PDA

View Full Version : Has a stranger ever done something nice for you?



Gretad08
08-30-2011, 09:38 PM
This morning my low air tire sensor came on. I stopped to put some air in and when I pulled off the hose the valve stem came off. Whoooossshhhhhh!!!! Every last breath of air in the tire came out. Awesome. Husband was 45 minutes away. I've been taught how to change a tire, but never actually done it, so my husband was trying to walk me through it over the phone.

A complete stranger came over and asked if he could help me. My kids are both under 3, and one of them was crying the whole time. We had to remove car seats and try to keep the kids in the car, we couldn't find the jack...it was chaotic to say the least. He kept a smile on his face the whole time, and once he was finished he wouldn't take any money.

So, has anyone done anything nice for you? Or have you done anything for someone else?

writerterri
08-30-2011, 09:58 PM
That was sure nice.


If a stranger smiles at me that's good enough for me. I've been at the receiving end of good natured people a lot of times in my life and I usually pay if forward when the opportunity comes up.

JSDR
08-30-2011, 10:11 PM
That's an awesome story, Greta. As a parent of a toddler, I know how it feels when they start crying and you need to be doing something else...

As for my own story: I was in college at UCSB. I had to drive a few hours away for some chocolate-covered pretzels. On the way back, I ran out of gas and had to push my car off the highway and into... a trailer park.
I was young, from an affluent area where people constantly warn us about "trailer park folks," completely ignorant and classist. I looked for a trailer that didn't look intimidating. I found one with toys scattered on the lawn and knocked on their door. A whisp of a man opened it. I craned my neck to look at the inside of his trailer. Clean. Nice furniture. No blood on the floor. More toys.
I explained that I ran out of gas and asked where the nearest station was, and he told me it was two miles past the dense forest behind the trailer park. I thanked him and started to leave. He said hold on, can't let you walk through there by yourself. Let me give you a ride. I was like: OMG, this is it. My parents are going to read about this in the paper next week. Stupid college kid got killed on the way home from buying pretzels. Body found in dense forest.
So I said ok, I'll take the ride. He brought me over to his minivan. There were carseats in the middle. I got in. He drove to the gas station, paid for the gas, helped me put it into my car (because I don't know how to use those red gas can things).
Afterward, I tried to get his name and address so I could send him a wine basket for his troubles. He declined. I asked him why he lived in a trailer park. He told me that was all he could afford.
Anyway, that event is going to stay with me for the rest of my life because it reminds me of how incredibly stupid and ignorant I was, and how kind people can be.

Grrarrgh
08-30-2011, 10:37 PM
Once someone paid for my coffee at a gas station. No reason, and I'm not even really sure who it was; they didn't stick around to be thanked. When I got to the front, the cashier just said that it had been taken care of. When I was baffled and a bit wary, tbh, she said that it's just something that guy does once a month or so; pays for the coffee of some random person in line. It was such a small, nice thing to do that I started doing it myself.

COchick
08-30-2011, 11:09 PM
When I was 16, I was in line at the customer service desk at the grocery store for some reason. At the counter was an old man who didn't speak English, and the clerk was being extremely rude and uncooperative, although the guy seemed to need something pretty badly. I remember watching him walk away and sitting by the front door, obviously confused and upset about what to do.

Well, he was from South Korea, and my mother is Korean. I don't speak or understand very much Korean, but my mother was out in the parking lot waiting for me. I brought her back inside with me, and I'll never forget the old man's face when he realized that we were there to help him and my mother spoke Korean.

It was something about money--I don't remember what. But the three of us stood at the counter...the old man telling my mother what he needed, my mother translating to me, and THEN I would make the final translation to the clerk. And since my mother doesn't take no sh*t from anyone, she made the clerk go over the process until the old man understood exactly what he needed to do the next time.

My mother, who isn't exactly generous with compliments, told me how proud I made her. It's still a memory that really sticks out for me, and if I can teach my own kids something, it's that you never walk away when you see someone who needs help.

