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Ann_Mayburn
06-03-2011, 03:37 AM
Heard this on Twitter and thought I'd pass it along to the lovely folks here. In my opinion, Carina is one of the top ePubs with the economic powerhouse of Harlequin behind it. Unlike Harlequin they put out just about every type of book possible.

Taken from: http://carinapress.com/blog/2011/06/now-hiring-freelance-developmentalcontent-editors/

Yes, itís that time again, my favorite time of year when we go looking for some fresh victims talented team members in the form of freelance developmental editors.


Now, before you get all excited and shoot off an email, please read what weíre looking for carefully. Respondents who donít meet the requirements or who donít include the requested material will not receive a reply.

Requirements:


* One year paid experience editing fiction. In lieu of paid experience, I will accept editorial and agent internships in which the applicant worked with fiction and provided editorial feedback.


* Understanding of the difference between editing and polishing a book/offering insight into editorial issues and rewriting or interfering with an authorís voice.


* Ability to communicate editorial revisions to an author in a professional manner.


* Genuine love of editing, reading and the craft of writing.


* Ability to self-motivate, stay on task and meet deadlines consistently.


* Ability to take direction and feedback, while also offering critique.


* Interest in working in a freelance environment with a team feel.


* Desire and ability to help an author build her career.


* Interest in working in the digital industry, being part of a growing business, and being a leader in the digital industry.


* Willingness to engage in other activities, both paid and unpaid, such as contest judging, offering critiques, guest blogging and interacting with editorial and author peers in an online environment.


* Willingness to attend virtual editorial team meetings.


* Desire to learn about digital book marketing, as well as other aspects of digital publishing.


* Thorough understanding of and insight into the genres you choose to edit.


If you meet these qualification requirements, are willing to work in a freelance capacity for a flat, per-project/per-assignment fee, and would like to learn more about the freelance editorial position, please send your CV and a letter of interest, detailing your qualifications and stating why you are interested in working for Carina Press in particular, as well as what genres you feel youíd be qualified to edit, to my attention at generalinquiries AT carinapress.com I will respond with some further information about the position.



From there, we ask all applicants to who move forward with the process to perform an editorial evaluation on a manuscript, so please be prepared to go through this process if you apply.


Please note that reply may be sporadic, as I will be traveling quite a bit in the month of June, and will not always be able to reply promptly to letters of interest.

Sn00py
06-06-2011, 05:24 PM
Ann,

Thanks for posting this opportunity. Does Carina have a standard pay rate per project?

Edit: Haha, I see now you're simply reposting the job info, so I guess you might not know the answer to that question. Apologies. Hopefully someone from Carina, or someone who has worked with them, will answer.

HapiSofi
06-07-2011, 12:09 AM
Heard this on Twitter and thought I'd pass it along to the lovely folks here. In my opinion, Carina is one of the top ePubs with the economic powerhouse of Harlequin behind it. Unlike Harlequin they put out just about every type of book possible.

Taken from: http://carinapress.com/blog/2011/06/now-hiring-freelance-developmentalcontent-editors/

Yes, it’s that time again, my favorite time of year when we go looking for some fresh victims talented team members in the form of freelance developmental editors.They have to find new ones every year? That's not a good sign. Neither is going after them in batches.

I'm going to mark small editorial emendations in Carina's press release, because I can't bear not to. I won't add the missing definite article at the beginning of every item in their list of requirements, but I should.

Now, before you get all excited and shoot off an email, please read [carefully] what we’re looking for carefully. Respondents who don’t meet the requirements or who don’t include the requested material will not receive a reply.They should reply. Form replies are easy, and they keep applicants from re-applying because they aren't sure that their first one got through.

Requirements:

* One year [of] paid experience editing fiction.
Oh dear.

1. A year is not enough experience for unsupervised freelance editors who are going to be turned loose on novel-length fiction.

2. Experience editing what, for whom, under whose direction? An operation that's been paying grass-green newbies to edit books (as opposed to having them do support staff work while they learn their trade and ease into editing) is one I'd be inclined to view with alarm.

