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View Full Version : E vs. Paper--how do you buy as a reader?



JSSchley
05-11-2011, 03:39 AM
What price point, or difference in price point do you want to see for an ebook vs. its print counterpart? How much does form factor play into your book-buying decisions?

The day before yesterday I started reading Emily Giffin's SOMETHING BORROWED while at the bookstore where I work. It's kind of a fun, nice, quick summer read, and I'm about to finish classes for the year. So I looked into buying it for my Sony reader. I can get the ebook for $7.99. However, I can also get the trade paperback for $9.42, and I'm an Amazon Prime member, so that's all I'd pay. Giffin's trade paperbacks are quite pretty, and they make a really cute little set with their matching print and pastel colors. For $1.50 difference, I thought, hmm, maybe I'll start collecting her trade paperbacks instead.

I made a similar decision recently with BATTLE HYMN OF THE TIGER MOTHER--the ebook was $12.99 and the hardcover at 40% off bestseller price at B&N was $15 and some change. It was a lovely hardcover, and it meant that once I was finished reading it, I could wrap it up and give it to my mom for her birthday.

Borders threw a sale at the beginning of this year where they put a bunch of e-editions of paperback bestsellers out for $5 each. In that instance, I didn't hesitate at all--I bought five. I prefer trade paper to mass market, so in that instance I was saving at least $4 per copy and in many instances, a lot more.

What's the tipping point for you when it comes to an ebook? What factors play into your decision? Collecting nice-looking physical copies? Difference in price point between physical and ebook? All of the above?

movieman
05-11-2011, 03:46 AM
Personally I haven't paid more than $2.99 for an ebook. I might go to $4.99 for an author I like, but when I can buy a paperback for $6.99 I don't see why I'd pay more than $4.99 for an electronic version.

Of course there's no author whose books I feel I 'must' read the instant they come out, whereas some people would be comparing ebook prices to hardback.

squibnocket
05-11-2011, 05:11 AM
You know, I'm not even comparing E vs paper any more since I'm reading 99% on my ereader(s) now. I'm happy to pay anywhere from $2.99 to $7.99 from publishers I know/authors I like. Self-pub and more obscure pub houses I'm less likely to pay over $2.00 for. Anything over that for an electronic file has to be something I'm dying to read or something extra special.

ryannj5
05-11-2011, 05:38 AM
BUY? I'll go e-book, because of price. If I LOVE the book and it must become part of my library, I'll probably get the paper version too. But my number choice is always FREE. It's this great thing called the library. :)

VoireyLinger
05-11-2011, 08:32 AM
I split between ebook and print pretty evenly. If it's a keeper book, I want the nice hardcover. If it's a favorite author that i know i will read over and over, I want a paperback.

I like ebooks for the books I'm going to read and be done with. I consume books.

As for prices, if I'm paying more than $5 for an ebook, well, it has to be an author I know I will enjoy. I'm more willing to experiment with new authors at a lower price point, $3 and under is wonderful for me. I definitely want the ebook to be a real savings over the print book.

the most I've paid for an ebook was $15. When I woke up on release day, the book was waiting on my kindle, and that's why I paid that much. I also ran out two hours later when the bookstore opened and paid another $17 for the print copy because I was that flipping anxious to have it. I get this way about maybe one book every year or two.

I'm one of those weird people who doesn't like library books. I have a sensitive nose and the smelss they pick up bother me, especially if they have been in the house of a smoker. Pages feel dirty or loose. Spines cracked. That funky cellophane covering...

I like virgin books.

Sydneyd
05-11-2011, 09:03 AM
Almost a year ago I told myself that I love the smell of books, I love the feel of books, I would never want an e-reader, then I got my Nook.

I love my Nook.

But I still buy hardcopies. My nook is more for my guilty pleasure books, or for books that are cheap (think 7.99 or under). When I find/hear about a series, I buy hard, cause I like the look of it on my bookshelf, in that case it doesn't really matter to me if the e-reader version is cheaper, I will still buy the paper copy. Now that I have written this, I don't think my answer is very helpful :)

5398cane
05-11-2011, 09:38 AM
ebook I really don't like to read paper books anymore price point does not enter the equation. I will take my cell to the book store to take pictures of books I want to buy when I get home.

Kmarshall
05-11-2011, 05:53 PM
I buy ebook whenever I have the option. If I LOVE the book, I'll buy a nice hardcover edition. I'm a sucker for special editions. My wife can't give up the printed copy yet. I understand it; I used to be that way. Then again, I read fantasies, many of which are thick books. I'd much rather read those on an e-reader. My only caveat is that I don't really like using my iPad for it. I will read on my laptop, occasionally, and more on my iPhone. I prefer the Kindle over any of these,though, because of the e-ink.