COchick
08-30-2011, 11:17 PM
I forgot to add something nice a stranger has done for me.

When I was in my early twenties I worked at a gas station in the middle of nowhere, and I'd get off at about 1am and have to lock up and walk myself out to my car through the dark parking lot.

One night I had a guy come in and ask to use the phone. (This was before cell phones.) He called the police, and then waited inside the store until they showed up. When the police arrived, I saw them chase a few guys off. Then the guy who called the cops told me that he'd been walking by and had heard a group of guys talking. They'd been planning to wait for me by my car so they could grab me. He didn't say what they were planning to do, and I didn't want to know.

That guy could have easily just kept on walking, but he stepped in to help. I think he might have saved my life that night.

ETA: I never went back to that job.

SaraKC
08-30-2011, 11:28 PM
No, a stranger has never done anything nice for me. Come to think on it, even non-strangers are not particularly unselfish either. :-) Not affixing blame here. Selfishness is an integral part of our biological hard wiring. All part of the self-preservation instinct.

Cheers

backslashbaby
08-30-2011, 11:29 PM
Too many times to even remember! Especially with car trouble around here you get so many folks helping so quickly it's amazing.

The most involved one was a young guy with his friends on the day of graduation rehearsal. My car broke down, everyone who could help immediately was at work, and if I missed rehearsal I couldn't be in the ceremony.

The guys arranged me a ride so I wasn't even late, and when I got back to my car hours later, it was fixed!

The dude had bought the part I needed and left the receipt with his number so I could send him the $50 for the part. No labor charge. Dad said it would have taken a long time to fix, so that nice guy did all that while I was at rehearsal :) :)

Gretad08
08-30-2011, 11:30 PM
Great stories all. Yep, there are still a lot of good people lurking about :)

Maryn
08-30-2011, 11:32 PM
Oh, strangers who look like the most mean-spirited people imaginable have been kind and helpful more times than I could say. A biker in New Mexico who fixed the VW for free on Christmas Eve. The person who handed me a lit cigarette when I learned my cat had died. (Long enough ago that smoking wasn't that weird.) The reeking homeless man who gave me his seat on the subway when I was hugely pregnant. A nurse at the end of her shift who walked me through the labyrinth of the local hospital to find the place I needed to be--it took three elevators, two up and a down. Another nurse who taught Mr. Maryn how to give himself shots he needed by injecting his own thigh several times, and letting Mr. Maryn inject it a couple of times, too.

I try to be the nice person, but I'm not as selfless as many. At most, I might brighten a day, but some of these stories you all are sharing involve people who are so amazingly generous I feel like a miser in comparison.

Maryn, who rarely gives more than a few minutes

KellyAssauer
08-30-2011, 11:35 PM
Has a stranger ever done something nice for you? (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=223518)

Yes.

Am I going to tell you about?

No.

:D

SaraKC
08-30-2011, 11:43 PM
Golly, I just remembered something that happened a very long time ago. So I'll certainly give credit where it's due. My car stalled on a main road late at night, and a group of teenagers pushed it into a parking lot for me. I didn't ask for help. I was waiting around for the AA mechanic to arrive. I remember feeling very amazed and happy. It renewed my faith in human nature a bit. And it wasn't as if they even lingered around to be paid or even thanked. So it does happen. But that is the only incident I can recall of strangers doing a kindness for me, without expecting anything in return. As I said before even non-strangers don't step up to the plate that often. :-)

Cheers

Gretad08
08-31-2011, 12:28 AM
Oh, I have an AW related one. Just last week I asked a question in the poetry forum. Someone (I won't name, just in case he/she doesn't want to be recognized) offered to take a look at a poem for me. It was just to answer a quick question, which he did, but then he continued and critiqued it line by line. It was so incredibly helpful. A few days later he asked if he could take a look at the revised version. Again, he offered some wonderful suggestions and critiqued line by line. He put in a lot of time, and I hadn't even asked for it, he just offered. I can't tell you how much it helped me. Made me confident enough to sent it out to a major mag :)

Lavern08
08-31-2011, 12:32 AM
Kayleamay sent me drugs.

