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The Backward OX
03-02-2011, 03:23 AM
I frequently lack the enthusiasm to write and wondered where you get yours from. What is it that gets you going?

Medievalist
03-02-2011, 03:25 AM
Honestly?

It's the paycheck.

I would never have described myself as a writer, otherwise. But I can write, and people will pay me.

So I'm crass and mercenary. Being desirous of food, ultimately, is my inner muse.

But in terms of motivations, I think sometimes it helps me to think, I'll do another 500 words, and read for an hour, or listen to music while I write, or go for a walk.

scarletpeaches
03-02-2011, 03:29 AM
What makes you think you need enthusiasm?

Tirjasdyn
03-02-2011, 03:42 AM
It was beaten into me by an English teacher. Then other English teachers encouraged me at my peril. Then, and this is the craziest part, people bought what I wrote.

Madness, I tell you.

If you don't like writing why are you trying to be a writer?

Jamesaritchie
03-02-2011, 03:46 AM
Primarily the money. But if I didn't enjoy the process, I wouldn't write, even for money. There are too many easier ways of earning money to make a living doing something you don't enjoy. Take away the money, and I wouldn't write. Take away the enjoyment, and I wouldn't write.

I've never been big on the concept of motivation. Motivation strikes me as something that's needed only when there's something you have to do, but really, really don't want to do.

I need motivation to do all sorts of unpleasant things, but just as I don't need motivation to read a good book, or to take a vacation with the family, or to go out to the shooting range, I don't need motivation to write. I Don't need motivation to do anything I really enjoy doing, and I don't do things I don't enjoy doing unless I absolutely have to do them. Life is too short.

Eddyz Aquila
03-02-2011, 03:58 AM
I'll be honest - money.

But there's another side to it. I loathe working for something I don't like. If I didn't like a lot (sometimes even love!) writing, I wouldn't be doing it.

Doing something I love and getting paid for it? My dream job.

Lost World
03-02-2011, 11:48 AM
Wow...I'm kind of surprised that no one has hit on my reason yet: a need to CREATE something. Some people carve ice sculptures or paint or do woodwork. I write. And I have never received anything more than token payment for doing so.

Reason two is that I want to leave something behind, and writing can make you immortal, whether to future generations or simply to your own progeny. If you don't leave something behind, then you only took up space....Least that's the way I see it.

T.S.Rex
03-02-2011, 12:35 PM
I'm with Lost World on this, the need to create just makes me enthusiastic. I want to tell this story I've had playing over and over in my head for so long. There are times I'm frustrated and tired, but give me a long drive to work or too long away from the computer and my mind nags at me, replaying scenes and conversations that make me itch to put this story I'm so passionate about into words.

Dandroid
03-02-2011, 12:40 PM
i am rarely enthusiatic as i let the computer boot up...but when a few sentences are down, i tend to enjoy the escape of it, and the mania that sometimes ensues...

Kewii
03-02-2011, 01:22 PM
I agree with Dandroid. Starting is hard, but once I start I do a lot of *muahahaha* and *hahahaha* and *I love this idea*. The actual writing part, I like. The sitting down and focusing part, not so much.

I'm also motivated by my goals. It's like that carrot on a stick thing. I keep going trying to reach my carrot (having something in a book store).

seun
03-02-2011, 01:24 PM
If you're not enthusiatic about writing for whatever reason, maybe you shouldn't be writing.

lvae
03-02-2011, 02:26 PM
I'm confused about what you mean by 'acquiring enthusiasm for writing'. I assume we're all enthusiastic about writing itself here... Do you mean getting your mojo on to write for long periods of time, adding new things to your manuscript that won't end up getting deleted without a trace?

In that case, I find I'm most productively creative when I'm juggling multiple things at once, with school, work and writing. There's just something about having only a small amount of space to write that sends my mind ticking on overdrive.

Anne Lyle
03-02-2011, 03:16 PM
What is it that gets you going?

Butt In Chair, Hands On Keyboard.

Seriously. I don't write every single day, because some days I'm working on wider career goals and others I'm taking a break (just as I do from my day job) - but when I've made a commitment to write a draft, or work on my edits, or outline some scenes, I sit down at my desk and just do it.

You start with enthusiasm for the shiny new project, and you keep that enthusiasm by keeping on going. Also, I belong to another forum (Forward Motion) where we post weekly goals and cheer one another on. I have beta-readers as well, to criticise my work when it's ready for public consumption, but I think it's good to have cheerleaders as well, to keep you going until you get to that stage.

quicklime
03-02-2011, 06:11 PM
What makes you think you need enthusiasm?


this, to at least some extent.

a lot of folks who want to write seem to think it is some magical bit of fairy-fun and wonder. Sometimes I'm sure it is. But almost every interview i've seen by published, working on books full-time authors, they're pretty damn up fron about the fact they handle it like a job. Their job it to type. That means a lot of mornings they don't skip their way to the keyboard, humming and smiling, but they go there anyway.

elmoie
03-02-2011, 06:22 PM
If I'm down about writing (worried I'm not good enough, panicking about plot holes etc) I just remind myself of why I'm doing this - because the second I sit down and focus on my book I'm happy.

I'm not happy in my current profession - it's not the worst job in the world but I can get really down about it sometimes. With the current economic climate in Ireland (and it is really bad here at the moment) there are no other options for me - it's either do a job I hate or starve - there are no other jobs out there and hundreds of thousands of young people are leaving the country because it's so bad.

Writing makes me feel better about all of this. It's hard to describe it, but it just does.

Namatu
03-02-2011, 06:30 PM
a lot of folks who want to write seem to think it is some magical bit of fairy-fun and wonder.Are you trying to crush my delusion? ;)


Sometimes I'm sure it is. But almost every interview i've seen by published, working on books full-time authors, they're pretty damn up fron about the fact they handle it like a job. Their job it to type. That means a lot of mornings they don't skip their way to the keyboard, humming and smiling, but they go there anyway.Yes, it very much is a job and a habit. You don't always like your job, but if you want the end result (paycheck/publication), you do it anyway. I might feel morose and completely not creative, but if I can crack the seal and get a few words down, it grows to a few more words, and soon I'm feeling much better - happy. It's fun, even if it can be a hard habit to create and maintain.

scarletpeaches
03-02-2011, 06:32 PM
Writing's like sex. You might not feel like it tonight, you might plead a headache, but if you do it to keep other people happy, once you get into it you start enjoying it yourself.

KyraDune
03-02-2011, 07:17 PM
I write because I love to write, I need to write. Now, don't get me wrong, I'd love to get rich and famous, but that isn't why I write. Sometimes I might feel tired or even discouraged, but I never have to find enthusiasm for writing, I already have it.

The Backward OX
03-03-2011, 01:51 AM
I'm confused about what you mean by 'acquiring enthusiasm for writing'. I assume we're all enthusiastic about writing.

Assumptions are dangerous.


I think I might inhabit a different world.

I would like to write. Fiction. Not necessarily to have a story published Ė that is too far off to even contemplate. At this stage my goal would be simply to finish the writing.

1. Currently I have the broadest of broad outlines for a story in my head Ė it goes something like this Ė a guy wants nothing more out of life than to stretch out under a tree, but in order to reach that goal he finds he has to keep doing stuff.

2. I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate. I think this may be caused by various age- and health-related aches and pains preventing me from zeroing in on writing.

3. I thought, perhaps naÔvely, that if I had boundless enthusiasm for the project, that that enthusiasm might override the aches and pains.

Perhaps my OP was also naÔve.

AlwaysJuly
03-03-2011, 02:07 AM
I write because I think I'm good at it, and when I write more, I get better at it. That's mostly what fuels my enthusiasm.

Also, I'd like to quit my day job someday. Might not happen, but trying isn't costing me anything except the time I would otherwise spend watching Teen Mom 2.

backslashbaby
03-03-2011, 02:33 AM
Fiction or nonfiction?

Nonfiction is the paycheck. I do like it more than a lot of things I've done to get a paycheck, so that's a bonus. But it's not like I usually care much about the topic or anything. I care to make it so that the reader understands it well, or it's not so dry, etc. That challenge is fun enough.

