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Chrisla
06-03-2011, 05:02 AM
If a death occurs outside a house, and it doesn't appear to be a suspicious death, how long would the police keep the family from going back into the house?

Do they ever escort family to the house for questioning and/or a walkthrough, to see if anythis is amiss?

I'd appreciate any help I can get!

heyjude
06-03-2011, 05:03 AM
:hi: Chrisla! I'm going to port you over to our Experts forum where you'll get lots of great advice. :)

alleycat
06-03-2011, 05:09 AM
When you say the death doesn't appear to be suspicious, do you mean the person has been sick or is elderly?

For many deaths the police aren't involved at all, or only marginally.

The location would also make a difference.

Sullivan Lee
06-03-2011, 05:42 AM
In Florida, where I worked, law enforcement went to every unattended death (that is, outside of a hospital or Hospice care) but if the person was obviously elderly or known to be terminally ill, all they'd have to do is write a basic report and contact the decedent's doctor to get a verbal statement that they would sign a death certificate. I can't see any reason why the family would be kept out of the house at all... though of course if you needed it for the story you could come up with a reason. Is this family that lived in the same house, or elsewhere? Probably technically the property should be preserved pending the reading of the will, but unless there was some obvious trouble brewing -- say, siblings screaming over who was going to snatch the family diamonds first -- I think law enforcement would always let family in right away.

AmsterdamAssassin
06-03-2011, 11:24 AM
If a death occurs outside a house, and it doesn't appear to be a suspicious death, how long would the police keep the family from going back into the house?

Do they ever escort family to the house for questioning and/or a walkthrough, to see if anythis is amiss?

I'd appreciate any help I can get!

Outside a house, how? In the garden? On the patio, strewn with broken glass from a patio door? In the shed? On the lawn next to the mailbox? On the sidewalk, with a fresh tomato pressed between the buttocks? In the street, with the head pulped and sticky bits of grey matter in the weaving bloody tyre tracks?

Zelenka
06-04-2011, 02:36 AM
We had a body found outside our house on Christmas day a few years ago, sure I've told this story before, but we had CID and uniform at the house, cordoned off the whole building for about six or seven hours, basically long enough for the coroner to turn up and move the body. Those who were in the houses (ours was a block of flats) were told to stay inside and no one was allowed into the building during that time.

Uncarved
06-04-2011, 02:40 AM
Outside a house, how? In the garden? On the patio, strewn with broken glass from a patio door? In the shed? On the lawn next to the mailbox? On the sidewalk, with a fresh tomato pressed between the buttocks? In the street, with the head pulped and sticky bits of grey matter in the weaving bloody tyre tracks?


I want to read THIS Story.haha

RJK
06-04-2011, 08:11 PM
The scene of an unattended death needs to be preserved until the medical examiner determines the death is accidental or from natural causes. That could take an hour, or several hours. The only reason the residents would be kept from their home would be if the boundaries of the scene blocked them. It's possible the death could be the result of a crime and it's also possible that the crime scene may need to be physically expanded to include the house, so of course the police don't want dozens of people contaminating their potential crime scene, so they'll tell everyone to stay either in, or out of the house.

mgencleyn
06-05-2011, 06:01 AM
I want to read THIS Story.haha

Tomato rape is a serious problem in the world. Happens much more frequently than you'd think. I had a dear friend once who was completely sauced. He's never been the same.

Chrisla
06-06-2011, 09:36 AM
Okay, the woman has fallen from a bedroom deck extension, through a railing to the patio below (in California). The medical examiner says she died of a broken neck. There are no witnesses. I'm assuming that to rule out foul play, the police will want to search the house. They find nothing there to indicate foul play. The woman is fairly wealthy and has nieces who inherit. I don't know if that would prolong an investigation, and if so, if the family would be denied access to the house during the course of the investigation, or only during the time of their initial search.