There are a lot more paying editorial gigs than there used to be where the work primarily consists of working on murky, misshapen books that have been rejected by conventional publishing houses:

Commercial editing, packaging, and promotion services
Half-fast POD or epublishing startups
Publish America's unfortunate in-house staffers
Local typing and editing services, if their clients write fiction
Working for or as the kind of "professional editor" to whom shady agents refer their clients.

And so forth. I don't look down on people who've held such jobs. The problem is that good overall editorial judgement is something you can only learn by working on good or nearly-good books. They'll teach you to discern what needs fixing and what doesn't, what's fixable and what isn't, strategies for fixing it, how to communicate that to the author, and managing the overall process.

Bad books don't need much judgement because you spend 90% of your time working on the mechanics, and if one set of issues gets fixed, it just clears a workspace in which you can go after the next set. Books that are unpublishable because they're misconceived do take some judgement, but it's fully exercised at the point where you determine whether the writer understands that the problems are problems. If they do, it's a journeyman author, so you wish them well on their next book. If they don't, nothing you can do will help them.

3. As I noted earlier, there are paid jobs in publishing where newbies do work with experienced editors, but the newbies who hold those jobs don't spend a lot of time editing fiction. Instead, they do support-staff work while they learn the basics of their trade. It's a fair arrangement. If you'd just paid $75K for a book, you wouldn't want a novice editorial assistant to edit it (unless they were really good at it and had other pertinent experience).

4. Requiring that the editing have been paid work rules out beta readers, and writers who are long-term members of critique groups -- some of whom are very knowledgeable and accomplished editors.

5. I do approve of distinguishing fiction from nonfiction editing. They're both expert skills, but they're not the same ones.

In lieu of paid experience, I will accept editorial and agent internships in which the applicant worked with fiction and provided editorial feedback.
Professional publishing and agenting operations don't provide substantial editorial feedback on any but a few slush submissions, unless they're one of the short-fiction markets that uses "Why you're being rejected" check-off forms.

* Understanding of the difference between editing and polishing a book [and] /offering insight into editorial issues[,] and rewriting or interfering with an author’s voice.
Sometimes, rewriting and interference are necessary. It's no favor to take a hands-off attitude when the writer genuinely needs help.

* Ability to communicate editorial revisions to an author in a professional manner.

* Genuine love of editing, reading[,] and the craft of writing.
Why else would anyone want to edit?

* Ability to self-motivate, stay on task[,] and [consistently] meet deadlines consistently.
I'd go for "The ability to maintain a consistent quality of work, and consistently meet deadlines." They're freelancers. Their motives and their work habits are none of their employer's business. What matters is the quality of their work, and when they turn it in.

I'd also throw in a line here about having the judgement to recognize that their current manuscript has problems and issues that fall outside their normal scope of operations, or that seem likely to require many more work hours than have been budgeted. A major cause of epic-level freelancer meltdown is taking on a job that proves to have problems beyond anything they're prepared to handle, and having them try to handle it anyway, instead of phoning the office, saying the book has big problems, and asking what to do abut it.

* Ability to take direction and feedback, while also offering critique.
I have to assume this means taking direction and feedback from one's employers, and giving critiques to the authors.

* Interest in working in a freelance environment with a team feel.
Ah, the good old "team feel." There is no "I" in "team," not like there is in "benefits," "paid vacations," "employer contributions to Social Security," "predictable pay dates and amounts," "consistent employment," "on-the-job training," "raises and promotions for outstanding work," "access to information about the company and industry," and "providing a decent workspace."

If you can outsource copy editing, you can outsource editing. You can even structure acquisition so it gets paid as piece work. Why not? The radical drop in production and warehousing costs for ebooks means that if you can strip your fixed costs to the bone, you can publish more marginal properties and still make a profit.

Don't mind me. I'm just talking.

