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doomwdfortune
04-23-2011, 07:42 AM
I'm sorry this is a long one but no one has to answer the whole thing just bits and pieces is more then enough

the story is about a fictional unit in the nypd that was created because of a drop in the closer and conviction rates of the homicide and svu units. this new unit is created by a Sargent with a lot of pull with the mayor to take on extreme case and to to solve the cases that the other units cant or wont bother to work on
the first question is
1. dose that seem realistic that a unit like that would be made
the Sargent runs the unit a little
different then the how the rest of the police department works like
allowing his detectives to carry any side arm they want so long as its reasonable and the qualify with it that means no .22 or .500s and having them give (the Miranda warning right when they arrest some one)
the Grift was right in how he interpreted the
Miranda warning the idea is that its given when the the suspect is arrested so that anything he says on the way to the station can be used against him


do you think the brass would allow this if the mayor told them
also any information about how the police work and how to write courtroom scenes and interrogations is welcome
again also any ideas on what to name the unit are appreciated

Drachen Jager
04-23-2011, 07:59 AM
Isn't there already a unit that does that? Law and Order has a series about the 'Major Case' unit. Sounds exactly like what you're talking about.

doomwdfortune
04-23-2011, 08:12 AM
the real life major case squad doesn't handle murders unfortunately

James D. Macdonald
04-23-2011, 05:29 PM
It's okay to make up a special unit. You wouldn't be the first.

I'm a bit concerned with the emphasis on what firearms they can carry; it seems irrelevant. I'm also unsure what you mean about the Miranda warnings. Are you trying to say that these fellows don't have to give them? If so, I expect their conviction rate to be ... poor.

There are a ton of true-crime books out there that go into police and courtroom procedure in great detail. I'd suggest going to the library, starting at one end of the shelf, and reading to the other end.

Graz
04-23-2011, 06:55 PM
[QUOTE=James D. Macdonald;6068269]It's okay to make up a special unit. You wouldn't be the first.

I'm also unsure what you mean about the Miranda warnings. Are you trying to say that these fellows don't have to give them? If so, I expect their conviction rate to be ... poor.


Criminal: "No one read me my rights."
Cop: "Yes we did."
Judge: "Guilty."

Soccer Mom
04-23-2011, 07:08 PM
You would never have a Sgt running such a unit. Make it a Capn. Also, Miranda is not something you do if you feel like it. The requirement is federal, not local. The mayor can't just decide what to do. Neither can the police commissioner. You need to do a lot more research before tackle such a topic.

The Grift
04-23-2011, 07:31 PM
The NYPD has tons of units and special assignments that nobody has ever heard of. They work in dozens of countries and on task forces with every agency under the sun. I would be shocked if they didn't have an analogue to the LAPD's Special Investigation Section. http://www.tactical-life.com/online/tactical-weapons/lapds-elite-sis-tactical-detective-squad/ . As you can see from that article, they not only get more leeway with their firearms, but they had a special one made just for them.

As to Miranda, I think the OP was saying that his squad would always give the warning right when the person is arrested. Depending on how you define "arrested," this doesn't always happen and doesn't need to. You only need to give Miranda when someone is in a custodial situation and being interrogated.

The bottom line is that special units with expanded purviews are always believable, because (a) so many of them exist in real life and (b) we as an audience have been conditioned to believe in them (see, e.g. The Wire, Miami Vice, Fastlane, Dark Blue). Have fun.

doomwdfortune
04-24-2011, 12:56 AM
the Grift was right in how he interpreted the
Miranda warning the idea is that its given when the the suspect is arrested so that anything he says on the way to the station can be used against him

jclarkdawe
04-24-2011, 01:41 AM
the Grift was right in how he interpreted the
Miranda warning the idea is that its given when the the suspect is arrested so that anything he says on the way to the station can be used against him


Miranda warnings are a moving target. You give it at the time of the arrest if you plan on questioning the suspect. If you have no plans to question the suspect (which occurs a lot of times -- you catch the guy coming out of a building at 2 AM you don't need to talk to the suspect), you don't. This is one of the first lessons a new officer learns.

But anytime you start questioning the suspect, you repeat Miranda warnings if you have any sense. And during extended questioning, you repeat the warnings every hour or so. Bottom line is that any cop who's done this for a while knows you never can do enough Miranda warnings. Because if I have a client with a confession, I'm going to attack the Miranda warnings any way I can. And no cop wants to testify in court and look like an idiot because he screwed up a basic thing.

One of my favorite confessions for a client consisted of ten pages of Miranda warnings for a forty page confession. And the detective repeated the warnings at page thirty. Think there was anything I could do with that confession?

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe