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Captcha
09-04-2011, 02:05 AM
This is more of an opinion/usage question than an actual request for expertise, but...

Now that most cell phones are touch screen, have people changed the words they use when referring to them?

For example...

We still answer. Do we still 'hang up', or do we 'end the call'?

We don't dial anymore, surely... but what DO we do? Often we select numbers from speed dial... but is it still called speed dial, or is it 'memory' or 'contacts' or something?

If we aren't using a speed dial, what word do we use to refer to the act of pressing the proper sequence of numbers in order to reach somebody?

Am I just making this harder than it has to be?

ETA: Buttons? Like, how do I say "He hit the speaker phone button," when it's not really a button at all...

Becca_H
09-04-2011, 02:19 AM
I still say 'hang up' in speech, but yeah, it's an 'End' button on the screen.

I don't use speed dial. I use phone book or dialled/missed call lists when calling people.

I would still call them buttons.

I think you're possibly overthinking it. Really, it depends on the character. Someone in their sixties will be more likely to use 'old' terminology compared to a young teenager. And not everyone has touch screens right now - many people I know have basic Blackberrys with normal old-school buttons.

JulieHowe
09-04-2011, 02:38 AM
I still call it "hitting a button" even though the actual motion involves taking my finger and tapping on the touch-screen icon on my phone when I want to make a phone call, pull up Google Maps or read my email.

leahzero
09-04-2011, 02:48 AM
I'm with Becca: "hang up" in speech, "end call" if writing about it. It'd be interesting to see what terminology teens use, as many have grown up in a cell-only world.

I wouldn't say "dial" (though some phone interfaces include anachronisms like dialing, rotary dials, etc.), but simply "call." Unless there's a pressing need to describe the process of selecting a contact and calling, don't bother describing it, as telecom tech changes so rapidly it could be dated in a couple years.

And virtual buttons are still buttons. We call buttons on web pages buttons. Why not phones?

kuwisdelu
09-04-2011, 08:36 PM
The only one that's really changed in your list I think is "dial." I haven't heard anyone say that in ages. It's just "call."

The general routine for getting someone's phone number these days, IME, involves one person telling the other person his or her number, the other person saving it, calling it to make sure yes it's calling you, and then the original person saving the other person's number from the incoming call.

If you don't have someone's number, I still haven't heard anyone actually say "dial" or refer to the sequence of inputting the number as anything at all. It's just "call."

There is no "speed dial," and while there are "contacts" or something similarly named, I mostly just hear people speak in terms of "having" or "not having" someone's number.

Kitti
09-04-2011, 09:28 PM
I still use "speed dial" all the time - my top contacts each have their own assigned number, I push it on my cell phone and hold it for a second or so, and off the call goes. I actually don't know my dad's cell phone number, he's just speed dial three. A heck of a lot easier than scrolling through all my contacts to find someone.

kuwisdelu
09-04-2011, 09:33 PM
I still use "speed dial" all the time - my top contacts each have their own assigned number, I push it on my cell phone and hold it for a second or so, and off the call goes. I actually don't know my dad's cell phone number, he's just speed dial three. A heck of a lot easier than scrolling through all my contacts to find someone.

Why would you need to scroll? Just hit the first letter in their name.

samw11
09-05-2011, 12:07 AM
I still dial, pick up, hang up call them 'buttons'... to be fair when it crashes & does a complete re-set (like yesterday when it deleted all of my contacts, messages, e-mail settings and tweetcaster!!!) I threaten to replace it with a traditional dial phone... less portable but way more reliable!

it could be an age thing though... it's because I was brought up with an old fashioned dial phone in the house... my cousin (who is substantially younger than me) laughs when I call the touch screen points 'buttons' and say 'hang up' because I am 'old fashioned'!

TheBladeRoden
09-06-2011, 11:51 AM
I just say "put in the numbers and hit 'call'". Though "button" still finds its way in sometimes

Buffysquirrel
09-07-2011, 12:33 AM
I think I said, 'oh, I already have x in my contacts' the other day. Then again, I was talking to my husband. If I'd said 'in my phone book', he'd go, what phone book?

Snitchcat
09-07-2011, 03:05 AM
Generally, I just say, "Hit 'call' or 'send'" (depends on the phone) when I dial/call, and at the end, for me, it's, "Cut the call". (Then again, language differences affect terminology.)

Other phrases I tend to use a lot:


Hang on, let me put you on speaker.
Call you in a tick.
Call me later, or text [or SMS] me.
Talk to you later.
Will SMS.
Got IDD? [International Direct Dial]
'sfine; have caller ID. I'll get your number from that.
Left you a voice message; did you get it?
Using the Tab / iPad.

And when I get a new mobile:


Testing call quality; how's the sound for you?


Can't think of any others off-hand.

Mac H.
09-07-2011, 07:20 AM
I remember trying to explain this to a newly arrived Russian speaker a few years ago - showing him how to use the normal office phones.

If he was speaking to someone on the phone and asked a question, he'd often get the response 'Hang on...' while the other person looked up the answer. So he'd obey the instruction and hang up the phone. After - 'Hang up' & 'Hang on' .. aren't they the same thing?

So:

Pickup the phone = Lift the handpiece up to start a call
Hangup the phone = Put the handpiece down to end a call
Hang on = Nothing to do with 'Hang up ' - it must means wait
Hold on = The same as 'Hang on'
On hold = Nothing like 'Hold on'
Dial a number = Nothing to do with the tiny dial on the phone with numbers - that is the volume control
I realised how little of the English language actually makes sense.


Mac

Becca_H
09-07-2011, 03:15 PM
I realised how little of the English language actually makes sense.

When I was at school we had a new boy from Russia, who the teacher placed next to me to help him with his English.

And yeah, completely. I remember the phrase "eating out" came up in a textbook and he asked me what it meant.

That was my epiphany regarding our very complex language.

TheBladeRoden
09-08-2011, 12:51 PM
Look at how many definitions "up" has http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/up

BigWords
09-08-2011, 04:36 PM
I remember the phrase "eating out" came up in a textbook and he asked me what it meant.

There is more than one meaning for that... :D

Becca_H
09-08-2011, 04:47 PM
There is more than one meaning for that... :D

Well I was an innocent, good kid. (Still am, sort of.) So I told him it was about restaurants (he didn't know what a restaurant was, either, so Urban Dictionary's definition may have been digested easier).

This is the main reason the teacher put him with me. Too many bad experiences of kids deliberately teaching English-learners sexual or swear words in place of the real thing.

It was quite funny to hear, but so, so wrong.