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View Full Version : How to get me to never read your book



VTwriter
09-06-2011, 03:12 AM
I was looking for a new novel to read, had heard about a new book that sounded interesting, and read an excerpt on the publisher's site. I was ready to buy. I went to amazon, found the book, and there's no Kindle version.

I love my Kindle, and am surprised that I do. It's portable, I can change the font sizes, and it's easier to hold due to my hand tremors.

Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.

BenPanced
09-06-2011, 03:17 AM
Or it depends on the circumstances behind the release. The author, their agent, and the publisher may not have been able to negotiate e-pub rights, and the Kindle version may be coming later. All formats don't seem to come out at the same time, I've noticed.

Lil
09-06-2011, 03:25 AM
That's what libraries are for.

Calla Lily
09-06-2011, 03:32 AM
It took a few months from my book to show up for Kindle. I have no idea what the schedule is for these things and I do think they vary by publisher.

Alessandra Kelley
09-06-2011, 03:33 AM
Does anyone know if the "I'd like to read this book on Kindle" link on Amazon's book pages goes anywhere? Does Amazon actually "pass your specific request to the publisher?" And does it have any effect on publishers?

Or is it like the elevator "close door" button?

Polenth
09-06-2011, 03:45 AM
If it's a new book, chances are the ebook version is coming later. It's not uncommon for the hardback, paperback and ebook to all have different release days.

DeleyanLee
09-06-2011, 03:54 AM
I've also heard that there's some publishers who don't sell the ebook in any formats via Amazon but only on their own website.

I think that's cutting off their nose to spit their face, but it's possible it's available somewhere else.

Kitty Pryde
09-06-2011, 04:07 AM
Or the author might retain the epub rights, and be selling it on his own website! Or...it might be on the author's website for free!

Fenika
09-06-2011, 04:28 AM
Really? It's not digital therefore you won't touch it? Is this what the world is coming to? It's not like it's only in expensive hardcover and never to be in paperback. It's not like ebooks are a ton cheaper than paperbacks (on average).

And if they do (or already have) release it to ebook, there is no law that says it must be in Kindle format just because you own a kindle.

I know I'm being a bit snarky, but this was not what I expected when I clicked the link. No one is required to epub. It might be beneficial to do so, but it's not a given.

VTwriter
09-06-2011, 04:37 AM
I checked the author's web site and sent him an e-mail.

No publisher or author is required to release an e-book version. And I am not required to buy any book that's not in a format I prefer. There are plenty of other books to buy.

quicklime
09-06-2011, 04:39 AM
I was looking for a new novel to read, had heard about a new book that sounded interesting, and read an excerpt on the publisher's site. I was ready to buy. I went to amazon, found the book, and there's no Kindle version.

I love my Kindle, and am surprised that I do. It's portable, I can change the font sizes, and it's easier to hold due to my hand tremors.

Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.



so you're proposing to boycott the author for the decision of his publishing house?

quicklime
09-06-2011, 04:41 AM
nevermind, it appears you are.

Goldenleaves
09-06-2011, 04:45 AM
Really???? You don't like books?

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 04:46 AM
so you're proposing to boycott the author for the decision of his publishing house?The way I read it, OP is boycotting the book, not the author.

Not really a boycott, though. And I understand the sentiment. I don't buy print editions now for personal reasons. If it's not available as an e-book, I don't buy it. But it doesn't make me mad like it did the OP.

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 04:49 AM
And if they do (or already have) release it to ebook, there is no law that says it must be in Kindle format just because you own a kindle.Not a problem. Get the epub version and convert to mobi. Assuming no DRM, that is. Even then, you can become one of those nefarious, low-life DRM crackers.

Goldenleaves
09-06-2011, 04:51 AM
So, Kindles are actually easier to read in certain circumstances? I've been wondering about them - haven't actually wanted them because I love my page turning, but I see there may be other advantages besides the weight issue. Interesting.

Ari Meermans
09-06-2011, 05:16 AM
So, Kindles are actually easier to read in certain circumstances? I've been wondering about them - haven't actually wanted them because I love my page turning, but I see there may be other advantages besides the weight issue. Interesting.

There are, but the major disadvantage to me is that I can't relax in a nice hot bubble bath with a reader without the (likely self-fulfilling) fear I might drop it in the tub. Major drawback as far as I'm concerned. That, and a Kindle just can't possibly smell like a nice new print book.

blacbird
09-06-2011, 05:20 AM
How to get me to never read your book? Has nothing to do with technology:

1. Excessive introspection.

2. Excessive stage-direction, via adverbs.

3. Absurd, unrealistic dialogue or narrative description.

4. Violence substituted for suspense.

5. Clichéd genre tropes; no more elves, wizards, dragons, magic amulets, zombies, vampires (sparkly or otherwise) pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease.

