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Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 02:21 PM
Theoretically, would it be possible to rinse out a disposable diaper and let it dry, then reuse it? Or would it simply turn into a soggy mess and be ruined?

I have a woman who's trapped on an alien ship with her newborn baby, and she has only a few diapers that were in her bag when she was abducted. She's been saving them for when the baby poops, but I was wondering if she could stretch them further, somehow, especially the diapers that have only been peed in. There's a toilet, so I envisioned her trying to rinse the diapers in the toilet and setting them out to dry. Would this actually work? Or would it destroy the diapers?

alleycat
08-31-2011, 02:36 PM
Just a casual comment . . .

That sounds very awkward to have to write. You could just have her find some towels or washcloths-like things (aliens probably have to wash their hands too, even if they have six of them).

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 02:57 PM
That sounds very awkward to have to write. You could just have her find some towels or washcloths-like things (aliens probably have to wash their hands too, even if they have six of them).
That would be a good alternative! Unfortunately, the aliens aren't concerned about whether their captives live or die. They aren't providing them with food or water, so I doubt they'd give them towels. :-/

The scene wasn't awkward to write at all. It's just a short paragraph, really. It may need to be altered, depending on what I learn about disposable diapers, but here's how it stands now. Does it come across as awkward?


The baby wailed pitifully, unhappy with her soaked diaper. I'd tried washing the diapers out in the toilet, but they were disposable and not meant to be cleaned. She'd developed a rash from the constant damp and I had nothing with which to ease her suffering.

alleycat
08-31-2011, 03:08 PM
I'm no expert (thankfully), but I think someone could wash a disposable diaper by hand in a pinch. The big thing is not to put them in a washing machine where they can come apart.

alleycat
08-31-2011, 03:08 PM
That would be a good alternative! Unfortunately, the aliens aren't concerned about whether their captives live or die. They aren't providing them with food or water, so I doubt they'd give them towels. :-/


Ah. But they have provided them with a toilet . . .

I'm no expert (thankfully), but I think someone could wash a disposable diaper by hand in a pinch. The big thing is not to put them in a washing machine where they can come apart.

JinxVelox
08-31-2011, 03:15 PM
It would be a soggy mess, unfortunately. Disposable diapers are more absorbent than a maxi pad, but they are both very similar items. The mom would have to make-do with some sort of makeshift cloth diapers if she ran out of disposables. :)

shaldna
08-31-2011, 03:32 PM
disposable nappies are filled with teh same stuff as sanitary towels, many have those little gel beads inside them. and they swell up quite large.

Bear in mind that the nappies are mostly made of paper and plastic, washing them would pretty much destroy them.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 03:40 PM
Kind of what I suspected. Thanks!

PorterStarrByrd
08-31-2011, 03:49 PM
Borrow one and soak it in water.

I think you'll have no doubt that, theoretically possible or not, it is no where near practical.

IsisAnalysis
08-31-2011, 04:20 PM
Okay, this is gonna get gross, fair warning.

My little ones had only cloth diapers, apart from travel, and when I was young I babysat for babies in disposable diapers. Here's my experiences.

Cloth diapers work really well, but need to be changed fast when they get wet. Babies in wet cloth diapers get irritated skin real fast. Babies don't need plastic pants -- they only hold in the moisture and make things worse. My children had wool diaper covers, and they worked great. Even damp, they "breathed" and held in the yuck long enough for a changing.

Disposable diapers have a dried gel inside that soaks in moisture and swells up. There is no way to clean them for reuse. It would be like trying to wash the flavor out of jello. That gel can hold a terrifying amount of moisture. When I was a kid I babysat for a teenage mom who couldn't afford many diapers, or really hated changing them. That baby had something like one diaper a day, and by afternoon the poor thing was crawling around with a swollen, squashy cushion on her bottom. While the skin was irritated, it was nothing like what it would have been in a cloth diaper left on that long. Apparently disposable diapers do do a good job of whisking wetness away from baby's skin.

Disposable diapers can be left on long enough to become health hazards, in my opinion, while cloth diapers need to be changed frequently enough that they don't start to ferment.

These aliens don't give food or water, but there is a toilet with water in? Okay...

Clearly disposable diapers can be left on a lot longer than recommended. But they cannot be reused or cleaned in any way. Maybe they could be dried out, but given the nature of the gel I suspect you would at least need an oven and they would probably dry rock-solid.

If I were in that situation, I would go through the store of diapers as slowly as possible, then start using ripped-up bits of my clothing, preferably with something a little waterproof, like bits of a nylon windbreaker, over them, rinsing them out in the toilet and reusing them.

