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MRevelle83
06-28-2011, 02:42 PM
Hello all. I have been trying to create this thread for a little while now, but just now decided to take that plunge. Because... well, look at the title.

I have been doing research on child incarceration. I know a few details, but most of the articles I have found dealt with the psychological impact on children, statistics, etc.

I was wondering if anyone knew (or could link a helpful site) about incarceration of children or teens? Not sent to prison from being tried as an adult, but juvenile detention centers perhaps. What crimes are usually committed for such a thing to happen? What is life like inside?

Also, the book takes place in the '70s. And I have created a fictional location, so it doesn't matter if the knowledge is about a specific country. But I just found it difficult to find information that wasn't too vague (perhaps I suck at Google).

Wayne K
06-28-2011, 03:05 PM
The link in my signature "My motivation" is a death list from places that the courts send troubled teens. Its not pretty, but its real

Bigglesworth
06-28-2011, 04:32 PM
Here's an article from The Independant (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/i-thought-paul-was-a-success-story-paul-is-dead-aycliffe-durham-is-home-to-some-of-britains-most-disturbed-children-but-can-it-help-them-ann-mcferran-reports-1563498.html) about a children's home in the town where I grew up - one of the main centres of its type in Britain.

jclarkdawe
06-28-2011, 05:01 PM
I don't understand your question as it's too broad to address except in a book.

Youths up to the age of 16, 17, or 18 (depending upon state and maturity of youth) were sent to juvenile facilities. There are several reasons for this including state laws, practicality, and federal laws. Juvenile facilities can consist of group homes, retraining facilities like shock incarceration and boot camp, or youth detention facilities (same thing as jail).

Crimes range from the one big thing approach (murder, rape, armed robbery) to enough little things (misdemeanors) to annoy the crap out of a judge.

There are numerous books on juvenile justice, both written recently and written in the 70s. Get thee to a good sized library and start looking through the card catalog. If I go to the New Hampshire State Library's catalog, I find nearly 600 entries, with the first page littered with books from the 60s and the 70s. The internet is not the only place to do research.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

HistoryLvr
06-28-2011, 10:20 PM
Just to give you a quick answer: my mom works with the JV kids, both boys and girls, and because where I live there are a lot of gangs and the economy is real bad (Central Valley, CA), most of the crimes are lower-end felonies. Things like being in possession of a gun, theft, armed robbery, under-aged DUIs, etc. Just as a guess, I'd say theft, auto, petty, or normal, is over 50% of all our JV crimes.

As for the facilities, they are not exactly nice, they're quite barren really. The kids attend school on site, there are places for sports ie basketball courts, they have a small library, and the other facets of the adult jails are mostly the same. I can't get into as much detail about this as I've only heard stories, but I can tell you that for the most part, the kids who do commit crimes do it for reasons most middle- or upper-class folks wouldn't understand. Like they honestly believe if they don't steal food (or something they can sell for cash to buy food) they will starve. Many of them do not know who their parents are, or they're not around at all, so they try and live the only way they know how: through all the crime they see around them on the streets.

I hope this doesn't spark a debate or anything. I'm not saying the people in jail, any jail, don't deserve to be there, but going to see 13 year olds cooped up with a bunch of gang members with tattoos really can be sad.

ironmikezero
06-28-2011, 10:24 PM
Assuming you refer to criminal violations (juvenile detention can be under civil laws as well), I can give you a (US) federal perspective.

There are pragmatically speaking three classifications of detention; pre-trial, post-trial (convicted, pending sentencing), and sentenced. Prior to sentencing, the inmate is housed (usually) in a contracted juvenile facility convenient to the location of the court. In some circumstances, the juvenile may be held in an adult facility (jail) if it has separate housing accommodations (juveniles are not exposed to adult offenders). After conviction, a pre-sentencing investigation is typically ordered by the court. During the pendency thereof, the convicted juvenile stays in his/her current detention housing. After sentencing (assuming a period of incarceration is imposed - usually less any time served while in pre-sentencing status) the US Bureau of Prisons will determine where the sentence will be served, usually a contracted state/local facility.

This does not vary too much from the way adult offenders are processed.

Detention facilities (prisons, correctional centers, jails, etc.) are dangerous places. Violence is pervasive - moreso among young adults, and especially among juveniles. Life is cheap, easily spent, and there are no refunds.

It was so in the 1970s, the 1870s, it is now, and it will likely be so in the 2070s.

MRevelle83
06-29-2011, 08:32 AM
I know it's a broad question, but I was looking for more of a broad answer. While there is still much more researching that I will need to do, I will say thank you to everyone here as this was what I was looking for.

Thanks to all of you for this information. (And, yes, I have gone- and plan to go back to- libraries. Didn't mean to give the impression I didn't.)



I don't understand your question as it's too broad to address except in a book.

Youths up to the age of 16, 17, or 18 (depending upon state and maturity of youth) were sent to juvenile facilities. There are several reasons for this including state laws, practicality, and federal laws. Juvenile facilities can consist of group homes, retraining facilities like shock incarceration and boot camp, or youth detention facilities (same thing as jail).

Crimes range from the one big thing approach (murder, rape, armed robbery) to enough little things (misdemeanors) to annoy the crap out of a judge.

There are numerous books on juvenile justice, both written recently and written in the 70s. Get thee to a good sized library and start looking through the card catalog. If I go to the New Hampshire State Library's catalog, I find nearly 600 entries, with the first page littered with books from the 60s and the 70s. The internet is not the only place to do research.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe