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ScribeLady
06-05-2011, 07:15 PM
On March 24th, I sent a full manuscript to an agent at her request. Her response to my query stated that they would get back to me in a month or two. Well, it's now 2+ months, and I'm wondering if I should try to find out what's going on.

This is a major agency and I don't want to screw up. Any thoughts about this? I'm also wondering how I should phrase an inquiry about this manuscript.

All wisdom and commentary will be greatly appreciated.

Scribelady

waylander
06-05-2011, 07:44 PM
First thing is to confirm that they received it, so that is what I would ask.

scope
06-05-2011, 08:00 PM
Her response to my query stated that they would get back to me in a month or two.
Scribelady

At least you know that she received your manuscript. I'd wait 2 more weeks and if no reply would send a SQ.

ScribeLady
06-05-2011, 08:47 PM
Actually, the only way I know she must have received the manuscript is when I received an out-of-office notice when I e-mailed it in.

Scribelady

scope
06-05-2011, 11:18 PM
On March 24th, I sent a full manuscript to an agent at her request. Her response to my query stated that they would get back to me in a month or two.
Scribelady

I took this to mean that she acknowledged (perhaps indirectly) that she received your manuscript.

Susan Littlefield
06-05-2011, 11:40 PM
I would give her two more weeks. If you don't hear back, politely ask for a status.

ScribeLady
06-07-2011, 04:53 AM
Two weeks sounds about right.

Thanks so much!

Scribelady

Doobie Cantrip
06-15-2011, 04:13 PM
So, I've just reached the three month mark with one of my fulls and though I know it would probably be wise to be patient a little longer, I know I'll send a nudge off into the ether in the next couple of days.
Is there perfect wording, or a correct format to follow when sending a nudge? I don't really want to "just check you received" as then if they respond with a simple "yes" I won't really be any the wiser!
Would appreciate some input from those of you with superior knowledge and experience!

Barbara R.
06-15-2011, 04:26 PM
What I'd be thinking is "Move your butt, you lazy *!**@!!." though I'd try to be more tactful in the letter. Ideally, what you want to write is that another agent has made an offer and you don't want to accept without giving Lazy Agent a chance to respond. But you would have mentioned if that's the case, so I assume it's not.

Humor's good, if you can manage it without a strain. Otherwise, I'd just go for something simple: "I wondered if you've had the opportunity to read MAGNUM OPUS, which I sent on your request last March."

Good luck!

PinkAmy
06-15-2011, 05:08 PM
I disagree with the above post.
An agent who hasn't gotten to your manuscript isn't lazy. He's probably busy with his signed clients, getting their manuscripts published etc. There might be a long queue, and he hasn't reached yours yet. Often agents read submissions on their own time, because they have so much work to do in the office. Lazy.
Don't use humor, because it doesn't always transfer well in emails and because your sense of humor might be different than his. Wait a bit longer. Some say 4 months, others 6 months. Keep your letter short and sweet. You know he's busy, but wanted to be sure he received your full that he requested on X date. I'd take the letter where he asked for a full and reply to that with your nudge to remind him who you are and what you sent. If the agent had read it, he would have responded and if he accidentally forgot to respond, your nudge will remind him. The last thing you want to do is seem like you're demanding or that you'd be a pain in the ass to work with (and I'm sure you're not.)

ink wench
06-15-2011, 05:32 PM
Keep it short, sweet, and professional. They may not have gotten to your MS yet, or they may have already tried to contact you and the email got lost (it happened to me - the agent had already emailed with a pass, but I never got it).

Dear Agent,

I wanted to check in to make sure you received my submission (sent on DATE) and see whether it was still under consideration. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Angsty Author

ScribeLady
06-16-2011, 07:10 PM
The time has come for me to send a nudge letter to an agent who, when informing me she wanted to see a full manuscript, said I would hear from them in a month or two. This e-mail was sent to me on March 24th. Should I wait until the end of this month?

In the meantime, I'm wondering what I should say in this nudge letter. Any thoughts?

Thanks so much for any and all wisdom!

Scribelady

Susan Littlefield
06-17-2011, 06:41 PM
What I'd be thinking is "Move your butt, you lazy *!**@!!." though I'd try to be more tactful in the letter. Ideally, what you want to write is that another agent has made an offer and you don't want to accept without giving Lazy Agent a chance to respond. But you would have mentioned if that's the case, so I assume it's not.

Humor's good, if you can manage it without a strain. Otherwise, I'd just go for something simple: "I wondered if you've had the opportunity to read MAGNUM OPUS, which I sent on your request last March."

Good luck!

Agents are not lazy at all. They are just busy. As for being more tactful in a nudge letter, I would say humor is not good, and perhaps a bit unprofessional. A polite, professional query on the status of one's manuscript is more than enough.

Doobie Cantrip
06-17-2011, 07:17 PM
Well, I sent the nudge and got a pretty speedy reply saying that she thought she'd responded ages ago! Marvellous(!)
She really enjoyed reading it but didn't think it was quite edgy enough . Ah well, there goes another one : (

Twizzle
06-17-2011, 07:39 PM
The time has come for me to send a nudge letter to an agent who, when informing me she wanted to see a full manuscript, said I would hear from them in a month or two. This e-mail was sent to me on March 24th. Should I wait until the end of this month?



I found it helpful, and more accurate, to always double their response times. At a minimum.

Twizzle
06-17-2011, 07:42 PM
Agents are not lazy at all.

Some are. :) So are some writers, editors,publicists, plumbers, teacher, dentists...