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View Full Version : Ebooks with soundtracks -- would it drive you nuts?



Alessandra Kelley
08-24-2011, 09:33 PM
I saw this in the New York Times, but I can't find their article online, so here's a different link:

Booktrack adds soundtrack to your eBooks, by George Wong (http://www.ubergizmo.com/2011/08/booktrack-soundtrack-ebooks/#0_undefined,0_)

My question is, would this drive you crazy? I hate to have music playing while I'm reading -- either it distracts me from the book, or I get so immersed in the book I don't even notice the music. Either way, it's unfair to both the art of music and of literature.

And that's music, not (shudder) sound effects.

This appeals to me about as much as a root canal done in the throes of motion sickness. But maybe I'm the exception.

So what are people's opinions?

Bubastes
08-24-2011, 09:39 PM
I'd hate it for the reasons you mentioned.

Shadow_Ferret
08-24-2011, 10:04 PM
Do eReaders even have sound? And I like to listen to my own music, something I'm familiar with that will nor be distracting. I can't read if there is something I'm not familiar withplaying. And sound effects? How do the coordinate that with what you are reading?

Chicago Expat
08-24-2011, 10:12 PM
That's an awful idea. I'll choose my own music, thank you very much. I sure as heck don't trust the publisher's (or author's) taste in music, not to read to, not even just to listen to.

If they start adding sound effects, you'll know just how devalued imagination has become in our society.

Cassiopeia
08-24-2011, 10:13 PM
Oh heck yeah, I'd hate it. It'd drive me nuts. I can't stand when I go to websites and people are STILL insisting on sound. That's sooooo 90's.

If I want to listen to music, I have it handy on my ipad2 that I use for reading books now.

veinglory
08-24-2011, 10:16 PM
Yes, it would drive me crazy.

Medievalist
08-24-2011, 10:18 PM
An odd piece of anecdotal data.

In 1992 The Voyager company released an ebook of Crichton's Jurassic Park; at Crichton's request the ebook included black and white illustrations (line drawings) of dinosaurs, and "dinosaur sounds."

I thought the sounds idea was, well, idiotic at best.

Readers loved them.

Chicago Expat
08-24-2011, 10:20 PM
Well, to be fair, anything that dinosaurs do is pretty cool.

Alessandra Kelley
08-24-2011, 10:26 PM
:Wha: What sort of ebooks did they have in 1992? I'm imagining something like one of those kids' books: ...and on this page press this button and hear a dinosaur roar...

which of course is the sort of novelty item people seem to enjoy.

This infarnation (that was a mistype, but I think I'll keep it :)) promises music and sound effects, and goodness knows how they'll coordinate them.

Chicago Expat
08-24-2011, 10:34 PM
I'm looking forward to the product placement commercials. Character drinks a Coke? Guess what jingle you'll hear next.

Medievalist
08-24-2011, 10:50 PM
:Wha: What sort of ebooks did they have in 1992? I'm imagining something like one of those kids' books: ...and on this page press this button and hear a dinosaur roar...

Actually, Voyager's ebooks were pretty damn sophisticated.

A book about Beethoven's Ninth which included the entire score, linked to CD audio; click on a measure and the music picked up there.

The ability to play isolated parts, say the first violin.

Essays, maps, a guided text-caption tour of the symphony. A trivia game. A glossary.

An edition of Macbeth, with the complete performance in video and audio; click on a line of the play, and the performance picked up there. Essays, maps, annotations, scholarly notes, a concordance, a game where you played one of the parts of the play, images, clips of other performances, etc.

Adobedragon
08-24-2011, 10:53 PM
I listen to music almost constantly. My iPod and I are practically inseparable. But I'm listening to my music, songs I selected. I don't want to listen to someone else's soundtrack.

I don't even see how you could coordinate this with the reading experience. If the person reads slowly, will they have to listen to the same bloody song, the same sound effects, over and over and over? Sounds absolutely dreadful.

scarletpeaches
08-24-2011, 10:55 PM
This would get on my tits just as much as those bloody blogs that play music as soon as you open the page.

Alessandra Kelley
08-24-2011, 11:16 PM
Actually, Voyager's ebooks were pretty damn sophisticated.

A book about Beethoven's Ninth which included the entire score, linked to CD audio; click on a measure and the music picked up there.

The ability to play isolated parts, say the first violin.

Essays, maps, a guided text-caption tour of the symphony. A trivia game. A glossary.

