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SaraP
08-13-2011, 08:28 PM
I was talking to hubby today about things we read when we were kids, and it dawned on me that many folks here wouldn't know these authors.

Which got me to wondering, how did the country you grew up in influence the kind of books that were available to you?

For me, growing up in Portugal meant reading a few portuguese authors, like Alice Vieira (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Vieira) (who remains my favorite to this day), Ilse Losa and the duo Ana Maria Magalhães & Isabel Alçada. But I also read all of Countess of Ségur's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie,_Countess_of_S%C3%A9gur) work (Sofie's Misfortunes, anyone?) and of course all of Enid Blyton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enid_Blyton) I could get my hands on.

There were also a few scattered works, like Edmondo de Amicis' Heart (:rolleyes:) and a few of the classics like Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days.

So, you international folks out there, what did you read when you were a kid?

Xelebes
08-13-2011, 09:59 PM
The books of Robert Munsch (There's a Subway in My Apartment), Dennis Lee (Alligator Pie) and Beatrix Potter. There was also Dr. Seuss and the Bernstein Bears.

Switch-Phase
08-13-2011, 10:13 PM
Elsie Dinsmore, Anne of Green Gables, Trixie Belden, Everything by Stephen King, Harry Potter, the bible.. lol I had to sneak my non christian books at the time

waylander
08-14-2011, 12:16 AM
'The Little Grey Men' and 'Down the Bright Stream'
Wonderful books for an imaginative child.

lastlittlebird
08-14-2011, 01:03 AM
New Zealand had a wonderful bunch of fantasy authors for kids/young adults while I was growing up... so I read Maurice Gee, Sherryl Jordan, Gaelyn Gordon... along with Margaret Mahy and Lynley Dodd and others.
Oh and some Australian authors as well. Like John Marsden and Paul Jennings.

I just read whatever was on hand though, so a lot of US and UK authors as well, including Enid Blyton for a while.

Mann Crux
08-14-2011, 01:19 AM
Secret Seven, Famous Five, the Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, etc. Probably goes a long way to explaining why I've always loved detective stories.

Cliff Face
08-14-2011, 11:26 AM
One of the first things I can remember reading was The Ancestral Trail. I forget who it was by, but it was kind of like a picture book series. There was usually quite a bit of text per page, but amazing pictures.

There were 52 issues over 2 years. The first year was Fantasy. The second year was Sci-Fi. It really explains my interest in those genres now.

And I also remember reading the Goosebumps series. Again, not sure who the author was. But that got me somewhat interested in Horror (which has passed me by by now).

And a few other random books. One that I remember had a Hippo in a river race with other hippoes. Of course, the MC gets the win in the end, but it was quite an enjoyable read. And then there was the one where a monkey went into space. Not much really happened, but I loved that book.

I don't think I really read anything by any famous authors, except for the Goosebumps series.

Then I read The Hobbit by Tolkien when I was 14 or 15, and I've been an avid reader since. :)

VeryVerity
08-14-2011, 11:46 AM
Enid Blyton, Nancy Drew, Roald Dahl. I read Edgar Rice Burroughs' Mars series when I was about 12 and loved it. What else? Oh, Willard Price's Adventure books, they were great, as I recall.

I started reading when I was 2 or 3 and didn't stop. In my teens I would devour about 2 Nancy Drew books a day.

University killed it for me. I had to read some novels I really hated.

Cai
08-14-2011, 01:24 PM
I read a lot of books from Otfried Preußler like The Little Witch, The Little Water Sprite, The Little Ghost or Krabat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krabat) which is really, really great. I still pick it up occasionally and would recommend it to anyone who's looking for great German fantasy or wants to read a German folk tale.

A lot of Astrid Lindgren's books (translated) because these were (and still are) really popular around here.

When I was 11 or 12, our teacher made us read The Hobbit for school. I loved Tolkien after that and immediately jumped to LOTR. I've read both as translations back then and read the original texts a few years later, too.

Cliff Face
08-14-2011, 01:55 PM
Yeah, I jumped straight to Lord Of The Rings as soon as I finished The Hobbit too. Instant fan. :)

Y'know, now that I think about it, I don't think I ever read anything as a child that wasn't SF/F/H in some way...

I wonder if that was because of what I found interesting, or because maybe my parents just gave me SF/F when I was really young for some reason known only to them?

Interesting.

Puma
08-14-2011, 03:57 PM
I'm in the states but I suspect I had more international books available when I was little than most people. Three I recall well were Hary Janos, The Little Prince, and The Wind in the Willows. Puma

firedrake
08-14-2011, 04:04 PM
I was horse-crazy when I was young so I read books by Margarite Henry, Jane MacIlvane Clary, K.M.Peyton and Mary Elwyn Patchett. Then I read 'Lord of the Rings' when I was 12 and everything changed.

that redhead
08-14-2011, 07:27 PM
Unfortunately, I grew up in a house that didn't really value books. Some were around, but the importance and fun of reading was never impressed upon me. With one notable exception. Mom loved the "Little House" series, and got me hooked on it. I still love reading them to this day. On my own, I did manage to get into Beverly Cleary, Judy Blume and Rosamond du Jardin's series about Toby and Midge Heydon.

My love of reading came a little later on. I've always stuttered, so it was embarrassing and difficult to express myself verbally. I turned to writing as a way of expression, and that turned into a love of reading. :)

bmadsen
08-14-2011, 11:08 PM
I grew up in a house that has over three thousand books, so I was pretty much a book worm from the start. I read many a different thing but at about twelve, I fell for Forsyth, Ludlum, and many latinamerican writers. Now, I'm more into non fiction, though.

rhetoric by rosalie
08-15-2011, 10:15 AM
I have memories of Dr. Seuss, so naturally I read those to my kids as well. Once they were in school they got to choose what we read together.

caspermac
08-15-2011, 06:51 PM
Brian Jaques' Redwall books, the Harry Potter series and JRR Tolkien. There were many others but these are the ones I remember the most.

Fresie
08-22-2011, 08:28 PM
Oh, in Russia, even in the times of the Soviet Union when I grew up, the children's market was very multicultural -- in fact, publishing houses aimed it to be multicultural and children's translation was a biiig business. Brilliant literature was shoved down Russian kids' throats, from staples like Charles Perrault, Andersen and Brothers Grimm to Jonathan Swift to Antoine de St Exupery. But my absolute favorites were Astrid Lindgren's Seacrow Island, Tove Jansson's Moomintroll (is it my imagination or is there a tendency that the most creative children's writers tend to be Scandinavian?), Mary Poppins, any folk tales I could lay my hands on, all Russian and international SF I could lay my hands on, plus a bunch of great Russian children's writers, like Nikolai Nosov with his Dunno trilogy and Anatoly Alexin with his down to earth YA novellas.

But Seacrow Island and Moomintroll, I still reread them at least twice a year -- they're so addictive!

