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JennieRose8
07-13-2011, 09:29 AM
Sorry, I don't know what happened to my teacher thread, so I need to know once again who'd volunteered to offer input when I need it. Could you please reply again? I think it got deleted when the forum was being worked on.

Thanks

Jen

Nianne
07-13-2011, 06:13 PM
I'm not a teacher, but I used to be a teacher's aide. I'd be happy to help if I can.

vitt_0
07-13-2011, 09:31 PM
English teacher here. Happy to help...

Jstwatchin
07-13-2011, 09:33 PM
Taught everything from Pre-school to Grad school. I remember the thread (and having answered there), but cannot remember the question...

JennieRose8
07-14-2011, 12:33 PM
Thank you, folks. I suppose one of the things I'll need help with is the teacher's lessons. I don't plan on going in-depth, but a little bit about how you prepare them and what generally makes up the school year would be nice- that would be for high school senior English.

Thanks in advance. :)

Jen

vitt_0
07-14-2011, 07:13 PM
I am actually teaching an undergrad student, but I would think there are many crossovers between that and teaching high school.

Preparing the lesson is actually quite simple. In general, it takes teachers one or two hours to review the book, and take notes as to what they'll say in the classroom. For the more experienced ones or those who have been very familiar to the readings, they could only need a quick 10 -15 mins review. And teachers like to do that closer to the teaching time as opposed to two, three days before.

These days, students are more and more expected to lead the discussions where teachers just act as an observer and instructor. In the case of a large class discussion, teachers prepare even less or even none at all.

The curriculum can be decided by the school, or by the previous year's curriculum or by the conversation the teacher has with the dean. In any case, the teacher is expected to meet the schedules that were set in the beginning of the term. The books can either be chosen by the teacher or pre determined by the school.

Again, it's all relative, and i only have experience as an undergrad teacher. But hopefully this helps.

I also noticed from other thread that the topic of what you're working on is about teacher's crush. I happen to have some insights based on real life experience. Let me know if i can help more.

Rio

JennieRose8
07-15-2011, 05:14 AM
Hey, thanks for your input. My teacher (in the story) is new, so I suppose he'd take a little more time for preparation. But thanks for the heads up, because I can have him get a routine going where it isn't as time consuming.

Jen

Gretad08
07-15-2011, 08:02 AM
I just finished my student teaching, and from what I've been told, it's similar to your first two years of teaching b/c you have to create everything from scratch. Quizzes, notes, tests, etc. all have to be written from scratch. That takes a TON of time. The first test I wrote was a 100 question multiple choice, and short answer test over Romeo and Juliet. It probably took me about 3-4 hours. This included creating all the questions and possible answer choices, proof-reading, printing, and making 150 copies.

Also, at the beginning of the school year English teachers meet with others in their dept. to plan who will be teaching what, and when. For example, they can't all teach To Kill a Mockingbird at the same time because there aren't enough books and other supplies, so they try to make sure they stagger their units.

Hope this helps.

JennieRose8
07-15-2011, 04:18 PM
I just finished my student teaching, and from what I've been told, it's similar to your first two years of teaching b/c you have to create everything from scratch. Quizzes, notes, tests, etc. all have to be written from scratch. That takes a TON of time. The first test I wrote was a 100 question multiple choice, and short answer test over Romeo and Juliet. It probably took me about 3-4 hours. This included creating all the questions and possible answer choices, proof-reading, printing, and making 150 copies.

Also, at the beginning of the school year English teachers meet with others in their dept. to plan who will be teaching what, and when. For example, they can't all teach To Kill a Mockingbird at the same time because there aren't enough books and other supplies, so they try to make sure they stagger their units.

Hope this helps.


Kewl, thanks for the info. :)

ebennet68
07-16-2011, 01:05 PM
Thank you, folks. I suppose one of the things I'll need help with is the teacher's lessons. I don't plan on going in-depth, but a little bit about how you prepare them and what generally makes up the school year would be nice- that would be for high school senior English.

Thanks in advance. :)

Jen


Many states are adopting what are known as the Common Core Standards. These are what a teacher must follow when preparing lessons.

Here is a link to the English Common Core Standards for grades 11 and 12.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards/reading-literature-6-12/grade-11-12/


As to how you prepare lessons, that can range from working with a colleague to research on the internet to just sitting at home, pouring over books and writing down your ideas. Sometimes you just have that teachable moment that you haven't planned for but you go with the flow because that is what the class needs. Those are moments that are so much fun!