6. Too much technology description. I don't care how your left-handed deefendorfer actually functions by means of ionic radiance transfer.

7. Too much time spent having characters think stuff instead of doing stuff. Which immediately leads to:

8. Head-hopping.

9. Blatant simple factual errors, of the sort that should be common knowledge to any even slightly educated person. The city of Seattle isn't located in the state of Kentucky (I've actually seen this). You can't talk about the Bermuda Triangle in a work set in 1940 (the term didn't exist until 1964, and I've seen this, too).

10. "As you know, Bob" dialogue.

That's ten reasons. There are more, but that's enough.

caw

fadeaccompli
09-06-2011, 05:40 AM
There are, but the major disadvantage to me is that I can't relax in a nice hot bubble bath with a reader without the (likely self-fulfilling) fear I might drop it in the tub. Major drawback as far as I'm concerned. That, and a Kindle just can't possibly smell like a nice new print book.

Gallon size ziplock bag + Kindle = Reading in bath goodness.

(Really, if you have any sort of reliable ziplock bags, it works just fine. Seal 'em up well, and you can read the screen and push the buttons easily through the clear plastic.)

Goldenleaves
09-06-2011, 05:41 AM
I'll read anything. Hell, I read sauce bottles.

Goldenleaves
09-06-2011, 05:46 AM
I'm horribly careless with books, so it's not only the bath issue, there's the dropping all over the place issue. Kindles have to be nursery proofed before I'd even think about them.

It makes me shudder to think of having all my tatty but incredibly precious treasures reliant on a power source of any kind.

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 05:48 AM
So, Kindles are actually easier to read in certain circumstances?Impaired vision is one.

Ari Meermans
09-06-2011, 05:55 AM
Gallon size ziplock bag + Kindle = Reading in bath goodness.

(Really, if you have any sort of reliable ziplock bags, it works just fine. Seal 'em up well, and you can read the screen and push the buttons easily through the clear plastic.)

Great tip. Thank you. Hmm, I might just ask for one for Christmas.

ETA: Meant . . . you know . . . a Kindle, not a ziplock bag. :)

Invincibility
09-06-2011, 08:20 AM
I checked the author's web site and sent him an e-mail.

No publisher or author is required to release an e-book version. And I am not required to buy any book that's not in a format I prefer. There are plenty of other books to buy.
You're not required to buy it, but you're coming across as really whiny.

Terie
09-06-2011, 09:41 AM
Also coming across as someone who's ignorant of the difference between a writer's decision and a publisher's decision.

Polenth
09-06-2011, 10:57 AM
So, Kindles are actually easier to read in certain circumstances?

I find Kindles difficult to read, due to the low contrast. It's best to try one in a shop before making a firm decision.

gothicangel
09-06-2011, 11:08 AM
I was looking for a new novel to read, had heard about a new book that sounded interesting, and read an excerpt on the publisher's site. I was ready to buy. I went to amazon, found the book, and there's no Kindle version.

I love my Kindle, and am surprised that I do. It's portable, I can change the font sizes, and it's easier to hold due to my hand tremors.

Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.

That's sad. I pity you.

Nephthis
09-06-2011, 11:10 AM
This sounds pretty childish and unrealistic to me. The world isn't utterly technological yet, so its absurd to expect everything to be digitized. It's all pretty much still new as most people didn't expect digital readers to stick around. It's catching up quickly, but people's demands are always more than what's available.
Aww....the new 'gimme' age.

FrederickS
09-06-2011, 12:12 PM
I was looking for a new novel to read, had heard about a new book that sounded interesting, and read an excerpt on the publisher's site. I was ready to buy. I went to amazon, found the book, and there's no Kindle version.

I love my Kindle, and am surprised that I do. It's portable, I can change the font sizes, and it's easier to hold due to my hand tremors.

Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.

Wow! Since it's free for them and growing popularity, I would have thought they would release EVERY book in e-format. Who'd a thunk?

Terie
09-06-2011, 12:18 PM
Wow! Since it's free for them and growing popularity, I would have thought they would release EVERY book in e-format. Who'd a thunk?

Free? Not hardly. There are many costs associated with e-books even after the fork, such as conversion to multiple formats, QA, and so on.