PrincessofPersia
08-22-2011, 08:35 PM
The first book I picked up to read was Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas (I refuse to use the mistranslated English title, since it misses the point). I read a lot of English lit as a kid. I never read many Aussie or American authors. Harry Potter came out when I was already in grade 9, but I guess I was still technically a kid.

Piper Brooks
08-22-2011, 11:18 PM
I had pretty eclectic taste for a kid, I guess: Where the Red Fern Grows, 101 Dalmatians (the actual novel, not the Disney stuff), Island of the Blue Dolphins, anything Tolkien, and a number of Judy Blume books. I still have not forgiven Steinbeck for "The Red Pony". I was 8 years old and kept waiting for it to have a happy ending!

Rhea
08-23-2011, 07:48 PM
Oh, Fresie said it :) Growing up in the Soviet Union had its advantages - including the international authors translated into my mother tongue and the wonderful cartoons Sojuzmultfilm produced.
But back to books - Astrid Lindgren, Tove Jansson, R. L. Stevenson, A. Dumas (sen.) and his Count of Monte Cristo and my all time favorite (and the reason I live in Mexico) - Jules Verne. I also liked Victor Hugo (hands up everyone who has read Les Miserables three times from cover to cover).
Also the authors who wrote in my mother tongue and fed my imagination with the unforgettable characters.
And, of course, all the fairy tales one could read. Soviet Union might have had only 15 "states", but it had far more nations and the fairy tales of these nations were translated and published in my language too. What bliss it was :)

backslashbaby
08-23-2011, 08:19 PM
I love Antoine de St Exupery! I read it later than childhood, and I didn't grow up with French at all, but I wish I had :)

Snitchcat
08-23-2011, 11:04 PM
Which got me to wondering, how did the country you grew up in influence the kind of books that were available to you?

Where I grew up is completely different to where I am now.

Had access to all the Enid Blyton stories, Nancy Drew, anything by Diana Wynne Jones, all the Point Horror books I could get my hands on; anything fantasy / SF.

Also had access to manga (back when it wasn't a huge thing), so read series like Ranma 1/2 (in Chinese), and other kids story books like 小王子, not to mention the studying, e.g., 中文一百字.

Don't remember much more right now. I'd have to go look through the boxes in the attic and that's not feasible right now. :)

andreea
08-24-2011, 12:58 AM
Some Romanian authors, like Gelu Naum and Constantin Chirita, and Kipling, London, Dumas, Zevaco, Zelazny, Karl May, Jules Verne, Stepanov, Pierre Clostermann, Sven Hassel, Jack Higgins, Clavell, Bronte, and of course Margaret Mitchel's Gone with the wind. Basically, I read just about anything I could get my hands on. I couldn't live without book. I used to skip school to stay home and finish whatever book I was reading at the time. Few days after finishing 8th grade, just before exams, my mom made the mistake of bringing home James Clavell's Shogun. Needless to say I forgot about everything else but THE BOOK.

Rhea
08-24-2011, 01:31 AM
Ah, Shogun. And Taipan, by the same author. I don't know what it is about the conflict of cultures that interests me so much :d

BigWords
08-24-2011, 03:39 AM
I don't know if this is a British thing (or rather an English thing, as I haven't actually seen any of the titles in Scotland), but I remember reading the Serendipity (http://dreamfollow.com/lilypad/serendipity.html) books as a child, and have yet to come across anyone else who has read them. The Moomin books mentioned before reminded me of the fat (100+ page) black and white collections of comic strips - another thing which nobody seems to recall. The best thing about spending time in the South East was the number of used bookshops which carried foreign language titles brought over by the students from the language schools - it's where I picked up most of my (French-language) Titans comics (Marvel reprints) and a few Australian pocket westerns - no idea why westerns were massively popular in 1950s Australia, but the numbers on my copies are in the high 600s.

Chantal.H
08-24-2011, 12:36 PM
When I was a child it was all Enid Blyton then Roald Dahl, C.S Lewis, Tolkien and Lewis Carroll. In between all that I loved The Little Vampire books (always a fang girl!) and The Demon Headmaster. Then I can remember hiding Judy Blume books and the Sweet Valley High series under my bed lol!

Then I read all the classics which my parents house is full of. Wuthering Heights was a favourite. I would go off to my bedroom and read until it was dark and I wouldn't have noticed the day had gone except for the fact that there was no light left to read by.

Snitchcat
08-24-2011, 10:03 PM
Ah, finally found other stories I read. They're collated in a book now, called, "中国历代微型小说一百篇" (100 Anceint Chinese Miniature Stories). Also Hua Mulan (Chinese history for kids version).

RobJ
08-24-2011, 11:12 PM
Enid Blyton (Secret Seven, Famous Five), C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia, Alice in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass, a whole bunch of children's classics, Marvel comics, Eagle annuals, and then Arthur C Clarke's short stories in Speed & Power magazine in the early 70s got me reading science fiction.

Sane_Man
08-25-2011, 12:05 AM
I loved all the works of Roald Dahl.
The Harry Potter series
The Jungle Book
The Wind in the Willows
Treasure Island

ShadowyEclipse
08-27-2011, 06:03 AM
Harry potter, Hardy boys, "Self Reliance" By Waldo Emerson.... :P


The series of unfortunate events?

dreamcatcher
08-27-2011, 08:18 AM
I remember Emily Rodda was huge in Australia when I was a kid.

I'm 22 now (for reference).

firecam3
08-27-2011, 08:41 AM
Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings and while I was in primary school I used to read the Animorphs books.

valeriev89
09-04-2011, 12:15 AM
Harry Potter, Sweet Valley Twins (which quickly led me to Sweet Valley High), The American Girl Series, Fear Street, Captain Underpants and so many more that I can't remember. Ugh, now I want to find all these books and read them again!

Cliff Face
09-04-2011, 07:58 AM
I remembered the author of the Goosebumps series - R.L. Stine.

(Actually, I saw some vintage Goosebumps books today at a second-hand book store. So I didn't technically "remember", so much as I "used my eyes"... :tongue Good books. I had about half the collection. Horror for children. :))

BookFormatterJen
09-04-2011, 10:48 AM
When I was in Grade one, that was 1986, I have this blue English book given by our government to all public schools. It has a story in it called Henny Penny. I still can remember the lines...Henny penny is a hen, henny penny is a big hen, henny penny lays eggs, henny penny lays ten eggs... :-)

Elenitsa
09-21-2011, 01:45 AM
Mostly French ones : Alexandre Dumas, Paul Feval, Michel Zevaco, Victor Hugo, Eugene Sue...

But German ones too, especially Karl May's.

DamaNegra
09-21-2011, 05:15 AM
The Little Prince, obviously (I never understood the ending until I re-read it this summer, and then I started crying like an idiot). I also used to have a book of 365 classic kid's fairy-tales (mostly European). Then there was, obviously, the Harry Potter books (which I still love and re-read often).

There was also a collection of children's books published by the A la orilla del viento imprint of the Fondo de Cultura Económica, which contained a lot of amazing books whose authors I never bothered to learn.

Ruriworm
01-18-2012, 05:55 PM
The Harry Potter series was a part of my life back in the early elementary school years; I think I had a unrequited crush on Harry. It really inspired baby me to write. Oh, I almost forgot to mention, DOCTOR SUESS:)

Astrid
01-18-2012, 06:15 PM
I grew up with:
- Annie M.G. Schmidt works (Dutch children's book, musical and verse writer).
- Astrid Lindgren books
- Roald Dahl books
- Alice in Wonderland and Through the looking-glass (when I was about twelve already).

Lucas
01-18-2012, 06:32 PM
I was talking to hubby today about things we read when we were kids, and it dawned on me that many folks here wouldn't know these authors.

Which got me to wondering, how did the country you grew up in influence the kind of books that were available to you?

For me, growing up in Portugal meant reading a few portuguese authors, like Alice Vieira (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Vieira) (who remains my favorite to this day), Ilse Losa and the duo Ana Maria Magalhães & Isabel Alçada. But I also read all of Countess of Ségur's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie,_Countess_of_S%C3%A9gur) work (Sofie's Misfortunes, anyone?) and of course all of Enid Blyton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enid_Blyton) I could get my hands on.

There were also a few scattered works, like Edmondo de Amicis' Heart (:rolleyes:) and a few of the classics like Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days.

So, you international folks out there, what did you read when you were a kid?

The book which I remember made the greatest impact on me I read when I was twelve. It was the assembled volumes of Edward Gibbon's "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire".

I must admit that I found most fantasy books quite bland.

My favourite novel of all times is a really short one, written by the Norwegian Author Carl-Fredrik Engelstad. It is called "De levendes land" ("Land of the Living") and is about Jeanne d'Arc.

fireluxlou
01-18-2012, 06:39 PM
Well when I was kid we read Goosebumps, Jacqueline Wilson and J.K. Rowling. Road Dahl was quite popular to read because of Matilda came out at the cinema when I was in primary school. Francis Hodgkinson Burnadette was popular because of The Secret Garden and the Little Princess movie. Sweet Valley High, Babysitters club etc.

Lucas
01-18-2012, 06:50 PM
I grew up with:
- Annie M.G. Schmidt works (Dutch children's book, musical and verse writer).
- Astrid Lindgren books
- Roald Dahl books
- Alice in Wonderland and Through the looking-glass (when I was about twelve already).

Oh, horrible memories of being force-fed Astrid Lindgren at primary school and through Swedish TV.

Aspiring Author
01-18-2012, 08:12 PM
'Gerry the Giraffe'

Roald Dahl; C.S Lewis 'Narnia';Ursula Le Guin 'Wizard of Earthsea'; Tanith Lee; Enid Blyton; Jill Murphy 'Worst Witch'; various other little children's collections and tales.

Dawnstorm
01-20-2012, 05:30 AM
Das Kleine Ich Bin Ich (http://kjl.aatg.org/books/ichbinich.html)

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
01-20-2012, 06:06 PM
Judy Blume, Roald Dahl (only the chocolate factory stuff though. Wasn't interested in the others), and some Laura Ingalls Wilder (I liked Plum Creek and Big Woods the most).

My favorite part of the library in elementary school was the corner where all the history and biographies were. I loved reading the biographies about Dolley Madison, Clara Barton, Florence Nightingale, and other famous ladies. My dad gave me a stuffed dog for Christmas one year and I named her "Clara Barken." :D

Also, in about 5th or 6th grade, I became fascinated by shipwrecks. If you look at the old copy of "Night to Remember" from our old library, my signature was on the card for months at a time. And another called "They Sailed into Oblivion."

Also, I loved Alexander and the Magic Mouse. Was tickled to see it come into the used bookstore where I worked about two decades ago, and I still have it:
http://www.amazon.com/Alexander-magic-mouse-Martha-Sanders/dp/0828150060

Nickie
01-20-2012, 06:13 PM
I live in Belgium, am Dutch (or Flemish)-speaklng but my grandfather spoke French as well. Aged 2, he read to me from Alexandre Dumas' La Reine Margot. I continued on my own in The Three Musketeers, The Black Tulip, The Man in the Iron Mask and more stories of this author. I really haven't read a lot of children's books (I wrote my own) and skipped quickly to adult literature.

KatieJ
01-21-2012, 07:25 AM
Lewis Carroll, the Bobbsey Twins, the Hardy Boys. Some Dickens and all the Sherlock Holmes.

There was a series of books published in the US called "The Best in Children's Books" It was sort of a Reader's Digest type of anthology, with great illustrations and abbreviated stories. It helped me find a lot of authors, I'd read something in one of those books, then go find the rest of what they had written.

triceretops
01-21-2012, 07:49 AM
The Yearling, Tom Sawyer, Toby Tyler. A whole bunch of DC and Marvel comic books. A little later all the non-fic history I could get my hands on. Can't leave out the Moon's a Baloon and Bring on the Empty Horses by David Niven.

But the most important book of my childhood and one that I would keep and read from every day for seven straight years was the Official Boy Scout Handbook. God, I was a lifer. And an eagle scout.

Tri

Quickbread
01-21-2012, 08:12 AM
Ah, Moomintrolls! I didn't stumble across them until adulthood.

As a kid I read a lot of Nancy Drew books, Jerome Beatty Jr., SE Hinton, Judy Blume, Madeleine L'Engle, Susan Cooper and Stephen King. And in between all of those, My Father's Dragon and Island of the Blue Dolphins, about 8,000 times.

Alessandra Kelley
01-21-2012, 08:32 AM
My parents were hangers-on in the science fiction community (Milford!), so I read a lot of age-inappropriate sf as a child. We also had Antoine de Saint-Exupery, and all the Asterix books as they came out. I liked My Father's Dragon and Pippi Longstocking, but by 10 had graduated to all the non-LOTR books by Tolkien (The Smith of Wooten Major, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, etc.) and The Chronicles of Narnia. I also had bags and bags of Marvel comics from the 60s and 70s and DCs from the 50s.

I had an English gran, and some English stuff. I hated Enid Blyton with a cold little democratic passion.

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
01-21-2012, 06:07 PM
My parents were hangers-on in the science fiction community (Milford!), so I read a lot of age-inappropriate sf as a child. We also had Antoine de Saint-Exupery, and all the Asterix books as they came out. I liked My Father's Dragon and Pippi Longstocking, but by 10 had graduated to all the non-LOTR books by Tolkien (The Smith of Wooten Major, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, etc.) and The Chronicles of Narnia. I also had bags and bags of Marvel comics from the 60s and 70s and DCs from the 50s.

I had an English gran, and some English stuff. I hated Enid Blyton with a cold little democratic passion.

Turns out you had good reason. I read a few of the Secret Sevens when I was young, but it wasn't a few years ago I found out what a total b$%^& she was in real life!

