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CatharsisChild
08-11-2011, 11:37 PM
I've really wanted to write this sci-fi noir for a long time. I won't go into to too much detail about the plot, but I want it to be a quick read, almost like a hardboiled paperback from back in the day (at the minimum, 180 pages). It's narrated in the first person by a femme fatale of sorts, in a stream-of-consciousness style that is terse, uncensored, and filled with metaphor and parallel structure that would make Frank Miller proud. It has a bittersweet ending where both sides experience a Phyrric victory, and the morality of the characters is gray versus black: the scarred versus the scum. There is a London trenchcoat. Cars from the forties and fifties with VTOL capabilities. It constantly rains, and gets heavier as the story goes on. Nightclubs with questionable clientele. Lots of smoke. A convoluted jigsaw puzzle plot. Corrupt cops and government officials. An abandoned waterfront warehouse. The violence in the story is usually quick and anticlimactic, and while there is nudity, it's mostly non-sexual, and the sex itself is implied rather than shown.

Yep. Sounds very noir.

mirandashell
08-11-2011, 11:45 PM
No it doesn't. Noir isn't stream-of-consciousness. And it's about more than trench coats and sleazy nightclubs.

CatharsisChild
08-11-2011, 11:51 PM
Stream-of-consciousness in noir? Two words: Jim Thompson.

mirandashell
08-11-2011, 11:54 PM
Who?

Mr Flibble
08-11-2011, 11:57 PM
Most noir isn't stream of conciousness (I suppose it could be, provided the conciousness involved is cynical). Not sure about the parallel structure either - depends what you mean by that. The rest of it sounds fairly noir though.

However, what question are you asking here?

CatharsisChild
08-11-2011, 11:58 PM
Wrote a ton of hardboiled crime books back then. Put a literary spin on them. I'm sure you may have heard of The Killer Inside Me, a notable case of the unreliable narrator.

To answer the previous poster, I really want to capture the essence of the genre in a sci-fi setting. It's been done before in films like Blade Runner and Gattaca, and even influenced punk sci-fi to a certain extent. A theme of this book is nostalgia and memory, and how they have baggage. The noir vibe kind of strengthens it, in my opinion.

mirandashell
08-11-2011, 11:59 PM
Hmmmmm....... not what I'd call noir but what do I know.....

CatharsisChild
08-12-2011, 12:03 AM
Noir itself is the subject of much controversy as to what the true definition of it is. In general, people see it as a style.

mirandashell
08-12-2011, 12:04 AM
Hmmm......

To be honest, I hate stream of consciousness. So I wouldn't read it anyway. I love noir but even that wouldn't make me read SoC.

CatharsisChild
08-12-2011, 12:06 AM
It takes awhile to get used to. I still haven't gotten into Faulkner.

Mr Flibble
08-12-2011, 12:08 AM
Still have no idea what you're asking.

If you want to write SF noir, do it. Plenty of fantasy noir about. I coudl probably think of a couple of SF noirs, if you want.

mirandashell
08-12-2011, 12:09 AM
It takes awhile to get used to. I still haven't gotten into Faulkner.


There isn't enough time in the Continuum for me to 'get used to it'.


And yeah, what are you asking?

CatharsisChild
08-12-2011, 12:09 AM
I just want some advice about how to make it nostalgic. A respectful throwback.

Mr Flibble
08-12-2011, 12:11 AM
How to make it nostalgic?

Nostalgic for what? Nostalgia is a tone - a regret for things lost, or how things used to be. So...write like that? With your MC being nostalgic? Regretting the past, or what he once had.

I am at a loss.

I think you'd be better off crystallising what you're asking.

Chase
08-12-2011, 12:11 AM
She stubbed out her smoke stick in one of the Vegan's five eyes. "Maybe now you're twenty percent blind, you'll slow down enough to listen. Put up your tentacles . . . all of 'em . . . or feel the flame of my ion heater, bubba."

When the Vegan asked if she meant testicles, she burnt a hole through him you could fly a shuttle through.

mirandashell
08-12-2011, 12:11 AM
What do you mean by nostalgic?

CatharsisChild
08-12-2011, 05:36 AM
It's an homage, basically.

Summonere
08-12-2011, 07:18 PM
Sounds like homework time. Read some good examples of what you're after. Seems Stephen King vaunted William Hjortsberg's use of nostalgia in his 1978 novel, “Falling Angel” (detective noir/horror, set in New York, 1958, likely better known in its movie incarnation, “Angel Heart”) – been a long time since I read it, so I could be wrong, but that book was H's homage to the likes of Chandler and Hammet, and it's short.

William Gibson's “Neuromancer” is a famous noir SF novel, albeit not one suffused with nostalgia (oh it's in there, but I don't recall it being more forceful than, say, a general air of pathos).

Jim Thompson is good and gritty noir, but I don't recall any nostalgia, there. Of course you could also read some Chandler and focus on the bits of his work that evoke the emotional tones you're looking for.

Good luck with the project. Sounds interesting.

Rufus Coppertop
08-12-2011, 11:15 PM
I just want some advice about how to make it nostalgic. A respectful throwback.


Write it. Write it with all the elements you've stated above and let those who read it feel the nostalgia if they have the disposition to do so.

Ria13
08-13-2011, 11:23 PM
Stream-of-consciousness in noir? Two words: Jim Thompson.
I think you have confused stream-of-consciousness with internal monologue.

(my knowledge of his works consists of only having read The Killer Inside Me, though, so maybe I have that wrong.)

DrZoidberg
08-15-2011, 03:20 PM
I've had a similar project. I bought a bunch of Mike Hammer books and burned through them to get the tone right. And then I channeled the spirit of Hammer. I was trying to be satirical. But I was quite pleased with the result.

BigWords
08-15-2011, 10:07 PM
Stream-of-consciousness in noir? Two words: Jim Thompson.


Who?

One third of the Hardboiled Holy Trinity, alongside Hammett and Chandler.


And then I channeled the spirit of Hammer.

Which can be as dangerous as aping the style of any writer - there is a fine line between homage and parody, as Sledgehammer (an old television show) made abundantly clear...