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Chantal.H
08-25-2011, 10:34 PM
Hi,
I was just wondering if there are any Welsh speakers in the ranks to help with a small translation?

I used one of those machine translators for a teeny bit of text I wanted to use, but when I tried to convert back into English what it had translated to Welsh (I'm just careful like that) it came out with a load of mumbo-jumbo.

Shouldn't be surprised really:Shrug:

Sane_Man
08-26-2011, 07:59 PM
I'm Welsh but only have a basic knowledge. I may be able to help though.

I hope I can. Depends just how basic the translation is haha.

Chantal.H
08-26-2011, 08:47 PM
Cool!!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

The translation is for; May the eternal light shine bright.

The problem I seem to have is that burn, shine and heartburn seem to have the same word in Welsh - but that could be completely wrong too, I'm relying on advice from the machine translators so far. If you could help that would be amazing!!!

Thank you!

Sane_Man
08-29-2011, 03:43 PM
Cool!!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

The translation is for; May the eternal light shine bright.

The problem I seem to have is that burn, shine and heartburn seem to have the same word in Welsh - but that could be completely wrong too, I'm relying on advice from the machine translators so far. If you could help that would be amazing!!!

Thank you!

Sorry I've taken so long in getting back to you. I've had a busy weekend revising a few short stories.

I'll be honest because I don't want to waste anymore of your time. I can't help you here. As I said my knowledge is very limited, I've had a think and dug out some old textbooks and have only a vague idea of how that translation would read.

It's a pretty difficult and strange language. I definitely think it would be best if someone more skilled helped you.

Good luck with the translation and your writing.

Sorry I couldn't help.

gianni pezzano
09-11-2011, 05:48 PM
You can always ask Torchwood...(!)

Chantal.H
09-11-2011, 06:00 PM
Sorry I've taken so long in getting back to you. I've had a busy weekend revising a few short stories.

I'll be honest because I don't want to waste anymore of your time. I can't help you here. As I said my knowledge is very limited, I've had a think and dug out some old textbooks and have only a vague idea of how that translation would read.

It's a pretty difficult and strange language. I definitely think it would be best if someone more skilled helped you.

Good luck with the translation and your writing.

Sorry I couldn't help.

Thanks for trying anyway :)

Carmy
09-19-2011, 11:28 PM
I'm Welsh but I now live in Canada so my Welsh is a bit rusty.

To be honest, your phrase is a difficult one to translate. What do you have so far?

Certain words may look the same in Welsh but the connotations may well be very different. Show me that you have and I'll do my best.

I don't come in every day so please be prepared to wait for an answer.

Sorry (Carmy from Carmarthenshire)

Hwyl!

Deb Kinnard
09-20-2011, 02:46 AM
Can I throw out an easy one? I write medievals, so I'm after the Welsh versions of "lord" and "lady." The helper I had gave me "argllwyd" for "lord," and I'm thinking an American audience would definitely not get this one.

Any other options? Advice would be most appreciated.

Medievalist
09-20-2011, 03:12 AM
Can I throw out an easy one? I write medievals, so I'm after the Welsh versions of "lord" and "lady." The helper I had gave me "argllwyd" for "lord," and I'm thinking an American audience would definitely not get this one.

That's correct, even for medieval Welsh. The feminine would be Argllwyddes.


Any other options? Advice would be most appreciated.

There's unben; it's a rather generic equivalent of "lord."

There's an instance in the Mabinogi of a Norse title/English title being borrowed, (Earl, spelled Iarl, I believe) but I'm not sure that would be any more recognizable.

I'd go with argllwyd, personally, but I suggest you might ask Dr. Heather Rose Jones. She's a Ph.D. in Celtic Linguistics and a major mover and shaker in the SCA. Her Web site is here:

http://heatherrosejones.com/medwalesmenu.html

jennontheisland
09-20-2011, 03:28 AM
I suggest you might ask Dr. Heather Rose Jones. She's a Ph.D. in Celtic Linguistics and a major mover and shaker in the SCA. Her Web site is here:

http://heatherrosejones.com/medwalesmenu.html
I've emailed her before (likely at Medi's suggestion... ?) and she was wonderfully friendly and helpful. :)

Medievalist
09-20-2011, 03:32 AM
I've emailed her before (likely at Medi's suggestion... ?) and she was wonderfully friendly and helpful. :)

She is one of my very favorite Celticists, a lovely person, a good writer, a artist and a very fine cook and top notch scholar.

I can't say enough good things about her.

Plus, when I was a junior scholar and terrified, she was unfailingly kind to me.

Carmy
09-23-2011, 06:02 AM
Pardon me, but it's Arglwydd - one L two Ds. The DD sounds like English TH in THE.

Arglwydd is often used for God.

English Earl is Iarll in Welsh (double ll at the end).

Thanks for the link. I feel I'll be needing it soon, as my Welsh is really rusty these days.

This might also help someone: http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/welsh.php

Medievalist
09-23-2011, 06:56 AM
Pardon me, but it's Arglwydd - one L two Ds. The DD sounds like English TH in THE.

I don't know how "authentic" Deb wants to be, but she is quite correct that in Medieval Welsh, it is in fact Arglwyd for the masculine; see Llyfr Coch o Hergest/The Red Book of Hergest/, in the mabinogi Pwyll, when Arawn confronts Pwyll:

“Brenhin corunawc wyf i yn y wlat yd hanwyt titheu oheni?”
“O Annwuyn,” heb ynteu, “Arawn urenhin Annwuyn wyf i.”
“Arglwyd,” heb ynteu, “pa furyf y caf i dy gerennyd di?”

l. 45ff. in Thomson, R. L. Ed. Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1986.

Iarl /Iarll/Jarll are all used for the borrowed Earl in Medieval Welsh. Hergest uses both Iarl and Iarll in Pwyll, but Jarll in the romances.

waylander
09-23-2011, 02:46 PM
Can anyone suggest a suitable word for magic/power from archaic Welsh?
The context is that my Welsh speaker, a magic user, is saying to his adult son that he is meeting for the first time "Yes, you are my son. The ****** is strong in you".

Medievalist
09-23-2011, 07:36 PM
Can anyone suggest a suitable word for magic/power from archaic Welsh?
The context is that my Welsh speaker, a magic user, is saying to his adult son that he is meeting for the first time "Yes, you are my son. The ****** is strong in you".

I've been thinking about this for months and haven't really come up with one.

You might try Heather, who I mention upthread.

There's an entire class of words to do with shining or glittering, but that's a little too Stephen King?

Carmy
09-24-2011, 01:18 AM
I'll accept that it was 'arglwyd' in Medieval Welsh. A bit before my time. I grew up in a Welsh-speaking part of Wales and in the 1900s we said 'Arglwydd'.

Odd that they used Jarll because there is no J in the current Welsh alphabet.

I'm staying away from the archaic Welsh question.