Synovia
05-11-2011, 06:11 PM
You know, I'm not even comparing E vs paper any more since I'm reading 99% on my ereader(s) now. I'm happy to pay anywhere from $2.99 to $7.99 from publishers I know/authors I like. Self-pub and more obscure pub houses I'm less likely to pay over $2.00 for. Anything over that for an electronic file has to be something I'm dying to read or something extra special.

Exactly this.


I don't think I've bought a paper book since I bought my kindle. Initially I wouldn't pay more than about $4 for ebooks, but at this point, I read what I want to read, and don't worry about it.

shadowwalker
05-11-2011, 06:31 PM
At this point, ebooks have to be free - and I have to be able to read them on my regular old pc without having to buy additional software/ereader. I'm just not that excited about them. And I refuse to pay that kind of money for an ereader just so I can read a book on a screen.

Synovia
05-11-2011, 06:39 PM
At this point, ebooks have to be free - and I have to be able to read them on my regular old pc without having to buy additional software/ereader. I'm just not that excited about them. And I refuse to pay that kind of money for an ereader just so I can read a book on a screen.
There's a huge difference between reading on a PC screen and reading on something like a Kindle (or nook non-color).

The kindle is a lot closer to paper on the eyes than it is to an LCD.

Anne Lyle
05-11-2011, 06:41 PM
I tend to buy novels as ebooks nowadays, particular if the author is someone I haven't read before - I have a house full of books, so every new dead-trees copy has to earn its place on my bookshelf.

On price, a little below the print price is fine - I'm happy to pay for the privilege of saving space on my bookshelves, and unless a book is on short-term special offer, I'm likely to be suspicious of anything that's priced very low, on the principle that you get what you pay for. OTOH I wouldn't pay premium prices for an ebook just to get it on release day. If I like a book that much, I probably want a hardback copy anyway!

jnfr
05-11-2011, 08:50 PM
We've moved to 99+% ebooks over the past year. Just got my own Kindle yesterday, my husband got his last fall and I'd been reading on my netbook.

And thank goodness for that, because we're literally out of walls for bookcases. With two people who love books and read constantly, we have thousands of volumes already.

shadowwalker
05-11-2011, 09:03 PM
There's a huge difference between reading on a PC screen and reading on something like a Kindle (or nook non-color).

The kindle is a lot closer to paper on the eyes than it is to an LCD.

That may be - but I still don't see the point in paying out that kind of money just so I can read a book. Think how many 'real' books I could buy for that! ;)

Samantha's_Song
05-11-2011, 09:12 PM
I buy lots of Kindle ebooks and sometimes they're more expensive than buying the paperbacks, how can they possibly justify that? :Shrug:

The Otter
05-12-2011, 09:07 AM
If the cover/blurb looks interesting to me I'll probably buy it regardless, unless the price is something really crazy and over-the-top. I'm a picky reader and don't frequently see things that interest me, so when I do, I'm not likely to deny myself because it costs a couple extra bucks.

kuwisdelu
05-12-2011, 09:27 AM
I really hate paying for anything with DRM on it.

However, when my iPad arrives, I'll probably start buying ebooks and cracking the DRM (MEH) rather than buying any physical books, purely for the sake of convenience. I have a hard time supported such a messed-up system, and it makes me kind of sick. But alas.

At the end of the day, I'd gladly pay hardback price if the e-version allows me to download it in whatever format I want without DRM. Otherwise, I'll grudgingly hit the "buy" button and crack the fucked up code that would try to prevent me from actually owning what I purchased moments before. Baka.

Amadan
05-12-2011, 09:40 AM
I almost never buy print copies anymore. I have too many books already and they take up room. I always buy the ebook if it's available.

Medievalist
05-12-2011, 10:02 AM
I've always been a fan of beautifully produced books. I've been buying and making ebooks since 1989. I've bought some books, either for scholarly reasons, or because I love them so very much, in hard cover, paperback, and two or three different ebook formats.

At this point though, my vision is decaying so very rapidly that print books are getting harder and harder to read. I'm planning on selling most of my hardcover SF, for instance. I've been trying to get ebook versions of fiction that I know I'll want to use for writing and reading, both, in the years to come.

kuwisdelu
05-12-2011, 11:14 AM
Unfortunately, the Eloi won't even remember what these "book" things are.

scarletpeaches
05-12-2011, 03:37 PM
It makes me laugh when Americans complain about the cost of books being an exorbitant $8 or so. Try living in Britain. Books are twice as expensive over here and I've still got nearly a thousand of the buggers.

Ebooks? Roughly half that again.

Mr Flibble
05-12-2011, 03:48 PM
Yep, my nice shiny new android tablet (yay!) cost roughly the same as ooh, maybe as many as eight paperbacks. I've saved that much already on ebooks :D

I still buy ppb, though as usual, it's normally having a splurge when they have a special offer on at Waterstone's. BUT the ereader app means it's easy to get hold of writers who aren't usually stocked there (Bujold for instance, they don't have much Le Guin etc etc) and sometimes they can't even order those in (Or they can, for a price. In one Bujold case, it was 50! Almost as much as my pad.)