I'd also like to point out another option I saw once. I met a family who just let the baby tear around bottomless, like an unhousetrained puppy. It saved on diapers, but made the floor awful.

Fruitbat
08-31-2011, 04:32 PM
As others have said,I don't think it would work well at all to rinse and dry disposables, they're just not designed for it.


If there were extra cloth things around, she could make cloth diapers out of them.


Or, just do without them. Babies tend to go on a somewhat regular schedule if they eat on a regular schedule. The mother would take the baby to the toilet then and hold it over it, keep a bowl or bucket handy, and clean up the floor when needed. Back when very early potty-training was a big status thing among mothers (as young as six months) the mothers were probably just training themselves on when to take the baby to the potty. So it can be done. And of course plenty of third-world women don't have diapers for their babies, although granted they are probably outdoors more.

IsisAnalysis
08-31-2011, 04:39 PM
As others have said,I don't think it would work well at all to rinse and dry disposables, they're just not designed for it.


If there were extra cloth things around, she could make cloth diapers out of them.


Or, just do without them. Babies tend to go on a somewhat regular schedule if they eat on a regular schedule. The mother would take the baby to the toilet then and hold it over it, keep a bowl or bucket handy, and clean up the floor when needed. Back when very early potty-training was a big status thing among mothers (as young as six months) the mothers were probably just training themselves on when to take the baby to the potty. So it can be done. And of course plenty of third-world women don't have diapers for their babies, although granted they are probably outdoors more.

Fruitbat beat me to it. I just remembered there were people who did this, even these days. You need a lot of time on your hands to watch the baby, but I guess you would have it if you were stuck on an alien spaceship with nothing else to do. People have claimed they can tell through facial expression and body language when the baby is about to go, so they can get 'em to the toilet in time.

Frankly, that alien spaceship toilet is your salvation here.

Although, to be honest, the bucket thing sounds better, because then your humans can drink the water from the toilet.

Devil Ledbetter
08-31-2011, 04:53 PM
As Fruitbat and Isis indicated, diapers, cloth or disposable, are not a necessity. For the entire length of human existence predating diapers (that is to say, most of it) a different method was used. It is called elimination timing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elimination_communication) (or elimination communication). In the absence of diapers, a mother could figure this out pretty quickly. Basically it consists of recognizing the baby's cues just prior to peeing or pooping, and holding him away from you, over a sink or something.

I haven't tried it (I used cloth on my babies) but I have some IRL friends who have succeed with this method. If I read a story where a mom was trying to wash out disposables I'd think she was pretty gormless. Disposables take on more and more moisture until they can't hold anymore. They don't get dry. They do get rotten. No loving mother would want to put an overused disposable anywhere near her infant.

JMO

samw11
08-31-2011, 05:00 PM
Disposable diapers have a dried gel inside that soaks in moisture and swells up. There is no way to clean them for reuse.

My daughter did use disposable nappies (English diapers) and I can confirm the dried gel inside (can be used to make low quality fake snow interestingly enough - if clean & unused obviously).

best thing to do is to see if you can buy a cheap small pack & open one up & then pour water into it... you will see for yourself just what happens!!

She would probably be better ripping a square of cloth (maybe off her skirt) to use as a reusable... she'd need at least 2 though because she wouldn't put a wet one on the baby, she'd have to dry it out & she'd use the softest fabric she could get hold of!

Devil Ledbetter
08-31-2011, 05:04 PM
best thing to do is to see if you can buy a cheap small pack & open one up & then pour water into it... you will see for yourself just what happens!!

Nothing substitutes for first-hand research. But use urine (I don't want to know how) because that will naturally turn to ammonia and give a much clearer picture of the nastiness a mother trying to extended a the life of a disposable would face.

Fruitbat
08-31-2011, 05:20 PM
Ha ha, imagine getting caught and trying to explain your way out of that little experiment! :)

alleycat
08-31-2011, 05:24 PM
If there were aliens planning on killing me and my baby I probably wouldn't worry about a dirty diaper, but that's just me. Heck, I wouldn't even make my bed.

;-)

Maryn
08-31-2011, 06:13 PM
Wow, you're quite the rebel, alleycat.

Remembering back to baby days, what's in a diaper bag? Okay, she's got disposables. Use until they can't be used any more, then useless.

But wait. She's also carrying something with at least one, possibly two, waterproof surfaces to use as a changing pad. This is a newborn; you set her on something, she can't even roll over, much less crawl off.

