PDA

View Full Version : Books with Christian themes in them?



Ivonia
11-12-2005, 10:51 AM
What are some books that you know of which has Christian virtues in them, but doesn't exactly fall under "christian literature"?

One of my works in progress has some heavy Christian themes in it (such as "love thy enemy"), but the book is fantasy in nature. I guess you could say I'm trying to write a book that shows Christian virtues without blatantly expressing them outright (or "preaching" I suppose is a more appropiate term).

I've heard someone say that Chronicles of Narnia is sort of an example of this (is it? I haven't read the books yet), but what other books do you know of? I want to read them and see how the authors handled those issues, so I can get an idea of how to do it (or else come up with something entirely new, so as to not look like I'm a worthless hack who just stole someone else's idea).

Sorry if I'm sounding kind of vague. I have some big plot twists involving some spiritual aspects (the story is in a fictional futuristic world, but I'm trying to write it in such a way that people will connect and relate with them anyway), and I wanted to see how others have done it.

Gravity
11-12-2005, 04:02 PM
Ivonia...it may sound crazy, but check out any of Dean Koontz's stuff from the last five years or so, such as One Door Away From Heaven, The Face, Hideaway, Life Expectancy, or The Taking. He gets away with stuff that would never fly in the CBA. In my opinion, if that guy isn't a believer, I'll eat my hat.

John

Pat~
11-12-2005, 05:52 PM
And if you're a fantasy writer, you really ought to read Narnia. Lewis didn't write these with the purpose of trying to write Christian allegory. (They were originally stories told to nieces and nephews.) But all the themes are there, and expertly so.

Cheryll
11-13-2005, 05:09 PM
Ivonia...it may sound crazy, but check out any of Dean Koontz's stuff from the last five years or so, such as One Door Away From Heaven, The Face, Hideaway, Life Expectancy, or The Taking. He gets away with stuff that would never fly in the CBA. In my opinion, if that guy isn't a believer, I'll eat my hat.

John

I completely agree with you, John.

Cheryll

Robin Bayne
12-04-2005, 11:30 PM
The Lord of the Rings Trilogy.

fallenangelwriter
12-05-2005, 06:08 AM
first of all, not all chrisitan virtues are uniquely chrisitan. "love thy enemy" can be a part of a purely secular philosophy.

Narnia, however, has not just chrisitan virtues but chrisitan theology in it, as well as references to specific biblical events.

that, to me, is the dividing line between christian fiction and general fiction.

Puddle Jumper
12-05-2005, 08:51 AM
I've heard someone say that Chronicles of Narnia is sort of an example of this (is it? I haven't read the books yet)
Yes, Christian allegory I believe. Jesus takes form in the land of Narnia as a Lion named Aslan, son of the Emperor beyond the sea.

SPOILER ALERT, I'm going to explain how so don't read if you don't want to know.




When the kids enter into the land of Narnia in "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe," the plot unfolds where Aslan must sacrifice his life to save one of the children who fell into slavery to the White Witch. But then Aslan comes to life again and defeats the White Witch.

All the children from earth who enter Narnia are known as sons of Adam and daughters of Eve. In "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," they go to the very edge of the sea where one member on the ship sails on past the end of the world into Aslan's country, never to return. Though others also desire to go, they are not yet allowed since it's not their time. As three kids from earth - Edmund & Lucy Pevensieve (sp?) and their cousin Eustuce Scrubb are walking near the end of the world, they come across a lamb. The lamb then transforms into the Lion Aslan who tell Edmund and Lucy that they will never again be allowed back into Narnia and when they despair he tells them that he is also in their world and that they must come to know him by his name there. (Jesus)

Aside from that, the stories are all filled with Christian stories and values told in a fantasy setting in the land of Narnia. You should read them, they're easy reads and each book isn't that long. I've only two more to read, "The Silver Chair," and "The Last Battle."

Betty W01
12-06-2005, 01:26 AM
I just read a book called Kitty and the Midnight Hour, featuring a late night DJ who just happens to be a werewolf. The author asked some interesting moral questions in the context of the fantasy world Kitty lives in that made me wonder where she (he? - can't remember) was coming from. I'm looking forward to seeing how the character develops in the next book, Kitty Goes to Washington. Has anyone else read this book? What do you think?