Fiction is another story (bwahaha). It's just fun to write (along with all of the work part, of course). But people enjoy it in a way that feels different than a training manual or textbook success. There is an artsy creative thing there that is rewarding without a paycheck, for me.

Of course, now I'm shooting for a paycheck worth anything on the fiction front, too. We'll see :)

Lillie
03-03-2011, 02:35 AM
I have to make up stories in my head.
I've done it all my life and I can't help doing it.

Writing is a way of trying to fix some of those floating stories.

I once thought that one naturally led to the other and because I did the one I'd be able to do the other easily. It didn't turn out like that as they are really two different things.

So writing for me is trying to turn one thing into another, it's a challenge and it's a learning process. But the stories in my head? they are an addiction.

Berenice
03-03-2011, 12:13 PM
I have to make up stories in my head.
I've done it all my life and I can't help doing it.

Writing is a way of trying to fix some of those floating stories.

Same here. There's nothing I like more than imagining a complex plot in a nifty alternate universe, and then filling it out with characters. Everytime I get too lazy or too caught up with life to write, I feel something's missing and I always have to come back to it.

Another thing is that I love to read. Some books have brought me such intense satisfaction that I felt forever grateful to their authors. My ultimate dream is to bring the same pleasure to someone reading my stuff. I don't really care about the money, I already have a well-paying job I love, but I just want to be read, and that's what keeps me going.

The Backward OX
03-03-2011, 12:18 PM
I have to make up stories in my head.
I've done it all my life and I can't help doing it.

That sounds as if a strong and vivid imagination plays a large part in being able to write.

bearilou
03-03-2011, 05:48 PM
Assumptions are dangerous.


I think I might inhabit a different world.

I would like to write. Fiction. Not necessarily to have a story published Ė that is too far off to even contemplate. At this stage my goal would be simply to finish the writing.

1. Currently I have the broadest of broad outlines for a story in my head Ė it goes something like this Ė a guy wants nothing more out of life than to stretch out under a tree, but in order to reach that goal he finds he has to keep doing stuff.

2. I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate. I think this may be caused by various age- and health-related aches and pains preventing me from zeroing in on writing.

3. I thought, perhaps naÔvely, that if I had boundless enthusiasm for the project, that that enthusiasm might override the aches and pains.

Perhaps my OP was also naÔve.

In all honesty, B-Ox, it sounds less like an enthusiasm problem and more of a focus problem for your story. It's extremely vague and broad and so far shows no conflict whatsoever. The conflict, of wanting to sleep his day away in a hammock, should come from life, his circumstances and your story.

I might suggest some brainstorming and asking some questions of the story and the character. Play the What if game.

What if:

An alien invasion landed in his backyard.

While trimming the hedge, overhearing his neighbors talking about an assassination.

The kid that lives across the street is the Anti-Christ.

Or perhaps something less fanciful but ideas that would drag your MC out of his pursuit of complacency into an adventure of some sort. He'll have to solve this problem before he can go back to sleep under that tree.

Provided the aliens haven't taken it as a specimen.

Phaeal
03-03-2011, 06:20 PM
Yes, I'd say a lively imagination is a mandatory requirement for the writer. Also a drive that goes beyond the vague desire to have written something.

The enthusiasm that underlies a vocation is variable but enduring and probably innate. It can be manic, it can be quiet, it can be the sheer bloody-minded determination to sit in that chair and put out words no matter what.

I honestly don't see how you can "acquire" it.

Lillie
03-03-2011, 09:37 PM
That sounds as if a strong and vivid imagination plays a large part in being able to write.

Partly, I suppose.

But for me there are two things going on. The first is all the imaginary stuff in my head and the second is the ability to write it so it is as real for other people as it is for me.

That second part is the actual writing, and being good at the first one doesn't necessarily make you good at the second.
It's a craft, it's technique. It's something that (I hope) can be learned and improved.

My enthusiasm for writing lies in the space between the two. The attempt to translate one into the other. The challenge.