Catana
05-12-2011, 08:12 PM
Since I don't have access to any brick and mortar book store, I buy my print books from half.com or Amazon -- used. And always paperback unless I have a special need for a book that's only available in hardcover. Whether I buy a specific book in print or as an ebook depends on which one is cheaper, adding shipping to the cost of the print book.

Keyan
05-12-2011, 09:02 PM
My house is overflowing with books. The more I send away, the more I seem to bring in. I got a Kindle a few months ago, and now would preferentially buy e-books, even if they're $1-2 *more* than, say, a used paperback. I still buy paper books, but not as frequently. (Also, some of my books are so old they're falling apart, so I can't argue that it's more permanent than an e-format that'll probably be obsolete in two years.)

I guess if a book *really* was a keeper, I'd buy a hard copy. For now, it's only when I want it inscribed by the author. Or can't get it on Kindle. Or make an impulse purchase at a book sale. Or expect to be able to pass it on to someone.

My default -- in a period of months -- is becoming the e-book.

kuwisdelu
05-12-2011, 10:14 PM
It makes me laugh when Americans complain about the cost of books being an exorbitant $8 or so. Try living in Britain. Books are twice as expensive over here and I've still got nearly a thousand of the buggers.

What's odd is I'm American and I have no idea where these <$8 books are. Most of my books were purchased in the double digits. Maybe genre has something to do with it.

Colin L
05-12-2011, 10:18 PM
I still buy some hard copies but I've moved mostly to eBooks. I don't buy any that are over $10 and I try to only purchase non-DRM titles. I've found some great indie and self-published works using this criteria!

Medievalist
05-12-2011, 10:36 PM
You people don't seem to realize that shelves of books breed.

This is why we have things like New Weird and Urban Fantasy. Someone put their books on a shelf and didn't pay attention to what was going on between the covers.

Hybrids people; we're allowing our books to engage in free-range crosses.

This is the real reason DRM exists . . .

kuwisdelu
05-12-2011, 10:45 PM
You people don't seem to realize that shelves on books breed.

This is why we have things like New Weird and Urban Fantasy. Someone put their books on a shelf and didn't pay attention to what was going on between the covers.

Hybrids people; we're allowing our books to engage in free-range crosses.

This is the real reason DRM exists . . .

Sounds like abstinence-only education to me.

Medievalist
05-12-2011, 10:49 PM
Sounds like abstinence-only education to me.

Well, you know, having all those books around, in public, is just bound to create readers.

That is, by the way, one of the virtues of printed books as concrete objects. They aren't tethered by hardware or DRM technoloy; moreover, they are designed to facilitate spontaneous browsing and sharing.

Soccer Mom
05-12-2011, 10:58 PM
I tend to buy non-fiction in paper and all my fiction in e-reader. Non-fic often has charts, pics, and such and I tend to underline, write in margins, etc... For fiction, I no longer collect books. They were indeed breeding on my shelves and it was scaring the cats.

kuwisdelu
05-12-2011, 11:03 PM
Before my ex moved out, the breeding on the shelves was obvious. Through our combined collections, there were quite a number of duplicate copies.

Mr Flibble
05-12-2011, 11:34 PM
You people don't seem to realize that shelves on books breed.



This why some Victorians allegedly* kept books by male and female authors separately (unless said authors were married). Otherwise...well...and in public too! *swoons in shock*


*I have no idea if this is true or not, though I believe it's mentioned in etiquette books, but it tickles my fancy

JSSchley
05-13-2011, 02:44 AM
Well, you know, having all those books around, in public, is just bound to create readers.

That is, by the way, one of the virtues of printed books as concrete objects. They aren't tethered by hardware or DRM technoloy; moreover, they are designed to facilitate spontaneous browsing and sharing.

Hee.

But seriously, this is one of the reasons I still buy a lot of hardcopy. I buy them and give them away. I have a big stack of Percy Jackson at the moment on loan from a friend.

It's the ultimate in DRM-free reading.

AmsterdamAssassin
05-13-2011, 01:15 PM
I'm thrifty [but I have an excuse, I'm Dutch] and I rarely buy books, as I live close to the biggest library in the Netherlands. I got rid of most of my paperbacks and my Kindle is loaded with free e-books [Alice in Wonderland, etcetera] and free book samples. If I read something I like and the price is right, I'll buy it. Regrettably, most good e-books are priced too high [Amazon ups the price with 2$ when downloaded from .com, and I'm not allowed to download from co.uk.]. I won't pay more than 8$ for an e-book and then it has to be incredibly well-written.

Amadan
05-13-2011, 06:05 PM
I still don't quite understand why so many people think that $12 for a movie ticket is reasonable, but $12 for an ebook is exorbitant.

That said, it does seem that the market is deciding that $12 is too much for an ebook, so publishers will probably be pressured to lower prices whether they like it or not.