STKlingaman
09-06-2011, 12:22 PM
Put Fabio or some look-a-alike on the cover with his
hair blowing, shirt ripped, and a woman kneeling beside
him with the name of a flower and any of the following
words in the title; Lust, Passion, or Desire.

yea . . . I'll pretty much avoid that like the Plague.

gothicangel
09-06-2011, 01:19 PM
Authors spitting out their dummy in public is a pretty good way to stop me buying their book.

areteus
09-06-2011, 02:05 PM
I've just had to send my kindle back (screen damage) and am getting my new one tomorrow. As for the bath issue, I prefer to use books for that so I will often have two novels on the go at once - one for the bath and one for the rest of the time. It's no big deal for me as I am used to reading up to 5 novels at a time. I also tend to use the kindle for reviewing work pdfs (easier to read than a laptop or PC screen and cheaper than printing it all out) and my wife uses hers for reviewing work contracts.

As for ebook versions - it is sometimes worth checking an author or publisher website for links to an ebook version (or news of when it might be released and where). Sometimes there are freebies included in the ebook if you buy it at source. For example, I recently bought an ebook by a friend of mine from her publisher (who is also my publisher from next year :) ) and when I finished the novel the next page had a note saying 'Thank you for buying this book from the publisher, as a reward here is a free short story written by the author'

Amadan
09-06-2011, 03:05 PM
I sympathize with the OP a bit; though I wouldn't "boycott" an author or a book because it's not available as an ebook, I pretty much only buy ebooks nowadays. So when I hear about an interesting book and go to buy it and find out it's available as print only, I shrug and buy some other book.

I'd make an exception for a book I really, really want to read, but otherwise, either I'll wait until it's available digitally or I'll forget about it because my TBR queue is long enough as it is.

(I also make exceptions for older OOP books that are unlikely to ever be released digitally, but those I mostly put on my BookMooch/PaperbackSwap wishlists.)

scarletpeaches
09-06-2011, 03:08 PM
So...this is a thread about a reader spitting the dummy because a book isn't available on Kindle? Either buy it in print, or download something else instead.

Yes, I have an ereader but I still read print books too. In fact just recently I've cut down on my time on various other sites (Twitter and so on) and I've found, surprise surprise, I have a lot more reading time available. Most of the books I've read recently have been in print.

My ereader, I keep for my smutty books. ;)

Torgo
09-06-2011, 03:40 PM
Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.

Wrong, wrong, wrongity-wrong.

There are two likely scenarios here.


The book is backlist and still in the queue for conversion.
The publisher and the author/agent have been unable to agree the sale of ebook rights.

Torgo
09-06-2011, 03:41 PM
Wow! Since it's free for them and growing popularity, I would have thought they would release EVERY book in e-format. Who'd a thunk?

Yeah, it's not free. And that's precisely what most publishers aim to do.

jaksen
09-06-2011, 03:58 PM
If I really want to read a book, I'll read it on clay tablets.

Well, not really, as they'd be hard to lug around.

But for me it's the story, not the medium. I'll even watch a good book or one I love if it's made into a movie, TV series, etc.

It's the story I crave, not the way it gets to me.

VTwriter
09-06-2011, 04:35 PM
I apologize for being whiny, and after a night's sleep, perhaps I can better explain why this issue got under my skin. This upset me both as a consumer and as a writer.

My assumption is that Random House delayed the Kindle version purposely to maximize profit from the hardcover version. I've seen articles about this approach from some publishers. They don't want the Kindle version to eat away at the hardcover sales. This makes sense only if the people who would prefer the Kindle version actually buy the hardcover instead.

Now assume you're a midlist author and you've written what you hope is your breakout novel. Maybe even the publisher has invested money in publicity for your book. You know that you have a short-lived buzz about your book and need to capitalize on that. The book is getting really good reviews. And some segment of your potential readers is shut out because they want a Kindle version. Should that concern you or not?

I'm not blaming the author here. I feel sorry for him. Marketing decisions are made by the publisher.

The publisher has every right to control the release of different formats of the books they release. They've done this with paperbacks, obviously. The difference with paperbacks is that bookstores have "New in Paperbacks" sections. Many Sunday newspaper book sections (and I read many of these every week) have a "New in Paperbacks" article.

Nowhere am I aware of a "New in Kindle (or e-book)" section or article anywhere. After the buzz has worn off about the book, the publisher silently releases an e-book version, and nobody is aware of it. Those who might have bought it when the hardcover was released have moved on.