Libbie
03-03-2011, 10:52 PM
The possibility of getting paid for it. Also, I guess I'm apparently pretty good at it, and it feels good to do things I know I'm doing well.

brainstorm77
03-03-2011, 10:56 PM
I enjoy it.

dangerousbill
03-03-2011, 11:12 PM
I frequently lack the enthusiasm to write and wondered where you get yours from. What is it that gets you going?

Is it possible that writing isn't your natural form of creative expression?

I find that getting out among other writers, and joining a regular critique group stokes my enthusiasm, but I can't honestly say I have trouble finding enthusiasm. Actually sitting my ass down and writing--sometimes that takes a little work or patience, but I'm always thinking about what I'm writing, or about to write.

Writing works for me because it's a form of self-exploration. I've discovered things about myself that I'd never have guessed otherwise. Good things, scary things.

dangerousbill
03-03-2011, 11:21 PM
I would like to write. Fiction. Not necessarily to have a story published Ė that is too far off to even contemplate. At this stage my goal would be simply to finish the writing.


Take a life inventory.

Is there anything in your life that you've enjoyed doing and then finished? Some folks go through life imagining the things they'd like to do, but never get around to doing it. They buy paints and canvas, and never get around to painting. They buy seeds and trowel, and never plant that garden. They draw plans for a house over and over, but never build it.

I hope you're not one of these. I know some, and now I'm old, these people are desperately unhappy about their empty lives.

Accomplishment is habit forming. You have to want to do something badly enough to do it, and hold it up like a trophy. Then do something else, etc, until you get high on the sense of accomplishment.

The Backward OX
03-04-2011, 01:32 AM
I have to make up stories in my head.
I've done it all my life and I can't help doing it.



That sounds as if a strong and vivid imagination plays a large part in being able to write.


Partly, I suppose.

But for me there are two things going on. The first is all the imaginary stuff in my head
And where does all that *imaginary* stuff in your head originate? In your *imagination*, that's where. Where else? And where does your imagination live? In your head, perhaps?

mccardey
03-04-2011, 01:40 AM
And where does all that *imaginary* stuff in your head originate? In your *imagination*, that's where. Where else? And where does your imagination live? In your head, perhaps?

I don't know if imagination resides anywhere - it's just part of the total writer. Like - perfectionism (or not); gregariousness (or not). It's just a factor in a personality.

Phaeal
03-04-2011, 02:09 AM
The imagination lives in a big yellow house with green shutters just south of the pineal gland. There are cats on the front porch, pit bulls in the back yard and a slightly irascible dragon in the basement. Sometimes bats fly out of the tower, but they're cool and have no interest in human hair.

dpaterso
03-04-2011, 02:20 AM
And where does all that *imaginary* stuff in your head originate? In your *imagination*, that's where. Where else? And where does your imagination live? In your head, perhaps?
Are you gettin' snippy 'cause you're not finding the answers you wanted, or is this a joke that's not translating too well?

Maybe another approach: what kind of fiction do you like to read? Who are your favorite authors, in what genres? Is this the kind of stuff you want to write, too? Or are you wanting to venture into something completely new that you're not comfortable with (yet)?

-Derek

Bubastes
03-04-2011, 02:21 AM
To the OP: I'm curious -- why do you want to write? If you can't muster any enthusiasm or imagination for it, why bother?

bearilou
03-04-2011, 02:40 AM
And where does all that *imaginary* stuff in your head originate? In your *imagination*, that's where. Where else? And where does your imagination live? In your head, perhaps?

Or in asking questions of your idea.

Why have the garden gnomes suddenly come alive and started cannibalizing the neighborhood? Why did the cat decide to start talking to the boy? Why does your MC want to live a life of leisure, napping under the tree?

It follows naturally when you allow yourself to ask these questions and not demand they conform.

Perhaps, I've just misunderstood the intent of your question.

[goes back to her cannibalistic garden gnomes eating all the pink flamingo lawn ornaments]

Lillie
03-04-2011, 03:12 AM
And where does all that *imaginary* stuff in your head originate? In your *imagination*, that's where. Where else? And where does your imagination live? In your head, perhaps?

Well yes. it does.

My point was that thinking something is not the same as writing it, and my inspiration for writing, the actual putting it down on paper, is the desire to realise those thoughts in a physical (and readable) form.

