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euclid
05-02-2011, 02:23 PM
Over here we have a slang word: "arseways"

meaning back-to-front.

Is this word used in USA?

Maybe "arsewise"?

Or is there another word? (The more colorful the better). :D

Puma
05-02-2011, 03:08 PM
backasswards

Off the top of my head I can't think of any others. Puma

cryaegm
05-02-2011, 03:27 PM
Half-ass backwards?

D: I'm not exactly sure. I never really thought about it. God, I'm a terrible USA-er. ;(

Cyia
05-02-2011, 03:42 PM
backasswards

Or, occasionally, bass-ackwards.

euclid
05-02-2011, 03:59 PM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?

CaroGirl
05-02-2011, 04:20 PM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?

Nope. They wouldn't get that. Ass backwards or half-assed are well known terms.

Kitti
05-02-2011, 05:07 PM
"ass" is the best American translation of "arse" - say "arse" and you'd better have spent a lot of time in the UK or watching BBC America and it'd still be a weird personal quirk

veinglory
05-02-2011, 06:12 PM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?

No. I think assbackwards would be the American version. And never spelled arse.

PeterL
05-02-2011, 06:32 PM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?

Most Americans think that "arse" is a misspelling of "ass", the silly asses. I think that "bassakwards" would best replace it.

MeretSeger
05-02-2011, 10:32 PM
I second 'Bassakwards', never arse of any kind. I've never heard 'backasswards' in California (that I noticed). Might be some regionalisms at play, perhaps?

Tiger
05-02-2011, 10:42 PM
"Ass-backwards."

On an aside: I like "arse"--I mean the word, "arse." "Ass," the animal, and, "ass," the body part cause too much confusion in America. An elementary school kid should not get a talking to from his teacher for telling his friends not to make asses of themselves.

JayMan
05-02-2011, 11:43 PM
I live on the east coast, and have never heard bassakwards, and only occasionally hear backasswards. "Ass backwards" is what I'd say (or "ass fucking backwards" if you want to add a little color!).

PeterL
05-03-2011, 12:39 AM
I live on the East Coast, and I have frequently heard "ass backwards" and its flip side "bassakwards".

Cranky
05-03-2011, 01:27 AM
Out here in flyover country, it's bassakwards, and sometimes ass backwards. But the first is the most usual. :)

euclid
05-03-2011, 05:57 PM
Thanks everyone.

How about a polite word for the same thing?

Inverted?

Williebee
05-03-2011, 06:02 PM
Inverted would still have the word "ass" in it, and wouldn't be considered polite.

The correct, polite word would depend on context:

You've got them reversed/confused.
You put the cart before the horse.
It went sideways/upside down.

ETA: Rereading, Yeah "inverted" would work. :)

euclid
05-03-2011, 06:08 PM
You know the way a space rocket must land on its tail. While executing this manoeuvre it's orientation is... what?

I would say: "inverted"

sunandshadow
05-03-2011, 06:23 PM
Bassackwards isn't considered impolite, it's on the level of darn, dang, and "H E double hockeysticks". But you could try cockamamie - that doesn't specifically mean backwards, it means crooked or "every which way except the right one" but it's used the same way.

PeterL
05-03-2011, 06:23 PM
Thanks everyone.

How about a polite word for the same thing?

Inverted?

Backwards

DreamWeaver
05-03-2011, 06:40 PM
You know the way a space rocket must land on its tail. While executing this manoeuvre it's orientation is... what?

I would say: "inverted" To change to tail first would be an inversion, but since by the example this rocket is supposed to land on its tail, it doesn't land inverted--it lands right side up for its design. However, if one says that in flight it turned bassackwards to orient itself for landing, that gives a pretty colorful picture of an awkward but necessary maneuver. JMO.


Bassackwards isn't considered impolite, it's on the level of darn, dang, and "H E double hockeysticks". +1. In my neck of the woods, ass backwards is the PG version, and bassackwards is the G version you can say in front of kids and your grandparents :D.

tjwriter
05-03-2011, 06:43 PM
Bass-ackwards = the way a kid says ass-backwards without getting in trouble type of thing.

Tiger
05-03-2011, 09:46 PM
Thanks everyone.

How about a polite word for the same thing?

Inverted?

As in: "sir, you are gluteus maximusly-inverted?" I kinda like it...

Nick Blaze
05-04-2011, 04:45 AM
Man, I have no idea what's going on in this thread. I've honestly never heard any aside from "ass backwards". Maybe I don't get out and interact enough with "normal" Americans? O.o

benbradley
05-04-2011, 06:05 AM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?
I've never heard that before, though I can figure it out in context. I wouldn't use it unless you want some non-American language flavor, and it looks like you're trying to avoid that.

