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Xelebes
06-08-2011, 03:05 AM
For folks who like reading and speaking in the Dutch tongues (English, Dutch, Norse, Swedish,) this thread may be fun. The thought is to leave out all loaned words from outside the Dutch tongues - almost like how if the Siege of Hastings in 1066 had backfired for the Normans. Many of the kennings will have become not like then and some of what is now spoken so readily will not be spoken so much. In the end we get something that looks like lawful writs with the needed old foreputwords and deed wordlings.

But, let us see how far we will go. I know Lisa will not be too happy at how freely we are smearing this fine tongue with these swettleless strivings.

Standards:

Anglish: All words come from Anglo-Saxon first and any words that cannot be found must be from a Dutch tongue.
New Anglo-Saxon: All words come from Anglo-Saxon and must be built up using offlide (ablaut) and ymblide (umlaut) to nudge findled words.
Orwell's English: Use only English words and not dig too deep into Anglo-Saxon. Borrow words from other Dutch tongues if you must, but use English spellings.

Xelebes
06-08-2011, 03:08 AM
Oh, and if anyone wanted to see what Netherlanderish looks like with all its loanwords left out, here you go! (http://bondtegenleenwoorden.nl/)

Xelebes
06-30-2011, 06:20 AM
Is this thread to hard to write in? Does it take too much forethought? Or are the folks reading this baffled as a whole as to what I am saying?

Rufus Coppertop
06-30-2011, 06:53 PM
Does that mean that "smashery" becomes the new word for "vandalism"?

Xelebes
06-30-2011, 11:06 PM
Does that mean that "smashery" becomes the new word for "vandalism"?

There is no brooked answer for that, so I guess it is a go.

Alessandra Kelley
07-01-2011, 02:43 AM
A blithe game!

Xelebes
07-01-2011, 03:07 AM
We could sit here and draw out the marks of saws, tales, songs, leids, galders, plays, lakes, larks, spells and what not besundering the written bodies. It would be the height of fun!

Anyone got a good word for the deed "type"? I'm leaning towards truckle (oftfall shape of thrutch) and key.

Bartholomew
07-01-2011, 12:36 PM
I'm not much for this; I like my tongue as it stands.

...wait, I think I'm doing it.

Rufus Coppertop
07-01-2011, 09:30 PM
Anyone got a good word for the deed "type"? I'm leaning towards truckle (oftfall shape of thrutch) and key.

I'm minden by truckling to embiggen me boke.

Xelebes
07-02-2011, 03:31 AM
Minden? Are you striving to say you are busy truckling to fatten your book?

Rufus Coppertop
07-02-2011, 07:13 AM
Minden? Are you striving to say you are busy truckling to fatten your book?

Forsooth.

Xelebes
07-02-2011, 07:15 AM
Is your book a saw or a moot?

Rufus Coppertop
07-02-2011, 07:29 AM
Is your book a saw or a moot?

I'm pretty sure it's a moot. I'm assuming that "saw" means comic as in seeing=visual?

Moot has connotations of thinking or imagining?

Albedo
07-02-2011, 07:50 AM
I'm here on the between-nets, seeing mine sap-bitish* aerrandbook (ǽrendbˇc)**.



*electronic, or 'related to amber particles'
**I couldn't find another term for mail not derived from French, so I looked up the OE.

Xelebes
07-02-2011, 08:51 AM
I'm pretty sure it's a moot. I'm assuming that "saw" means comic as in seeing=visual?

Moot has connotations of thinking or imagining?

Saw as in "Oh, here comes that old saw again," or "Reminds me of that old saw." Saw is akin to the word Saga and Saying.

Moot would be not a saw but a row, a lore, an output of a meeting or something. Definition 9 (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/moot)

Xelebes
07-02-2011, 08:55 AM
I'm here on the between-nets, seeing mine sap-bitish* arrandbook (ǽrendbˇc)**.



*electronic, or 'related to amber particles'
**I couldn't find another term for mail not derived from French, so I looked up the OE.

the web
Sparking
errand, errandbook (your spelling was off.)

Rufus Coppertop
07-02-2011, 05:47 PM
Saw as in "Oh, here comes that old saw again," or "Reminds me of that old saw." Saw is akin to the word Saga and Saying.

Moot would be not a saw but a row, a lore, an output of a meeting or something. Definition 9 (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/moot)

Probably more of a saw then.

Xelebes
07-03-2011, 12:56 AM
And what is your saw? A Tale of Yore? A Thriller? Whodunnit? A Towardly Tale? A Whimsiful Tale? A Lover's Tale? A Hamer's Tale? Steampunk? A Witherbound Tale?

Rufus Coppertop
07-03-2011, 07:37 AM
And what is your saw? A Tale of Yore? A Thriller? Whodunnit? A Towardly Tale? A Whimsiful Tale? A Lover's Tale? A Hamer's Tale? Steampunk? A Witherbound Tale?

Steampunk with much galdorcraeft and gehygd haeling using ligetung and werewolfen, two boys are the aethelings with much anginn.

Xelebes
07-03-2011, 08:11 AM
Steampunk with much galdorcraeft and gehygd haeling using ligetung and werewolfen, two boys are the aethelings with much anginn.

Let me get this straight: "Steampunk with much galdorcraft and y-hyked healing noting lightning and werewolves, two boys are the athelings with much anginn?"

Rufus Coppertop
07-14-2011, 01:37 AM
Yes.

Xelebes
07-14-2011, 02:12 AM
Well then, it's good that we have that all straightened out.

Xelebes
07-14-2011, 03:31 AM
Has anyone striven to forspeak a lofty writing that is weighted down by unreadable Romish, Greekish and other belearnt words? Something like the writings on the cuns of faxwork, lichlore or starlore?

Rufus Coppertop
07-14-2011, 10:03 AM
I'm sorry Xelebes but this is too hard for my meagre little brain.

cuns of faxwork? lichlore?

starlore has to be astrology or even astronomy.

Xelebes
07-14-2011, 11:33 AM
cun = experiment (think cunning)
faxwork = quantum mechanics (fack = gap (New English: unit, interval, period of time); see High Dutch fach)
lichlore = medicine & anatomy (lich = cadaver, body)
starlore = astronomy (astrology would be star-reading)

It is much more swift and thylecraftly than the heavy belearnt words.

Xelebes
07-16-2011, 03:56 AM
To show, aliken the unforspoken Andrew Wiles' Reckoning of Fermat's Last Rimetroth and the forspoken.

Andrew Wiles' Modular elliptic curves & Fermat's Last Theorem (http://math.stanford.edu/~lekheng/flt/wiles.pdf)


A ring-shadow's edge over Q is said to bend back if it has an ending skin by an edge bending back in the shape Xo(N). Any such (ring-shadow) edge has its mark where its Hasse-Weil zed rimewile has an ongoing unwhelminghood and fulfills a working likening of the standard kith. If a ring-shadow's edge over Q with a given j-fastener bends back then it is easy to see that all ring-shadow's edges with the same j-fastener bend back (which we can then say that the j-fastener bends back.) A well-known guess which grew out of the work of Shimura and Taniyama in the 1950s and 1960s says that every ring-shadow's edge over Q bends back. However, it only became widely known through it's forlaying in another reckoning of Weil in 1967 (as a game for the gripped reader!), in which, moreover, Weil gave forefindling hints for the guess. Although it had been shown rimewise that in many setups, before the outcomes told in this writing, it had only been known that an ending tally of j-fasteners bended back.

Bartholomew
07-18-2011, 01:07 PM
It was the best of fax, it was the worst of fax, it was a span of the aldlearnish, it was a span of the stomish...

Maybe.

Xelebes
07-19-2011, 06:34 AM
It's the ghost that tallies.

Xelebes
08-16-2011, 01:49 AM
This thread must be awoken from the netherleaves.

Xelebes
10-07-2011, 04:02 PM
So on another thread we were speaking amongst ourselves about the Teddish shape of learnt tales and learning-games. I thought I give this thread another breath of life to see if we can further the back-and-forth here.

AnWulf
11-15-2011, 03:41 AM
Standards:

Anglish: All words come from Anglo-Saxon first and any words that cannot be found must be from a Dutch tongue.
New Anglo-Saxon: All words come from Anglo-Saxon and must be built up using offlide (ablaut) and ymblide (umlaut) to nudge findled words.
Orwell's English: Use only English words and not dig too deep into Anglo-Saxon. Borrow words from other Dutch tongues if you must, but use English spellings.

Let me tell yu what will make yur life eather (eath = easy, eather = easier) ...

Take it slow! Don't try to swap all the words until yur're well rooted. ...

Keep the fustra (OE for focus) on Latinates and the eath Greek words like half-world for hemisphere ... Don't bother with words like "problem" ... leave 'em be for now.