So I was drawing a distinction between what inspires my thoughts and what inspires the desire to write them down.

But yes, the way you mean it you would be correct. It starts in the imagination and works forward from there. If I had nothing in my imagination ultimately I would have nothing to write.

So yes, I do agree with you on that.
Did it sound like I didn't? It wasn't meant too.

backslashbaby
03-04-2011, 03:22 AM
Well, you could lack innate abilities on parts of what are involved. Say a poet wants to write novels, or shorts. The poet has always loved reading those works, but was just drawn to poetry.

Could a poet learn to plot? I think very many could, yes. Some probably couldn't.

Is there anything about creative wordplay or creating stories, etc, that calls to you naturally?

Kitty27
03-04-2011, 03:52 AM
I just have it. I write every day because I enjoy it.

Of course,I want to be published one day. But deep down,I just love to write. I write because its fun,therapeutic,and exciting. The drive to write cannot be bought or taught. Even the laziest writer will put ass in chair and write something because they absolutely have to do it.

The Backward OX
03-04-2011, 04:16 AM
are you wanting to venture into something completely new that you're not comfortable with (yet)?

-Derek
Yes

The Backward OX
03-04-2011, 04:24 AM
My point was that thinking something is not the same as writing it..
So I was drawing a distinction between what inspires my thoughts and what inspires the desire to write them down.



Debatable, but okay.

In my case the cupboard is bare. There's no bones there.

Lillie
03-04-2011, 04:55 AM
No bones in the imagination cupboard?

Sometimes that happens to me when I want to write something short and not one of the big long things going on in my head. When that happens I sometimes go to a few sites with title generators (google them) and then when I see a title or other prompt that strikes me I just start writing whatever comes out.
Sometimes it's rubbish, sometimes it's quite good.
Sometimes they go nowhere and just end up as a mad ramble, other times they turn into proper stories.

This site has all sorts of prompts to get you going.
http://shortstoryideas.herb.me.uk/index.html

Try it! If it don't work out you can always hit 'delete' and pretend it never happened.

butterfly
03-04-2011, 02:47 PM
Assumptions are dangerous.


I think I might inhabit a different world.

I would like to write. Fiction. Not necessarily to have a story published – that is too far off to even contemplate. At this stage my goal would be simply to finish the writing.

1. Currently I have the broadest of broad outlines for a story in my head – it goes something like this – a guy wants nothing more out of life than to stretch out under a tree, but in order to reach that goal he finds he has to keep doing stuff.

2. I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate. I think this may be caused by various age- and health-related aches and pains preventing me from zeroing in on writing.

3. I thought, perhaps naÔvely, that if I had boundless enthusiasm for the project, that that enthusiasm might override the aches and pains.

Perhaps my OP was also naÔve.

Writing is easy, really. It's making it interesting that's difficult.

First, don't focus on excuses because they will multiply exponentially until you are so exhausted you won't even want to pick up your favorite pen.

Second, think of it as a word problem:
x=guy
y= same guy stretched out under a tree
equation: x+?=y

Or if you like geography, how does the man in a dinghy in the middle of the ocean get to the island without any oars?

Equate it to something you like and go from there.

And, just so you know, it doesn't have to be brilliant right off the bat, it just has to be on paper.

backslashbaby
03-05-2011, 04:02 AM
When I was starting to write more than lyrics/poetry, I fell into writing that was basically fan fiction. I continued Ian Fleming's James Bond novels with his daughter as the MC :) It was great fun.

Maybe you have a favorite book or movie that you could continue? It's not publishable, but I think it's excellent for training wheels, personally. You know the setting (but can change it) and the characters (but add/lose them, change thier backgrounds -- whatever). Now, what happens next? :D

Monkey
03-05-2011, 06:45 AM
I have to do something creative or I blow a fuse. Writing is my favorite creative outlet.

That said, writing a novel follows a semi-predictable course, and there are some points where it gets hard. Those points are where new or less dedicated writers tend to falter.

You've got a general idea...that's easy enough, and fun, and even kind of exciting. You have the prospect of a novel in front of you--yay!

