PDA

View Full Version : "Dead" languages



Averon 2011
07-14-2011, 04:03 AM
DELETE

Xelebes
07-14-2011, 04:07 AM
They can be considered dead because there are several words from those languages that remain a mystery. For example, the Old English word ides. Currently it is thought to mean a revered woman (glossed as Latin, matrona), but it could also mean something like the Norse Dís (Norns and Valkyries.) It could mean both, but we are not sure.

Alessandra Kelley
07-14-2011, 04:17 AM
I thought a dead language was one that people have to learn after their native language, that nobody speaks from birth anymore.

Medievalist
07-14-2011, 04:20 AM
A dead language is one that is not longer growing or changing.

A dead language is one that is not used for colloquial conversation.

Classical Latin, Old English, Old Irish, Old Norse are all dead; there are modern cognates, but they are sufficiently different that the ancestor languages require modern study.

Medievalist
07-14-2011, 04:22 AM
And also what are the chances of dead languages being revived in a spoken form? They somehow managed to resurrect Hebrew specifically so that people forming the country of Israel could have a national language, so would they be able to do that with other older/classical languages?

New Latin is a modern artificial version of Classical and Church Latin.

Modern Irish, apart from areas of the Gaeltacht, is an artificial creation that is very different from Old Irish, Middle Irish, and Classical Irish.

Modern Cornish is another reconstructed, artificial language.

thothguard51
07-14-2011, 04:34 AM
I thought dead languages is what zombies speak...

Susan Lanigan
07-19-2011, 01:09 PM
New Latin is a modern artificial version of Classical and Church Latin.

Modern Irish, apart from areas of the Gaeltacht, is an artificial creation that is very different from Old Irish, Middle Irish, and Classical Irish.

Modern Cornish is another reconstructed, artificial language.

An ea? :)

The accent is artificial all right, caighdeán Irish and proper Irish in dialect sound pretty different, but the language I believe is similar.