She's probably got at least one fluffy and soft infant blanket, possibly two of different weights (one flannel, one fluffy, maybe even a third of thin soft cotton). That's two, maybe three, cloth diapers right there.

One thing about that toilet. Don't assume it's got water. We're on a water-rich planet and use it lavishly. Other life forms may use a chemical toilet, or the alien equivalent of clumping kitty litter, or recycle all waste products.

I assume the mother is nursing? She can go without food for some time, but she needs water. Hope she gets it.

Maryn, whose babies are huge now

amyashley
08-31-2011, 06:35 PM
I'd make my character have a sweater/cardigan or sweatshirt. Cut it in half. Perhaps she has nail clippers in her bag to use on it. If you cut it exactly along the outline, where it has a front with fronts of sleeves and a back with backs of sleeves, this will serve for a diaper.

Lay it like a T with the baby in the middle (on the I bar if the T with the cross bar horizontal along the waist), fold and bunch the material in between the legs, bring to the tummy, fold over if there is extra, and tie in place with the arms.


Not perfect, but it would do.

I'd do so quickly and alternate my two cloth diapers with the disposables so I had time to wash them out.

NOTE: I have done this IRL. It works in survival situations.

Fruitbat
08-31-2011, 06:43 PM
The only thing about the cloth is that you'd need at least a half dozen because they need time to dry.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 06:45 PM
Thanks to everyone for commenting! I imagined that disposable diapers wouldn't rinse out very well, so it's good to know I was on the right track. She'll make the attempt, see that it's useless, and give up.

Trying to predict when the baby is going to pee is an interesting idea. Not sure I want to go into that much detail in this story, but it's a fascinating concept to be sure!


If there were aliens planning on killing me and my baby I probably wouldn't worry about a dirty diaper, but that's just me. Heck, I wouldn't even make my bed.

Well, the thing is, she's stuck on this alien ship for about a week. So she's got to do something about the baby's diapers!


She's probably got at least one fluffy and soft infant blanket, possibly two of different weights (one flannel, one fluffy, maybe even a third of thin soft cotton). That's two, maybe three, cloth diapers right there.
Excellent point! It's been too long since I've packed a diaper bag, I forgot what all goes into them. At this point in the story, the mother is no longer wearing the long skirts she used to wear, so I didn't think she would have anything she could tear up to use---but you're absolutely right, she could use one of the baby blankets. Actually, we used to carry cloth diapers around to use as spit-up rags. She could easily have a couple of those that she could turn (back) into diapers! Problem solved, hooray! :D


One thing about that toilet. Don't assume it's got water. We're on a water-rich planet and use it lavishly. Other life forms may use a chemical toilet, or the alien equivalent of clumping kitty litter, or recycle all waste products.Exactly. I plan to have them investigate the toilet as a source of water, only to find that it's some kind of chemical fluid. Being on a spaceship, water would be at a premium and not to be wasted on toilets.


I assume the mother is nursing? She can go without food for some time, but she needs water. Hope she gets it.I had another thread going about this. The consensus was that she could go a very long time without food or water before her milk would dry up. Apparently, the body draws from the blood and bones to keep the milk supply going, at the expense of the mother's health. Her milk does dry up, but it's because they separate the mother from her baby, so she can't nurse.

soapdish
08-31-2011, 06:46 PM
The baby wailed pitifully, unhappy with her soaked diaper. I'd tried washing the diapers out in the toilet, but they were disposable and not meant to be cleaned. She'd developed a rash from the constant damp and I had nothing with which to ease her suffering.




I assume the mother is nursing? She can go without food for some time, but she needs water. Hope she gets it.
Just wanted to add--if this is true, she can use breastmilk to clear up the diaper rash. Or at least try.


As Fruitbat and Isis indicated, diapers, cloth or disposable, are not a necessity. For the entire length of human existence predating diapers (that is to say, most of it) a different method was used. It is called elimination timing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elimination_communication) (or elimination communication). In the absence of diapers, a mother could figure this out pretty quickly. Basically it consists of recognizing the baby's cues just prior to peeing or pooping, and holding him away from you, over a sink or something.Yes. See, this is WAY more believable to me than her fashioning a diaper or trying to clean diapers. Perhaps after a few failed attempts to fashion a diaper, her instinct would kick in and she'd begin EC.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 07:02 PM
If she's on the ship for a week, I would fashion a diaper or three and use them for naps and night time sleeps.

Use whatever scraps she has left to attempt to keep things clean. Consider that although the mother may not have long skirts, it isn;t so important to be wearing mass amounts of clothing as it is to avoid walking (and crawling) around in feces. I personally would sacrifice my shirt as a poop cleaning rag! That doesn't need to stay dry. Just rinse and hang between swabbing the deck.

If I didn't know how long I had, I'd go into survival mode pretty quickly, especially with a kid. It might take about 6 hours, but after that I'd be rearranging the room to suit having my baby there for the long haul.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 07:12 PM
If I didn't know how long I had, I'd go into survival mode pretty quickly, especially with a kid. It might take about 6 hours, but after that I'd be rearranging the room to suit having my baby there for the long haul.
Rearranging the room, how? Keep in mind, this is a newborn baby, just a couple weeks old. I imagine the mother would be holding her all the time, even while sleeping. I would, anyway, especially because the other people she's been kidnapped with disappear one at a time. She'd want to be sure that if/when she vanishes, the baby goes with her.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 07:25 PM
Unpacking the bag, laying out supplies in a fashion where everything is within reach and convenient. Making sure I had some sort of support at my back so it was comfortable to nurse (probably the rolled up, empty bag).

I've spent a LOT of time in emergency rooms and other tight spots alone with newborns and often other children (I now have three under 5). When you aren't sure what is happening and you have a small child, even a newborn, sometimes rearranging even the small amount of supplies you have gives you comfort and a sense of control.

Also, although a newborn may seem easy and simple, they are absolutely NOT. As a mom, you are often uncomfortable, and nothing you need is ever at hand right when you need it. Tucked away in the diaper bag is never convenient.

I'm trying to help based on my own experiences. Obviously I've never been abducted by aliens, and perhaps you'd rather have your character shivering in one spot in a corner holding a baby for a week. I'd be constantly DOING something, anything I could, even if it was useless.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 07:25 PM
Also, I'm a huge proponent of babywearing. I'd wear the baby.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 07:42 PM
Unpacking the bag, laying out supplies in a fashion where everything is within reach and convenient. Making sure I had some sort of support at my back so it was comfortable to nurse (probably the rolled up, empty bag).
Makes sense. At the same time, she doesn't know when they might be rescued and have to move in a hurry. Would that affect whether you unpacked the bag or not? If it was me, I think I'd prefer to grab it and go, if help came. She has no idea she's going to be there for a full week. At the same time, I could see the desire to want to "set up house" and have things out and convenient.



I'm trying to help based on my own experiences. Obviously I've never been abducted by aliens, and perhaps you'd rather have your character shivering in one spot in a corner holding a baby for a week. I'd be constantly DOING something, anything I could, even if it was useless.Oh, she's not going to sit idle the whole time, believe me. She helps the others explore the space they're in, looking for a way out. She comes up with a few suggestions and tries to take the lead. But once it's been a few days with very little food or water, I imagine that she's not going to have the energy to do much other than sit and hope for rescue.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 07:57 PM
I'd probably rearrange things, do what I could to make myself and my baby more comfortable. I'd definitely sacrifice any extra clothing (underwear bra, sweatshirt, etc.) to make what I needed, and I'd do so as soon as I could.

This may help even if you had not planned it.

http://wearyourbaby.com/Default.aspx?tabid=169

If I were in this situation, I wouldn't want my baby an inch away. These will allow hands to be free. I've worn all of mine, first out of neccessity because my husband was gone, but then because it's FAR more convenient than strollers, playpens, and bouncers.

HTH.

And I'd let the baby poop and pee on me and rinse myself clean periodically. Who cares, if you don't know what's going to happen next? Alive is what is important.

samw11
08-31-2011, 08:17 PM
Devil Ledbetter - just eugh!

Out of curiosity - how newborn is the baby... because she aint going exploring a spaceship if baby is very young & she's going to need other absorbent materials for herself for a while too... if you can't figure that out without me getting explicit then you're a bloke. Just nursing baby and getting out of bed can exhaust you after the experience of giving birth.

People who recover fastest tend to have been in excellent shape to start with, but even just sitting down/using the loo can be very unpleasant for the first few weeks.

Also, you say her milk dries up because she's seperated from the baby... how long for? Do you know how long it takes mothers milk to dry up once she's nursing & not bound up? I can tell you - it can take months!!!! I've been there... it wouldn't happen in just a few days unless the kid was about 2/3 years old, even then it can be weeks (when I was a nursery nurse we had a 4 year old pre-schooler whose Mum came in every lunch time to nurse him, when she started to wean him it took her a good few weeks to stop leaking at mealtimes!)

Thinking about it, having kids is gruesome even after the initial 13 hours!!! My daughter will remain an only child!

Maryn
08-31-2011, 08:20 PM
Excellent point. Wear that baby, using whatever clothes lend themselves to creating a sling.

At the risk of grossing out those who've never had babies, nursing babies' poop isn't all that disgusting. It doesn't even stink. And pee? That's nothing. While I'd prefer a diapered baby, I'd probably use the blankets to keep the infant with me, not clean.

Maryn, inured for life

amyashley
08-31-2011, 08:34 PM
Maryn, I think after a few babies, poop is just, well, poop. You get over it.

FWIW, I only nursed my first child for 2 weeks. My milk has still not dried up 5 years later. I did not nurse my other two because I take copious amounts of prescription drugs to make all my bits run properly.

Pretty sure even a short separation wouldn't matter if the baby sucks. Google relactation and see what pops up. Adoptive mothers who have never had children biologically are able to induce lactation. Very young infants have a VERY strong urge to nurse. Mom might think she's dry, but it will come in, and that hungry baby isn't going to stop trying until it does. There's liable to be lots of screaming involved, but it will happen.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 08:41 PM
She'll definitely be keeping the baby close at hand. She'll have a few cloth diapers, so she can use the blankets to rig a sling.

The baby is about two weeks old when they're first abducted. I didn't even think about the fact that the MC might still be bleeding. The website I looked at said it usually lasts 2-3 weeks, so I can say that she's at the tail end of it and had a few maxi-pads stuck in her diaper bag, just in case. I won't go into much detail, though. Don't want to gross out my readers!


Also, you say her milk dries up because she's seperated from the baby... how long for? Do you know how long it takes mothers milk to dry up once she's nursing & not bound up? I can tell you - it can take months!!!!In the breastfeeding thread, I was told by some mothers that her milk might dry up in as little as a weekend without nursing. I guess it varies wildly between women. She'll be separated from the baby for about two weeks, so I figured that would be long enough, especially given how dehydrated she is.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 08:52 PM
Some women do. Some women are like Bessie the Cow. Same with the bleeding. I would gloss over the bleeding because I don;t think many people will notice. It can last for up to 13-14 weeks. 2-3 weeks is definitely on the short side!

I did try relactation. I had little luck because my son was a pill. However, I have a friend who recently adopted a newborn 5 years after she gave birth to her daughter. She did nurse her daughter, so the process was natural relactation using a breast pump. She had no problem getting her milk in and was there at the hospital for her new son's birth. He has never had formula- 100% breast milk. You don't need any tools to do it either. Baby is better than a pump.

It's actually a LOT easier to do early on when your hormones are still fluctuating then to do it later like my friend did. The problem is that most women are impatient. Baby cries, so they assume the baby will starve or they get frustrated. They don't understand how their bodies actually work.

In an emergency, with a hungry baby, you could probably get full milk flow going on that momma within 48 hours or less. I bet less.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 08:53 PM
Go to kellymom.com
They have relactation info that is legitimate.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 09:06 PM
I just realized, she can't wash the cloth diapers out in the toilet because it's a chemical toilet, not water. I'm betting those chemicals would NOT be safe for the baby. Any thoughts on that?

As far as relactating goes, I'd prefer if she wasn't able to get the baby to nurse again. She has a habit of randomly jumping through time, and if she was breastfeeding, it would be difficult for the baby's father to feed the baby while she's away. She is able to get her milk flowing again and expresses her breastmilk for the baby to take from a bottle, but the baby isn't willing to nurse after becoming accustomed to the bottle. I heard that can be the case with some babies. If it's not plausible enough, I can always say that the baby refuses to nurse due to something the aliens did to her.

IsisAnalysis
08-31-2011, 09:12 PM
Babies refusing breasts after bottles is really common. It was one reason why I was so furious with the nurses with my first child, who casually fed her with a bottle. Fortunately my baby had good little remora instincts. But it can go the other way. Months later my husband had real trouble trying to bottle feed her with my expressed milk. She refused to recognize a bottle as food.

And yeah, I had forgotten, baby poop doesn't smell bad. Well, breastfed baby poop doesn't. Formula-fed babies' poop is pretty awful, and once they're eating anything else, yuck.

amyashley
08-31-2011, 09:13 PM
Do they have any water at all?

If not, formula isn't an option anyway.

Yes, some babies are cranky about switching, however if they have nothing else, they will eventually give up the fight. Usually it's not the newborns that are extremely picky.

You can also express breast milk by hand into a bottle. I don't know if you want to do that or not.

Your choice about all this. I don't know how big that diaper bag is and what supplies she has in it. I do know that natural is lighter on supplies and easier in the long run especially in rough situations like earthquakes etc. which are the only thing I can compare this to.

I'd just let the baby poo on me. If I had an extra blanket, I'd let one dry at a time (with mess on it) and brush off the dried matter. Even flipping sides is better than nothing.

Devil Ledbetter
08-31-2011, 09:42 PM
I'm beginning to think this fictional baby is more trouble than he's worth. How much of the details of his diapering and feeding drive the plot? Maybe just have the aliens run off with him until you need him for a later plot point? Then you won't have to explain all of these niggling details about his care.;)

DL, pragmatist.

JinxVelox
08-31-2011, 09:59 PM
Heh. Every woman is different. Most don't have a period again until they are done nursing, unless they take birth control pills. I breastfed my son for 2 1/2 years, until he self-weaned, and the milk supply gradually lessened over the months as he nursed less and less after being introduced to solid food.

Babies are much more portable than many people realize. A spaceship actually wouldn't be a huge issue, as far as baby care and child rearing. ;)

JSDR
08-31-2011, 10:24 PM
I was watching a movie called Babies, and the African woman just let her baby poo on her knee. She casually wiped it away with a corncob. Pretty awesome.
I think newborns poop less than older babies, so the "let the baby poop on me" action seems the most viable in your MC's circumstance.

Canotila
08-31-2011, 10:28 PM
Heh. Every woman is different. Most don't have a period again until they are done nursing, unless they take birth control pills. I breastfed my son for 2 1/2 years, until he self-weaned, and the milk supply gradually lessened over the months as he nursed less and less after being introduced to solid food.

Babies are much more portable than many people realize. A spaceship actually wouldn't be a huge issue, as far as baby care and child rearing. ;)

Lucky!

And that whole nonsense about being unable to conceive while breastfeeding? Yeah. There's a reason my brother and I were born 10 months apart.

I'd just do what amyashley said. Wear the baby, and deal with the poo and pee getting on us. Plus you can usually tell babies are going to poo ahead of time. For the first month or so at least it takes a big effort. My son is three weeks old right now and he goes through a whole range of weird facial expressions, grunts, and hand jives before managing to void his bowels. Even in his sleep.

Breastfed baby poo is kind of meh. It doesn't really stink and looks like scrambled eggs. Urine when they're breastfeeding is super watery. The smell would definitely build up over time, but it's not like dark yellow nastiness.

As far as post partum bleeding, she might be done, or not having much. Sorry if this is too much information, but I stopped at two weeks post partum.

Orianna2000
08-31-2011, 10:48 PM
I'm beginning to think this fictional baby is more trouble than he's worth. How much of the details of his diapering and feeding drive the plot? Maybe just have the aliens run off with him until you need him for a later plot point? Then you won't have to explain all of these niggling details about his care.;).
The diapering scene is about two sentences long. I just wanted to be sure I'd gotten the details right about disposable diapers not being reusable. The conversation sort of took off from there! I won't be going into a lot of detail about the baby's care, just a line here and a line there to make the scene feel realistic.

As a matter of fact, the baby does get taken by the aliens. They keep mother and daughter separate for two weeks while they're experimenting and observing them, before they finally get rescued.



Your choice about all this. I don't know how big that diaper bag is and what supplies she has in it. I do know that natural is lighter on supplies and easier in the long run especially in rough situations like earthquakes etc. which are the only thing I can compare this to.
The issues with breastfeeding vs. bottle feeding come up later, after they're rescued. Sorry I wasn't clear about that. On the alien ship, she breastfeeds until they take the baby away from her. Then her milk starts to dry up. Once they're back on Earth, she's forced to start using a bottle, with her own expressed milk.

The main abduction scene isn't very long, so I probably won't go into details about the baby peeing and pooing on the mother. I don't want to gross the readers out with that kind of information, as realistic as it may be. :)

Devil Ledbetter
08-31-2011, 11:16 PM
I think newborns poop less than older babies, so the "let the baby poop on me" action seems the most viable in your MC's circumstance.Breastfed newborns typically poo about twice a day. Older breastfed babies can go days and days without pooping yet aren't constipated. The longest my son went was 11 days. He was perfectly happy and comfortable.

Day 12 I did nothing but change his pants all day though.