I love books. I have bookshelves in three different rooms in my house and tons more in boxes in the basement or different closets. Now that I have a Kindle, I prefer the Kindle version for a variety of reasons. Am I a small segment of the reading public? Do others in the same scenario give up and buy the hardcover? I don't know.

Torgo
09-06-2011, 04:39 PM
My assumption is that Random House delayed the Kindle version purposely to maximize profit from the hardcover version.

Right, but that's just an assumption, and the general policy of RH Inc appears to be that the ebook comes out at the same time and the same price point as the hardcover. When the paperback comes out the ebook price drops to match that. We could argue the wisdom of this pricing policy if you like, but it's a different issue. I suspect your assumption is wrong and there is some other reason for the non-appearance of the Kindle edition; it's most likely RH don't have ebook rights.

BunnyMaz
09-06-2011, 04:53 PM
Am I a small segment of the reading public? Do others in the same scenario give up and buy the hardcover? I don't know.

Now, to that I would say yes. If only because I know of a grand total of one person that owns an e-reader, and then it isn't a kindle. Truth is, just like blu-ray, most people aren't clamouring to pick up a new format for them to re-buy their loved media in. As for the one person I know who does own an reader, it's my mum, who bought it because she lives abroad and can't get English editions of books easily, and doesn't want the expense of shipping physical books abroad.

In the tech-geek world, it looks like everyone is getting them, but outside of that world, most people still don't own one. Just as most people still don't own a smartphone, although certainly a lot of people do.

THAT SAID. That shouldn't matter. But still, I'm sure the publisher had good reasons for delaying the ebook version, whatever they were.

Terie
09-06-2011, 04:53 PM
Am I a small segment of the reading public?

Yes, you are. E-book sales are still (last I heard, though there might be newer info) less than 20% of book sales. Publishers are very much aware of growing e-book demand, but it's still not the lion's share of the market.

NeuroFizz
09-06-2011, 04:55 PM
Every reader should read what he/she wants to read in the preferred format (either exclusively or not).

Publishing houses will try to maximize profits. So will literary agents and authors. This means the publication formats may or may not take a standardized sequence, but eventually, all formats will likely be realized/tapped.

If electronic availability starts screwing agents and authors out of royalty money (and publishing houses out of full sales), expect several possible outcomes, most likely author/agent backlash and acceleration of publishing house pricing.

A classic example is the used textbook market for university courses. Because of the used book market, publishers will come out with a new edition every three years or so because by year four, the book is usually no longer profitable. Also, the tremendous upswing in new textbook pricing is a direct result of the used book market. Publishers have to make a profit or they go out of business. Used books bring no money back to the publisher, but competes with new book sales. And used books bring no money back to the author/agent team. It's total third party profit. Is Amazon or other third-party sellers doing something similar, in whole or in part? Expect a response from the primary parties.

What will the e-book market do to publishing in the long run? One thing is certain...prices will go up in all formats.
Final result: the consumer always loses in the long run.

Torgo
09-06-2011, 04:58 PM
What will the e-book market do to publishing in the long run? One thing is certain...prices will go up in all formats.
Final result: the consumer always loses in the long run.

Hmm. We seem to be in a race to the bottom as far as ebook pricing goes - you can buy a Steig Larsson on Amazon today for £2.44.

ChaosTitan
09-06-2011, 05:41 PM
The way I read it, OP is boycotting the book, not the author.


As authors make a living from the sales of their books, how is there a difference? Every lost sale to a publisher is also a lost sale to that particular book's author.

Toothpaste
09-06-2011, 05:47 PM
Do you know how hard I am working right now to get my publishers to have both my books as ebooks? I'm on the backlist now, not exactly top priority. When my books came out ebook readers didn't exist and now that they do I have to wait in a long queue to get my backlist in any kind of e-format. Yes, I get it, punish publishers for not putting every one of their books immediately available as an ebook. All I know is that I'm the one feeling the sting of your comments.

areteus
09-06-2011, 05:58 PM
You are possibly right about there not being any marketing for the e-book release and maybe there should be. Perhaps a page on Amazon where publishers can post the details of the ebook releases they plan?

Not sure it is entirely about profits (though it is easy to see that motive in there) because the profits are actually higher in ebooks on individual sales because you don't have to pay shipping or printing costs. I am tending to the liklihood that publishers simply like to see how popular a book is - how many good reviews it gets, how well the hardcover sales go, how the author is recieved in various publicity - before they bother to do either the paperback or ebook versions, both of which involve yet more investment and effort anmd are generally open to a wider market.

