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aruna
11-01-2005, 10:09 AM
An editor from a reputable Portuguese publisher has contacted me via my website, asking me who represents me for the Portuguese translation rights for my previous books. The foreign rights to these books have till now been handled by my previous agent, whom I've now left. I don't yet have a new agent, but the full manuscript is being considered at the moment. I expect a reponse in a week or two at the most.
Should I let this agent know of the Portuguese interest? I'm aware that that might tip her on the side of "yes" if she is in any way wavering, but is that too pushy, especially as she has not herself read the books in question. Or better to wait to see how she reponds to the new book? I would prefer her to take me on because she loves the new book, not because oshe can sell the old ones tp a foreign publisher! I'd love tohear some of your opinions.
Oh yes, and of course I'm pleased as punch!

JohnJStephens
11-01-2005, 01:43 PM
An editor from a reputable Portuguese publisher has contacted me via my website, asking me who represents me for the Portuguese translation rights for my previous books. I don't know anything about handling agent relationships, but it sounds wonderful to me. Portuguese publisher=Brazilian market, doesn't it? That's huge. And you have South American connections via Guyana, which may give you added appeal over there. Which agent could resist?

aruna
11-01-2005, 04:35 PM
Yes, Brazil is huge - but I'm not sure if the reading population is that huge. And links between Brazil and Guayan are virtually non-existant, in spite of the proximity. I'm just not sure of the etiquette of dangling this before her at this stage.

katee
11-02-2005, 01:44 AM
Congrats aruna!

I don't think it could hurt to mention the foreign rights to potential new agents. And if your new book is in a similar vein to your previous books, then I'm sure any new agent you get will be more than happy to handle the foreign rights.

The only thing you might want to consider is whether you want an agent who's only taken you on because they were tipped over because of the foreign rights ... surely any new agent should love your book so much she's happy to represent it, foreign rights or no?

aruna
11-02-2005, 10:35 AM
The only thing you might want to consider is whether you want an agent who's only taken you on because they were tipped over because of the foreign rights ... surely any new agent should love your book so much she's happy to represent it, foreign rights or no?

Yes, that's my concern - but in particular, my qeustion was whether Ishould inform the agent who is reading the ms RIGHT NOW, as it might influence her decision. I would really prefer she say yes to my book on its own merit, not just because she can sell the rights to my old books. But i guess that's just my pride speaking. Logically, and from a business point of view, there should be no problem in showing potential agents that I already have a publisher - albeit a foreign one - lined up.

Daughter of Faulkner
11-04-2005, 07:39 AM
This is wonderful to read. I am thrilled for you!



I understand how you feel by wanting the new agent to want your new / now work first. I offer this: Go with your instincts. If you do that you will have peace that you made the best decision for you and your future. Even if the new agent begins by making easy money, so to speak, by an instant sell on your past work, so what? If you find that you connect with him / her then the your future will work itself out.

You can wait until the last minute to see if the new agent falls in love with the present read / mss too.



And think about this--If there is an agent that you like or have admired from afar, why not contact him with the new offer and see if you two connect, etc.? Just an idea... That would be something to think about.


God bless and a BIG CONGRATULATIONS!

:hooray: :partyguy: :Trophy: :TheWave: :Cheer:

Andrew Zack
11-07-2005, 08:35 PM
While this is good news, keep in mind that foreign publishers frequently pay in the $500 to $1,500 range for rights to US books. They have to pay a translator also, so they keep what the pay the US author low, unless the book is a best-seller in the US. Short of hearing a big number, I don't know that interest from a foreign publisher (or a US publisher!) would compel me to drop what's currently on my desk and pick up that manuscript.

Not to be a party-pooper, but I did want to give you a straight opinion.

Best,
Andy

aruna
11-07-2005, 08:54 PM
While this is good news, keep in mind that foreign publishers frequently pay in the $500 to $1,500 range for rights to US books.

I'm a UK author, Andy. I got a lot more than that from my other foreign publishers. I don't expect a huge amount, especially not from Portugal, but on the other hand I've got two other foreign publishers waiting to read the fourth ms, so it's not just that. My books did quite well in Europe; I'm sort of assuming she heard something in Frankfurt.

(Just checked: a LOT more, the least being $8000... )