"ass" is the best American translation of "arse" - say "arse" and you'd better have spent a lot of time in the UK or watching BBC America and it'd still be a weird personal quirk
An attractive red-haired woman with a strong and sweet Irish accent can get away with saying "arse" in the USA.

Much like the way this woman talks:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofKcN1a8ObM

"Ass-backwards."

On an aside: I like "arse"--I mean the word, "arse." "Ass," the animal, and, "ass," the body part cause too much confusion in America. An elementary school kid should not get a talking to from his teacher for telling his friends not to make asses of themselves.
What's really bad is the animal is spelled out in the bible, as I recall it's right there in the Ten Commandments. "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's ass."

The mind reels.

Thanks everyone.

How about a polite word for the same thing?

Inverted?
Fucked up?

Oh, that's not polite? How about a euphemistically worded variation on a rather gross phrase?

Recto-Cranial Inversion.

Okay, that's perhaps not what you want, but it can substitute for either "head up his ass" or "ass on his shoulders."

Man, I have no idea what's going on in this thread. I've honestly never heard any aside from "ass backwards". Maybe I don't get out and interact enough with "normal" Americans? O.o
Maybe it's just us rednecks rural residents in the South that make the common rephrasing into "bass ackwards."

Medievalist
05-04-2011, 07:07 AM
Thanks to you both. Is "Arsewise" okay in Americaneze?

It's non-standard; arse is a British use that wasn't carried over into U.S. English.

It's not going to cause a 'merican to clutch their chest in fright and keel-over, ass-over-teakettle, or fall backwards, but you might be better server in U.S. markets by bass ackwards, though it is exceedingly colloquial.

johnnysannie
05-04-2011, 03:17 PM
"ass" is the best American translation of "arse" - say "arse" and you'd better have spent a lot of time in the UK or watching BBC America and it'd still be a weird personal quirk

True because I say "arse" but mostly at home because out in the real American world, most people either don't understand or look at you in a very strange way.

As for the original question, bass ackwards, ass backwards, either one would come.

Rachel77
05-04-2011, 09:02 PM
How about a polite word for the same thing?

Inverted?

As others have said, "bass-ackwards" isn't really "impolite" to begin with. I think of it as sort of "cutesy", myself.

But a more formal version...would depend on the context, I suppose. "Inverted" would work, as would simply "messed up" or "screwed up".

Aaron Wilder
05-04-2011, 09:31 PM
Maybe it's just us rednecks rural residents in the South that make the common rephrasing into "bass ackwards."

Speak for yourself =)

Lived most of my life in North Carolina and have never heard anyone say anything other than ass-backwards.

Tiger
05-04-2011, 09:57 PM
There are other, longer expressions: cart leading the horse and ready, fire, aim! come to mind. But, I don't know if these were made in America.

jaksen
05-04-2011, 11:39 PM
Ass-backwards in some parts of New England. I really thought it was a local colloquialism, but maybe not.

(And it's rarely heard. More common among older people than younger, and often used when talking about younger people who don't know how to do a thing. They are doing it 'ass-backwards.' My grandfather, who was born in 1904, used this expression very often when saying someone hadn't a clue what they were doing, or were doing something 'wrong,' in his opinion.)

Tiger
05-05-2011, 12:29 AM
Friends from Japan thought that was the funniest thing they ever heard. I predict it'll enter the Japanese vernacular soon.

Jonathan Dalar
05-05-2011, 12:48 AM
From the Pac NW, I've heard both ass-backward and bass-ackward, although the latter is colloquial, a sort of ass-backward way to say ass-backward. And it allows pseudo-cussing, which is cute to the Ned Flanderses of the world.

I'd easily recognize 'arse'. Although I am well traveled, the term has been given some exposure to America via films like Braveheart, and really isn't that much different than saying 'ass'. I've seen it used when Americans want to be more polite than saying 'ass'. Heh.

There are a lot of terms you can use for it. Colloquial terms might include something like 'six ways from Sunday', but as far as polite terms, you could just say backward. After all, saying 'ass-backward' is just dirtying it up a bit. Try searching for synonyms of backward if needed.

benbradley
05-05-2011, 12:48 AM
As others have said, "bass-ackwards" isn't really "impolite" to begin with. I think of it as sort of "cutesy", myself.
Well, it's LESS impolite, but everyone knows it's a euphemism and you really mean ass-backwards.

Speak for yourself =)

Lived most of my life in North Carolina and have never heard anyone say anything other than ass-backwards.
I'm only a gas tank away from NC, at least if I don't drive bass-ackwards. :D

Uncarved
05-05-2011, 01:29 AM
Or, occasionally, bass-ackwards.