An edition of Macbeth, with the complete performance in video and audio; click on a line of the play, and the performance picked up there. Essays, maps, annotations, scholarly notes, a concordance, a game where you played one of the parts of the play, images, clips of other performances, etc.

Ooooh, that actually sounds pretty neat!

jimbro
08-24-2011, 11:28 PM
My question is, would this drive you crazy?
...
So what are people's opinions?

I think it very unlikely that I would like this at all. I think it would be very inappropriate for fiction. It is a threat to the reader's imagination.

But, I'd like to see it done so I can experience it once. Maybe, if we're lucky, it would be like the background music in some movies: just enough to enhance the mood, but subtle enough not to be intrusive. I think that before anyone gets this right, a lot of people will be getting it very wrong - sort of like 3-D at the movies.

For non-fiction, though, this could be a true enhancement if done properly.

Soccer Mom
08-25-2011, 03:44 AM
Hmmm, could actually be pretty cool for the right book. I think ebooks will become more and more interactive, especially for children. I love the idea of maps that could show you exactly where the characters are at the point in the story.

Hiroko
08-25-2011, 04:40 AM
I guess adding music might enhance one's images of the book - like background music enhance scenes in a movie - but if the music is not something I can enjoy (or at least tolerate), then I'll read with the volume off.
Consider an author putting together a rock soundtrack for a book. Not everyone likes rock, so not everyone will enjoy a book's soundtrack.

thothguard51
08-25-2011, 04:49 AM
For a general fictional novel, I could do without the music. It could be too distracting as I start tapping my feet or signing along at a very inopportune time.

BenPanced
08-25-2011, 04:50 AM
Do eReaders even have sound? And I like to listen to my own music, something I'm familiar with that will nor be distracting. I can't read if there is something I'm not familiar withplaying. And sound effects? How do the coordinate that with what you are reading?

My nook can play mp3 files and even has a headphone jack.

But that's what I have an iPod for.

Mr Flibble
08-25-2011, 05:00 AM
It would drive me crazy


I am not averse to having music in the background while I read. But it ha to be music I like.

If I didn't like the music, I wouldn't read the book. I am kind of shuddering at the thought of listening to the Smurf song while reading the comics...the film was bad enough...la la la-la-la-la...........ARGH!!!!!!

DancingMaenid
08-25-2011, 06:12 AM
Do eReaders even have sound? And I like to listen to my own music, something I'm familiar with that will nor be distracting. I can't read if there is something I'm not familiar withplaying. And sound effects? How do the coordinate that with what you are reading?

Some can. I think my Kindle is theoretically capable of it -- there's a speaker and an earphone jack -- but I've never tried to utilize it.

As for the topic at hand, I think making a soundtrack to go with the story and making it available could be really neat. It'd be a cool multimedia thing.

But what they're describing? Not so much. I want to decide what music I listen to while I'm reading, or if I listen to it at all. Maybe this thing could work well for a very short story, as a special thing, but I can't imagine sticking with it for a whole book, or wanting it very often.

Also, am I the only one wondering about the quality of the soundtrack? I'd be surprised if they used licensed music, so would it all have to be specially composed? Again, that could be really cool if it were a genuine multimedia project where the music was given a lot of emphasis, but with this, I can't help but imagine really crappy, slapped-together music.

Medievalist
08-25-2011, 08:01 AM
Also, am I the only one wondering about the quality of the soundtrack? I'd be surprised if they used licensed music, so would it all have to be specially composed?

With downloadable ebooks, the soundtracks are typically midi based or licensed looptracks.

There are not only licensing issues, there are file size issues.

JinxVelox
08-25-2011, 11:36 AM
It would definitely annoy me. It's a book, not a video game. I create playlists for my writing, but I certainly don't want any music while I'm reading, unless I select it myself!

Max Vaehling
08-25-2011, 02:20 PM
They tried this with web comics years ago. Annoyed the heck out of a lot of people. I've got music playing right now, I don't want other sounds to interfere while I'm reading.

That said, enhancing ebooks with audiovisual treats that you can choose to click on for further exploration - that may actually be awesome for a lot of books, and not just non-fiction.

Years ago, I released a (printed) comic book with an audio commentary - a CD of me talking about the book. Proved to be more popular than I'd bargained for. Oh, and one webcomic story I presented came with an embedded soundtrack on the final page (http://www.dreadfulgate.de/wordpress/eng/the-haunting-finale) - but it didn't just blast off, it was jst an offer to the readers to add it to the experience.