If is has a Germanic root ... brook (use) it! Many French words hav Germanic roots so don't toss a word only for the sake that it is French.

Gloss a lot! If you brook something that others may not know, gloss it at least once.

Make a list of the words that yu brook ... mine is ferly (very) long!

AnWulf
11-15-2011, 03:56 AM
Has anyone striven to forspeak a lofty writing that is weighted down by unreadable Romish, Greekish and other belearnt words? Something like the writings on the cuns of faxwork, lichlore or starlore?

I hav some of a sci-fi writ written with few Latinates. An editor told me that I was brooking too many "Middle English" words! lol

BTW, while starlore works for astronomy (study of the stars), the OE word for astronomy was tungolcraft. Tungol = planet.

One of the places (place is a fore-1066 Latinate), that I hav put a few Anglish overbringings (translations) is here (http://lupussolus.typepad.com/). I haven't dun one in a while! Too busy with other things ...

Xelebes
11-15-2011, 05:45 AM
Well, it's good this thread thread has some life in it. Some of my words may be a bit daft or too from out in the open. Oh well, my knowledge of Old English stems from my work in High Dutch and dives into Norse and English folklores moreso than any dives into the wordcraft of the then tongue.

AnWulf
11-16-2011, 04:46 AM
Most tungs have more than one way to say something so don't feel bound to any one word.

Here's the way I do it:

1. See if there is alreddy a word in one wordbook or another than I can brook insted of a Latinate (I don't bother much with Greek rooted words unless there is an eath-seen [obvious] word I can brook) ... Folks will always go to a wordbook if they don't kno the word ... Often there is and it's marked obsolete, archaic, or Scots/Scottish. I take it and brook it anyway.

2. If not, then I go back to OE and find a word. From there I try to follow it thru ME. This often leads to a word that I can brook.

3. (Sometimes I do #3 before #2). I look at our brethren-Germanic tungs. Sometimes they yield a word or lead me to a word that can be brooked.

4. Check the Anglish moot to see if someone else has found one or made one that makes good meaning (sense).

5. I only upspring a word only as the last deed.

Xelebes
11-16-2011, 04:56 AM
I read the Anglish Moot a lot and has been a worthy mate in my writings here.

AnWulf
11-16-2011, 08:33 AM
I read the Anglish Moot a lot and has been a worthy mate in my writings here.

The Anglish Moot has become much better in the past few months. Someone (or some folks) hav been posting better suggestions and deleting some old, badly thought out ones. I put a few in.

Xelebes
11-16-2011, 09:29 AM
I think I've seen your name there. It can only get better if everyone works on it.

Xelebes
12-21-2011, 03:25 AM
Anglish Yuletide Wothes!


On the first day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
A great quail in a pear tree.

On the second day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the third day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.


On the fourth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the fifth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the sixth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the seventh day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the eighth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Eight maids y-milking
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the ninth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Nine ladies salting
Eight maids y-milking
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the tenth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Ten lords y-leaping
Nine ladies salting
Eight maids y-milking
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the eleventh day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Eleven pipers piping
Ten lords y-leaping
Nine ladies salting
Eight maids y-milking
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.

On the twelfth day of Yuletide, my true love gave to me. . .
Twelve drummers drumming
Eleven pipers piping
Ten lords y-leaping
Nine ladies salting
Eight maids y-milking
Seven swans y-swimming
Six geese y-laying
Five golden rings
Four calling birds
Three french hens
Two lover doves
And a great quail in a pear tree.


Eh? Eh?

Xelebes
06-23-2012, 06:42 PM
The half-yearly bump, besunderingly for those bewildered by AnWulf's writings in the Spelling Room.

AnWulf
06-23-2012, 09:09 PM
The half-yearly bump, besunderingly for those bewildered by AnWulf's writings in the Spelling Room.

LOL ... I'v add so many words and new spellings to my list.

I'v added besunders (like Ger. besonders) for especially. It seems to work. I'm adding bequeem for comfort / comfortable. I haven't found it truly noted but it makes sense. It's noted that way in German I think.

I try to keep my odd words down while on here. But if someone can find it in the Oxford Online or Wiktionary ... it's fair game!

Xelebes
06-24-2012, 12:07 AM
Does GemŘtlichkeit come athwart as Seeliness (alike the Netherdutch Gezelligheid?) and make seely a runner-up for "comfort"?