(Does that count?) :Shrug:

Susie
08-31-2011, 12:56 AM
One time we ate out and had a lovely time. When it was time to pay, Howie looked through his items and his credit card was missing. To say we were dismayed was an understatement. We told the manager that I would stay there and Howie would go home to get it. The manager knew us and said that was fine. Before Howie walked out the door, the manager returned and said that the bill had been paid. We were stunned and asked who was so kind to do that, but he said the fellow wanted to remain anonymous. He just said that we should pass it forward if we could. It really made us realize how kind and nice some people are in times of need.

Great stories!

amrose
08-31-2011, 01:00 AM
A woman at my last SOLA meeting gave me a dollar when I couldn't find one for the coffee tip cup. I found it later and offered it to her, but she declined and told me to give it to someone who needed it. :)

L.J.
08-31-2011, 01:22 AM
I'm scared to get on an elevator by myself. Sort of a claustrophobic thing, I guess. I was at a medical building for an appointment and had to go up two or three floors. I was just too afraid to get on the elevator and asked the person at the desk where the stairs were. A lady nearby heard my conversation and asked if I was only afraid by myself, and I said yes. She said she would ride up with me, and she did. :) It may seem a small thing, but it meant a lot to me.

Paul
08-31-2011, 01:30 AM
does strangers you pay count?

Paul
08-31-2011, 01:31 AM
Kayleamay sent me drugs.

(Does that count?) :Shrug:
Depends. Is that how you ended up in 7th Heaven?

Zelenka
08-31-2011, 01:37 AM
Years ago I was waiting at the bus stop on the junction between Cowdenbeath, Lumphinnans and Kelty in Fife, middle of summer, and a massive wasp was flying round about me. I was wearing court shoes so the top part of my foot was bare, and next thing I know, this wasp lands on my foot and starts repeatedly stinging me. I screeched like the total scaredy I am when it comes to those things and kicked it, and it still wouldn't stop stinging until I actually physically squished it with the other foot, and the stinger broke off and was still in the wound. It started to swell right away and I couldn't put any weight on it.

A total stranger was pushing her kid in a pushchair across the street and came over, I managed to tell her that my mum worked in Lumphinnans, and so she put her arm around me and practically carried me about a half mile into the village to my mum's workplace, where they gave me first aid. By the time they'd ushered me in she'd gone and I never did get her name or get to say thank you to her.

Couldn't walk for three days though, but on the plus side, I got a couple of days off school!

Mac H.
08-31-2011, 01:53 AM
Selfishness is an integral part of our biological hard wiring.Actually it isn't.

Altruism is an integral part of our biological hard wiring.

Here's a good discussion of it: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/altruism-biological/

It isn't just humans - it is seen throughout nature.

Mac

Ari Meermans
08-31-2011, 02:00 AM
I've been helped too many times to recount here. I, too, try to pay it both forward and back knowing I will be helped many more times in my life.

Kaiser-Kun
08-31-2011, 02:37 AM
A mysterious one came to my aid and shot a Super Mutant while Dogmeat was incapacitated. Allowed me to get to the G.E.C.K.


*a slobodohundred kaiserpoints to he who recognizes the reference

writerterri
08-31-2011, 03:33 AM
Kayleamay sent me drugs.

(Does that count?) :Shrug:


*giggle*


Got any leftovers?

Cliff Face
08-31-2011, 03:55 AM
I've got a couple that I can think of right now. Both happened on 2 separate holidays with the family when I was a kid.

The first one involves me. The second one is more my mum's story.

Okay, so the family and I were walking along a road right next to a beach. It was a warm night. I said to my parents, "Can I run ahead a bit?" I was a pretty active kid at that point. So they said I could, but to stay in sight.