French Maiden
01-21-2012, 06:25 PM
Enid Bliton. and CS Lewis

Alessandra Kelley
01-21-2012, 10:23 PM
Enid Bliton. and CS Lewis

I was fascinated by the Britishness of their books, but I disliked the stories. I loathed Lewis' "The Last Battle," and as I grew older I became more disdainful of his heavy-handed Anglican allegories. Blyton just drove me berserk with her unconcealed contempt for the lower classes.

pretzels
01-22-2012, 10:42 PM
since I live very near to san diego I got to experience both authors (mexican and american), I mostly read american though.

randi.lee
01-22-2012, 10:50 PM
When I was young my mother would catch me reading her Stephen King books. I didn't understand the context but my little girl mindset was that they were mom's so they must have been "big girl books."

Clay
01-23-2012, 03:53 AM
When I was about 11 or 12 I read Tolkien's The Hobbit. That was the first book I read as a kid that I actually enjoyed thoroughly, and since that time I've read very nearly everything of his pertaining to "Middle-earth". What else did I read when I was younger? Well, a few more recent books I've read include an English translation of The Kalevala by Eino Friberg, William Morris' The House of the Wolfings, Kevin Crossley-Holland's The Norse Myths, Tolkien's Of Sigurd and Gudrún — all good works that I would highly recommend. Another book I'd recommend is the biography on J.R.R. Tolkien by Humphrey Carpenter.

Paige Lollie
01-29-2012, 01:30 AM
I have always been a fantasy and animal lover. Growing up if anything had something to do with dragons, it usually caught my eye. I was big into Micheal Crichton's works like Jurassic Park and Congo. I tended to jump around in genres, going from strict fantasy to thriller/mystery to horror to romance and everything in between. I usually don't get into non-fiction, but I will say one of my favorite books to date is Peg Kehret's Small Steps: The Year I got Polio. I have re-read that book, and many of her other great stories, growing up.

SakuraReyna
01-29-2012, 02:22 AM
1. The Babysitter's Club
2. Little House on the Prairie
3.Curious George
4. Huckleberry Finn & The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
5. A Little Princess
6. The Secret Garden
7. Roald Dahl's Matilda
8. Manga (Sailor Moon was the first and best)
9. The Ramona Quimby books by Beverly Cleary
10. The Babysitter's Little Sister series

wyndmaker
01-29-2012, 02:31 AM
Growing up my mom read fairy tales to me, but as I began to read for myself iread the books that most kids grew up reading, Black Beauty, Call of the Wild, Island of the Blue Dolphin, Other
Side of the Mountain. I loved to read the Sherlock Holmes books as well and of course plenty of comics. Superman, Batman, and Hawkman were my favorites but I enjoyed the Illustrated Classics as well. Later in my youth, High School I discovered Toliken and fantasy in general. L. Sprague de Camp was one of my favorites.

RPecha
01-29-2012, 07:33 AM
Hard to remember the numerous childrens books, but I remember reading my very first novels somewhere between 6 and 8 years old (The Star Wars trilogy for those who are wondering.).

I read the lord of the rings and the hobbit while still in elementary school (I also remembering pissing off my reading/english teachers because while they would pull out the mass paperbacks for class-wide readings (such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory), I would pull out my own books in between sections I had to read ("Something Wicked this way Comes" in particular. It is still one of my favorite books to this day.).)

And the thing is I actually understood what I was reading at that time, although some people may not believe it. What annoys me is that the other men in the family (My Father and Grandfather) Really frowned down upon me for reading books instead of being the typical guy and going out and playing sports and such.

CynV
01-29-2012, 08:10 AM
Oh wow, I used to read voraciously as a child. I remember they had book order day in school and I would order stacks of them. My top picks were always Choose Your Own Adventure Books (anyone remember those!)
I also grew up loving Piers Anthony's Xanth Series; C.S. Lewis and the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series; and another young adult series called Dakota King. The author Jake MacKenzie wrote these in such an interactive way...they were fun.
As I got older it became Dean Koontz. Anyone who's heard the story knows it was his novel Intensity that got me started writing seriously. Before that I'd only done short stories for family and friends. But after reading Dean I knew I wanted to reach more people.
Lately I'm always on the lookout for new voices.

RPecha
01-29-2012, 08:14 AM
Oh wow, I used to read voraciously as a child. I remember they had book order day in school and I would order stacks of them. My top picks were always Choose Your Own Adventure Books (anyone remember those!)
I also grew up loving Piers Anthony's Xanth Series; C.S. Lewis and the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series; and another young adult series called Dakota King. The author Jake MacKenzie wrote these in such an interactive way...they were fun.
As I got older it became Dean Koontz. Anyone who's heard the story knows it was his novel Intensity that got me started writing seriously. Before that I'd only done short stories for family and friends. But after reading Dean I knew I wanted to reach more people.
Lately I'm always on the lookout for new voices.

I too used to order lots of stuff from the book fairs when I was in elementary school. I used to love the read your own adventure 'goosebumps' books. (Used to love the goosebumps series in general). I also remember getting weird looks because I was reading Stephen King/Richard Bachman in 4th/5th grade (The Stand and The Regulators in particular, I even did a book report on The Regulators in 7th grade as an extra credit deal.)

Lexxie
01-30-2012, 09:39 PM
When I was very young, I read all the Pippi Longstocking and Emil books by Astrid Lindgren, then as I got a little older (maybe around 10) I read Mio my Mio, Lionheart as well as Ronja, also by Astrid Lindgren. After that I went on to more mystery with Trixie Belden and Nancy Drew, Roald Dahl and others.
I think I almost always had a book in my hand - much like nowadays actually. I love reading.

Nawlins
02-02-2012, 10:37 AM
I lucked out as a kid - when I was two, older sis began grade 1 and learned to read. Mama held me while she helped sis with her schoolwork and I learned to read along with my sister. Even better, my parents were readers, too. I read everything, so my early childhood was a mix of the children's encyclopedia by Golden, which my dad brought home to keep my sister and I occupied during the summer, Dad's Reader's Digest, 365 Bedtime Stories (it had a neighbourhood map inside the front cover so I'd have to read the story and check the map, lol). I read mysteries - Trixie Beldon, Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, movie star mysteries, etc. I also read a lot of old old girls fiction - school girl stories from the late 1800s which I got from the Symphony Book Fair each year. I read Grimm and Andersen fairy tales, and when my cousin quit college the year I turned ten, he gave my sis and me his old texts, so I read the Story of Civilization, which I did understand and the complete works of Shakespeare, which I didn't (though the language stuck which made it easy to understand later on). And children's paperback books - everything Scholastic published, i think - and young children's books that my younger sisters received. And books of the lives of the saints and career fiction and young adult classics and Jean Christophe and Elswyth Thane and cereal boxes and instruction books for appliances and anything else I could get my hands on.

When I was a teen, my mom would punish me by taking my books and library card away. I used to beg her to take my phone privileges in exchange for my books. I still get a kick out of girls' fiction from the early 1900s that I read on Gutenberg.

plebeian
04-08-2012, 01:07 AM
Primarily grew up reading Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, and R.K. Laxman's Malgudi Days.

Chazevelt
04-08-2012, 08:20 AM
My mom used to read to me, and since we shared a love for horses, naturally that's what we both enjoyed. I remember during My Friend Flicka, she read, "Grass, grass, grass, clear up to his ass." I said, "Mom! It doesn't say that!" She laughed at me and said, "I just wanted to see if you were paying attention."
I practically memorized the Black Stallion series by Walter Farley and the Billy and Blaze series by CW Anderson.

Our grade school had two librarians. In fifth and sixth grade, one threatened to bar me if I didn't read something besides horse books. The other called me in to help her order new books because I knew by heart every horse book they had or didn't have. The last week of my sixth grade year- I'd be moving to the high school the next year- that same librarian brought me a bag full of my favorite horse books to take home with me. She said they were old and being replaced, but I think now I know better. I still have those old hardbacks, and treasure them. The Stubborn Mare, The Black Stallion, Billy and Blaze, My Friend Flicka...

The one non-horse book I read as a kid sticks in my mind. I'm not sure of the exact title, but it was something like Snow Treasure. It was about a small town in Norway under Nazi seige. There was a submarine in the fjord, and everyone had to keep black-out curtains pulled. They had this cache of gold bars they were trying to keep the Nazis from finding. So they had the kids put a couple of bars under a blanket on their sleds every time they slid down the hill. Then they'd bury them in the snow and build a snowman over them. At night, somebody from the Allied side would slip past the Nazis and squirrel the gold bars to safety. I'd like to find that book and read it again.

Nimram
04-08-2012, 09:16 AM
In the Communist era I used to read Jules Verne, Twain, London, Karl May, Romanian historical novels of Mihail Sadoveanu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihail_Sadoveanu), Alexandru Mitru, Vintila Corbul and Grigore Bajenaru (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigore_B%C4%83jenaru), some soviet authors and lots of non fiction. After the '89 revolution I was reading more SF as Asimov, Herbert, Le Guin, etc. started to be published here. Migrated to poetry as the hormones kicked in, then french existentialists, american beat...

toecollector
04-09-2012, 10:09 PM
Roald Dahl

a.forr3st3r
06-13-2013, 02:06 AM
So, you international folks out there, what did you read when you were a kid?

though i saw the thread was ages old i could not refrain from putting my two cents in... and must i add I am just amazed at how many books there are to grow up with that i have never even read...

My country is heavily influenced by the Brits so i grew up with a lot of English literature but there was a lot of American writers to go around as well

i loveeee Enid Blyton (i think i like her more now than when I was little), there was Nancy drew, Hardy Boys, Babysitters Club and Sweet Valley High (yes i did it because i was a girl)... there were so many othrs but i failed to keep track of the authors the only thing i focused on was the reading, which i regret now because I'm stocking up on all my favourite books and wish i could buy the ones from my younger days!!

Judy Koot
06-14-2013, 02:01 PM
Supercool thread, this!

I live in the Netherlands, and they offer a wide range of (translated) books here from all over the world, which I really love. Getting in touch with other cultures and languages through books, is such a privilege.
As a child and teenager, I read almost everything: fiction (different genres), poetry, non-fiction, comic books (Dutch underground, but also American comics like Spiderman and X-Men)...
I was (and still am) a pretty eclectic reader (and writer).

As far as fiction goes:
I love(d) Dutch writers Ted van Lieshout and Edward van de Vendel, they're pretty well known in other (European) countries as well.
I also loved a lot of foreign writers: Belgian Bart Moeyaert, New Zealand Margaret Mahy (The Tricksters & The Changeover, anyone? They are bloody brilliant), English Roald Dahl, American Jean Webster (Daddy Long-Legs & Dear Enemy), I loved German books like The Never Ending Story by Michael Ende, and Krabat by Otfried Preussler...
I could go on and on.

When I was younger, I read in Dutch (I knew Krabat as 'Master of the Black Mill' back then, b/c it was translated that way; I only realized it was called differently when the movie came out a few years back).
As soon as I got into high school, I started reading books in the original versions (English, German and French) and as a grown up I lived in Spain for a year, where I started to read books in Spanish.
Being able to read different languages opens up even more worlds, b/c not everything is translated into Dutch.

Judy Koot
06-14-2013, 02:41 PM
Hmmm, come to think of it, children's literature in the Netherlands is not so culturally diverse as I always thought it was.
What I see in bookstores are mostly Dutch children's books and books from the U.S. and England, Scandinavia, France and Germany.
Hardly anything (if any) kid lit from Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Africa or Eastern Europe... Except maybe for the occasional Asian, Middle Eastern and East-European fairy tale anthologies.
O yeah, and manga comics.
I think it was the same when I was a child, and it hasn't changed much, although I do get the idea that children's books from the U.S. have become way more popular than they were 20 to 30 years ago.

Hermian
07-07-2013, 10:20 AM
Growing up, I went to a Catholic school. My fifth grade teacher taught Sex Ed--she was a withered old nun who played the ukelele while singing songs about the birds and the bees.

At lunch time, us curious kids would huddle in the bathroom and read Forever, sometimes the same paragraph over and over again until we figured out the what, why, and how to of it all. Judy Blume was part of my growing up.

Where the Wild Things Are always was and always will be my favourite. I love Maurice Sendak.


:Guitar:

leela_e
08-19-2013, 04:30 PM
I grew up covered with 101 books - have read them all. Geez, it’s the children's books that always caught my fancy. Shhh, :Sun: can't get over with Disney's classics. :)

Judy Koot
08-19-2013, 05:38 PM
Growing up, I went to a Catholic school. My fifth grade teacher taught Sex Ed--she was a withered old nun who played the ukelele while singing songs about the birds and the bees.

At lunch time, us curious kids would huddle in the bathroom and read Forever, sometimes the same paragraph over and over again until we figured out the what, why, and how to of it all. Judy Blume was part of my growing up.


Bahaha, I just love this!

dianeP
08-31-2013, 09:04 PM
The first non-picture book I remember (11 yrs old) is Ribsy, by Beverly Cleary... stories about a thin, mutt, and believe homeless dog. After that a series of books I can't even remember. I've never really stuck to any particular author and I went on to pick books in a rather haphazard way.

And, at 50, I'm finally reading my first French Book (Da Vinci Code)

Kaila Raine
09-14-2013, 07:28 AM
Black Beauty, Charlotte's Web, Dracula, Mad Magazine, my dad's Playboys, Sunday newspaper comics.

Goldberry
09-14-2013, 10:02 AM
I was obsessed with books, and I read everything I could get my hands on. Some of my favorites:

Men of Iron, all the King Arthur books by Howard Pyle
Moomintroll books
Nancy Drew
The Hobbit, LOTR (I was an advanced reader)
Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks
Oz books
Unicorn with Silver Shoes- Ella Young
Wrinkle in Time- Madeleine Lengle
The Witch Family- Eleanor Estes

So many others! I think I went through the entire library!

chickenma
09-14-2013, 10:27 AM
Does anyone remember a book called At the Back of the North Wind by somebody MacDonald? It was fabulous.

kobold
09-14-2013, 11:47 AM
AT THE BACK OF THE NORTH WIND by George MacDonald? That's an intriguing title.

In childhood I read:

Richard Scarry books
Big/Little Books
Curious George
Dr. Suess
WINNIE THE POOH
GUS THE GHOST
PIPPI LONGSTOCKING
STUART LITTLE
THE GUARDIANS and THE LOTUS CAVES by John Christopher
Alfred Hitchcock's 'The Three Investigators' books
CALL IT COURAGE
Narnia books
Ray Bradbury's R IS FOR ROCKET and S IS FOR SPACE
RUNAWAY RALPH
THE JUNGLE BOOK
A WRINKLE IN TIME/A WIND IN THE DOOR
THE SPACESHIP UNDER THE APPLE TREE

and I don't think it's possible to over-praise Eleanor Cameron's THE WONDERFUL FLIGHT TO THE MUSHROOM PLANET and sequels.

Does anyone remember a kids' book called NAN CAN FLY? It was about (if I'm remembering accurately; no guarantees) a young woman determined to learn how to pilot a plane.

Believe me, I've searched and searched.

Ramshackle
09-14-2013, 12:13 PM
When I was little, I was pretty much obsessed with Goosebumps, Fear Street (anything R. L. Stein), Roald Dahl, Point Horror, Point Crime and Christopher Pike. I even remember reading Stephen King (specifically Christine and Dolores Claiborne) and reading James Herbert's Once on the recommendation of my school librarian.

I read more than that, but that was the stuff I really gobbled up.

... also, I can recall enjoying a book called Stargirl, and the authors Dick King Smith and Paul Jennings. Finally, I remember reading at least some of War and Peace on a self-imposed challenge (I was ten and it bored me to tears).

All else is fuzzy.

kobold
09-15-2013, 05:11 AM
I liked the sound of the title so I looked it up-- it's by Jerry Spinelli.

chickenma
09-15-2013, 05:23 AM
I loved reading for my daughter. There's some great stuff out there:
Julie of the Wolves, Animorphs, American Girl...

Goldberry
09-15-2013, 06:43 AM
and I don't think it's possible to over-praise Eleanor Cameron's THE WONDERFUL FLIGHT TO THE MUSHROOM PLANET and sequels.


That book rocked! I loved it! :)

There was another book I liked- THE DAY OF THE NESS? Does that sound familiar?

I used to love books by Edward Eager, such as HALF-MAGIC, MAGIC BY THE LAKE, and THE TIME GARDEN... I found one in a bookstore yesterday and looked at it. I think kids today would find it boring- lots of description and slow action.

LAVENDER-GREEN MAGIC by Andre Norton was nice. I also loved THE CITY OF GOLD AND LEAD by John Christopher and SWEETWATER by Laurence Yep.

THE WICKED ENCHANTMENT by Benary-Isbert Margo was this strange, creepy fantasy that was one of my favorites. I don't think it's even in print anymore.

Judy Koot
09-15-2013, 03:55 PM
Richard Scarry books

Oh, yes!
We had one Richard Scarry book, I don't know the English title (we had a Dutch version). It had a lot of silly cars in it in the form of vegetables, cheese, sausages and stuff, and on each spread you had to look for a tiny golden bug.
It was one of the most read/loved books in our family.

williemeikle
09-15-2013, 04:51 PM
Early reading for me was children's classics, with my favorites being Treasure Island and Swiss Family Robinson. At the same time ( in the early to mid '60s) I discovered comics - Batman and then Spiderman getting my attention.

In '68 or so at around ten I discovered Tolkien, Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, and that was the start of getting into grown up reading. Also around that time I got an Alistair MacLean habit for a year or so and read all of his work.

kobold
09-15-2013, 10:03 PM
That book rocked! I loved it! :)

There was another book I liked- THE DAY OF THE NESS? Does that sound familiar?

I also loved THE CITY OF GOLD AND LEAD by John Christopher. . .

Goldberry, I was starting to think I was the only one who remembered those Mushroom Planet books. THE DAY OF THE NESS. . .if you're still talking about Eleanor Cameron, is it about two modern-day kids who encounter a diplodocus? If yes, then that's THE TERRIBLE CHURNADRYNE.

THE CITY OF GOLD AND LEAD-- Those John Christopher tripod invasion books were amazing.

Yorkist
09-15-2013, 10:22 PM
Some favorites:

The Chronicles of Narnia
A Wrinkle in Time
Island of the Blue Dolphins
Bruno and Boots
Are you there, God? It's me, Margaret

I also read everything by Beverly Cleary, Lois Lowry, Judy Blume, most Nancy Drew...

I kinda left childhood books behind at a relatively young age, so around the ages of 10-12 I was obsessed with Christopher Pike. He's known as a horror YA writer but my favorite stuff of his was heavily spiked with science fiction or fantasy.

12-14, I read a lot of classics, particularly those from antiquity. After that I was in the grown-up section.

Chris P
09-15-2013, 10:31 PM
I couldn't read until I was about 8 years old, but once I got going I never stopped. I started with The Boxcar Children books, then went to The Three Investigators, which was like a politically correct Hardy Boys. From there I went to Agatha Christie. I was about 12 before I knew that books could be anything other than whodunit mysteries!

By then my older brother was in high school reading Catcher in the Rye, which I read and I thought Holden was just the coolest guy EVER! I read the book once a year for the next four years, and now I think Holden is double the pretentious phoney he accuses everyone else of being. I was about sixteen when I discovered Vonnegut, and my world has not been the same since.

kevinwaynewilliams
09-15-2013, 10:58 PM
I'm glad to see I'm not the only one to have read John Christopher as a child. The White Mountains, The City of Gold and Lead, and The Pool of Fire are still in my library. I shared them with my daughter when she grew up, and I think she still owns copies.

I didn't outgrow Heinlein until my teens, and some of his works are still readable (most are too painfully sexist to stomach). I read everything A.E. van Vogt ever wrote.

Goldberry
09-15-2013, 11:17 PM
Goldberry, I was starting to think I was the only one who remembered those Mushroom Planet books. THE DAY OF THE NESS. . .if you're still talking about Eleanor Cameron, is it about two modern-day kids who encounter a diplodocus? If yes, then that's THE TERRIBLE CHURNADRYNE.

THE CITY OF GOLD AND LEAD-- Those John Christopher tripod invasion books were amazing.

I think that must be it. I googled the NESS book, but another book by Andre Norton came up, so I must have gotten confused.

I looked on your profile, and we're the same age. I don't know if that has anything to do with what books we read, but the mushroom planet books were very popular in my library when I was a kid. So were the Moomintroll books.

kobold
09-16-2013, 09:29 AM
I don't remember Moomintroll books, but checked and it seems they were sure popular enough. They're directed at what grade level?



Black Beauty, Charlotte's Web, Dracula, Mad Magazine, my dad's Playboys, Sunday newspaper comics.

Now that's a reading list.

Meleena
09-16-2013, 10:11 AM
I could no sooner tell you all the books I grew up with. I read so many, and to make a list would be difficult as I know I would forget at least a dozen wonderfully crafted books I adore.

However, I will say that the ones I immediately think of that have had some of the biggest impact on my life, love for reading/writing, and myself are: Animorphs, Harry Potter, All Virginia Andrews books I could get my hands on, Danielle Steel, Goosebumps, The Secret Garden, A Little Princess, Tomorrow When the War Began, Dr Seuss, and I'm sure there are a few others I'm missing.

I was a very advanced reader for my age. I don't mean to gloat or anything, it's just a fact. I taught myself to read because I was annoyed by my class learning sentences and I was ahead at paragraphs and pages. Those books, most of them I read as a child. Some Virginia Andrews books didn't come until later, and the Tomorrow series wasn't until high school due to the material in the books, and also I didn't discover Harry Potter until I was almost in my teens, but the rest I grew up reading.

This is a marvelous topic, thank you! It's very interesting to see what others grew up reading, from around the world. I live in Australia, though I have read some translations of other books. I recognise some of the author names mentioned, though it's been a while so I don't recall exactly what they wrote.

Goldberry
09-16-2013, 10:40 AM
I don't remember Moomintroll books, but checked and it seems they were sure popular enough. They're directed at what grade level?

I think grades 4-7. The author was Finnish, so they were translated into English. Her characters were hilarious. The chapters had long, crazy names like, "Chapter Nine: Which is about a fantastic crossing of the dried-up sea and how the Snork maiden saves Moomintroll from a giant octopus." I found them quite entertaining. :D

Sometimes I miss being a kid...

lindas
09-17-2013, 08:28 AM
I also grew up with Enid Blyton and I think my love of fantasy began there. The Faraway Tree series and The Wishing Chair. I tried to introduce my kids to the books as I still have them but they found some of the English prose nearly indecipherable. Sigh so sad.

Elias Zapple
10-02-2013, 06:26 PM
I grew up with many books and they're still the same size as me.

Wilde_at_heart
10-02-2013, 07:56 PM
I learned both English and French growing up, so I read Asterix comics in French, along with Inspector Miagret stories and others that I can't remember now.

This is a play I remember as a kid as well:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_(play)

I also lived in Guyana for a bit as a kid and while I don't remember any particular author, there was a local vampire legend - the Old Higue - I was quite fascinated with at the time.

http://sapodilla.blogspot.ca/2005/10/vampire.html

aliceshortcake
10-02-2013, 10:18 PM
*Waves at Wilde_at_heart*

Hiya, fellow Oscar fan!

I'm surprised that no-one so far has mentioned Wilde's wonderful fairy tales - The Happy Prince, The Selfish Giant etc.

Chris P
10-02-2013, 10:26 PM
*Waves at Wilde_at_heart*

Hiya, fellow Oscar fan!

I'm surprised that no-one so far has mentioned Wilde's wonderful fairy tales - The Happy Prince, The Selfish Giant etc.

We read The Happy Prince in school, and I hated it. I read it again about a year ago, and almost cried, it hit me so hard. I guess I just hadn't had my heart broken enough by seventh grade.

Wilde_at_heart
10-03-2013, 02:39 AM
*Waves at Wilde_at_heart*

Hiya, fellow Oscar fan!

I'm surprised that no-one so far has mentioned Wilde's wonderful fairy tales - The Happy Prince, The Selfish Giant etc.

I thought the original OP was about the non-English or American stories and as usual, I posted without reading anything else in the thread :D

The Happy Prince is absolutely a favourite of mine as well.

Along with nearly all the Wizard of Oz books, Mary Stewart, Enid Blyton, the Ms. Tiggywinkle series, Roald Dahl, Narnia, Alice in Wonderland, Tin Tin, an unabridged copy of Grimm's fairy tales...
Mum mum tried to get me to read things like Ann of Green Gables or My Friend Flicka and I steadfastly refused to.

Gugland
10-03-2013, 09:30 AM
My pre-school days were filled with Richard Scary and Peanuts books. Then it was encyclopedias, Guinness world record books, and a Reader's Digest book called "Fascinating World of Animals." I still have it - right in front of me actually. Half the pictures are cut-out (some I remember, some I don't) and on one page I wrote "Julie Dixon is a fox"

Then, somewhere around 5th grade (when Julie actually began to notice me) I got "Durango Street" by Frank Bonham. My life sucked at the time, and I totally related to it. I read a bunch of those books, and then didn't read at all for a few years, until I discovered Piers Anthony's "A Spell for Chameleon" (is that right?) I read a ton of those, but then I grew up, got busy with life, and didn't read for years again.

Lemontree
10-03-2013, 09:45 AM
I was hooked on Gordon Korman (Bruno and Boots series), The Mouse and The Motorcycle, James and the Giant Peach, The BFG, The Hardy Boys, Sherlock Holmes, and the Chronicles of Narnia.

I remember distinctly being really pissed off reading Prince Caspian, getting halfway through and discovering the book was defective - the second half was just the first half bound upside down. For a while a though it was some literary thing. . .

Chris P
10-03-2013, 10:23 AM
Then it was encyclopedias, Guinness world record books, and a Reader's Digest book called "Fascinating World of Animals." I still have it - right in front of me actually. Half the pictures are cut-out (some I remember, some I don't) and on one page I wrote "Julie Dixon is a fox"

Haha! Are you the right age to remember The Book of Lists? Very late 70s to early 80s. There were three volumes that I know of, just pages and pages of "Twenty-five basketball greats you've never heard of" and "Eleven people who suffered from constipation." It was an impressive bit of oddball scholarship of useless knowledge. My preteen years are forever lost in its pages.

wilchris
10-03-2013, 12:25 PM
Eid Blyton then CS Lewis, into Asimov and Ian Fleming

Finnmc
10-03-2013, 12:35 PM
Roald Dahl was first and I devoured his books. After that I started reading everything I could find in my dad's extensive library with a special interest in SF/history: Jules Verne, Alexandre Dumas, Karl May, etc.
I remember reading a fictionalised version of Alexander the great's life and playing Macedonian general for months after that.
After that phase came Agatha Christie and Sherlock Holmes.

WriterInTheStone
11-19-2013, 01:42 AM
I'll second Roald Dahl.

I've read Tolkien/LoTR probably at least 15 times.

I wish my family and school had a more extensive library, but LoTR was a masterpiece for me.

I also loved C.S. Lewis, Orson Scott Card, and the Star Wars Young Adult sagas.

London89
11-19-2013, 02:01 AM
Treasure Island was my favourite book growing up, I also read lots of Roald Dahl, and of course Harry Potter...