Brandon Seifert did something like that with the first version of Witch Doctor (http://www.witchdoctorcomic.com/) - you could launch a player to set the music while you were reading. Trouble was, it was embedded in the page, and when you clicked on the next page, it stopped playing.

Anyway, the bottom line is: if it's an extra you can choose to ignore, there's nothing wrong with it.

seun
08-25-2011, 02:48 PM
Not for me. Sounds like a great way of losing focus of the most important issues when it comes to a book - the writing and the story.

KTC
08-25-2011, 03:13 PM
I would rather chisel the bullet out of my skull that I plugged myself with when I considered the idea of having ads on an ereader than listen to music on it.


ETA: It's up there with being treated to music upon arrival to a website. CLICK OFF.

Shara
08-25-2011, 04:03 PM
I always thought the next generation of e-books would feature some kind of multimedia system. I was imaging children's books with moving cartoons, or characters that speak to you, or something (sort of like an upgrade from the pop-up book).

I have heard of the concept of e-books with music, but not sure I like the idea. But I generally don't like multi-tasking when it comes to reading, or writing. I prefer to read in silence, and I prefer to write in silence.

Shara

A.R. Starr
08-25-2011, 04:38 PM
Sounds like an awful idea. If I want music while I read, I have my mp3 player.

skylark
08-25-2011, 08:08 PM
No, it wouldn't annoy me, because the sound on my computer is permanently turned off. I wouldn't even notice it had a soundtrack.

But if the book relied on the music being there (for instance, if there was very little mood-setting done in the writing, it was all done with sound) then I'd probably be very unimpressed with it without ever realising what I was missing.

scarletpeaches
08-25-2011, 08:40 PM
I would rather chisel the bullet out of my skull that I plugged myself with when I considered the idea of having ads on an ereader than listen to music on it.


ETA: It's up there with being treated to music upon arrival to a website. CLICK OFF.AND KEVIN WINS THE INTRATUBES.

Sheryl Nantus
08-25-2011, 09:11 PM
yeah... no.

I can pick out my own soundtracks, thank you very much.

the last thing I need is someone deciding I need to listen to heavy metal during a particular love scene 'cause, like, it's the MOOD, you know.

barf.

Jess Haines
08-25-2011, 11:41 PM
Ugh. No. NO.

A thousand times, no.

I've gotten pretty good at tuning out background sounds while I'm reading--the last thing I want to do is add to the noise.

Ari Meermans
08-25-2011, 11:53 PM
I would rather chisel the bullet out of my skull that I plugged myself with when I considered the idea of having ads on an ereader than listen to music on it.


ETA: It's up there with being treated to music upon arrival to a website. CLICK OFF.

yessss

Devil Ledbetter
08-26-2011, 12:20 AM
Do eReaders even have sound? Mine will read aloud. It was a helpful feature when editing my WIP (I leak articles like a sieve) but other than that, I want to read, not be read to.


This would get on my tits just as much as those bloody blogs that play music as soon as you open the page.I know. Will someone please think of our poor, beleaguered tits for once?

I recently read an excellent book. Shortly after I was at the author's blog and she had suggested a soundtrack for it. It was a nice soundtrack, but really, the book stood on its own just fine without audio enhancements. The songs I would have chosen for it were different. As the reader, I think the soundtrack is up to me. I guess I'm narcissistic like that.

Michael E. Walston
08-31-2011, 12:25 AM
As a musician myself, I'm intrigued by the possibility of scoring a book after writing it. Not quite the same thing as having actual songs that would distract the reader, is what I'm thinking...

Carrie in PA
08-31-2011, 02:00 AM
A book about Beethoven's Ninth which included the entire score, linked to CD audio; click on a measure and the music picked up there.

That, I would like. It makes sense.

Fiction? Absolutely not. How would it know how fast I'm reading? I read really fast, so what if I reach the end of the page before that page's score is up? I'd hate to have the dramatic thunderstorm score show up three pages after I've read the dun-dun-dun moment. Or gentle tinkling bells as the main character is dashing into the darkened forest.

Bleh. No thanks.

eward
08-31-2011, 03:59 AM
Fiction? Absolutely not. How would it know how fast I'm reading? I read really fast, so what if I reach the end of the page before that page's score is up? I'd hate to have the dramatic thunderstorm score show up three pages after I've read the dun-dun-dun moment. Or gentle tinkling bells as the main character is dashing into the darkened forest.

That's exactly what I was thinking! Everyone reads at a different pace, so everyone's audio experience would be different.

I would like to try it, just to see what the publisher chose. I probably wouldn't want to read 90% of ebooks that way, but I'd be curious to see what songs they'd chosen.

It's interesting reading the reviews on the itunes store. . .people seem to really like it! Then again, you probably won't spend that money if you don't suspect you will.

Mark W.
08-31-2011, 09:01 AM
I would hate that terribly. The music could turn a good story into one I hate because of poorly matched music.

However, I could see maybe adding it as an toggle option for those who enjoy that sort of thing.

Invincibility
08-31-2011, 02:53 PM
Well... it depends. For ordinary novels, I'd say no. But there are probably new, as-yet-undeveloped forms of literature that could be made possible with this technology. If done well, I'd love to read such a book.

Filigree
08-31-2011, 08:24 PM
Hell, no. My reading speed varies, depending on my mood and needs. I'm also a music snob, and very picky. If I want music, I want my choice of music on my great headphones, or in my audio room with the fabulous quad sound. Not bleating out of some tinny e-reader. Many song lyrics can inspire a story, but songs with lyrics distract me too much from the words I'm reading. I can score my own books, sure, but that's a private soundtrack that I don't want to share with anyone else.

Another vote against sites with music. I leave them within the first three notes, and don't come back unless I can disable the sound.

jeffo20
09-01-2011, 05:49 AM
I'm looking forward to the product placement commercials. Character drinks a Coke? Guess what jingle you'll hear next.And if Ewan Morrison turns out to be right (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/aug/22/are-books-dead-ewan-morrison), this may be the only way writers get paid in the future.

juniper
09-01-2011, 08:13 AM
I wouldn't want a soundtrack playing along. I'd turn off the sound. I don't want someone else picking out music ...

And I saw this at the library last week - Jodi Picoult's newest hardcover has a CD with it, lyrics by Jodi P, sung by someone else. The title is "Sing You Home" so I guess it's connected, but I've never seen a novel with CD before.

http://www.amazon.com/Sing-You-Home-Jodi-Picoult/dp/1439102724/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314850066&sr=1-1

R.S. Dean
09-01-2011, 08:49 AM
Putting music with an novel seems amateurish to me. It's something you see a lot in fanfiction. If I saw an ebook advertise that it comes with a soundtrack, I probably wouldn't buy it.

GFanthome
09-01-2011, 06:29 PM
Oh geez. Another distraction to keep me from enjoying my reading?

No thanks.

EnitaMeadows
09-04-2011, 10:40 AM
Drive me crazy? I'd be put in a straightjacket. I just would NOT be able to stand it.

heyjude
09-05-2011, 12:36 AM
No, I'd hate it. And I click off websites that do music or auto-play videos, too.

blacbird
09-05-2011, 01:14 AM
Yes. Not in a million years would I read such a thing.

caw

flarue
09-07-2011, 12:53 AM
I guess it would depend if the music really fit the mood of the story, and if I liked the song(s). I would definitely want the option of turning off the soundtrack if I got annoyed with it. Sometimes music is great to have in the background, but other times it's pretty distracting.





Woot! I finally made it to 100 posts. :)

Max Vaehling
09-08-2011, 02:11 PM
I think the notion of "this music should go with this part of the book" is flawed to begin with. The sensation of music is strongly subjective and also rooted in everybody's always-different experiences. What's a representation of, say, intimacy and coziness to one may be a nightmare to another. If it's a specific song, it may trigger very different memories in different people. One may love it because it's the song he first made out to, another may just have heard it at a loved one's funeral.

NeuroFizz
09-08-2011, 04:40 PM
When I read a story, I want to have some level of personal ownership of that story, particularly with respect to MY emotional responses to that story. Having the author's idea of a good soundtrack to accompany his/her story would be a huge invasion of my emotional ownership of that story. Don't do anything to straightjacket my mind while I'm reading your damn-good story, please.

JJLindsell
05-17-2012, 06:17 AM
Well I know I'm a n00b here, but I've been thinking about this a lot I've got to say I'm surprised by the unanimous hostility. I completely understand everyone's noted 'cons', and I think most of them are valid - the 'reader speed one' might not be, since they seem to have developed pretty comprehensive learning technology to work at the right pace.

I certainly don't like the 'sound effects' part, which I agree would be intrusive in 'dictating' our imagination. I'm perfectly capable of imagining the sound of hoofbeats, waves etc all on my lonesome.

However, from a vaguely postmodernist point of view, I have no problem with an ambient/music track playing to 'set the mood', much as virtually all film and TV do. Sure, some of it can be heavyhanded or feel 'wrong', but for the most part, they enhance the mood excellently without jarring with the audience. BookTrack seem to be attempting a very professional approach, using people with appropriate expertise from related industries.

Moreover, I don't see why we need to interpret an author suggesting a soundtrack as a failing, or as their inability to adequately convey the mood in writing alone. Why not use sound, if some (and from amazon and anecdotes, some do) want to use it? It's no different from a picture (even a cover picture) - in fact, it's somewhat less intrusive since any illustration necessarily either clashes with or confirms our own 'mental picture', whereas sound is more likely to simply nuance it.

I may be entirely alone in this, but as a music lover I've experienced some indescribable emotions from sound that I've never found in reading. That isn't to say that reading can't play with my emotions, but that the two media both do so differently. So I'm really excited if one is being used to augment the other - say, like an artist, who has always been sketching with HB pencils, discovering multichrome paint.



I think the notion of "this music should go with this part of the book" is flawed to begin with. The sensation of music is strongly subjective and also rooted in everybody's always-different experiences. What's a representation of, say, intimacy and coziness to one may be a nightmare to another. If it's a specific song, it may trigger very different memories in different people. One may love it because it's the song he first made out to, another may just have heard it at a loved one's funeral.

Deconstructionalists would point out that it isn't just music that is flawed in this subjective manner - language is too. To each reader, different words, phrases and inflections have wildly different meanings, emotions and memories attached to them. Don't you ever read a line and temporarily pause your reading as you muse about this-or-that idea you just had?
I'd say this subjectivity is no more reason to limit using sound, as to limit using language itself.

Obviously, I can see individuals making a hash of it, and I would certainly want the ability to mute or pause whatever was going on. Very much a 'take it or leave it'. But I, at least as an experiment, would be taking it.

KalenO
05-17-2012, 06:37 AM
I think all it really needs is the option of the reader being able to choose whether or not to have it in order to make it more palatable. For instance, lots of authors post on their sites or blogs their 'playlists' of music that they think fits their book well, or inspired them, or they listened to while writing. But rather than trying to have an actual soundtrack, just include those files at the front or end of the book for people to listen to at their own choosing. That, I could see as a fun little extra. Even if it was just samples of the songs at the back, to save on licensing costs, with links to where they could be purchased.

But yeah, I don't see forcing them on readers or trying to match them to variable reading speeds as ever ending well.

JJLindsell
05-17-2012, 06:54 AM
The issue with simply having track listings at the back of a paper copy (versus this ipad/kindle model) is pragmatism. To wildly invent a statistic, I'd imagine less than 5% of people, however much they are enjoying a book, will make the considerable effort of either buying several CDs, downloading multiple tracks (legally or not...), or subscribing to a Spotify playlist (which forces readers to lurk by their laptops - hard whilst travelling, or on holiday etc)

KalenO
05-17-2012, 06:58 AM
The issue with simply having track listings at the back of a paper copy (versus this ipad/kindle model) is pragmatism. To wildly invent a statistic, I'd imagine less than 5% of people, however much they are enjoying a book, will make the considerable effort of either buying several CDs, downloading multiple tracks (legally or not...), or subscribing to a Spotify playlist (which forces readers to lurk by their laptops - hard whilst travelling, or on holiday etc)

Well of course not. But modern technology affords considerably more options than that. It'd simply be a matter of embedding samples of each song in a list at the back, with each sample hyperlinked to somewhere like the Itunes store, where purchasing/downloading each song is pretty much a one click step.

Rubay H.
05-17-2012, 07:41 AM
I say no to authors giving soundtracks to their novels. It's a little too cheesy for me personally, but giving me the option to turn it on or off would solve that problem.
I wouldn't mind if an author put links in e-book version of the story that lead to back-stories of certain characters or the history of certain locales in Fantasy novel. Much like a footnote or a glossary.
The opportunities the technology presents is exciting, unfortunately the most obvious of uses seems to be the most obnoxious at this point.

EngineerTiger
05-17-2012, 03:33 PM
In the audio book world, musical scores and sound effects are discouraged. Intro music and exit music are tolerated but, as one audiobook fanatic told me recently while I was researching the matter, "It's a book, Sweetie, not an old radio show. Even though we audio book users listen to the narrative instead of read it, we still like to use our own imaginations to conjur the author's settings and themes."

fireluxlou
05-17-2012, 03:34 PM
Lol that would annoy me.

One thing I disliked about the Hunger Games audio book was the sound effects.

bearilou
05-17-2012, 04:30 PM
It would drive me crazy

I am not averse to having music in the background while I read. But it ha to be music I like.

This to the nth.

I think it's a neat concept but I have my own playlists, thanks. I'd prefer not to have someone impose their tastes in music thrust on me. If there is an option to turn it off, I will.

CrastersBabies
05-17-2012, 10:03 PM
An interesting sentiment, but probably not for me. Obviously you have the option to turn the music down, but if it costs more than one w/o music, I'd take the cheaper version.

Once!
05-17-2012, 10:46 PM
Hmmm ... this one is not easy.

When I first heard this, my instant reaction was "hell, no, that would drive me nuts". But then pause, think, breathe ... am I so sure?

I'm thinking that I wouldn't like it because I haven't tried it. I am used to reading a book in the way that I've always read a book. Quietly.

But then, if we rewind the clock to the days of Homer, I imagine his audience would have been absolutely adamant that the only way to appreciate a story was to have a bard sing it to you, possibly with a harp twiddling away in the background and a slave feeding you grapes. Try telling someone from that age that in the future they would enjoy a story from written words on a page. Quite possibly they would have said "hell, no, that would drive me nuts".

So maybe it is something that we have to try before we dismiss it as silly. It never ceases to amaze me how the generation after me seems incapable of making a train journey without a styrofoam cup of coffee in one hand, a smart phone in the other and white bootlaces coming out of their ears.

I don't feel the need for those things, but they do. So who am I to say that ebooks with music will never catch on?

robiiehood
05-20-2012, 10:50 AM
I've listened to audiobooks with music clips on them and most of the time I'd rather not hear it. The music isn't horrible, it just mostly sounds cheap. I think that if I was trying to read an ebook the music would probably slow me down.

Xelebes
05-23-2012, 02:26 AM
A little Merzbow never hurt anyone trying to read Emily Bronte.

James D. Macdonald
05-23-2012, 09:37 PM
Web pages that play music are on just-about everyone's Top Ten list of Things They Hate.

Seriously (http://www.tegeorge.com/Fiction/?p=1077)

Marceline
05-23-2012, 10:23 PM
I've played sound novels on my computer for years, and I think the music and sound effects really add to the experience. Most of the ones I play are horror stories, and certain sound effects really startle me or give me the chills.

I wouldn't want a book with a soundtrack on my e-reader, though. Sound novels are set up to be more like a game, and I think that's why the sound aspect works so well in them.

I would like it if I could click to hear a piece of music when it's mentioned in the book, or something like that. As long as it was optional and I could turn it right back off, it would be great.

Pinguicha
05-23-2012, 10:43 PM
Web pages that play music are on just-about everyone's Top Ten list of Things They Hate.

Seriously (http://www.tegeorge.com/Fiction/?p=1077)

It's actually a rule of design: DO NOT PUT MUSIC IN YOUR WEB PAGE.

Music in ebooks... No. I'd hate to be reading something I love and then be bombarded with music I might hate because the author thought it'd be a good fit.

iron9567
05-23-2012, 11:07 PM
In my opinion it all comes down to the book or story you are reading. If its an educational piece of work and the sound corolate with what is being discussed for example the stories or atricule with musicians or speaches have excerts about the topic on that page being read. If that is the case then I would not have an issue with it. The biggest issue is over who decides the clips being put in the book. If there is going to be clips in it then let the author pick them because they know better than anyone the type of tone they are going for when they wrote the book. If you have another person doing it then you have to have faith that they picked up on the tone of the book. It cook work out or ruin a book if you were to give this idea a thought. Some would say that if you hate this idea then just mute it when you go to read the book. To them I would say if you have to mute a set of clips to read a book then you're less likely to want to read it when you have to take longer to get to reading becauser of having to mute it every time. I say I would pass on this idea because it'll either be a matter of times before ads get put in. If it isn't that I would most likeley be cheesey elevator music or that cheap sounding instramental music you heard on sites in the early 90's. So no thank you I'll pass.
thanks
the iron man