So I ran at half-speed along the footpath, dodging little bits of roadworks and scaffolding, and I came to a horizontal pole in front of me. I jumped over it - and hit my head on another horizontal pole above it. Ouch.

I don't remember much of the rest of that night, but apparently what happened was that my family hadn't seen me go down, but were catching up to where I was and saw a biker stop next to my prone body, pick me up, put me on the back of the motorbike.

They freaked out. Dad ran as fast as he could, swearing at the biker. So the biker stopped when he noticed dad running, and as it turns out, the biker thought I had been alone, and was planning on dropping me off at the hospital. He then handed me back to my parents and told them where the nearest hospital was, then told them the phone number of a local cab company.

:)

The second one, mum's one, was when we were overseas. We were coming back from England to Australia, with a stop-off in Asia somewhere (I forget which country). So we spent the night in a hotel, and we had an early start the next morning to get the plane home. Mum went to pay the hotel bill - and she couldn't find her credit card. Either she had lost it, or someone had stolen it.

She was totally frantic, as you might expect, with worries that we would be stranded in Asia for weeks while a replacement card found its way to us. No card meant dad (who was at home) couldn't even wire us the money we needed.

But an Australian couple had heard mum freaking out about this, knew what the problem was, and paid the hotel bill. That couple did give mum their address and phone number, so she could pay them back, but the woman had told her, "We had this happen to us once before. I know you just want to get home." So that was incredibly nice of them. And yes, mum paid them back, once we had gotten home (on pre-paid flights).

I'm sure I have other stories, but I'm struggling to think of some right now.

Silver King
08-31-2011, 05:53 AM
A couple of years after I was married, I went on a delayed honeymoon with my wife. We'd planned on staying two weeks in Key West, Florida. The day after we arrived, she left her purse, with most of our traveling money, in a hotel restroom for a few minutes. When she went back to retrieve it, the purse was gone.

Back then we didn't have a credit card, and debit cards hadn't been invented yet. We had a wad of cash, about $3800 or so, in that purse, which we'd scrimped and saved for two years to afford our trip.

We went to the front desk, hopeful that it had been turned in. But it was all wishful thinking on our part and rewarded with advice to check back later in the day.

We were crestfallen. All of the joy and anticipation for our honeymoon had been knocked out of us. My wife couldn't stop crying and said at one point, "I never leave my purse anywhere in public. Ever! How could I be so stupid?"

We left the hotel and went for a walk along the beach and discussed who we would contact to wire us enough money to get back home. I had a few dollars on me, so we ducked into a hole-in-the-wall and ordered burgers and a pitcher of beer. We stayed there a long time, fearful of our immediate future.

Eventually we trudged back to the hotel. I told my wife that by now, someone had surely turned in her purse. But neither of us believed that to be true. Even the desk clerk acted like he didn't trust in miracles and said, "Can you describe the purse again, please?"

My wife did, including its contents, and the clerk said, "As a matter of fact, someone did turn in your property about an hour ago." Then he smiled.

We were stunned. It was surreal, and still is to this day. Nothing inside the purse had been touched. And no amount of persuasion could get that clerk to reveal who had turned in the purse. I even offered to bribe him, but he would have none of it and was adamant that the person had requested to remain anonymous.

As we turned to leave, he said, "I will tell you something, though, and you didn't hear this from me: Folks from Toronto have been known to be some of the most honest and decent people on the planet."

It was only then that I noticed his Canadian accent.

Priene
08-31-2011, 07:57 AM
I used to hitchhike. Every time a car stopped it was through the generosity of strangers.

cscarlet
08-31-2011, 08:27 AM
When I was little my parents would send me to Bible camp for a week each summer. One year, along the way, the bus broke down. We all piled out in the hot sun and complained about how much of an inconvenience it was and how the bus was such a piece of junk.

At one point a man pulled over to see if there was anything he could do to help. There wasn't, of course. He certainly didn't have a spare fan belt (or whatever it was) in the trunk of his car. The camp counselors instructed us not to speak to the man since he was a stranger, but I remember watching him hover along the edge of the woods, jumping on and off his cell phone.

