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View Full Version : Getting run over by a sheep sucks



GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 04:26 AM
We sold 5 sheep today. Around the third one the rams started getting a bit riled. It is kind of hot out (90's). He dove into the air majestic as a dolphin and then I realized, "Oh Shi..."

I had enough time to raise my arm since generally it is an accepted truth that it is a bad idea to try to head butt anything that grows its own horns. I saw the buyer cover her face in fear just before the impact.

Ouch does not convey the right sound. It was more of an, "Ughh," as he danced merrily away leading the ewes to trample me in their wake as I bounced off the fences. I don't believe in chiropractors, but now I think, "Maybe I should?"

And these are little sheep, like 70-90 pounds.

Tiny feet increase the impact.

I've opened my second bottle of Merlot wondering who won. No, I'm not wondering. They won.

veinglory
06-05-2011, 04:46 AM
I have never been hit by an airborn sheep but as a child I had my foot crushed my one. When I tried to push it off it just leaned back and ground its pointy little hoof into my toes. I was a bit leery of sheep for years after that. I should have been grateful that my sheep was not a ninja.

kuwisdelu
06-05-2011, 04:48 AM
Can't say that's happened to me yet. I wonder if it's happened to any of our sheep herders.

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 04:57 AM
... yet...

Ah yes, the key word.
There was a time once. I remember it fondly...this morning...when I could say that my tactics were foolproof regarding sheep psychology and how to avoid a thorough trampling.

MeretSeger
06-05-2011, 05:29 AM
Not to belittle your pain, but this (very) short story gave my entire family a moment of pure enjoyment. Well done!

And I really hope you feel better soon. Sheep are strong and very pointy for such fluffy creatures.

thothguard51
06-05-2011, 05:44 AM
Sheep taste good...

mccardey
06-05-2011, 05:44 AM
Not to belittle your pain, but this (very) short story gave my entire family a moment of pure enjoyment. Well done!

And I really hope you feel better soon. Sheep are strong and very pointy for such fluffy creatures.

Australia is also grinning widely.

But, you know - it's a terrible story. No, really... Dangerous things, sheep. Especially those little ones.... the whole fluffy thing is a con. As Meret points out, they're sharp little fuckers under the wool...

We're all very sorry. But just a teensy bit -
:ROFL:

Haggis
06-05-2011, 06:02 AM
Sheep taste good...
Yes, they do. And I would make sure I ate every bite of each of those sheep. You know, just to let them know who ruled the food chain and everything. :D

rainsmom
06-05-2011, 06:03 AM
Great story! I haven't tangled with a ram, but I've disagreed with a goat or two and once got my ass handed to me by a goose.

SWest
06-05-2011, 06:06 AM
Sheep also have killer breath. :D

I'd hug you, but, under the circumstances, maybe this is better:

:e2flowers Get some rest!

cooeedownunder
06-05-2011, 06:08 AM
Give the sheep a drink of the Merlot and sit back and watch them crash into the fences :D

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 06:09 AM
Australia is also grinning widely.

But, you know - it's a terrible story - no really...

We're all very sorry. But - just -

:roll:

Dangerous things, sheep. Especially those little ones.... the whole fluffy thing is a con. As Meret points out, they're sharp little fuckers under the wool...

:ROFL:

Rent...what's his name...Jackson...Peter Jackson's "Black Sheep?," Was that the title? It would have been hilarious to have seen it on a variety of TV shows exemplifying why average urbanites should never meet their dinner, wait, where's that other bottle of Merlot? Holy Shii! That bruise is going to be even worse in the morning!

Lesson: Never underestimate sheep. Not even little ones!"

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 06:20 AM
Great story! I haven't tangled with a ram, but I've disagreed with a goat or two and once got my ass handed to me by a goose.


OH!
The Goose!
The key is understanding their dynamics.
The key is to ignore every dang goose that attempts to get your attention. Only talk to, annoy, berate, the lead goose. Geese seem to assume that if you engage them then you must be at their level. If the geese are attacking baby chickens go inform him (the leader) or the problem and how you plan to remedy it by eating more geese. Suddenly they seem to understand English!

NinaK
06-05-2011, 06:29 AM
Be on your guard. He's going to tell the rest of them he bested you.

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 06:46 AM
Be on your guard. He's going to tell the rest of them he bested you.
Unfortunately I think that you are correct

cryaegm
06-05-2011, 07:50 AM
I had a goat once. It would headbutt me in the thigh and I was afraid if I fell down, it would headbutt me in the head.

Because of that, I was afraid to go outside and go near the goat unless it was a day where it decided to be nice.

Same with turkeys. Toms would chase me around the yard, trying to attack me and peck me. I would hate going inside the coup with my dad unless he kept the Tom at bay so I could grab the eggs.

frimble3
06-05-2011, 08:06 AM
Ah yes, the key word.
There was a time once. I remember it fondly...this morning...when I could say that my tactics were foolproof regarding sheep psychology and how to avoid a thorough trampling.


OH!
The Goose!
The key is understanding their dynamics.
The key is to ignore every dang goose that attempts to get your attention. Only talk to, annoy, berate, the lead goose. Geese seem to assume that if you engage them then you must be at their level. If the geese are attacking baby chickens go inform him (the leader) or the problem and how you plan to remedy it by eating more geese. Suddenly they seem to understand English!
Unfortunately, after reading the first post, the result of your knowledge of sheep psychology, I am just a tiny bit dubious of trusting your goose psychology. Fortunately, I have no livestock to worry about. And no-one understands cats.
Glad you survived the attack.

Susan Littlefield
06-05-2011, 08:43 AM
We sold 5 sheep today. Around the third one the rams started getting a bit riled. It is kind of hot out (90's). He dove into the air majestic as a dolphin and then I realized, "Oh Shi..."

I had enough time to raise my arm since generally it is an accepted truth that it is a bad idea to try to head butt anything that grows its own horns. I saw the buyer cover her face in fear just before the impact.

Ouch does not convey the right sound. It was more of an, "Ughh," as he danced merrily away leading the ewes to trample me in their wake as I bounced off the fences. I don't believe in chiropractors, but now I think, "Maybe I should?"

And these are little sheep, like 70-90 pounds.

Tiny feet increase the impact.

I've opened my second bottle of Merlot wondering who won. No, I'm not wondering. They won.

You should have had your shears ready to get their wool as they were trampling you. Or, if they'd been sheared beforehand, they would have weight about 39 lbs less.

Oh, how could I say that? :evil

I'm kidding, of course. All I can say is that must've really hurt. Nothing got broken, right? You're okay tonight?

Susan Littlefield
06-05-2011, 08:45 AM
Oh, when I was a child, we had a rooster who chased us around the yard pecking at our behinds. Mom never did tell me what happened to that mean old rooster.

mccardey
06-05-2011, 09:27 AM
One thing that does occur to me, is just how many people have had their lives made better because of this *thread.

Just imagine how many of us might have been planning to go out and get ourselves run down by a sheep, just to see if it sucked or not. And now we won't have to! :Sun:

Another win to AW, I think!!! Bless you, AW....

L.C. Blackwell
06-05-2011, 12:53 PM
Now that I'm done laughing....

If you're still sore today, try a hot bath and add a good amount of Epsom salts.

pdr
06-05-2011, 01:02 PM
McCardy, and you an Oz sheep expert as I'm a kiwi sheep expert. :)

No male animal is ever safe and a ram is dangerous. Thee and me know rams have killed people before now. I am amazed that a flying head butt did not break bones, George, but am assuming it was not a large Merino or Texel ram. My Perendale ram went into the freezer last year even though I had hand reared him. Once he reached hogget (two tooth) stage he began the old head butt and charge routine even with me. Just protecting his ewes, but too dangerous for people with his weight and speed behind a charge.

As for geese. It's the gander gets territorial in spring when the geese are nesting and he's a bugger. Can break your arm or leg with one blow from a wing. Some ganders are territorial all year and make wonderful watchdogs but the postman can't get to the door, nor can your friends. A broom is handy or the old neck grab and twirl him around 'til he's dizzy, but you have to be sure of your quick reaction and firm grasp!

mccardey
06-05-2011, 01:07 PM
No male animal is ever safe.



