PDA

View Full Version : So how are we to crit flash fiction?



wonderactivist
04-11-2011, 10:00 AM
I'm writing a crit and as I do I'm realizing that I don't know what the standards are for "flash" fiction--maybe I have an incorrect idea of what it is. I THOUGHT it was written in one setting, like in a stream of consciouness. If so, that it wouldn't be fair to crit it. Nobody writes perfectly the first time.

But then I read this online explanation and (http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/flash.shtml) I think I'm supposed to use the same standards as with regular fiction.

Y'all please clarify.

Thanks!

Lucie

CACTUSWENDY
04-11-2011, 10:41 AM
IMHO.....a story is a story is a story.....

Makes no difference how many words are in it. 100 word flash fiction stories need help just like the the 85,000 word stories. All the same things apply. Usually flash stories are to the point and read tight with great voice.

Just give your opinion and any insight how it affects the read. Best wishes.

wonderactivist
04-11-2011, 10:48 AM
Thanks! And I adore your avatar.

Lucie

Polenth
04-11-2011, 07:45 PM
All flash fiction means is it's short. It doesn't mean it's a first draft or dictate anything about how you write it. So yes, critique it like any other story.

GlobalWolf
05-07-2011, 03:18 AM
There are a few things about flash fiction that you have to get right that may not be a big deal with other fiction. In my experience, a bigger emotional impact is necessary to make the reader actually enjoy it. So, you might want to look for different stuff while critiquing it. Other than that, though, it's the same as regular fiction, only extremely short.

kennyc
06-11-2011, 04:08 PM
I personally think it should be critiqued like any other story, but I often think it gets "cut some slack" due to the restricted word count.

Joliedupre
12-13-2011, 07:45 PM
Flash fiction, no matter how short, is a complete story with a beginning, middle and an end. That should be your first consideration when critiquing flash fiction. If it is not a complete story, it is not flash fiction.

Next, look for a powerful ending. The best flash fiction ends with a punch.

the_Unknown
01-19-2012, 09:56 PM
No, you should put it in SYW by genre.

Skilled critters would rather have short length pieces instead of lengthy repetitions of problems.

dgrintalis
01-19-2012, 10:04 PM
I agree with everyone else. Critique it as you would any other story. IMO, flash fiction is a story first, flash second, if that makes sense. It should still be a satisfying story, no matter the length.

RobJ
01-20-2012, 03:34 AM
I'm writing a crit and as I do I'm realizing that I don't know what the standards are for "flash" fiction--maybe I have an incorrect idea of what it is. I THOUGHT it was written in one setting, like in a stream of consciouness. If so, that it wouldn't be fair to crit it. Nobody writes perfectly the first time.

But then I read this online explanation and (http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/flash.shtml) I think I'm supposed to use the same standards as with regular fiction.

Y'all please clarify.

Thanks!

Lucie
I've seen the term used to cover both of the definitions you provide. The most common usage is about story length, but some people talk about flash fiction as being written in a short space of time. Context usually makes it clear what's meant.

hvysmker
03-03-2012, 12:06 AM
I've been taught that flash fiction is different than short fiction.

That Flash should have few adjectives and adverbs for one thing, as well as having extraneous words cut out. It should be packed and concise without long descriptions or narration. Leave more up to the reader to imagine rather than take space explaining.

Short fiction is simply a story often written within word constraints. It's sometimes a "photograph" describing a point in time.

Maybe two people meet in a park and talk. It might be more to paint a picture and not contain all the elements of a complete story. For instance, no real conflict or resolution. It might simply make a point. For example two people could meet in that park and discuss having a baby. Both would give their views and then leave. It's a form often used by standup comedians.

With Flash fiction, you'd need all the story elements. Both would benefit from an unexpected twist at the end.

Charlie