I suspect the hassles of DRM have much to do with this. Especially those people who aren't really that tech savvy and think the difficulties of transferring an ebook to a new device are greater than they are. (I've heard people, even here on AW, talking about "bits disappearing" or "Not being able to read their ebooks ten years from now.") If publishers were really paying attention, they'd see that they are almost certainly losing more sales due to fears like these than they could possibly be gaining by "anti-piracy" measures.

(Also, FYI -- when I finally got annoyed enough to start doing it, I was embarrassed to find out how easy it is to strip DRM. Download a couple of scripts, or a plug-in for Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com/), and shazam. The first thing I do now when buying an ebook, after downloading it, is to remove the DRM. My folder full of ebooks will be portable and accessible as long as there exists software to read ebooks.)

movieman
05-13-2011, 07:04 PM
I still don't quite understand why so many people think that $12 for a movie ticket is reasonable, but $12 for an ebook is exorbitant.

Who thinks that $12 for a movie ticket is reasonable?

And why would I pay $12 for an ebook if I can get a printed copy for $6.99? The only reason I can see is if I don't want to wait for the paperback.

COchick
05-13-2011, 07:07 PM
I buy mostly e-books right now, and I'll pay $9.99 for an author I've enjoyed before. But I have noticed that some authors are being priced higher than that...of course, I'd pay it if I really wanted to read it.

I still like paper books. I have shelves full of them.

Amadan
05-13-2011, 07:10 PM
Who thinks that $12 for a movie ticket is reasonable?

And why would I pay $12 for an ebook if I can get a printed copy for $6.99? The only reason I can see is if I don't want to wait for the paperback.

I often don't want to wait for the paperback. (And $12 is usually the ebook price when the printed copy is only available as a hardback. By the time the paperback is released, the ebook is usually cheaper.)

Why does anyone buy books new? Unless you want it the week it's released, you can almost always get a used copy for much less from the Amazon marketplace.

Soccer Mom
05-13-2011, 07:16 PM
I'll pay whatever the PB price is for my ebooks. Most of them go for around $7.99 and I'm cool with that. I figure these have most the same expenses in production: art, editing, layout.

I have paid $12 for an ebook when the book debuted in hardback. If it's a favorite author of mine, I'll pre-order and pay the release price.

I'm not buying ebooks just to be cheaper, but because they're now my preferred format.

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 07:20 PM
Who thinks that $12 for a movie ticket is reasonable?Um...me? Seeing as a ticket to my local Odeon is nearly 8.

Medievalist
05-13-2011, 07:29 PM
Hee.

But seriously, this is one of the reasons I still buy a lot of hardcopy. I buy them and give them away. I have a big stack of Percy Jackson at the moment on loan from a friend.

It's the ultimate in DRM-free reading.

Going now to look up Percy Jackson . . . . (Yes this is how I find authors, or one way).

Soccer Mom
05-13-2011, 07:38 PM
Percy Jackson is the lead character in Rick Riordan's MG fantasy series. They aren't just MG, however. My husband and I both loved this series. The Lightning Thief is the first book.

KevinMcLaughlin
05-13-2011, 07:41 PM
Out local theaters only charge about $7-8, and I go to the movies a couple of times a year. If it was $12, I might go once a year - maybe. Most of the time, I'd rather wait a few months and rent the movie for a buck, instead.

For books, I average reading better than two books a week. If I was spending $10 a book, that would add up fast. So - yeah - I tend to favor somewhat cheaper books. I'm perfectly OK spending $4-6 on an ebook, but of the dozens I have bought this year, only one cost over $8. I've even balked at buying ebooks by authors I used to buy right away, because the books were priced over $10 and there were plenty of other good books at more reasonable prices.

As for the original question - for me, since getting a Kindle last December, I've basically stopped buying print books entirely. I've received a couple as gifts, but I've only bought a couple for myself. I could see myself continuing to want some reference books in print, but my fiction reading specifically has gone 100% digital.

Karen Arthur
05-13-2011, 07:44 PM
I got tired of losing boxes of books while moving.

I still have a rather extensive home library, but since I got a kindle most of my book acquisitions have been digital. I also make frequent use of the library.

My hard copy purchases are generally limited to books that I know I will want to reread and lend out to friends.

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 07:48 PM
Out local theaters only charge about $7-8, and I go to the movies a couple of times a year. If it was $12, I might go once a year - maybe. Most of the time, I'd rather wait a few months and rent the movie for a buck, instead.

For books, I average reading better than two books a week. If I was spending $10 a book, that would add up fast. So - yeah - I tend to favor somewhat cheaper books. I'm perfectly OK spending $4-6 on an ebook, but of the dozens I have bought this year, only one cost over $8. I've even balked at buying ebooks by authors I used to buy right away, because the books were priced over $10 and there were plenty of other good books at more reasonable prices.Once a year? For the sake of 6-7? Really?

And I thought Scots were supposed to be skinflints.

It boggles the mind to think there are people out there who think $10 for a book is too expensive. Not only that but I'm beginning to get more than a little ticked off with people complaining about expense when things are far more expensive in the UK and I still manage to buy plenty of books, cinema tickets and DVDs. And yes, we all have bills to pay too.

Catana
05-13-2011, 08:01 PM
Once a year? For the sake of 6-7? Really?

And I thought Scots were supposed to be skinflints.

It boggles the mind to think there are people out there who think $10 for a book is too expensive. Not only that but I'm beginning to get more than a little ticked off with people complaining about expense when things are far more expensive in the UK and I still manage to buy plenty of books, cinema tickets and DVDs. And yes, we all have bills to pay too.

Ahem. Not everybody has a deep pocket for things like movies and books. My income is barely over the poverty line, so price is very important to me. My top price for any book is $10.00. I rarely have any reason to pay that much, though, and I will never pay that much for fiction.

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 08:03 PM
I'm assuming most of the people in this thread complaining about expense own the computers they're using? Pay for their own internet connections?

Unless you're all at the local library?

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 08:08 PM
Not that I'm saying people with computers should sell them and buy books. I'm just saying it's hard to sympathise with people living in a country where the price of cinema tickets and books seems to be half that of the same items in the UK.

Kitty Pryde
05-13-2011, 08:15 PM
It's the library for me as well. I read probably 5-10 books a week, depending on length (a lot of MG and YA books). I haven't got the space or the money to buy print or ebook versions of all that! I have a ton of books already and I try to buy only around 20 print books a year, which i'm my fellow bibliophiles can agree is barely any!

If I had a bit more disposable income I'd consider ebooks, but ebook readers seem so delicate! I'd be terrified to break one--an ereader can't really go in the bath, get smushed into a backpack on a camping trip, get rolled around in the grit in the bottom of a tent, stored in a drybag on a raft, be left in a cubby at a ski resort, or flung across the room in disdain, or dropped on the ground because I have the coordination of a tipsy preschooler. Yes, I do all of these things to my books. It's a hard-knock life, for them. I really want someone to make a child's ruggedized ereader. One company made one, but it only displays the special interactive illustrated kiddy books you buy especially for it. Why is there not a brightly-colored rubberized ereader for slobby third-graders/me?

KevinMcLaughlin
05-13-2011, 08:22 PM
Once a year? For the sake of 6-7? Really?

And I thought Scots were supposed to be skinflints.

It boggles the mind to think there are people out there who think $10 for a book is too expensive. Not only that but I'm beginning to get more than a little ticked off with people complaining about expense when things are far more expensive in the UK and I still manage to buy plenty of books, cinema tickets and DVDs. And yes, we all have bills to pay too.

No, it's worse than that - the pound to dollar conversion makes five bucks US about three pounds UK. ;) I'm not a huge movie-goer.

I don't see it as being a skinflint though; I see it as having X dollars I can spend on entertainment of some variety, and lots of ways to spread that around. If the price on something increases, I recalculate how much I want that thing, is all. My "priority items" get the most attention - reading is one of them. But if I have to choose between buying ten $5 books or three $15 books, I will almost always choose the ten.

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 08:23 PM
Well, buddy, the only thing I can recommend is shoplifting!

Yes I was joking. Or was I? ;)

KevinMcLaughlin
05-13-2011, 08:26 PM
an ereader can't really go in the bath

Double layered ziplock bags for the win, here. ;) Er - the good kind, not the store brand.

Breaking the darn things is a downside though, I confess. Considered taking out one of those replacement insurance deals, but took a chance and didn't. So far, so good (knocks on wood). If you break things a lot, I'd suggest buying a policy that protects against accidental destruction, though. ;)

AmsterdamAssassin
05-13-2011, 09:03 PM
I don't mind if people call me a skinflint - I don't need to have the latest goodie or gadget. I have a Kindle, but it was ridiculously pricy to order from the Netherlands, so I asked an American buddy to bring me one as he's over here several times a month.

I rarely go to the cinema anymore, unless it's something that HAS to be seen on the big screen. I prefer DVD. And I won't buy DVDs that cost over 10 euro. If that means I had to wait three years before I could watch Zodiak, so be it. I think one of the last movies I saw in the cinema was The Usual Suspects [and that was a disappointment because I figured out the plot after twenty minutes, then had to sit through the rest of the movie for confirmation].

I don't even buy that many new clothes. I prefer thrift stores over H&M. And I work in uniform, so I don't need to dress up for work. My BMW motorcycle is 13 years old and has 125,000 kilometers on the clock. My Guzzi sidecar outfit is seventeen years old. One of the things I buy new and don't mind spending money on is motorcycle gear, because it protects my skin, and motorcycle maintenance.
And I spend money on good food and good coffee, because life is too short to drink and eat garbage.

Synovia
05-13-2011, 09:09 PM
Not that I'm saying people with computers should sell them and buy books. I'm just saying it's hard to sympathise with people living in a country where the price of cinema tickets and books seems to be half that of the same items in the UK.