JennieRose8
07-17-2011, 09:40 PM
Many states are adopting what are known as the Common Core Standards. These are what a teacher must follow when preparing lessons.

Here is a link to the English Common Core Standards for grades 11 and 12.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards/english-language-arts-standards/reading-literature-6-12/grade-11-12/


As to how you prepare lessons, that can range from working with a colleague to research on the internet to just sitting at home, pouring over books and writing down your ideas. Sometimes you just have that teachable moment that you haven't planned for but you go with the flow because that is what the class needs. Those are moments that are so much fun!

Hey, thanks for the link! This is great! :)

Darkshore
07-17-2011, 10:06 PM
I've only taught first grade, but I can relate to how a new teacher would feel. Even in a room full of youngins I was extremely nervous and had a hard time being stern with the little ones that were misbehaving (planning to teach older kids). Discipline and knowing the education level of all of your students is a big thing, especially in an inclusion classroom. My class had a kid on the autistic spectrum, he had his own personal aid, but you are still expected to include him in every lesson. This may be difficult, but I didn't have to much trouble with it, and I was happy to see that his classmates had absolutely no problem interacting with him. Back when I was in school I would have do to not being used to it. Hope I helped.

Chase
07-18-2011, 01:36 AM
I suppose one of the things I'll need help with is the teacher's lessons. I don't plan on going in-depth, but a little bit about how you prepare them and what generally makes up the school year would be nice- that would be for high school senior English.


Jen, I taught senior college-prep English for six years in a Catholic high school.

In the first year, I wrote meticulous daily lesson plans for reading through and writing from an older English literature text. We began with Beowulf, read some Canterbury Tales and Macbeth, and then went onto several modern short stories and a novel. Students handed in a two-page paper every Friday, which was returned with corrections and comments on Mondays. We used ten-year old copies of an Oxford English Grammar to discuss grammar Q and A.

With minor tweaks, the principal wanted the same lesson plans repeated during the next five years.

Shakesbear
07-18-2011, 01:56 AM
Teacher in the UK. Nearing retirement (happy dance!) and has taught in a wide variety of schools, main stream, special needs, school for delicate children, schools for disturbed children and truancy centres. Age ranges - 5-18 year olds. Mainly in London but also, for the last 10 years in rural parts. Subjects - I have taught most subjects except physical education.

sk3erkrou
07-19-2011, 05:10 AM
Thank you, folks. I suppose one of the things I'll need help with is the teacher's lessons. I don't plan on going in-depth, but a little bit about how you prepare them and what generally makes up the school year would be nice- that would be for high school senior English.

Thanks in advance. :)

Jen

I am a ninth grade English teacher in Florida. I just graduated college in December and got a job right away. I replaced a teacher who used to work very closely with another teacher for lesson plans. When I came in, I continued doing this. What we would do is get together after school every other week or so, and talk about where we were and where we needed to go. We would have any books needed in front of us so we could so "Okay, on Wednesday we'll read pages 105-107, watch this scene in the movie, then read to page 110" (were teaching mythology and watching The Odyssey while reading the myth). This worked really well, then we would use our notes to share the duty of writing the lesson plans. I would be willing to send you a copy of a lesson plan if it would help.

JennieRose8
07-22-2011, 01:11 PM
I am a ninth grade English teacher in Florida. I just graduated college in December and got a job right away. I replaced a teacher who used to work very closely with another teacher for lesson plans. When I came in, I continued doing this. What we would do is get together after school every other week or so, and talk about where we were and where we needed to go. We would have any books needed in front of us so we could so "Okay, on Wednesday we'll read pages 105-107, watch this scene in the movie, then read to page 110" (were teaching mythology and watching The Odyssey while reading the myth). This worked really well, then we would use our notes to share the duty of writing the lesson plans. I would be willing to send you a copy of a lesson plan if it would help.

Hi, I appreciate the offer. I think what I really need is more input on Senior English lit. According some of my web research, the Lord of the Flies is read in Senior Lit (though, strangely, I don't remember reading that one. Of course, I took an AP English course. I remember reading all sorts of things, but not Lord of the Flies).

I would really like a lesson plan for Lord of the Flies, if anyone has that. I usually have the teachers/students working on things like Scarlet Letter and Tess of the D'Urbervilles, but I wanted something different this time, something that a little more ties into the theme of the story. Not that Lord of the FLies is a real close match, but there are elements there that can fit in.

I don't want to weight the story down with this, of course. But considering the guy's an English teacher, I need a bit more in the way of details.

Thanks, everyone. :)

Jen