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-alex-
10-04-2011, 08:32 PM
Hey all,

I'm looking into researching “Princesses”.
What they might do in their daily lives, what is expected of them, and Princess Protocol etc.

I’m looking for western-like “Modern Day” Princesses (as in 2000-2011) and ages between 15-19yrs, as well as what their childhood may have been like etc.

Perhaps I could even look into the lives of First Daughters?

I was wondering if anyone knows of any websites or books out there which might help? Fiction or Non-fiction. Or if anyone has any ideas where I could start my research? Any real life known Princesses of that age that I could look into?

Thanks.

waylander
10-04-2011, 09:10 PM
Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie fit your age range.
Went to private schools and then on to university.

Orianna2000
10-04-2011, 09:14 PM
I don't know how realistic they are, but there's The Princess Diaries (http://www.amazon.com/Princess-Diaries-Meg-Cabot/dp/0061479934/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1317747801&sr=8-4) by Meg Cabot. There's something like twelve books in the series.

Here's an article about several modern-day princesse (http://www.lemondrop.com/2010/08/27/10-princesses-you-dont-know-but-should/)s. Perhaps you could research them individually and learn more.

And here's A Day in the Life of the Princess Royal (http://www.royal.gov.uk/ThecurrentRoyalFamily/ThePrincessRoyal/Adayinthelifeof/A%20day-in-the-life%20of%20The%20Princess%20Royal.aspx). Gives some insight into her daily activities. The links on the side might prove useful, too.

skylark
10-05-2011, 01:10 AM
In Europe, probably very expensive/exclusive boarding schools, often located in the Alps (My brother used to teach at one, but AFAIK they had princes but no princesses :) )

Alessandra Kelley
10-05-2011, 01:20 AM
Check out the emperor of Japan's family. They have pretty astonishing protocols.

areteus
10-05-2011, 01:28 AM
Members of the Royal family usually have various duties to perform. This would be a mix of public appearances, charity work and so on. Some also have other roles such as a career (depending on how far they are from the Royal line at present) which will depend on thier training and education. The closer you are to the current reigning monarch (especially if you are the heir) the more public appearances you may have to do.

However, at that young age, there is a chance that they may be deliberately kept from the spotlight until they have been to school and university. For example, the Royal family made a deal with the media in which they agreed not to harrass Princes William and Harry until they were a certain age (can't remember when it was but I think it was when they were both out of university).

Psychomacologist
10-05-2011, 01:43 AM
You could check out the website of the British royal family (http://www.royal.gov.uk/) for ideas.

The general pattern seems to be: expensive, exclusive private school - probably a very old-fashioned, traditional one, maybe a boarding school. Then University - traditionally Oxford or Cambridge, but not necessarily as times are a-changin'.

Both British Princes eventually ended up in the armed forces - Harry is in the Army and William in the RAF. It's pretty much a family tradition for the British royals to serve in the armed forces in one capacity or another. How much risk they are allowed to take/danger they're allowed to get into is usually directly proportional to how far down the line to the throne they are. (So Harry got to go to Afghanistan but William is only allowed to fly rescue helicopters)

Heirs to the throne typically have more public duties - opening things, meeting people, attending events, visiting stuff. They go to a lot of posh social events like The Races etc. There's a lot of waving and shaking hands with cute kids and that kind of thing. See Prince William's life now: he bummed around for a bit when he was younger but now he's very much in "heir to the throne" mode.

This is the British royal family, of course. Other parts of Europe still have monarchies as well so it'd be worth looking into those too :)

areteus
10-05-2011, 02:05 AM
William went to St Andrews for university. I know this because a friend of mine was a post grad there at the time he was an Undergrad...

The tradition is an old British nobility thing - one to inherit, one for the army and one for the church. It is what one does with spare sons who cannot inherit (Henry VIII was apparently destined for the church had his brother, Arthur, not died, could well have made a very good reforming Cardinal...). Modern times see Royals given more choice in career path but there are still a lot of them who go into the Navy or RAF (it is actually rare for them to be in the army, especially in active service, Harry is a rare exception and I think it serves him well from a publicity PoV).