From the limited research I did, the median income for a full time employee in the UK is 25,428. Thats about $41K.

The median income in the US for a fulltime employee is somewhere in the $34K range.

So, some of it is that you people make more money than we do.

Catana
05-13-2011, 09:10 PM
Not that I'm saying people with computers should sell them and buy books. I'm just saying it's hard to sympathise with people living in a country where the price of cinema tickets and books seems to be half that of the same items in the UK.

Sympathy isn't necessary. Logic would be welcome, though. I own my computer, and I pay for my internet connection. If I didn't budget my book buying very strictly, I wouldn't have a computer or an internet connection. It's somewhat similar, though more privileged, to the dilemma that people far poorer than I am have to face: whether to buy medicine or food. If you're free to buy what you want without considering what you might have to give up in exchange, then you're not likely to understand the problem. And it's exactly the same problem in the U.S and the U.K., and everywhere else.

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 09:21 PM
From the limited research I did, the median income for a full time employee in the UK is 25,428. Thats about $41K.

The median income in the US for a fulltime employee is somewhere in the $34K range.

So, some of it is that you people make more money than we do.Ha! I only wish I did.
...you're not likely to understand the problem. And it's exactly the same problem in the U.S and the U.K., and everywhere else.Between an American and a Brit earning the same amount of money, the American will be able to get more for their $$$ in the US than the Brit would for their over here.

So yeah, it still makes me laugh (or grimace) when I hear from people across the pond complaining that books are so expensive. They're still roughly half the price of books in Britain. (Or the UK, however you want to put it).

Amadan
05-13-2011, 09:24 PM
Not that I'm saying people with computers should sell them and buy books. I'm just saying it's hard to sympathise with people living in a country where the price of cinema tickets and books seems to be half that of the same items in the UK.

Yes, we're all rich here and enjoying our underpriced luxuries.


If I had a bit more disposable income I'd consider ebooks, but ebook readers seem so delicate! I'd be terrified to break one--an ereader can't really go in the bath, get smushed into a backpack on a camping trip, get rolled around in the grit in the bottom of a tent, stored in a drybag on a raft, be left in a cubby at a ski resort, or flung across the room in disdain, or dropped on the ground because I have the coordination of a tipsy preschooler. Yes, I do all of these things to my books. It's a hard-knock life, for them. I really want someone to make a child's ruggedized ereader. One company made one, but it only displays the special interactive illustrated kiddy books you buy especially for it. Why is there not a brightly-colored rubberized ereader for slobby third-graders/me?

You don't use cell phones? Ipods? Laptops? Okay, I wouldn't recommend taking a laptop on a camping trip, but an ereader with a cover is not all that delicate. My Sony could probably survive being dropped a few times (not that I am going to test it).

movieman
05-13-2011, 10:04 PM
From the limited research I did, the median income for a full time employee in the UK is 25,428. Thats about $41K.

The median income in the US for a fulltime employee is somewhere in the $34K range.

So, some of it is that you people make more money than we do.

Except when you buy something from a store in the UK you usually find that if it costs $10 in America then it costs 10 pounds in the UK. And then they put 20% sales tax on top.

They don't call it 'Ripoff Britain' for nothing.

movieman
05-13-2011, 10:19 PM
an ereader can't really go in the bath

A friend used to use his 'ruggedised' computer in the shower; it was low powered so it didn't need fans for cooling, but otherwise the manufacturer didn't seem to have done much to it other than sealing the case well and using connectors that water couldn't leak through. I wonder how much cost that would add to an ebook reader?

Kitty Pryde
05-13-2011, 10:23 PM
You don't use cell phones? Ipods? Laptops? Okay, I wouldn't recommend taking a laptop on a camping trip, but an ereader with a cover is not all that delicate. My Sony could probably survive being dropped a few times (not that I am going to test it).

I've already dropped my phone and broken three protective covers for it in the past year. My partner has, in the past two months: driven off with a smartphone on top of the car, dropped a messaging phone and broken the case, dropped a Droid phone and had her client drive over it in a 100+ pound wheelchair, and dropped the Droid phone again and broken the case. And a mobile phone is smaller and cheaper and less breakable than an ereader!

My iPod is in a rugged rubber casing, and light enough to withstand many bouncy drops. Also I always have it strapped it to my arm so it's nigh impossible to drop! And a laptop I also would not take to any of those places!

scarletpeaches
05-13-2011, 10:24 PM
The bath I can just about understand if you use a shelf to rest the ereader on, or if you just want to soak, but...in the shower? Holding an ereader? Unless it had suckers on the back to stick to the tiles.

What could you possibly do in the shower one-handed?

Don't answer that.

Kitty Pryde
05-13-2011, 10:26 PM
A friend used to use his 'ruggedised' computer in the shower; it was low powered so it didn't need fans for cooling, but otherwise the manufacturer didn't seem to have done much to it other than sealing the case well and using connectors that water couldn't leak through. I wonder how much cost that would add to an ebook reader?

HA! I'm in awe of his multitasking skizills! They sell rubber bouncy kiddo cameras and kiddo DVD player+screens for under $100 so I'm certain that it would be cheaply doable.

Adobedragon
05-13-2011, 10:29 PM
At this point, I don't think I'd pay more than about $7 for an ebook. The ebooks I've purchased have been from ebook publishers or self-published, though. If I want to read something from a big commercial publisher, I get it from the library. If I love it (it's a keeper), I buy it in print.

Medievalist
05-13-2011, 10:34 PM
HA! I'm in awe of his multitasking skizills! They sell rubber bouncy kiddo cameras and kiddo DVD player+screens for under $100 so I'm certain that it would be cheaply doable.

You can get pretty much any digital device "ruggeddized." It's done all the time for equipment used in field conditions.

It's not cheap though.

lachel
05-13-2011, 10:40 PM
I get almost all of the books I want to read immediately from the library. I buy a lot of books, but they're usually books that I want to read later. Usually nice hardcover history or craft or gardening books that I want to keep around.

I use my e-reader at the gym, and have been reading mostly public domain (read: free) books. The only e-books I've bought have been for my book club: too current and popular to be able to get easily at the library. They've been more than I want to spend, but as a SAHM with small children, I consider it a small price to pay to get out of the house and have semi-intellectual conversations with other adults.

KevinMcLaughlin
05-13-2011, 11:26 PM
My iPod is in a rugged rubber casing, and light enough to withstand many bouncy drops. Also I always have it strapped it to my arm so it's nigh impossible to drop! And a laptop I also would not take to any of those places!

Worth noting here that the iPod makes an outstanding ereader once you load Kindle, Nook, or iBook software on it. ;) If you like your iPod, maybe try that out instead of worrying about buying an ereader? Ditto for most of those cell phones you mentioned (just in case the ipod is a nano or something...). ;)

Nightmelody
05-14-2011, 03:26 AM
I have a Kindle and a cheap pda. I'm also on a book budget. I buy mostly Kindle but strip DRM on the books I want to carry on my pda for reading at work etc. I keep the Kindle at home. Also, the pda is my ziplocked reading friend in the tub!

I LOVE our library, it has a pb swap shelving unit where I can often get recent releases. They don't track titles just quantity--so I trade five, get five.

My Kindle acct. is on a gift card given to me by my sister--she now and then refills it on a whim. Thanks, sis!

I am thrilled that I can read a ton of books and not clutter up my house.

kuwisdelu
05-14-2011, 04:15 AM
I've already dropped my phone and broken three protective covers for it in the past year. My partner has, in the past two months: driven off with a smartphone on top of the car, dropped a messaging phone and broken the case, dropped a Droid phone and had her client drive over it in a 100+ pound wheelchair, and dropped the Droid phone again and broken the case. And a mobile phone is smaller and cheaper and less breakable than an ereader!

My iPod is in a rugged rubber casing, and light enough to withstand many bouncy drops. Also I always have it strapped it to my arm so it's nigh impossible to drop! And a laptop I also would not take to any of those places!

http://www.otterbox.com/


The bath I can just about understand if you use a shelf to rest the ereader on, or if you just want to soak, but...in the shower? Holding an ereader? Unless it had suckers on the back to stick to the tiles.

What could you possibly do in the shower one-handed?

Don't answer that.

http://www.ipadaccessories.com/general/waterproof-ipad-cases

KellyAssauer
05-14-2011, 04:38 AM
Typically the books I want and buy, are books I'll keep and reference so I only buy physical copies; new, used or otherwise. It also fits in with the fact that I don't have an ereader, video ipod, pda, smart phone, or disposable income for such toys, and I don't see that changing anytime soon.

Henri Bauholz
05-15-2011, 07:08 PM
Although I write for the internet, I still buy just about all paper. In fact, lately I have acquired a habit of buying used hardback copies through various Amazon vendors. I am currently reading The Woman Who Fell From The Sky and am enjoying the story very much.

veyles57
05-24-2011, 11:51 PM
I price my ebooks at $.99, $1.99, or $2.99 For a print edition the max i would price my books is $8.99. I'm doing most of the work, so I want to reap most of the benefits. I think it's fair to readers and fans also. I think that's about what the market will bear in a digital world.

Kevans
05-25-2011, 01:51 PM
Interesting,

I get paid every two weeks, (Every other Tuesday, don't ask why. sigh)

I buy E books from Baen, paper for every one else. Normally we pick up three to eight titles a pay period. Note, I keep the receipts and write them off at the end of the year as "Research".

I don't have an e-reader yet, the technology is still too primitive, kind of like mobile phones in the 70s, that is needing a retransmission station in the trunk of your car.

Baen has had their full list up as eBooks for at least ten years, prices have been $6.00 for most of that time. Of course if you want to get you fix early you can pay a premium for the EARCs and read a book as much as five months before publication.

BTW free books, http://baen.com/library/ (http://baen.com/library/) no DRM, at least six different formats.

Regards,
Kevin

Deizelcore
09-06-2011, 03:59 PM
Paper.

MartinD
09-06-2011, 10:43 PM
Hardcover, if it's one of the big coffee table books with lots of pics, or if paper is significantly cheaper than the e-copy (I've bought several out-of-favor books at less than a buck). I also buy paper if it isn't available in an electronic version...which, sadly, still happens a lot.

Otherwise, I much prefer the electronic edition. It's my preferred method of reading and is wonderfully convenient.

Deirdre
09-07-2011, 03:22 AM
As a photographer, I buy photo books on paper still.

I'll also buy out-of-print books on paper.

Everything else is digital now.

tim290280
09-07-2011, 12:55 PM
I just posted an interview with vice president of E ink displays. Apparently Pearl E ink screens are better contrast than a paperback. Of course photos are not text, so they need better screens. Once they have a 300 dpi screen then resolution should be good enough for most books (300 dpi being the limit were the brain can fill in the gaps enough to trick us into believing the picture is "real").

http://thetysonadams.blogspot.com/2011/09/e-reader-screens-better-than-paperback.html

Deirdre
09-07-2011, 01:22 PM
Paperbacks aren't actually all that high contrast. The paper's not very white and the ink's not very black.

Contrast loss is one of the reasons I read on an iPad (which is higher contrast -- if I want it to be -- than e-ink can get).

Keyan
09-07-2011, 03:24 PM
In the 8 months or so I've had a Kindle, I've become a convert. Partly because I've run out of shelf-space; partly because I find the Kindle easier (don't have to hold it open); partly because I can shop for books at 2 a.m...

I still buy paper books, but always think twice. If they have a Kindle edition, that's what I buy. In one case (and only one so far) I liked the e-dition so much I bought the paper version. But I will probably end up giving that to someone.

tim290280
09-07-2011, 03:43 PM
Paperbacks aren't actually all that high contrast. The paper's not very white and the ink's not very black.

Contrast loss is one of the reasons I read on an iPad (which is higher contrast -- if I want it to be -- than e-ink can get).
Which you pay for in battery life.

I've actually been impressed with reading on the iPad. My tablet PC wasn't that great, but then again I have the power settings for maximum life and it is a full PC not a toy.

Kindle, et al., are still great for reading though.

DTB are good for reading as well.

Books in general are good for reading......

L M Ashton
09-17-2011, 04:40 PM
The husband and I are 100% ebook readers. We buy paper books for other reading relatives because that's all they can use. For ourselves, we haven't bought a paper book in, oh, three years, maybe a bit longer. I doubt we will ever again. Paper just isn't convenient enough or practical enough, especially given the very sad lack of book selection in this country.

At present, we don't have a dedicated ebook reader, although the husband has offered to buy me one if I need it for my eyes. I don't see the point until the technology has improved further. At this point, we use iPhones, an iPad, and a Galaxy tab for reading.

Brutal Mustang
09-17-2011, 05:07 PM
I don't have a Kindle, or anything. So it's paper.

SJS DIRECT
09-19-2011, 09:12 PM
Paper for me. Authors make more royalties on paper. As a fellow writer and publisher, I know how much time it takes to write a book and that they have to pay bills between books.

Now if they're eBook exclusive, I'll buy a book that way, but my main goal is making sure the author gets the most royalties from the format I'm buying.

Lovely Decadence
09-20-2011, 05:31 AM
Definitely paper. I don't have an ereader either, but even if I did the old grump that's growing in me likes to have the physical book in my hands with pages to turn. That and I like to be able to lend a book I like to a friend so they can see how awesome it is. You can't do that with a digital version, and I'm sure most people would scoff at you if you were like"yeah go buy it." Not that they wouldn't, just people respond to free better, and it gives them more incentive to buy not just that book but other books like it afterward.

Eva Lefoy
09-20-2011, 10:07 AM
BUY? I'll go e-book, because of price. If I LOVE the book and it must become part of my library, I'll probably get the paper version too. But my number choice is always FREE. It's this great thing called the library. :)

eggsactly!

oh, and a little thing called book sales. Here at the local library, they have 2 per year, plus a cart where you buy directly each time you visit - if anything grabs yer eye.

Komnena
09-27-2011, 05:39 PM
A lot of the classics are available digital for free. You get to download them and keep them as long as you like without worrying about overdue fines.
It's great to be able to carry more than three hundred books in my purse. I have an ereader and the free Kindle app on my computer. The e reader is great on trips. I no longer need to drag around heavy bags of books to appointments. My library no longer carries one of my favorite horse books but I was able to preorder the digital version and should have it tomorrow. I have also bought digital copies of other favorite books for trips.
The digital books, though, have not replaced paper as bathroom literature.