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Lebby
08-28-2011, 03:21 AM
what would happen if a horse are a goldfish? I know some people keep them in water troughs to get rid of algae and bugs.

scarletpeaches
08-28-2011, 03:26 AM
They'd be getting rid of algae and bugs, but stocking up on goldfish shit, surely?

amyashley
08-28-2011, 03:46 AM
It would be a TERRIBLE idea to put a goldfish in a water trough to get rid of algae and bugs.

1) Goldfish are one of the worst W.O.R.S.T. fish around for producing waste. They produce a literal shit ton. And they GROW. It's advised you have at least 50 gallons of water for each goldfish MINIMUM.

2) Algae would thrive on this waste in combination with sunlight. They'd love it. Love love love. And the goldfish would grow. And eat. And grow. Then die. Then the water would be un-potable.

Anyone using a goldfish to keep small bodies of water clear of bugs is choosing the wrong fish. Mollies are okay (less waste, hardier fish), and mosquito fish are decent. Betta fish do well in small bodies of water.

I don;t know anything about the horse, but I know enough about fish to know that most people getting into goldfish haven't got a clue. This is why they all die within a few years when their life span is naturally considerably longer.

sheadakota
08-28-2011, 03:52 AM
what would happen if a horse are a goldfish? I know some people keep them in water troughs to get rid of algae and bugs.
I've had horses for over twenty years and have never heard of this- as far as what would happen to a horse that ate one- probably nothing- goldfish are little-

Polenth
08-28-2011, 04:09 AM
The idea is very unlikely to happen. If you want fresh water for your horse, you make sure to put fresh water in the trough on a regular basis. Fish will pollute the water, require feeding and generally aren't that great at algae cleaning anyway (as any fish owner will tell you, fish tanks need cleaning... the same is true for small ponds/troughs, as they're too small to maintain any number of fish without help).

Even if the horse decided to drink from water with fish in it, the fish will stay out of the horse's way. Most horses will avoid biting the fish. If they do bite one, they'll spit it out.

But let's say you happened to have a fish pond and a horse with a taste for eating raw goldfish. It'll be fine. Horses aren't designed to eat meat, but a few mouthfuls of meat is unlikely to cause a major issue. I can imagine the owner would try to keep fisher-horse away from fish ponds in the future though. (I've never heard of a horse that likes to fish, but they are individuals, so it's always possible).

(And the fish would learn to cower in fear at the bottom anytime they saw a horse... fish aren't smart, but they're not that stupid either).

amyashley
08-28-2011, 04:15 AM
As a side note, snails are much better at keeping a small body of water algae-free.

Lehcarjt
08-28-2011, 05:20 AM
People in my area do put fish into horse water troughs, but I don't think they are goldfish. On a recent visit to an organic farm, the farmer showed me some fish in a pond and told my kids (all horsey kids) that those were the type used with horses. They were tiny and silver, but that's all I know.

I've never heard of a horse drinking one, but then again they are so small that I'm not sure a human would have any way of knowing it had happened, short of keeping a count of the number of fish in the trough. I'd think it more likely they'd drink a floater than a live one anyways.

WriteKnight
08-28-2011, 05:30 AM
If a horse ate a minnow - not much would happen. I had one that loved to take a bite of hot dogs. (I think he liked the catsup) Nothing happened.

Medievalist
08-28-2011, 05:49 AM
Horses are quite capable of spitting out what they don't want, with surprising accuracy.

MacAllister
08-28-2011, 05:50 AM
Heh. I knew a big Morgan that used to love tuna and/or egg-salad sandwiches. He'd mug the kids eating lunch by the arena for bites of theirs. He never seemed to suffer for it.

L.C. Blackwell
08-28-2011, 05:54 AM
Notes on the Bedouins and Wahábys, by John Lewis Burckhardt, was published in 1830; and pg. 255 (as showed by Google), describes the custom of feeding meat to horses to increase their stamina.

amyashley
08-28-2011, 06:03 AM
Tiny and silver are probably mosquito fish. Not sure what the correct term is for these, but they do wonderfully in small ponds and such to keep the biological balance correct.

I know little of horses, but have had fish and water gardens (with and without pumps) for 30 years.

Medi, that's funny that horses spit well! I know camels do, lamas, and some others. Never had a horse spit at me. It makes sense. The mouth and jaw is roughly similar in shape.

Mac, the idea of a big Morgan stealing tina sandwiches is so wondrous. That would make a delicious children's book.

R.S. Dean
08-28-2011, 06:05 AM
I've heard of people using fish to clean horse troughs, but it doesn't seem like a good idea to me. Fish waste can harbor all kinds of nasty diseases. I once knew a woman who got Hepatitis from a dirty fish tank. (She worked at a pet store.)

As for the horse eating a fish, not a lot would happen to it. Obviously, horses are meant to be herbivores. However, my gelding has stolen bites of barbecue chicken, ham sandwiches, and Slim Jims, and he's never suffered any ill effects. I'm sure if a horse ate a LOT of meat, it would probably colic. But a single goldfish? Nah.

jclarkdawe
08-28-2011, 06:21 AM
Dick Francis used a horse that could be identified by his liking for sardines in one of his books. I knew a pony that like chicken nuggets (I forget which sauce he preferred). I feed horseflies to my horses when I catch them, which they all seem to relish (and provides some form of divine justice). So I don't think a goldfish is going to do anything to a horse, providing it is a small one.

People who have stock tanks (anywhere in size from 100 gallons to a 1,000+ gallons) will sometimes keep fish in them to control the algae and mosquito larvae. Sometimes critters will move into the water on their own. Tadpoles can be quite common. People will try various fish and survival depends a lot upon the environment and water temperature. I've seen some nice sized catfish in larger water tanks out west.

I doubt that a horse will suck up a fish while drinking. As Medievalist said, horses are very selective eaters, quite capable of rejecting what they don't want. If you watch closely as a horse grazes, you'll see how they pick and choose, getting rid of what they don't want.

Further, although fish aren't the brightest bulbs on the planet, they aren't going to hang around the surface of the water waiting to be sucked up by a fish. I've stopped to let horses drink in streams with numerous minnows and all the minnows head away from the horse. Quickly.

Run a google search on "goldfish water trough" and you'll find lots of information on people who do this.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

rainsmom
08-28-2011, 06:34 AM
It depends on how fresh and clean (bacteria free) the meat is. Small amount of cooked meat would probably pass through okay, and would something like a "fresh" goldfish.

The issue is the length of the gut. True carnivores have very short digestive tract. They can scavenge dead meat because the food passes through quickly, before the bacteria gets set in their gut. However, because their digestive tract is so short, true carnivores can't digest plant matter. The only plant matter they eat that gets digested is the pre-digested food in the gut of their prey.

True herbivores are at the other end of the continuum. They are built to digest not just plant matter but heavily fibrous plant matter like bark. But meat has to be very, very clean, or it's just ASKING to cause bacterial problems.

Omnivores have guts of varying lengths, depending on species, which is why some do better with a more heavily plant-based diet and some do better with a more heavily meat-based diet.

kikazaru
08-28-2011, 07:16 AM
It's interesting that animals which were always thought to be strictly herbivores are actually opportunists who will eat meat/protein if the situation presents itself.

I recall reading about bird biologists who were netting songbirds for counting and were puzzled about the lack of birds that they caught. They set up a camera and were amazed to discover that the birds were being predated upon by white tailed deer who were apparently delighted to find a bird buffet just there for the munching.

It's not too big of a stretch to think that horses could also eat protein (ie a small fish) with no ill effects - and they may even like them.

amyashley
08-28-2011, 08:14 AM
Jim, when I googled it, the best info said 2 fish/60gal, which is fairly reasonable for small (feeder size) fish. Lots of them are going to do more damage than good. I did run across several chat sites of people discussing what they had done who obviously were killing off their fish at rapid rates because they had no clue.

Catfish are great. They eat very nasty stuff.

kikazaru, I heard that story about the deer. Thought it was acalcium deficiency? Maybe I am thinking of something else though.

Sorry to interfere on this thread. I know most people here are really only concerned about the horses. Nobody cares about fish rights anymore. It's that Darwin guy. He messed it all up. Only the ones who grew legs matter.

jamiehall
08-29-2011, 02:04 AM
It's interesting that animals which were always thought to be strictly herbivores are actually opportunists who will eat meat/protein if the situation presents itself.

I recall reading about bird biologists who were netting songbirds for counting and were puzzled about the lack of birds that they caught. They set up a camera and were amazed to discover that the birds were being predated upon by white tailed deer who were apparently delighted to find a bird buffet just there for the munching.

It's not too big of a stretch to think that horses could also eat protein (ie a small fish) with no ill effects - and they may even like them.

Interesting situation!

Yes, when I went looking for bird-eating deer I found lots of evidence just on the first page of results, with these links being the best.

From scientific studies:

http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/JFO/v049n02/p0184-p0184.pdf

http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/news/press/ontape.htm

Caught on video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQOQdBLHrLk

shaldna
08-31-2011, 02:01 PM
very little will happen to a horse that eats meat. in fact, some horses will actually seek out dead animals and / or bones to eat to fulfil their nutrient requirements.

Perks
08-31-2011, 04:24 PM
This thread makes me think of the Seinfeld episode where Kramer feeds the carriage horse a lot of beef-aroni.

Wicked
08-31-2011, 11:50 PM
I keep three comet goldfish in a 480 gallon horse tank for the purpose of eating mosquito larvae. They don't hang at the top when the horses stop to drink, they head for the bottom far side.

Even in the unlikely event a horse sipped up a little fish, I doubt it would cause much of a problem. We once had a miniature horse that, upon hearing the crinkle of a fast food wrapper, would knock you over for your cheeseburger.


Horses are quite capable of spitting out what they don't want, with surprising accuracy.

:roll: I've had more worming paste spit on me than I ever care to remember.

shaldna
09-01-2011, 01:15 PM
I've had more worming paste spit on me than I ever care to remember.

And the box lies when it tells you it tastes like caramel.