And while the ebook market is getting bigger, there are still a lot of people who are not being converted for various reasons and the print market is still the most significant cut of the market. It also has more prestige as ebooks are still linked with poorly written and badly formatted self publishing set ups, whatever the actual situation is. This will change but it will take time and a lot of effort to change a lot of peoples' firmly set opinions of ebooks.

Namatu
09-06-2011, 06:33 PM
Do you know how hard I am working right now to get my publishers to have both my books as ebooks? I'm on the backlist now, not exactly top priority. When my books came out ebook readers didn't exist and now that they do I have to wait in a long queue to get my backlist in any kind of e-format. Yes, I get it, punish publishers for not putting every one of their books immediately available as an ebook. All I know is that I'm the one feeling the sting of your comments.As Toothpaste said, the conversion process, quality checks, etc., don't happen overnight, and there's a long queue. Is it really a problem to have to wait a few months for a new e-book? (Possibly longer if it's backlist.) I know we're an immediate gratification society, but waiting isn't necessarily a cruel trick. I love my e-reader, but yes, publishers may publish in print first. That's where the majority of sales still are, and maybe their workflows haven't reached the point yet where they can do simultaneous print and e-books. There are lots of reasons the e-book may not yet be available.

Becca_H
09-06-2011, 06:41 PM
The 'Not on Kindle' problem is a big issue over here. A lot of American YA was available on Kindle until Kindle UK launched. Now it's not.

I've emailed many authors about this, including NYT bestsellers, and told them their book is available on Kindle, but not available to the UK. (Visiting Amazon.com not logged in will tell me a Kindle book is not available to my country.)

All but one of those authors has told me it should be on Kindle and they have no idea why it isn't. They contact their publishers. Sometimes the switch is flicked and it appears on Amazon UK, sometimes not. The only exception was with one author who didn't have eBook rights in the UK but did admit he wanted something done about it.

VTwriter
09-06-2011, 06:43 PM
Just to clarify: the book that started this whole discussion was just released in hardcover in the last two weeks.

Torgo
09-06-2011, 06:52 PM
Just to clarify: the book that started this whole discussion was just released in hardcover in the last two weeks.

I'm willing to bet it's a rights issue, then.

Toothpaste
09-06-2011, 06:52 PM
Awesome.

I still will never understand a person who clearly loves books and reading wanting to punish a fellow author for something a publisher chooses to do. If you want to read the book, read it - either get it from the library or wait a little till it comes out in ebook form.

But I think I know what this thread is REALLY about. It's about old fashioned publishers not being with it and putting out books in ebook format and yet another reason they suck and are behind the times. Never mind the numbers that indicate that several of the old fashioned publishers are still turning a profit despite bookstores closing, and the reason? Ebook sales. Publishers aren't stupid. They are trying to figure things out still. Remember, it's only been within the last year that ebooks have taken off like they have.

At any rate . . . in the end, you can do what you like. But someday when you are published and don't have control over what your publisher is doing and you read that someone won't buy your book over something that is out of your control . . . well maybe then you'll understand that things are more complicated than you currently seem to think.

Jamesaritchie
09-06-2011, 06:52 PM
I was looking for a new novel to read, had heard about a new book that sounded interesting, and read an excerpt on the publisher's site. I was ready to buy. I went to amazon, found the book, and there's no Kindle version.

I love my Kindle, and am surprised that I do. It's portable, I can change the font sizes, and it's easier to hold due to my hand tremors.

Now I'm pissed. This isn't from a small publisher, it's from a Random House imprint. They must have made a conscious decision not to release in e-book format. At this point, I may never read this book in any format. I'm sure the author would have loved to have made the sale. The publisher must not have thought it was that important.

Odds are good the book will be out for Kindle, but just as most books are not released in hardcover and paperback simultaneously, they're aren't going to be released in Kindle simultaneously, either, nor should they be.

I'm sure the writer would have liked the sale, too, but probably not as much as he likes having as many hardcover sales as he can get first.

Really, are you saying you won't buy the book if the Kindle release is later than the hardcover release?

Susan Littlefield
09-06-2011, 06:53 PM
VT,

Too bad if you choose not to read a book because it's not in e format. Sure, we all have our preferences, but it's the publisher's choice as to format, not the author's. They even get to decide when it comes out any given format. A good book is a good book no matter what format it's in.

scarletpeaches
09-06-2011, 06:54 PM
Just buy the hardback, then. And if you think it's too expensive, just be grateful you don't live in the UK where everything is dearer, and yet bookworms over here still manage to get by.