But the first difficult point--the one that stops many would-be writers--is taking that general idea and making it as specific as humanly possible. You have to go from macro to micro...your big idea has to fit in the heart and mind of one character. All your struggle, all your story, is going to live inside that character.

So who is that character?

I could imagine a man living his life at a break-neck pace, every day throwing himself into his work, his hobbies, anything, just to forget the terrible things that happened in his past. He wants to stop--to find peace, and time, and calm--to be able to stretch out in a big hammock, read a good book, and let the world pass him by without feeling the need to look over his shoulder.

That would be the struggle...it's all INSIDE the character. Then you put that character in a situation that forces him to deal with the struggle inside himself. Maybe something from his past blows up in his present. Perhaps he finds out that he's a father of a baby girl, and the mother has just passed away. He could get involved with drugs, go insane, and spend half the book wondering how much of the crazy stuff happening to him is real.

But all that is external plot. Your STORY is in your character.

Find out who your character is, figure out what's going to happen to him, and start there: the moment that character's life is thrown into free-fall.

The rest will take care of itself...

Until you hit the middle-of-the-book doldrums. At which point, you're just going to have to tough it out.

BjornAbust
03-05-2011, 06:59 AM
Like others have said, I have a deep-seated desire to create something. I want to leave something behind in this world. Over the years, I've been influenced and captivated by the works of other artists. To be able to do that for others would be a dream come true. That having been said, I'm a practical person, too. The idea of earning a paycheck through writing fiction is alluring.

When it comes to finding motivation, I think I see what you mean. There are times when I can't seem to muster up the will to write; the muse seems to speak to me in waves; if I don't listen to her when she speaks, then that's that. It might be days before she speaks to me again, you know?

Writing, for me, is like drilling for oil. I'll tap a good vein from time to time and be really pleased with what I've written. Other times, the well is dry. You never really know how it'll turn out unless you drill, however. Even when the muse falls silent, I tend to force myself to write; if for nothing else than to get some practice.

Purple Rose
03-05-2011, 03:16 PM
It's hard to imagine not being enthusiastic about writing. I love to write and I can so I do. There are bad days, usually my own lazy days, when i dodn't feel like it, so I don't write. I don't fight it at all because I know there will be days in a row when I can produce 5,000 words without any difficulty. Ok, then 4,500 will be chopped the next day but you get the picture. Basically if you love to write, it just comes and you enjoy it.

Rhoda Nightingale
03-05-2011, 04:38 PM
My enthusiasm for writing is linked up with my enthusiasm for other people's books, movies, comics, even concept albums--the excitement of losing myself in another world with a great story. Everything in that list sparks the same nerve in my brain. That "Oh! Oh! What happens next?" that gets me jumping up and down like the fangirl I am.

I can't remember a time in my life when I haven't been making up stories. When I was little I had a whole fleet of imaginary friends and we'd all go on "adventures" together, sometimes in my dreams. Now, it's not much different, only I call them "characters" instead and don't talk to them out loud. Most of the time.

It would be nice to be paid for it, eventually, one day, which is what I'm working towards--the editing/querying/submitting part of this is decidely less fun than the creating part, but just as exciting in a way because it's new ("What happens next?!")--but that's not what drives me. The stories drive themselves. All I do is try and keep up with them.

Brutal Mustang
03-05-2011, 05:08 PM
In all honesty, B-Ox, it sounds less like an enthusiasm problem and more of a focus problem for your story.

Yes. At this point, your MC sounds a little boring. Are you bored with him? Sounds like he simply needs a more gripping yearning than wanting to sleep under a tree. Sure, that can make a good short term yearning, for a scene, or whatever. But for the whole story arc?

Don't get me wrong, some experienced writers can pull something like this off, probably in a comedy-like manner--but I think even they would reveal he has a deeper, complex yearnings(s) in his heart as the story goes on.

SaraFMC
03-05-2011, 05:30 PM
I write because I get irritable and sad and insecure if I don't. Also because I really can't seem to stop, I have tried, but scenes and dialogue keep popping into my head and I feel a loss if I don't write them down. So I finally got myself organized and started taking it seriously, treating it like work, trying to get good enough to get paid.

