PDA

View Full Version : What does a diamond do in hair bleach?



Fruitbat
10-01-2011, 12:52 AM
What would happen to a diamond ring if you put it in a bowl of hair bleach (like for highlights or frosting) for a half hour or so?

Jimayo
10-01-2011, 12:57 AM
It'll likely cloud up(take on a milky look).

Cath
10-01-2011, 01:01 AM
It will depend on the type of bleach. By 'hair bleach' do you mean hydrogen peroxide (http://www.greenlivingtips.com/articles/64/1/Hydrogen-peroxide-tips.html)?

TheIT
10-01-2011, 01:06 AM
Not sure, but you might want to take a look at www.firemountaingems.com (http://www.firemountaingems.com) . I know I've seen FAQs on that site on how to clean various gemstones.

Fruitbat
10-01-2011, 01:07 AM
Well, lol, here are the ingredients. Maybe ammonia and hydrogen peroxide? (I have no idea what a lot of the other things are).

Frost & Tip Highlighting Creme Formula: Water, C12-15 Pareth-3, Oleic Acid, Ammonium Hydroxide, Behentrimonium Chloride, C11-15 Pareth-9, Steareth-21, Propylene Glycol, Fragrance, Cetyl Alcohol, Polyquaternium-47, Erythorbic Acid, EDTA, Sodium Sulfite, Stearyl Alcohol, Sodium Metasilicate. Frost & Tip Creme Formula Highlighting Powder: Potassium Persulfate, Sodium Metasilicate, Ammonium Persulfate, Sodium Persulfate, Mineral Oil, Silica, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Carbomer, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate, Fragrance, Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Germ Oil. Frost & Tip Creme Formula Highlighting Developer: Water, Hydrogen Peroxide, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Emulsifying Wax, Stearamidopropyl Dimethylamine, PEG-75 Lanolin, Ceteareth-20, Oleth-10, Oleth-2, Etidronic Acid, Simethicone. Frost & Tip Conditioning and Color Toning Shampoo: Water, Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate, Disodium Cocamido MIPA-Sulfosuccinate, Alcohol Denat., Polyquaternium-10, Fragrance, Hydrolyzed Collagen, Imidazolidinyl Urea, Phosphoric Acid, DMDM Hydantoin, Ext. Violet 2.

jennontheisland
10-01-2011, 01:10 AM
Diamonds are pretty inert. It's the gold and other metals in the ring that would react. And they'd probably oxidize. Oxidized iron is red (rust), silver is black, copper is green...

BenPanced
10-01-2011, 02:14 AM
I dunno. Get wet?

Snick
10-01-2011, 02:19 AM
If it is just ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, then it probably wouldn't do anything to diamond. If there are chlorine bleach, then it might dissolve the gold of the ring, but it wouldn't touch the diamond.

Siri Kirpal
10-01-2011, 03:16 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Diamonds are the hardest substances on earth. They can be fractured if hit just right, but I don't think anything except a solar inferno could melt them.

Gold is more inert than most metals, but I'd check that part. Silver, now, that might be a mess!

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Snick
10-01-2011, 06:02 AM
Diamonds are the hardest substances on earth. They can be fractured if hit just right, but I don't think anything except a solar inferno could melt them.


Gold chloride is used for plating,m because gold will go into solution that way.

Mac H.
10-01-2011, 06:25 AM
Diamonds are the hardest substances on earth. They can be fractured if hit just right, but I don't think anything except a solar inferno could melt them.Diamonds can be melted without too much trouble.

The reason they don't normally melt is simple - they burn at a lower temperature, so in the presence of oxygen they'll burn away.

A Jeweller doesn't burn a diamond because the torch they use isn't hot enough - but it isn't difficult.

It technically isn't the hardest substance either - there's another allotrope of carbon called 'Lonsdaleite'. It has the carbon atoms arranged hexagonally instead of cubic like diamond does - and it is much harder. (I guess you could classify Lonsdaleite as a diamond if you wanted to - it is a crystal structure of carbon, after all)

There's also a crystal form of Boron Nitride that is strong - that is going to be pretty impressive if we figure out how to manufacturer it in practical way because it copes with much higher temperatures than diamond - so diamond coated drill tips won't get burned away.

Mac

Siri Kirpal
10-01-2011, 06:44 AM
Diamonds can be melted without too much trouble.

The reason they don't normally melt is simple - they burn at a lower temperature, so in the presence of oxygen they'll burn away.

A Jeweller doesn't burn a diamond because the torch they use isn't hot enough - but it isn't difficult.

It technically isn't the hardest substance either - there's another allotrope of carbon called 'Lonsdaleite'. It has the carbon atoms arranged hexagonally instead of cubic like diamond does - and it is much harder. (I guess you could classify Lonsdaleite as a diamond if you wanted to - it is a crystal structure of carbon, after all)

There's also a crystal form of Boron Nitride that is strong - that is going to be pretty impressive if we figure out how to manufacturer it in practical way because it copes with much higher temperatures than diamond - so diamond coated drill tips won't get burned away.

Mac

Sat Nam!

Thanks for the corrections. I should know better than give an opinion on topics I haven't research thoroughly! :)

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

shaldna
10-01-2011, 01:01 PM
The diamond won't do anything, it might get a milky film over it, but this is easily washed off.

The metal in the ring is another story. If it's gold then it should be more or less okay, gold is pretty tough. Silver will be damaged quite badly by it though.

Jimayo
10-01-2011, 08:26 PM
Diamonds are pretty inert. It's the gold and other metals in the ring that would react. And they'd probably oxidize. Oxidized iron is red (rust), silver is black, copper is green...

Diamonds are carbon. One of the most reactive substances in the universe.

waylander
10-02-2011, 08:49 PM
Diamonds are carbon. One of the most reactive substances in the universe.

Not as diamond it isn't

Diamond in persulfate/aq. ammonia won't do anything