Princesses are, of course, expected to marry at some point (as are the Princes but they are under less pressure for this I think) so some of their daily routine may revolve around that. And many of them become fashion icons.

Psychomacologist
10-05-2011, 02:47 AM
Princesses are, of course, expected to marry at some point (as are the Princes but they are under less pressure for this I think) so some of their daily routine may revolve around that. And many of them become fashion icons.
There was a lot of pressure on Prince Charles to marry "properly" - at least by some accounts. So possibly not just princesses...

Having said that, I'm sure there was a European princess who married her gym instructor or something. And of course William didn't marry aristocracy. So times have definitely changed.

I can imagine a modern British princess joining the armed forces in some sort of support role, especially if she wasn't the direct heir to the throne. In fact Queen Elizabeth served in the British Army (Auxiliary Territorial Service) during the Second World War. (She wasn't queen at the time though)

In fact, here's a list of military service by royals. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_service_by_the_members_of_the_British_Roy al_Family)

areteus
10-05-2011, 01:00 PM
I think the old 'only marry Royal blood' thing has been relaxed a lot in recent years... but there is still scandal in marrying common (and Kate Middleton is the most common royal wife in a while, I think, at least in the UK... and they are still very upper middle class).

And yes, there is pressure on the Princes too. The whole business of Royalty is making heirs to continue the line and that requires everyone within spitting distance of the Monarch to be sprogged up as much as possible.

Buffysquirrel
10-05-2011, 02:34 PM
It's interesting how more and more William is being treated as the heir apparent, even though he's not.

areteus
10-05-2011, 03:12 PM
He will be though... even if Charles does inherit it will only be for a very short time (as per Victoria's heir who was king for about 5 minutes... well, I exaggerate but it wasn't long). He's already formally taken on some of the monarch's duties and therefore passed some of the heir's duties onto William. There is a lot of speculation that he may abdicate in William's favour anyway.

Buffysquirrel
10-06-2011, 12:55 AM
Maybe. But the situation as presently constituted is he's the heir to the heir. I've even seen quizzes where this has been got wrong.

-alex-
10-06-2011, 01:59 AM
Thanks for the info, guys. I'll look into it all.

I have seen The Princess Diaries movies. I've tried to read the books, and I'm sure they would be some help to me, but I really don't like them... I just can't seem to get into the structure of the story. I may have to try again with them.

I forgot to add, the Princess in my story is the heir apparent, (since now that her older sister has died tragically) and she's seventeen.

So, I'm guessing, she'd have quite a few duties to do? Even though she’s still young?

I’m going for, as she (my MC) was never supposed to be Queen – it would have gone to her sister, and then her sister’s children – she was brought up a little different from her sister, more relaxed day-to-day life style, not taught so much in the ways of Protocol etc. And, she now has to learn things her sister would have had to learn.

1) Does this seem realistic?
2) Any info as to what these duties/ways might be?

As I said in the OP, I’m really looking for day-to-day lifestyle, and duties of a young Princess.

Thanks again.

dirtsider
10-06-2011, 08:09 PM
I would think that she's still be trained in protocol in just such an event as you described (the MC becoming heir apparent). It would've been less pressure on her but she still would've learned. From what I've seen of Princes William and Harry, they did a lot of things together because 1. they are brothers and seemed to be pretty close and 2. they were in a rather unusual position (for the majority of kids) of being royals and therefore being trained in all that protocols.

Even if she was the heir presumptive, she would've been heir apparent to her sister until her sister had kids. So she would've learned.

shaldna
10-06-2011, 08:37 PM
William went to St Andrews for university. I know this because a friend of mine was a post grad there at the time he was an Undergrad...

an artist friend of mine was offered a place there at the same time, but she turned it down because she didn't want to, in her words, deal with all that faff.


Jobs seem to be a big thing now for royals, much more than it was in the past. Several have forged very strong careers for themselvs, Zara Phillips for one, and the young princes as already mentioned, Edward works in television production, Charles does something environmental to do with crops and then there's his Duchy Originals company.