Toothpaste
09-06-2011, 06:56 PM
(also, I think people might be reacting strongly to your post because of how you titled this thread. You said you will never read this author's book because it isn't available how you want it when you want it. So what you're basically saying is, "Even when the book comes out in a format that I want it in, I still won't buy it! Ha! Take that publisher! (and author, sorry about doing that to you, but them's the breaks)")

Anaquana
09-06-2011, 07:11 PM
I don't read e-books because I don't like the experience of reading off of a screen even if that screen supposedly mimics the look of real ink and paper. This means there are a great many books that I will never read and authors I will never be able to support because of the format they publish in.

At least one series I love was dropped by the publisher after three books. The author is going to publish the rest of the series as e-books. I will miss out on some of my favorite characters because of this.

I don't blame the author or the publisher for any of this. It's my personal reading preference that is to blame.

Psychomacologist
09-06-2011, 07:15 PM
I don't read e-books because I don't like the experience of reading off of a screen even if that screen supposedly mimics the look of real ink and paper.
Just as a side note, MrMacologist bought me a Kindle last week as an early birthday present. The screen really does look exactly like paper. I didn't think it would (I'm a sceptic and was all "Pfft, yeah right, suuuuuure") but it's very convincing. So convincing, in fact, that when I'm reading it my hand goes to the top right corner of the Kindle to try and 'turn the page'.

VTwriter
09-06-2011, 07:29 PM
I was royally peeved last night and probably should have titled this thread differently. There are three versions of this book I could possibly choose for reading:

Hardcover - available now. I may break down and buy the hardcover, because this book sounds like it's right up my alley. The problem I have with hardcovers (and paperbacks) is that I've developed tremors and muscle spasms in my hands. It makes the book hard to read, since the damn thing is shaking in my hand. The tremors/spasms aren't there 100% of the time, but enough that it really puts me off from holding the book.

Paperback - same problem and typically a smaller font (can you tell I'm getting old? :)

Kindle - works best for me. If I remember to look in 3 or 6 or 9 months from now, the kindle version may be available. Realistically, I'll probably have forgotten about this book by then and will have new books loaded up on my Kindle .

Toothpaste
09-06-2011, 07:31 PM
I don't read e-books because I don't like the experience of reading off of a screen even if that screen supposedly mimics the look of real ink and paper.


It doesn't just mimic the look. Well, it does if you have an iPad - an iPad is just a fancy computer basically. However there is a difference between reading off of something like an iPad and an eReader. An eReader uses eink and isn't backlit. It's the backlighting that often gives one the most headaches reading off of a screen. Have you ever tried an eReader? At most bookstores these days they have displays where you can test one out. It really is like reading a book. Up until the whole eink thing, I knew I would never read anything other than paper books, but once eink was invented, well, now I can read both! It's awesome :) (it's especially good if you are reading your friends' MSs - you don't have to print them out, but you can still carry them around and read them) .

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 07:35 PM
Originally Posted by Al Stevens http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=6516846#post6516846)
The way I read it, OP is boycotting the book, not the author.


As authors make a living from the sales of their books, how is there a difference? Every lost sale to a publisher is also a lost sale to that particular book's author.

I guess if the author never writes another book...

scarletpeaches
09-06-2011, 07:37 PM
For the tremors, try a gimble, if they're sold where you are. They're basically large bookmarks that hold the book open for you, so you can rest it on another surface -- your lap, a table, a cushion, whatever.

But the thing is -- if a book trembles in your hands, wouldn't an ereader, too?

Anaquana
09-06-2011, 07:37 PM
It doesn't just mimic the look. Well, it does if you have an iPad - an iPad is just a fancy computer basically. However there is a difference between reading off of something like an iPad and an eReader. An eReader uses eink and isn't backlit. It's the backlighting that often gives one the most headaches reading off of a screen. Have you ever tried an eReader? At most bookstores these days they have displays where you can test one out. It really is like reading a book. Up until the whole eink thing, I knew I would never read anything other than paper books, but once eink was invented, well, now I can read both! It's awesome :) (it's especially good if you are reading your friends' MSs - you don't have to print them out, but you can still carry them around and read them) .

A friend has a Nook she let me play around with for a bit. I wasn't impressed. Reading is such a tactile experience for me. I love the weight and feel of the book. The smell of the paper. The sound of the pages turning.

I just re-watched the first season of Buffy this weekend and Giles' comments to Ms. Calendar in the I, Robot... You, Jane episode about how computers don't smell and that ruins the experience for him absolutely fits me.

