PDA

View Full Version : fun English word oddities



Rob_In_MN
05-10-2011, 08:36 PM
thought this was an amusing read.

http://listverse.com/2007/12/03/25-english-language-oddities/

Maryn
05-10-2011, 09:31 PM
Rob, I knew some of these facts but not all of them. Thanks!

Maryn, who bookmarked it

mirandashell
05-10-2011, 09:45 PM
Since when was 'respectlessness' a word?

Rob_In_MN
05-10-2011, 09:46 PM
I don't make the rules :Shrug:

Maryn
05-10-2011, 09:50 PM
I do. It's a word.

Maryn, who runs the show

mirandashell
05-10-2011, 09:53 PM
Is it? Are you sure? I've never seen it before. And I would use disrespect instead.

Bmwhtly
05-10-2011, 10:34 PM
What does 'ghoti' spell?

'fish'

Mr Flibble
05-11-2011, 03:15 PM
It doesn't list my favourite. The word in the English language that means the opposite of itself.

Rob_In_MN
05-11-2011, 06:03 PM
ok.. so it IS early in the morning, but... huh?

Mr Flibble
05-11-2011, 07:04 PM
Which post is making you 'huh?'

Rob_In_MN
05-11-2011, 07:30 PM
the word in the English langauge that means the opposite of itself.

Alpha Echo
05-11-2011, 07:35 PM
Whoever came up with that list had a lot of time on his/her hands. Just sayin'

Mr Flibble
05-11-2011, 07:40 PM
the word in the English langauge that means the opposite of itself.


Well, there is one. :D Go on, have a stab at it. (Hint, one of the meanings is often used in a Biblical/archaic sense, though even today it still means the same. Sometimes, when it doesn't mean its opposite)

ETA: I've just thought of another one as well!

Rob_In_MN
05-11-2011, 07:47 PM
how about irregardless :ROFL:

Mr Flibble
05-11-2011, 08:04 PM
*snort*

Nice try...

Rob_In_MN
05-11-2011, 09:12 PM
I think I need more hints :(

Bmwhtly
05-11-2011, 10:14 PM
The word in the English language that means the opposite of itself.Come on, lady, release the gold!

defyalllogic
05-11-2011, 10:22 PM
I love facts like this! thanks for sharing.

Rob_In_MN
05-11-2011, 11:40 PM
ok so, I cheated and looked on tha interwebz.

google for "Autoantonyms" for a gaggle of them.

one example is cleave:
my tongue cleaved to the roof of my mouth as I cleaved the monster's head from its shoulders.

mirandashell
05-12-2011, 12:22 AM
Would it be ..... extraordinary?

Mr Flibble
05-12-2011, 02:35 AM
Rob got the one I was thinking of - cleave means both adhere AND split in two. From different roots. Biblically it means getting jiggy :D or rather a joining together.

Another one (my aha! moment earlier) is sanction. I sanction your use of sanctions. From the same root, I think.

Although extraordinary...that has possibilities!

Rob_In_MN
05-13-2011, 09:39 PM
so, what do I win?

A cookie?

please say a cookie!!

The cookie was a lie :(

Bookewyrme
05-13-2011, 10:01 PM
I love that list, so many things I didn't know/never thought of before!

IRU, when I first saw your comment all I could think of was the word "inflammable" which means easily combustible, but looks like it should mean not easily combustible.

Mr Flibble
05-14-2011, 02:36 AM
so, what do I win?

A cookie?

please say a cookie!!

The cookie was a lie :(

An internet brownie with extra sprinkles!


IRU, when I first saw your comment all I could think of was the word "inflammable" which means easily combustible, but looks like it should mean not easily combustible. Yeah it does. I also wonder - what's the difference between flammable and inflammable? Is there one? ETA: Flammable, from Latin flammula "small flame," + able. Inflammable, from L. inflammare "to set on fire"

It's maybe like awful - it originally meant the opposite of what it means now (full of awe, not full of poop lol).


BTW: Extraordinary - means 'out of the ordinary' from the latin extraordinarius. Extra meaning 'outside of' So the 'extra' is like, um, extra-terrestrial, extra-marital? See also extraneous (external)

Man, I should stop geeking out like this...