It was this in the south where I grew up;)

Underthelivingmoon
05-06-2011, 07:27 AM
I'm from WI and I have never heard anyone from here use anything but ass-backward.


Over here we have a slang word: "arseways"

meaning back-to-front.

Is this word used in USA?

Maybe "arsewise"?

Or is there another word? (The more colorful the better). :D

I think that using arseways would be fine depending on your audience and context. The average American may not understand your meaning unless you used it in any obvious way. However if you are aiming for a more 'well-read' group I think that you would be fine using it any way you chose. (By the way. I didn't mean that to be insulting. It just seems to me that avid readers and writers have a rather broad vocabulary and are used to a variety of slang and colloquialisms.)

Smish
05-06-2011, 07:35 AM
No. I think assbackwards would be the American version. And never spelled arse.

This.

I've never heard bassackwards in my life. I'm going to be listening for it now. :D

I'm in the South, by the way. (But not Georgia, like tinasamuels)

mgencleyn
05-07-2011, 08:12 AM
Northernmost New England in the States here. I've heard bass-ackwards and ass-backwards about equally as much. But I hear backwards more than these alternates. Alone, I and others sometimes use arse in place of ass, but I've never heard arseways and arsewise till this thread. If I were to choose between arseways and arsewise, arsewise sounds better, intuitively.

Now I'm going to start using it.

walter101
05-10-2011, 05:58 PM
In my neck of the woods, it's "backside to."

DSA
05-13-2011, 07:34 PM
Another aside: A 5th grade student of mine got all excited when he found the word "ass" in a book by a British author.
I had to explain the "ass" vs. "arse" distinction to him.

Tiger
05-13-2011, 10:10 PM
That really is a shame. In Hawaii, we have an expression, "making 'A'" which is a sanitized version of someone making an ass of himself--something which should not need sanitizing.

On the other hand, the local vernacular also contains the word, "buggah," which we got from the colonists of yore, who would use the word, "bugger." Why "ass," and not "bugger," is a question that'll probably go unanswered in my lifetime.

Derail finished. Many pardons.

euclid
05-17-2011, 11:54 AM
Buggah is Australia, isn't it?

Substituting "A" for "Ass" is fairly universal, I think. I've seen that in American books.

And in UK they say: "straight A's". This must mean a backward student :)

euclid
05-17-2011, 12:40 PM
An attractive red-haired woman with a strong and sweet Irish accent can get away with saying "arse" in the USA.

Much like the way this woman talks:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofKcN1a8ObM



Hi Ben. This video is amazing! The fiddle player, Eileen Ivers, is outstanding! I've never seen anything like that before. How did I manage to miss her? The flute player's not so dusty either.

Thanks for pointing her out to me.

The woman who talks at the start of the video is from Scotland. You knew that, right?

IceCreamEmpress
05-17-2011, 01:48 PM
Substituting "A" for "Ass" is fairly universal, I think. I've seen that in American books.

I have only seen it in the expressions "Fucking A!" (in which case the point of mincing the oath "asshole" is moot) and "a-hole".

I've never seen or heard anyone say "I fell flat on my a" or "Don't be such an a" or similar. (I love that Hawai'ianism Tiger cited, but this is the first time I've encountered it.)


My credentials: 46 years of being a US resident, and almost 43 years of reading a lot.

Cyia
05-17-2011, 07:32 PM
I've heard kids use "friggin' A!" sort of like "Rats!", and I've heard them say someone was "such and A", then same way they say someone was a "Total B" for bitch." (Or my favorite "She's a B with an itch!" for younger kids)

Older people, not so much.

Tiger
05-19-2011, 04:39 AM
(I love that Hawai'ianism Tiger cited, but this is the first time I've encountered it.)

Whoa, you included the okina in "Hawai'i...."

Yah, the "A" in "making A" should refer to an animal--not a body part--but I'm sure kids are getting in trouble as we speak for using the whole word.

Tiger
05-19-2011, 04:41 AM
Buggah is Australia, isn't it?

Substituting "A" for "Ass" is fairly universal, I think. I've seen that in American books.

And in UK they say: "straight A's". This must mean a backward student :)

Well, it's in Hawaii too.

I had a straight "A" all the way through high school (I had to carry two wallets).

artemis31386
05-19-2011, 05:12 AM
We don't use the word arse in the States. We use ass. The phrase you're looking for is ass backwards.

Vespertilion
05-19-2011, 07:41 AM
Ass-backwards and bass-akwards in Texas, too, and like Medievalist mentioned, things also tumble ass over tea kettle.