Jenny Calendar (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0478750/): Honestly, what is it about them that bothers you so much?
Giles (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0372117/): The smell.
Jenny Calendar (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0478750/): Computers don't smell, Rupert.
Giles (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0372117/): I know. Smell is the most powerful trigger to the memory there is. A certain flower, or a-a whiff of smoke can bring up experiences long forgotten. Books smell musty and-and-and rich. The knowledge gained from a computer is a - it, uh, it has no-no texture, no-no context. It's-it's there and then it's gone. If it's to last, then-then the getting of knowledge should be, uh, tangible, it should be, um, smelly.

ChaosTitan
09-06-2011, 07:38 PM
Originally Posted by Al Stevens http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=6516846#post6516846)
The way I read it, OP is boycotting the book, not the author.



I guess if the author never writes another book...

Yes, because it's really that simple. :rolleyes:

rainsmom
09-06-2011, 07:39 PM
Kindle - works best for me. If I remember to look in 3 or 6 or 9 months from now, the kindle version may be available. Realistically, I'll probably have forgotten about this book by then and will have new books loaded up on my Kindle .

What I'm doing is putting the books on my wish list. If I know the release date of the e-version, I put a reminder in my Outlook. You could also put a reminder in six months from now, just to check again.

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 07:44 PM
...when I'm reading [the Kindle] my hand goes to the top right corner of the Kindle to try and 'turn the page'.
With an iPad, that's how you turn the page. (I have one of each and like them both for different reasons.)

Toothpaste
09-06-2011, 07:50 PM
A friend has a Nook she let me play around with for a bit. I wasn't impressed. Reading is such a tactile experience for me. I love the weight and feel of the book. The smell of the paper. The sound of the pages turning.


Don't get me wrong, I feel the exact same way. I also love how books look on my shelves - you should see my apartment.

But ereaders have their place. They are great for traveling. And like I said before, great for when you want to read a friend's MS and don't want to waste all that paper and ink printing it off the computer (also a printed MS is not something you can easily take with you on the subway). Plus the Kobo comes with 100 free classic books - you know, those books you always meant to read but never did? So now I actually am reading them!

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 07:54 PM
I love the weight and feel of the book. The smell of the paper. The sound of the pages turning. The ticking of my watch, the scratching of my phonograph, the sound and feel of a rotary dial, the smell of carbon paper, the click of a mechanical shutter, the heat put out by my TV set, the choo-choo of a steam locomotive, and so on. Kids today... :)

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 07:58 PM
Don't get me wrong, I feel the exact same way. I also love how books look on my shelves - you should see my apartment.There's got to be an "etchings" joke in there somewhere.

scarletpeaches
09-06-2011, 07:59 PM
With an iPad, that's how you turn the page. (I have one of each and like them both for different reasons.)I knew I was reading too many ebooks when I picked up a paperback in Waterstone's and tried to 'switch it on'. :ROFL:

VTwriter
09-06-2011, 08:01 PM
But the thing is -- if a book trembles in your hands, wouldn't an ereader, too?

The tremors get worse the larger the item I'm trying to hold. The e-reader I can also place in my lap or on a surface and not worry about losing the page.

areteus
09-06-2011, 08:02 PM
Yes, I reckon that the next time we go on holiday our suitcases will be a lot lighter... because usually at least half the weight is taken up with the books we each pack to travel with (it is usually 2 or 3 books each per week of holiday, often at least one hardback because we splurge on nice new books when we go on holiday). Next time it may only be the kindles and one book each to read in situations where it is not possible to read the kindle...

And yes, we do usually get through all 3 books in the course of the holiday. In fact, we often end up swapping books near the end when we run out... this is how I often end up reading more hard sci fi (which she loves) and she sometimes grudgingly admits that some things that Neil Gaiman writes are not all that bad (she once read Stardust on holiday and admitted she liked it, though she has since said she prefers the film :) ).

Anaquana
09-06-2011, 08:06 PM
The ticking of my watch, the scratching of my phonograph, the sound and feel of a rotary dial, the smell of carbon paper, the click of a mechanical shutter, the heat put out by my TV set, the choo-choo of a steam locomotive, and so on. Kids today... :)

What can I say? I'm a bit of a Luddite. I don't own a cellphone, an MP3 player, or an e-reader. We just finally broke down and bought a laptop a couple years ago, but my husband uses it more than I do because it gives me headaches no matter what we do with the settings.

heyjude
09-06-2011, 08:22 PM
The tremors get worse the larger the item I'm trying to hold. The e-reader I can also place in my lap or on a surface and not worry about losing the page.