<- Charles begs to differ...

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 02:58 PM
but am assuming it was not a large Merino or Texel ram.

Soay

Nothing broken, but I'm moving kind of slow this morning

firedrake
06-05-2011, 03:05 PM
Those Soays can be aggressive little buggers.

I was watching Countryfile the other week. They have a weekly piece by their resident farmer. He had to check a Soay lamb (for scour, I think) and its Mama didn't make life easy for him.

I have mint sauce. Shall I send you some? :D

GeorgeK
06-05-2011, 03:11 PM
It was probably a good lesson for the toddlers watching who insisted that our Great Pyranees were the sheep that they really wanted.

Goldenleaves
06-05-2011, 03:12 PM
No male animal is ever safe and a ram is dangerous. Thee and me know rams have killed people before now. I am amazed that a flying head butt did not break bones, George, but am assuming it was not a large Merino or Texel ram. My Perendale ram went into the freezer last year even though I had hand reared him. Once he reached hogget (two tooth) stage he began the old head butt and charge routine even with me. Just protecting his ewes, but too dangerous for people with his weight and speed behind a charge.

As for geese. It's the gander gets territorial in spring when the geese are nesting and he's a bugger. Can break your arm or leg with one blow from a wing. Some ganders are territorial all year and make wonderful watchdogs but the postman can't get to the door, nor can your friends. A broom is handy or the old neck grab and twirl him around 'til he's dizzy, but you have to be sure of your quick reaction and firm grasp!

When I was a kid a load of sheep chased me up a haystack. I've never lived it down.

I really wish I'd thought of that technique for dealing with geese. My Grandmothers geese were fearsome.

Turkeys seem to dislike turkey coloured indian cotton skirts.

I was over twenty before I stopped running from things.

Peaceful countryside my ...

Quentin Nokov
06-05-2011, 06:30 PM
We sold 5 sheep today. Around the third one the rams started getting a bit riled. It is kind of hot out (90's). He dove into the air majestic as a dolphin and then I realized, "Oh Shi..."

I had enough time to raise my arm since generally it is an accepted truth that it is a bad idea to try to head butt anything that grows its own horns. I saw the buyer cover her face in fear just before the impact.

Ouch does not convey the right sound. It was more of an, "Ughh," as he danced merrily away leading the ewes to trample me in their wake as I bounced off the fences. I don't believe in chiropractors, but now I think, "Maybe I should?"

And these are little sheep, like 70-90 pounds.

Tiny feet increase the impact.

I've opened my second bottle of Merlot wondering who won. No, I'm not wondering. They won.


Should I apologize for laughing at your own expense? The mental picture has me in stitches. :roll:You're a good story teller.

Nothing like that has happened to me, but my father was pitched head-over-heels by a cow.

One day my father was in the field and a cow saw the dog -- it was minding its own business, by the way. The cow knew that the dog was petrified of cows and tore after it. My dad turned and saw a the heifer hot on the dogs heels. The dog ran and hid behind his leg.

The cow had had its attention fixated on the ground in its pursuit that it didn't notice my dad until his feet came into view. When the cow saw them, it put on its brakes and skidded to a stop, ramming its head into my dad. Then it looked up to see what was going on and pitched my dad over its back. He fell down its side next to its foot. He could feel the foot push off and the cow tore up to the barnyard.

JayMan
06-06-2011, 06:42 AM
I know nothing about sheep, save for what I've learned watching the cartoon Sheep in the Big City.

But I am posting here anyway because all your sheep stories are entertaining as hell.

pdr
06-06-2011, 02:00 PM
you don't have Shaun the Sheep in the US? He'd soon show you that sheep are canny blighters with a weird reasoning all their own.

He'd also make you laugh!

KQ800
06-06-2011, 02:29 PM
Was the rams name 'arold?

"One thing is for sure; a sheep is not a creature of the air. They have enormous difficulty in the comparatively simple act of perchin'. (crash) As you see. As for flight, its body is totally unadapted to the problems of aviation. Trouble is, sheep are very dim. Once they get an idea in their heads, there's no shifting it."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vkw2DdoskPY