About an hour later the camp sent another bus to pick us up. You'd think I would have been happy ... but just as we were all piling in to leave, the man's wife showed up. The two of them rushed over to us with giant plates of sandwiches and a cooler of drinks in tow.

I was touched and asked one of the chaperones if I could take a sandwich, even though I wasn't hungry. She said no because we were late and made me get on the bus.

No one took a sandwich.

No one said 'thank you.'

I remember driving away from that man and his wife, still holding the plates, and thinking that it was such a shame. After all, it was a Monday early in the morning. The man was probably on his way to work. It had to have cost money for them to make all of those sandwiches. And they looked genuinely sad and confused when we left.

That was the last year I went to camp. I still feel bad for the couple after all these years, but at least remember the act of kindness and hope good karma eventually made its way back to them.

Gretad08
08-31-2011, 08:36 AM
When I was little my parents would send me to Bible camp for a week each summer. One year, along the way, the bus broke down. We all piled out in the hot sun and complained about how much of an inconvenience it was and how the bus was such a piece of junk.

At one point a man pulled over to see if there was anything he could do to help. There wasn't, of course. He certainly didn't have a spare fan belt (or whatever it was) in the trunk of his car. The camp counselors instructed us not to speak to the man since he was a stranger, but I still remember watching him hover along the edge of the woods, jumping on and off his cell phone.

About an hour later the camp sent another bus to pick us up. You'd think I would have been happy ... but just as we were all piling in to leave, the man's wife showed up. The two of them rushed over to us with giant plates of sandwiches and a cooler of drinks in tow.

I was touched and asked one of the chaperones if I could take a sandwich, even though I wasn't hungry. She said no because we were late and made me get on the bus.

No one took a sandwich. No one said 'thank you.'

I remember driving away from that man and his wife, still holding the plates, and thinking that it was such a shame. After all, it was a Monday early in the morning. The man was probably on his way to work. It had to have cost money for them to make all of those sandwiches. And they looked genuinely sad and confused when we left.

That was the last year I went to camp. I still feel bad for that couple after all these years, but at least remember the act of kindness and hope good karma made its way back to them.


That's sad. There's an acute discordance between the lessons taught at Bible camp, and the treatment offered to this couple by the Bible camp teachers.

cscarlet
08-31-2011, 08:59 AM
That's sad.

Oh, it was damn near traumatizing for a little kid ... but they did leave an impression. My husband and I are big on the whole "sandwich" thing now. For example, we will never give someone who is homeless cash money, but we will walk them into a store and buy them a sub.

I also try to say 'thank you' to everybody. Even for the tiniest of things.

KellyAssauer
08-31-2011, 02:19 PM
I've been helped too many times to recount here. I, too, try to pay it both forward and back knowing I will be helped many more times in my life.

I'm convinced AW runs solely on the kindness of strangers.
Some are perhaps, stranger than others -like me!- but when it comes to the seriousness of any aspect of writing, it is that kindness that makes this all work. =)

areteus
08-31-2011, 02:45 PM
Quite a few times.

Once when I was getting on the bus there was a family in front of me buying a 'daysaver family ticket'. There was only one adult in the group, I was nothing to do with them and had never met them before. As they were buying the ticket they said 'He's with us' because it cost them no more to have 2 adults on this ticket than it did to have one. I said thank you and put my bus fare away. Ok, it only saved me 1.80 but it was a nice gesture and it did get passed on later.

A few times we have had free parking when someone with a ticket with some time on it has driven up and given it to us. We also do the same when we have spare time on a ticket (unless they do some flange to stop you like printing the registration number on the ticket to link it to your car only).

Yes, selfishness is in our genes but co-operation is also in our makeup and sometimes co-operating and helping someone is a selfish act too because you do gain from it - albeit indirectly in many cases. A reputation for being 'a nice guy' is invaluable in some circles.

