since it looks like your next book is fiction. For me, I was writing about a lesser known treatment for Crohn's disease (enteral nutrition), so I looked for publications issued by Crohn's disease support organizations (e.g., the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America) and professional organizations for dietitians (since they're often involved in helping patients get started with this particular treatment). However, you might consider whether the theme of your book would be particularly relevant to any groups of people. For instance, if your novel happened to be about a man in the oil industry, you might investigate various energy companies to see if they have employee newsletters that might include a blurb about your book or an interview with you.

Sam Best
11-19-2011, 03:01 AM
However, you might consider whether the theme of your book would be particularly relevant to any groups of people. For instance, if your novel happened to be about a man in the oil industry, you might investigate various energy companies to see if they have employee newsletters that might include a blurb about your book or an interview with you.

That's an interesting angle and one which I've never before considered. Thank you!