* Desire and ability to help an author build her career.
I don't see the point. If an in-house editor finds a promising author and helps build his or her career, that editor accumulates credibility and standing with the house, the sales force, literary agents, and other authors. Not here, though. The editor is just a freelancer. If an author gets big, I'll bet you anything that they'll get reassigned to an in-house editor.

Now, freelance copy editors are often anonymous, but I can't imagine keeping the editor and author from talking to each other. Editors are, after all, the author's primary point of contact with their publishing house.

One occasionally hears about editors taking their big-name authors with them when they move to a new house. What happens if one of Carina's authors is writing a breakout book, hasn't formally delivered it yet, but has sent partials to his or her editor, who recognizes the book's potential? Are these freelance editors going to be made to sign binding documents that say they have to work exclusively for Carina? Come to think of it, I don't think the feds would approve of doing that with freelancers. Things could get interesting.

By the way, I don't see anything in these specs about working with agents. In the natural course of things, some of Carina's authors are going to acquire agents. What happens then?

* Interest in working in the digital industry, being part of a growing business, and being a leader in the digital industry.
Oh, malarkey. They're freelancers. They aren't part of the company, and they don't have a share in its success.

* Willingness to engage in other activities, both paid and unpaid, such as contest judging, offering critiques, guest blogging[,] and interacting with editorial and [auctorial] author peers in an online environment.
Publishing employees are forever being asked to do this sort of thing without overtime, but at least they're in-house employees. If freelancers are required to engage in these promotional activities, all their hours must be paid for. Their time is the only thing they have to sell.

* Willingness to attend virtual editorial team meetings.
Again, as long as they're paid for their time, I don't see a problem.

* Desire to learn about digital book marketing, as well as other aspects of digital publishing.
That's very odd. There are houses where editors do, over time, learn a great deal about marketing. There are other houses where the editorial and marketing departments aren't on speaking terms. But I can't imagine what mechanisms would enable out-of-house editorial freelancers to learn about book marketing and other aspects of digital publishing, and I don't see any requirement that applicants know squat about marketing when they start.

* Thorough understanding of and insight into the genres you choose to edit.
That's a justifiable requirement. You can generate awful messes by having someone edit a genre they aren't familiar with and don't understand.

If you meet these qualification requirements, are willing to work in a freelance capacity for a flat, per-project/per-assignment fee,
The editors don't handle acquisition, and they're paid a flat fee per book edited? Jeez. Even freelance copy editors and proofreaders get paid by the page, and typesetters get paid extra for especially difficult text. This arrangement has real potential for exploitation. Just for starters, there's no incentive to avoid overlong or over-messy books, because someone else will do all the extra work of fixing them.

Editing a novel is not the kind of task that ought to be piecework. They vary in length and complexity, and vary even more in the kind of problems they present, and the work needed to make them ready for publication. Moreover, a novel is a unitary and self-entwined work. You have to work on it as a whole. You can't just budget a certain number of hours, and down tools when the time is up. No one who cares enough about literature to work as an editor is going to do that.

...And suddenly I have a question: who is going to check the work these editors do? At minimum, there ought to be a mechanism for spotting subcontracting.

and would like to learn more about the freelance editorial position, please send your CV and a letter of interest, detailing your qualifications and stating why you are interested in working for Carina Press in particular, as well as what genres you feel you’d be qualified to edit, to my attention at generalinquiries AT carinapress.com I will respond with some further information about the position.

From there, we ask all applicants to who move forward with the process to perform an editorial evaluation on a manuscript, so please be prepared to go through this process if you apply.
A whole book's worth of uncompensated editorial work, after the CVs have been evaluated? That seems excessive. They can't need so many editors that paying a kill fee would be an onerous expense.

Please note that reply may be sporadic, as I will be traveling quite a bit in the month of June, and will not always be able to reply promptly to letters of interest.
So much for their favorite time of year.

regdog
06-07-2011, 01:11 AM
Thanks HapiSofi and that's why Hapi is a Sage:)