Alpha Echo
08-31-2011, 03:11 PM
What a great thread! Not only does this give me hope for the human race, but it also gives great ideas for stories!!!

I can't really think of anything a stranger has done that compares with anything you guys have mentioned. Honestly, I can't think of much more than a nice smile or a friendly conversation at checkout or someone holding the door for me.

But, you know, sometimes, a smile is all it takes. In fact, I've often thought about how uplifting it is to go to the store, ask someone for help, and actually get someone who goes above and beyond the call of duty to make sure I get what I need. My husband laughs at me sometimes because we'll come out of the store, and I'll be on this high just because the customer service agent was friendly and helpful.

I can think of plenty of things my friends have done for me when I was at my lowest. I couldn't have survived without them, I know.

But strangers...not so much. Maybe it's the area in which I live?

Mr Flibble
08-31-2011, 04:55 PM
Lots of times - several occasions when my motorbike broke down and random dudes came along and either fixed it, gave me a lift or, one time, rang a mate with a van so we could bung the bike in the back and I could get home.

The taxi driver who'd driven me home, a little *cough* tipsy on Christmas Eve, and turned up at lunch time on Christmas Day with my purse that I'd dropped in his cab. Intact, all the money. Wouldn't even take a tip.

The guy who noticed me struggling in a sudden riptide (I'm not a strong swimmer) and came and got me out just in time and waved away my thanks like it was nothing.

Reminds me. My boss was telling me the other day about how a random stranger helped his best friend: The two families, with little kids, were on holiday together. The youngest kid was paddling, only ankle deep, in the sea (none of the adults had seen the 'do not enter' flags, and like he said, only ankle deep). He was holding his Mum's hand, a littel wave came in an swept him off his feet, out of his Mum's grasp and out to sea. He kept disappearing under the water--it got deep very close to the beach, which they hadn't realised -- and every time the current popped him back up, he was yards further away. In seconds he'd been carried thirty or forty yards along the beach towards the headland (and the open ocean). The two Dads dived in, but had no hope of catching him, and with every possibility of drowning in the savage current themselves. A random stranger at the headland end of the beach saw what was happening, and with no regard to his own safety, dived in and managed to grab the boy just at the last possible second before he was swept out into the Atlantic.

The Dads were, obviously, incredibly relieved and thanked him and offered him all sorts, but the guy wouldn't take it. He then gave them a lecture about checking the flags and what careless parents they were. They just stood and took it. What else could they do? This guy had just saved the boy's life, and he had a point. Then the guy just left.

Anninyn
08-31-2011, 04:58 PM
Well, a stranger gave me a cupcake once, and it wasn't even laced with poison.

A few years ago, me and some friends went to the cinema for my 16th birthday. On the way back, a gang of kids the same age attacked us. They were slamming my face against the pavement (why my mouth is lopsided to this day) when some complete strangers waded in, shouting, scaring kids off, calling the police (who never showed). They picked me up, we stumbled off. I was too dazed to pick out their faces, and I'll never know who they were- but they may well have saved my life that night, or at least saved me from a hospital trip.

Gretad08
08-31-2011, 08:39 PM
Great stories.

I have another one. When I worked at a bank, on more than one occassion, people brought me thank you gifts. They were always from people I had just met, and sometimes only made a quick phone call for. The gifts were always small and thoughtful. For example, one lady gave me apple pie room spray with a big christmas bow on it. Another baked a gorgeous pineapple upside down cake and put it on a pretty plate. The list goes on. I was always almost embarassed but pleased at the same time if someone would bring me a gift. Made me feel special though.

lastlittlebird
09-01-2011, 12:55 AM
I was on a road trip with a couple of friends and we parked at the bottom of the "steepest road in the world" in Dunedin because we didn't think our old car could make the climb.
We walked up and then back down and realized that one of them (for the second time no less!) had locked the keys in the car.
We started trying to unlock the door through the window which was open a crack.
And within an hour, maybe three or four retired couples who lived on the street had surrounded our car and were trying to help us... they all had bent coat hangers to try to lift the lock.
One of them eventually called a garage and they came and opened it for us, free of charge.
We were extremely scruffy looking teenagers at the time, so it was even nicer than usual for these little old men to go out of their way to fiddle with our car, while the little old ladies fed us tea and cookies :D

Cliff Face
09-01-2011, 03:34 AM
I have a kind of sweet one actually...

I used to be in love with a lesbian who wouldn't give me the time of day. One night at a party, I saw her with another girl, getting pretty frisky, and I was so miserable.

5 minutes later, a cute girl my height walked through the front door. She wanted to go out for a walk in the night air, so I went with her. I had to get out of the house.

So we got to talking, and I opened up about my unrequited crush. The new girl (who I'd never met before) told me, "You're on the rebound."

"What? No, we've never even kissed."

"Doesn't matter. You felt something for her, and now that feeling is dying. You're on the rebound."

It was such a nice moment. I had just had my feelings validated, by a perfect stranger.

We were dating by the end of the next day.

(It didn't last though. But that still doesn't change how incredibly sweet our meeting was.)

rhymegirl
09-01-2011, 04:03 AM
As a matter of fact, a stranger did something nice for me TODAY!

I was out doing some reporting for the newspaper this afternoon in the hot sun. I was on a bicycle because I'd lent my car to my son. I'd already been riding around for at least a half hour when an elderly woman asked me a question from her front lawn. I stopped in her driveway to talk to her.

After we talked for five minutes or so, I said I really had to be going because I was really thirsty and needed to go home to get some water.

She offered to give me a glass of water. She said, "I don't have any ice but I can give you some water if you want to come inside the house."

I was a complete stranger to her yet she offered to let me come inside and have some water. So I did.

We had a nice conversation and when I was getting back on my bike she said, "Come back and visit me again."

I thought that was so awesome.

Silver King
09-01-2011, 05:31 AM
I was with my older brother once when we stopped in his car to pay a bridge toll, which cost a dollar. He gave the person two singles and said, "The extra one is for the car behind me."

I asked him why he did that, and he said, "Watch what happens."

The other car eventually caught up to us, and the man driving waved and smiled as he went by.

My brother said, "Wasn't that worth a buck?"

urbanmum
09-01-2011, 06:35 AM
Wow. So many great stories certainly help to sweep the bad experiences to the corners of the mind tonight. I have a few as well.

A few months ago I was trying to fit a new table my mum had bought into the back of my car when a man offered to put in in his van and drive it home for us, which he did and would not accept payment.

When I was about 14 I was walking with a girlfriend back to our hotel (I was visiting with her family) after the fireworks in Niagara Falls when these two female bikers on Harleys pulled up beside us and told us they had chased away two older guys who had been sneaking up behind us and made sure they didn't follow us to our hotel. They told us to keep an eye out and were off, we barely were able to thank them.

Back home in Edinburgh whilst visiting the beach at Portobello, my brother got caught out in the tide and a nearby workman, rescued him, wrapped him up in blankets warmed by the fire and set him on the doorstep without even stopping to be thanked.

Those are the best examples I can think of at the moment.

backslashbaby
09-01-2011, 07:29 AM
I had some random high school student kind of lurking around front one day while I was outside. She looked fairly suspicious, just because people usually only walk by here with a purpose and she didn't seem to be doing anything normal. She looked angry and/or sad, too.

I said hi and smiled. She came up and started talking, then chatting. It turns out she had an appointment earlier with her mom and was not in school, so she had walked to her friends school (right up the road) just to have something to do. She had no ride and was hungry. She wasn't allowed into that campus for 2 hours for security reasons, so she was just stuck.

So she hung out with me :D She hung out with my curmudgeonly dad when he came to help me saw something, and Dad brought us dinner :) She used my phone to text her pals. She adored my dogs (she can't have one).

She asked if she could come hang out with me again and bring her friends, lol! I said of course, but I never saw her again ;)