WriterInTheStone
11-19-2013, 02:11 AM
I just assume everyone my age ALSO grew up with Harry Potter. It's a pretty safe and useful assumption....anyone that HATES Harry Potter, well, I'm instantly suspicious of that person.

London89
11-20-2013, 05:24 PM
I just assume everyone my age ALSO grew up with Harry Potter. It's a pretty safe and useful assumption....anyone that HATES Harry Potter, well, I'm instantly suspicious of that person.

Who could possibly hate Harry Potter?! A plague on all their houses!! ...J. K. Rowling is a GENIUS I tell you... GENIUS!!...

:D

WriterEC
11-21-2013, 03:52 AM
Paul Maar, C.S. Lewis and Astrid Lindgren.

CeDany
11-21-2013, 04:02 AM
I grew up (just like Hermione) being at the library nearly every weekends.

I read the entire collection for children which was situated in the basement of my local library.

Because my Father knew the head librarian and I was one of the few well behaved children, I was allowed to go on the first floor and read Agatha Christie.

Out of all of these, my absolute favourite until we moved out of the area - was "Memories of a Canadian Dog". He was a Dalmatian that went everywhere with his master. I cannot remember the author but the year of publication was decades before my year of birth.

Therefore, by the time I left this library, I enquired about purchasing a copy - I was told that the 3 copies were the last in the area and not possible to purchase anywhere. Such a sad thing, since it was a great story.

So, all that's remaining is Agatha Christie and her famous Belgian Detective - Hercule Poirot. My loving husband is in the process of building the whole collection of Ms Christie with an accompanying magazine detailing her life and writings, he's great!

During my early adult years - Fred Saberhagen, Jackie Collins and Judith Krantz and photo-books derived from films/movies/television.

Finally at school, Shakespeare and Robert Burns and then countless History and Medical Books with 3 more women in my household that volunteered in the Medical Field, there were loads of strange talks around the dinner table.

My children received my collection of Lafontaine Fables and Hans Christian Handersen Tales. Now we have books everywhere in the house - so you can imagine that I'm glad of the new technology which let's me carry 200 books in one slim tablet - yes!

CeDany BB

Bush_moon
12-11-2013, 12:34 AM
When i grew up our education system exposed us to many genres but my fondest memories were of reading the following, which have stuck with me today still:

The old man and the sea
The cruel sea
To kill a mockingbird


BM

Melanii
12-11-2013, 12:38 AM
I grew up with...

The Baby-Sitters Club
Goosebumps

Oh dear gawd. :P The BSC inspired me to write, though, so I can't complain.

I remember loving the Claidi Journals by Tanith Lee in school and recommending them to my best friend who also loved them.

I read a lot as a little lass. Way more than I do now - but I still read.

Serene09
12-11-2013, 01:35 AM
Nancy drew, Enid Blyton, Baby Sitter's Club

Bush_moon
12-12-2013, 04:30 PM
Well ok, Dr. Seuss, and that Mr. men book series with Mr. happy, Mr. Sad, etc, by Roger Hargreaves:)

Then there were the bible stories where god inserts "R rated" violence and stuff into children's minds! I preferred Green eggs and ham actually to somebody getting slain by a sword!

BM:)

Taylor Harbin
12-12-2013, 07:28 PM
I was one of those kids who hated reading because it was related to school. But of the books I DID like:

- Hardy Boys
- Bernstein Bears
- Dr. Seuss
- Magic School Bus
- Hatchet
- Huck Finn

roundtable
12-12-2013, 09:05 PM
I was a bookworm. From the youngest memories, Dr. Seuss, books by Wende Devlin (Cranberry Thanksgiving!), and a book my British grandmother sent me - Mog the Forgetful Cat - were favorites.

As I got older, I read Judy Blume and Lois Duncan exclusively. Lois Duncan led to my fascination with Dean R. Koontz and Stephen King when I was an older teen.

Noniej
12-22-2013, 07:25 AM
I feel lucky with the material that was available to me when I was a child. My parents didn't really read and were so proud to see their 8 year old with a big book that what I was reading wasn't investigated. The first book I bought for myself (at 8) was Great Expectations - I devoured it by day and it terrified me by night. :-)

Dickens was my favourite for a long time. I read Wuthering Heights when I didn't at all understand it. I'm forever saying I must read it again. I always feel I've missed something.

I wanted to go to boarding school and play lacrosse thanks to Enid Blython and if that wasn't possible, I could be a child detective.

Tom Sawyer and Hucklebury Finn - I read those sitting by the river one summer - I felt like I was there.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was my first Agatha Christie at age 11.

I love to remember those books, and remember too how I was afraid that the world would run out of books one day.

I hope you all have a wonderful book to add to your memories over Christmas. :-)

Inky
12-22-2013, 08:12 AM
Goodnight Moon (Find the bunny on each page--passed it along to my daughters)
The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe (I'd sit in my closet for hours, hoping for snow and tea with Mr. Tumnus)
Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret (My sister's book that I swiped)
Blubber
Gone With The Wind (Hating this ending, I sat down to re-write this, and carry on where Ms. Mitchell left off. I was very sure of myself in my youth)

goodbyelizajane
12-31-2013, 04:52 AM
Brilliant thread; I'm still mining it for my to-read list though many of my favourites are mentioned above.

I'll note one that isn't: Great Ghost Stories of the World; or, the Haunted Omnibus, edited by Alexander Laing, illustrated by Lynd Ward. I don't suppose many parents today would read these terrifying stories to their children, but it must've been some tradition in our family as my mother inherited the book from her own mother, and we sat up many a late night when I was quite young reading "The Screaming Skull" and "The Monkey's Paw," and especially Algernon Blackwood's "The Wendigo," for I grew up in a great northern forest where the Wendigo always seemed to linger just outside my window.

The book comprised short-short stories and tidbits in between the primary fare, but it was the opening quote by Joyce that always scared me the most:

"What is a ghost?" Stephen said with tingling energy. "One who has faded into impalpability through death, through absence, through change of manners."

It's long out of print but thankfully you can still get it used on the cheap.

elinor
01-02-2014, 07:31 AM
Pretty much every science fiction and fantasy book written in the last hundred years, my parents had it. They had more books than the town library. They were heavily involved in the science fiction community before they had me. I grew up reading about Callahan's place, and the falling threads, but it was Barbara Hambly's wizards who really stuck with me. My grandmother was also adamant about exposing me to Georgette Heyer so I read most of her books by the time I was a teenager. This meant I was always using British spelling for years without realizing it was improper, like -re instead of -er and -our instead of -or.

Trapjaw
02-06-2014, 04:29 PM
I started reading at a very early age; my mom started teaching me when I was around 3, so that by the time I was in kindergarten, I could already recognise a few words. I was very much into non-fiction as a young child - particularly anything to do with animals, which I was (still am) crazy about.

Later on, around age 7 perhaps, I started reading The Hardy Boys novels, and also Willard Price's ___ Adventure novels, which I was massively into!