Not sure about the eduction things, obviously posh secondary schools are a must, but in terms of University, it's not always Cambridge or Oxford.

Charles went to Trinity, William to St Andrews, Eugenie went to Newcastle, Beatrice went to Goldsmiths, Edward went to Cambridge - and caused uproar because he didn't have the grades, which prompted an outcry among those who DID.

According to Wikipedia there are only five members of the royal family (by blood not marriage) who have a universty degree.

movieman
10-06-2011, 10:28 PM
It's interesting how more and more William is being treated as the heir apparent, even though he's not.

Probably because no-one wants Charles to be king; I wouldn't be surprised if the government give him an ultimatum when the time comes, either he abdicates or there's no more monarchy.

mickeyDs4
10-06-2011, 11:36 PM
Probably because no-one wants Charles to be king; I wouldn't be surprised if the government give him an ultimatum when the time comes, either he abdicates or there's no more monarchy.

I think that Charles will die before the Queen so Wills will be King first.

Buffysquirrel
10-07-2011, 02:06 AM
Probably because no-one wants Charles to be king; I wouldn't be surprised if the government give him an ultimatum when the time comes, either he abdicates or there's no more monarchy.

That would create an interesting constitutional crisis. However, I think the scenario you present is unlikely. After all, hereditary monarchies aren't about popular choice.

Someone mentioned Zara Phillips. Her mother never wanted her children to have titles; she wanted them to have as normal lives as possible. I wouldn't be surprised if it gradually dropped out of people's perception that that branch of the family is royal at all. So Zara isn't a princess and hasn't got any public duties.

Mr Flibble
10-07-2011, 02:20 AM
(and Kate Middleton is the most common royal wife in a while, I think, at least in the UK... and they are still very upper middle class).



While her dad's family were solicitors etc, they met while the were both at BA and her Mum was a stewardess (and brought up in a council flat). Hardly upper middle! Aspiring since then perhaps...

Psychomacologist
10-07-2011, 02:24 AM
Probably because no-one wants Charles to be king; I wouldn't be surprised if the government give him an ultimatum when the time comes, either he abdicates or there's no more monarchy.
Well... Parliament can't dissolve the monarchy. But the monarch can dissolve Parliament. In fact, no one can form a Government without the monarch's invitation, which is why newly-elected Prime Ministers go and visit the Queen.

Ultimate power in the UK rests in the hands of an eccentric 85 year-old grandmother.

Psychomacologist
10-07-2011, 02:25 AM
While her dad's family were solicitors etc, they met while the were both at BA and her Mum was a stewardess (and brought up in a council flat). Hardly upper middle! Aspiring since then perhaps...
They're new money, darling. They made their fortune in trade.

/CarolineBingley>

movieman
10-07-2011, 03:34 AM
Ultimate power in the UK rests in the hands of an eccentric 85 year-old grandmother.

However, back in the real world...

The monarchy lost any real power in the early to mid 20th century and have just been a figurehead ever since; given a choice between supporting Charles as king or supporting Parliament in eliminating the monarchy, I don't know anyone in the UK who'd pick the former. Most of them would be happy with William though.

Cath
10-07-2011, 04:56 AM
*cough*. I'll port this to P&CE (or somewhere equally scary) if the opinion pieces continue.

For the record, my dears, your mod is a Brit.

L.C. Blackwell
10-07-2011, 06:18 AM
In response to the OP's question, I think Victoria of Sweden might be the modern princess closest to what you have in mind. Wikipedia has an article that talks about her education and duties.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria,_Crown_Princess_of_Sweden

shaldna
10-07-2011, 01:10 PM
In response to the OP's question, I think Victoria of Sweden might be the modern princess closest to what you have in mind. Wikipedia has an article that talks about her education and duties.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria,_Crown_Princess_of_Sweden


I would also look at Beatrice and Eugenie

Priene
10-07-2011, 02:21 PM
Well... Parliament can't dissolve the monarchy. But the monarch can dissolve Parliament. In fact, no one can form a Government without the monarch's invitation, which is why newly-elected Prime Ministers go and visit the Queen.

Ultimate power in the UK rests in the hands of an eccentric 85 year-old grandmother.

This matter was sorted out by the Civil War and ratified in the Glorious Revolution. The monarch does what they're told by Parliament and has extremely limited practical powers. Any monarch that tried to impose their (theoretical rule) against the wishes of Parliament would be out in short order, either by forced abdication or abolition of the monarchy, which is why they won't ever try. Although Charles is pretty stupid, so I live in hope.

Selcaby
10-08-2011, 02:12 AM
Charles went to Trinity, William to St Andrews, Eugenie went to Newcastle, Beatrice went to Goldsmiths, Edward went to Cambridge - and caused uproar because he didn't have the grades, which prompted an outcry among those who DID.

Charles went to Trinity College, Cambridge. Just to be precise, since there are at least three Trinity Colleges in England and a famous one in Ireland.

My father was at Cambridge at the same time as him and says it was considered innovative that he went. Apparently he did have the brains for it.

Lillie
10-08-2011, 03:49 AM
I’m going for, as she (my MC) was never supposed to be Queen – it would have gone to her sister, and then her sister’s children – she was brought up a little different from her sister, more relaxed day-to-day life style, not taught so much in the ways of Protocol etc. And, she now has to learn things her sister would have had to learn.



When Edward VIII abdicated, his brother had to become George VI, quite unexpectedly.
And his daughter (our current Queen) became heir, also unexpectedly.

So it may be worth you looking into the lives of these people, both before and after the abdication.

MisterFrancis
10-10-2011, 01:18 AM
Charles went to Trinity College, Cambridge... Apparently he did have the brains for it.

Well, he was graciously allowed in even though he didn't have the required grades, and graduated with a 2:2, which is the lowest degree they could have given him without causing a scandal.

Cath
10-10-2011, 01:22 AM
Wow, what part of keep your personal opinions out of this did you guys not get?

Enough of whether you think Prince Charles is smart or whether his degree is honorary. It simply isn't relevant either to the original question or to this forum.

waylander
10-10-2011, 01:29 AM
Well, he was graciously allowed in even though he didn't have the required grades, and graduated with a 2:2, which is the lowest degree they could have given him without causing a scandal.

There were no required grades back then, there aren't now I believe. They make you an offer of a place...or they don't

Cath
10-10-2011, 01:31 AM
QUIT IT. Now.

Please get off the topic of Prince Charles. Last time I looked, he wasn't a princess.

Buffysquirrel
10-10-2011, 02:03 AM
If this is your world, then I think you could have your Princess taught as little or as much of the duties of the heir apparent prior to her accession as suits your story. Her public obligations could start whenever you want them to. You're not tied to real world rules.

Here in the UK, she would certainly be expected to make public appearances from a young age--the equivalent of standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace and waving at the crowd during public occasions, like the Queen's birthday. The royalists expect to see their royals, and so do the tourists.

Seventeen wouldn't be considered too young to start having public duties, but they would be arranged with her obligations to her education in mind. It's generally considered appropriate for young royals to take a university degree.

She would certainly attend her sister's funeral, which would be a public event, and subsequent memorial services for her and the like. She would also be expected to play a role in charities--Princess Anne frex is patron of the Save The Children Fund. When Diana needed to improve her public image, she got involved with the campaign against landmines whose precise name I forget.

-alex-
10-10-2011, 02:24 AM
Thanks again for the replies everyone. Although, I do agree with Cath. I opened this thread to request info regarding Princesses. Not Princes Charles, lol.

Buffysquirrel, thanks for the info.
Little bits like that is what I'm looking for and very helpful!

I recently brought a cheap copy of a non-fiction book called "Growing up Royal". I'm half way though it, and it's given some bits and pieces that I can use. If any one as any ideas of any more books similar to that, I'd be grateful for any info.

I'm STILL wanting stuff on everyday life for a Princess. What she'd do in her free time, and her daily routines etc. This is an area that I'm a little stuck on at the moment...

waylander
10-10-2011, 10:39 AM
There were pictures in the press last week of Beatrice attending fashion shows in Paris