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View Full Version : Police Hierarchy and Entry to Dangerous Scene



Dani
10-21-2011, 02:42 PM
I have a few questions about general police hierarchy, but if you'd like a specific location : Denver.

1. Would beat patrol officers defer to a vice detective who was a witness (not assigned to the case)? Would they call him sir, I mean? Or detective? Or ?

2. Are detectives officially higher up in the chain of command or is that only for cases they are assigned to?

About the entry to a scene:

1. If the scene of a shooting was on the upper floors of an office building (in the hallway) would they take the elevator or stairs? (very high up 18 floors)

2. Which ever way they took, how would the assess a scene with multiple victims on the floor and ten or so people standing in the hall? How would they handle that?

Appreciate the help.

Drachen Jager
10-21-2011, 07:29 PM
1) Yes, patrol officers would treat any witness with deference, but especially someone in a position of authority, or status in the community.

2) Well Detectives aren't in charge of patrolmen, but they can pretty much boss patrolmen around as long as they don't push things too far.

Next ones depend on where Denver is in the current scheme of things. It used to be, until recently, a patrol would wait at a scene like that for SWAT to arrive. Now many cities are changing the protocol so that the first available units enter immediately. I don't know where Denver sits.

Dani
10-21-2011, 08:30 PM
Thanks a lot for the help =) <3

ironmikezero
10-22-2011, 01:15 AM
I'm not familiar with the Denver PD protocol, so the following response is generic re: first officers on the scene.

The quickest and safest response method would most likely be used first (elevator, in this case); but someone would be assigned to clear the stairwell. Remember, suspects may still be a t large.

Everybody found on the scene is considered a suspect until ruled out. Consequently, everyone is treated cautiously - some may even be restrained (handcuffed) for officer safety.

FWIW, detectives aren't supervisors unless they hold a supervisor's rank (Detective Sergeant, etc.). Agencies will have some differences, but a quasi-military rank structure is commonplace. A detective may be in charge of a specific investigation and call the shots in furtherance of the case, but generally speaking he'd have to go to a supervisor to access more resources (manpower, etc.) or otherwise exceed his designated authority.

Dani
10-22-2011, 01:05 PM
I'm not familiar with the Denver PD protocol, so the following response is generic re: first officers on the scene.

The quickest and safest response method would most likely be used first (elevator, in this case); but someone would be assigned to clear the stairwell. Remember, suspects may still be a t large.

Everybody found on the scene is considered a suspect until ruled out. Consequently, everyone is treated cautiously - some may even be restrained (handcuffed) for officer safety.

FWIW, detectives aren't supervisors unless they hold a supervisor's rank (Detective Sergeant, etc.). Agencies will have some differences, but a quasi-military rank structure is commonplace. A detective may be in charge of a specific investigation and call the shots in furtherance of the case, but generally speaking he'd have to go to a supervisor to access more resources (manpower, etc.) or otherwise exceed his designated authority.


Thanks so much for your help. You've both given me exactly what I needed =) Awesome! <3