I have carpal tunnel and can so sympathize with this. I prefer an e-reader for this reason, too. I put books I'd like on my Wish List so that I don't forget about them. I check out the list whenever I go to find something to buy and hopefully by then the book is out as an ebook.

Al Stevens
09-06-2011, 08:33 PM
What can I say? I'm a bit of a Luddite. I don't own a cellphone, an MP3 player, or an e-reader. We just finally broke down and bought a laptop a couple years ago, but my husband uses it more than I do because it gives me headaches no matter what we do with the settings.There's got to be a headache joke in there somewhere.

COchick
09-06-2011, 08:48 PM
To the OP:

I've also had this happen to me. I've come across a few books I've been wanting to read and they're not available in ebook format. So I skip it and buy something else. So yes, they miss out on a sale.

I mostly read ebooks now because I never have the chance to make it to the bookstore or library. And when I do, I have 3 kids in tow, so I usually forget to think about the things I'd like to read. So ebooks are the natural choice for me. If I didn't have a kindle/iPad, I can guarantee that I wouldn't read as much as I do now.

However, a book not being available on the kindle won't stop me from buying it in another form. I've been wanting to read a really well known book for a long time that wasn't available in ebook. (it just came out a few years ago.) I moved on, but I still wanted to read that book. Finally, I broke down and slipped in to B&N one night just before they closed and picked it up. And I'm so glad I did. If the ebook was available I would have read it much sooner...but I did read it.

cwfgal
09-06-2011, 09:10 PM
The first book in my current series had an e-version available at the same time the hardcover came out, but the second in the series didn't due to an oversight. It was several months before anyone realized it (I noted it but figured it was a conscious decision by the publisher when in fact it wasn't.) But interestingly, the hardcover sales on that second book were much higher than the first. So it may be a sound business decision not to release an e-version right away (though I realize the increased hardcover sales for book #2 may have been unrelated to the e-book issue, too--who knows?)
Beth

Nephthis
09-07-2011, 01:01 AM
I say, if you want it bad enough, you'll buy it in hardback. If not, bookmark it, write in on your calendar, and check back monthly to see if it's been released on e-book. Contact the author if its such a big deal to you and I'm sure they'll have SOME sort of answer for you.
But, what about the opposite way then? When an author ONLY releases a e-book? What about those of us that don't have digital readers and can't constantly lug about our computers? Should I boycott that publisher/author just because of this? While I understand your disappointment, it's pretty sad to get angry about it.

Sunnyside
09-07-2011, 05:13 PM
I'm not certain I follow the outrage here. If I may make a rather lame comparison, this would be like me vowing to boycott Warner Brothers because I can't purchase THE DARK KNIGHT on DVD the same day the movie comes out in theaters. Does that mean Warner doesn't care about the DVD market? Not at all. Are they optimizing profits? Probably.

Publishers do the same thing. They release a hardback, then some time down the road, they go to paperback (while it happens, it's rare that the hardback and paperback come out on the same day) --- and sometimes the e-version will be held until the paperback comes out or even later. Other times, the e-book DOES come out at the same time as the hardback. It can vary.

But just because it doesn't doesn't mean the publisher "doesn't care" about e-book readers. Lots can go on behind the scenes, and I think it's fairly lame to malign and boycott either the author OR the publisher for these decisions when we don't know why there's a gap between the hardcover and e-book. Heck, I'm STILL waiting for my first book to come out electronically, and it was published three years ago. Did I want it out earlier than that? You bet. But like Toothpaste, I'm backlisted, so it takes time. (It comes out in paperback and e-book on the same day in November. Finally.)

Anyway. I'm just not sure I can follow the moral outrage. Books get published in different formats on different schedules. It happens.

crunchyblanket
09-07-2011, 05:27 PM
I don't want to buy the hardback either, nine times out of ten; I'll wait for paperback. And if I can wait for paperback, surely you can wait for the e-version?

gothicangel
09-07-2011, 06:55 PM
Sunnyside, I've just read your siggy. My sister is a huge fan of Jim Henson, can't wait to get a hold of that book.

Is it being published in the UK, or will I have to order from Amazon.com? :)

Sunnyside
09-07-2011, 07:06 PM
Thanks, Gothic! I don't wanna derail the thread, so I've sent you a PM.

(And I realize, of course, that by posting this, I've already derailed the thread, so no pointing out the irony. As you were....)