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Blue
10-31-2005, 09:42 PM
i just opened an email from an agency to whom i submitted a manuscript.

it read "see attachment."

i think "wow, they must be interested if they bothered to send an attachment. maybe it's a contract."

inside the attachment was a typical rejection letter.

is that f-ed up or what?

September skies
10-31-2005, 09:51 PM
sorry about that. Sounds like they are just making it simpler for themselves. They give some rookie a list of emails and say "Send a rejection slip to all these"

Oh well...at least you can say you've received an email attachment from someone. I've never received that kind yet....

Good luck! :)

Susie
10-31-2005, 09:54 PM
Sure sorry about that Blue. Hope better news will be coming soon for you.:)

Maryn
11-09-2005, 02:21 AM
Yet another reason not to hand out the ol' email address glibly. I still like to do my dealings, at least initially, using paper and the mail.

Maryn, quaintly ensconced in the fiber media

blacbird
11-09-2005, 03:25 AM
Just out of curiosity, what form of submission did you use? Snail-mail, with SASE, or E-mail (?with attachment). And how long did it take for the response?

bird

Jamesaritchie
11-10-2005, 03:22 AM
i just opened an email from an agency to whom i submitted a manuscript.

it read "see attachment."

i think "wow, they must be interested if they bothered to send an attachment. maybe it's a contract."

inside the attachment was a typical rejection letter.

is that f-ed up or what?
It's simply easier to set things up this way. Attachements are less bother, not more. Very little or no typing, no cut and paste, just click on the right button. No fuss, no muss. Believe me, if they're interested, you won't have to wonder, and you almost certainly won't be told by an attachement. . .unless it's a form attachement that says only "I liked you query and would like to read the complete manuscript." But I don't know any agents who use attachements for saying yes.

blacbird
11-11-2005, 02:27 AM
A lot of agents and publications pointedly WILL NOT accept e-mails with attachments. But I guess they figure it's okay going in the other direction.

bird

Christine N.
11-11-2005, 03:31 AM
Yeah, that sucks. I got a form letter today too. Treat yourself to something nice and go write something.

Jamesaritchie
11-11-2005, 08:56 AM
A lot of agents and publications pointedly WILL NOT accept e-mails with attachments. But I guess they figure it's okay going in the other direction.

bird

That's because agents and editors frequently reject writers. Sometimes rejected writers want to get even.

Lyra Jean
11-11-2005, 11:21 PM
I got a rejection from a magazine. Happy magazine says "Rejection sucks. We hope you can place your work elsewhere.

Um no kidding.

Celia Cyanide
11-12-2005, 12:02 AM
That's because agents and editors frequently reject writers. Sometimes rejected writers want to get even.

I hardly think that's an excuse. Do they think writers don't have to worry about recieving bad attachments, just because they don't reject anyone? When a lot of people get an email from anyone that says, "see attachment" and nothing else, it looks like spam, not to mention a virus carrying attachment.

blacbird
11-12-2005, 12:08 AM
I hardly think that's an excuse. Do they think writers don't have to worry about recieving bad attachments, just because they don't reject anyone? When a lot of people get an email from anyone that says, "see attachment" and nothing else, it looks like spam, not to mention a virus carrying attachment.

Exactly. And guess what? I delete them immediately and NEVER open them.

bird

Jamesaritchie
11-12-2005, 01:02 AM
I hardly think that's an excuse. Do they think writers don't have to worry about recieving bad attachments, just because they don't reject anyone? When a lot of people get an email from anyone that says, "see attachment" and nothing else, it looks like spam, not to mention a virus carrying attachment.

Of course it's an excuse. Writers don't have to worry about receiving bad attachments from a known source. Agents and editors do. The simple fact of the matter is that you can check the source of an e-mail before you open it, and if it's from an agent or editor there is pretty much zero chance of it containing a virus. And if you're really worried, you can open the attachment in notepad. Or you can run a virus check on a single attachment before opening it. None of this is true for agents and editors. Even when they check the source, there's no way of knowing whether or not a virus has been sent.

An agent or an editor who accepts attachments will almost certainly have hundreds or thousands to open, and very few have the time to do this, or to verify so many sources. It simply isn;t feasible for most agents and editors. This increases their risk hundreds or thousands of times above what your risk is.

And they really don't need an excuse. If you don't want to read the attachment, don't open it.

Jamesaritchie
11-12-2005, 01:06 AM
Exactly. And guess what? I delete them immediately and NEVER open them.

bird

That's exactly what you should do. But guess what? The agent or editor couldn't care less. And guess what? In the rare event that the agent or editor has something positive to say in the attachment, you just missed it.

There is no similarity in the position of a single writer receiving an attachment from a single source, and an agent or editor who receives attachments from hundred or thousands of sources.

It's really cutting off your own nose to spite your face. But believe me, they just don't care what you do with the attachment.

blacbird
11-12-2005, 02:14 AM
In the rare event that the agent or editor has something positive to say in the attachment, you just missed it.

Another of those things my experience indicates I have no reason to worry about.

Celia Cyanide
11-12-2005, 02:20 AM
Of course it's an excuse. Writers don't have to worry about receiving bad attachments from a known source. Agents and editors do.

Why do I not have to worry about that? I get send bad attachments from unknown sources all the time, James.


The simple fact of the matter is that you can check the source of an e-mail before you open it,

Oh, yeah. Because all those emails claiming to be from paypal are really from paypal, right?


And they really don't need an excuse. If you don't want to read the attachment, don't open it.

I'm not even the one who got the attachment. I'm only saying that I can see why Blue is annoyed. An email with nothing but "see attachments" looks like spam to most people.

brinkett
11-12-2005, 02:46 AM
Why do I not have to worry about that? I get send bad attachments from unknown sources all the time
Same here. Sending unexpected attachments is bad netiquette no matter who's doing it.