I don't always feel like writing, and on those days, again, I treat it like work. I see what needs to be done next, and I do it. And I've found that my dutiful work is sometimes even better than my simply enthusiastic work, which can turn it into enthusiastic work as I go.

shelleyo
03-05-2011, 09:21 PM
I would like to write.

Why? It's a question worth answering. Why do you want to write at all? People do it for different reasons. What's yours?




I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate.


You already having something, though. Start writing about the man. Just start. If you're having trouble with the outline, start writing. Maybe you're not an outliner. Ask yourself why he wants to get beneath that tree, and what kinds of things keep getting in his way. Write as you think. It's certainly worth a try. Getting started is often the hardest part, because it's easy to constipate yourself with the need to do it correctly or perfectly, and that's just not possible.

If I didn't have enthusiasm about writing and the written word in general, I wouldn't write. But there are days when I don't have enthusiasm for a particular story or project. That's natural.

Shelley

jaksen
03-05-2011, 10:51 PM
I never 'acquired it.' It's always been in me from the time I could talk. It's in me DNA, methinks.

My problem is taking breaks to eat, take care of my kids, interact with my family and do mundane things like sleep. Honestly, I could sit and write 20 hours a day. It's really the only thing I want to do.

I can't be the only one like this. I hope not.

Rhoda Nightingale
03-06-2011, 01:38 AM
^You most definitely are not. I don't have kids, but I will frequently forget to eat or sleep when I'm on a roll.

The Backward OX
03-06-2011, 03:02 AM
A great many replies here may well be written by people far, far younger than I. Their general tenor certainly makes them seem like that. Additionally, a great many have talked about enthusiasm as if it’s a given.

I’ve heard that sometimes a good way to make something more clear, to drive the message home, is to exaggerate it. Okay, with that in mind, let me rephrase the OP, exaggerated:

How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Silly question, but it made you sit up.

Okay, I’m not dead, but I’m possibly closer to dead than many of those who’ve replied. I’m 74, I have an inborn lethargy about me, I have various age- and illness-related aches and pains, and I sometimes think writing might be a way to kill time until the Grim Reaper kills me. I don’t have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where I’m coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.

Bubastes
03-06-2011, 03:11 AM
Isaac Asimov was once asked what he would do if he knew he had only six months to live. He said, "Type faster."

I have the same attitude. If I don't haul ass on my writing now, I will regret my lack of progress when I'm older. That fear of not writing all the stories I want to write during my lifetime keeps me pushing forward.

dpaterso
03-06-2011, 03:30 AM
I donít have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where Iím coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.
I've no idea what I'd do if I were in your position. But methinks it's very unlikely I would attempt to pursue something I wasn't really interested in. I'd be looking for other hobbies, checking out other online groups until I found that elusive something special to occupy my hours.

-Derek

Jessianodel
03-06-2011, 03:41 AM
I can't not write. I can't say one day that I am never going to write again. But the enthusiasm to finish (as I am completely okay with stopping half-way through and starting something else) is the dream of publishing it. The dream of people loving my work enough to buy it. My writing was good enough to make people part with hard-earned cash? Seriously?

Sydewinder
03-06-2011, 04:07 AM
My enthusiasm is the prospect of money. If I fail to make a living as a writer, I will likely stop writing. On January 01, 2009, as part of a "try something new" new years resolution my friends were doing, I said, "I think I'll become a writer."

I've enjoyed the process. No sales yet, but the prospect of sales is what makes me write.

shelleyo
03-06-2011, 04:15 AM
I've no idea what I'd do if I were in your position. But methinks it's very unlikely I would attempt to pursue something I wasn't really interested in. I'd be looking for other hobbies, checking out other online groups until I found that elusive something special to occupy my hours.

-Derek

This.

You have an idea, but no enthusiasm for it, no burning desire to write, as you said. There are many other creative outlets that might appeal more. Drawing, painting, playing music. I just can't imagine writing fiction if I didn't have a strong desire to do it and enthusiasm for the process.

You could, however, try reading a couple of books about the process to see if they help, since you cared enough to ask here.

Art & Fear: The Rewards and Perils of Artmaking (about artists, but applies to writing or anything creative)
Writing Down the Bones
Bird by Bird


And some of the how-to books on writing short stories by Damon Knight, John Gardner or many others, or even how-to books on writing poetry might be helpful, if it's something you really want to tackle. Maybe just not knowing what to do is sapping your enthusiasm. It happens.

Shelley

Royal Mercury
03-06-2011, 07:22 PM
1. Currently I have the broadest of broad outlines for a story in my head

2. I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate.

3. I thought, perhaps naÔvely, that if I had boundless enthusiasm for the project, that that enthusiasm might override the aches and pains.

Well, you know that the boundless enthusiasm isn't it. As others have shown, its more the discipline of showing up for writing on a regular basis, writing when you are there and things build up.

It also sounds like you are getting stalled because the project is too big. Maybe you should start out with some short stories. Give yourself a writing task that is bite sized. It may also help open up your book.

I have the idea for a nice trilogy. But it was hard to make that jump from the grand vision to specifics. So I went to the outskirts of the trilogy, and wrote a short about characters who might live in that world, but they are so far out of it that they would probably never appear in the books. For ease, it was a simple boy meets girl story. I just wanted to get into the world on some level.

And as I detailed it, the world that they lived in began to come alive. They are regular kids, but they have to meet each other within the confines of their world. I'm sure that that story will never be published. It's bad. But it opened up the world. And as a side benefit, one of the minor characters of the story seems to have a lot of potential for the trilogy.

I get the feeling that your story may be a bit autobiographical. Your mind may be refusing to cooperate because in reality it wants to lay out under the tree, not do stuff like writing.

But then again, there might be a cute plot idea in there. What if you were cursed with boundless enthusiasm?

Royal Mercury
03-06-2011, 07:26 PM
How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Probably by eating the brains of a best-selling author. ;) BRAINS!!!!

Monkey
03-06-2011, 07:57 PM
I gave the best advice I could--advice handed down to me from a writer older, wiser, and far more published than I.

If you'd like to join us in The Finish The Damn Book Challenge, where we set daily goals and cheer each other on, you're welcome to do so. We'd love to have you.

I like what someone said about short stories. Honestly, the story you have in your head would probably work better as a short than a novel.

But if nothing anyone has said is helpful, and you have no enthusiasm for writing, and it's not something you feel compelled to do...then what's the point? There are so many other ways to spend your time, and most of them move faster than writing/publishing. If you want to tell stories, you could do it with a voice recorder and your own experiences. If you're looking for something sedentary and time consuming, you could pick up painting. You could pick a subject--any subject--and research the hell out of it. Maybe even audit some classes at the local community college.

But whatever you do...I hope you're able to find something that fascinates you. Something that you can really enjoy, that you look forward to, that gets you out of bed in the morning. Best of luck.

rhymegirl
03-06-2011, 09:07 PM
I'm not sure if this answers your question or not, but here goes.

There are different kinds of writing. Some require more enthusiasm than others, or let's say it's easier to get enthusiastic about some kinds of writing than others. In my job as a freelance reporter/writer, I get sent out to cover events and I also come up with my own stories. Now some of the stories I have to cover do not interest me a whole lot. That's just the way it is. But, if I want to get paid, I've gotta get my butt out there and cover the story. So I do.

When I sit down to write a news story I'm having trouble with or lacking interest in, I tell myself this: Just put something on the page. Just start somewhere. Opening up Microsoft Word and putting something on the page means I can always delete it and I can always turn the words around, cut and paste, play around with what's there.

When it comes to creative writing, that's a different thing for me. Usually it's a lot easier because I'm writing what I WANT to write. I don't think about getting paid, I just think about writing down the ideas in my head.

I also think people need to play around with different kinds of writing to see what creates the most sparks.

The Backward OX
03-07-2011, 01:17 AM
^^ Lots of good stuff up there. Thanks.

butterfly
03-07-2011, 02:53 AM
A great many replies here may well be written by people far, far younger than I. Their general tenor certainly makes them seem like that. Additionally, a great many have talked about enthusiasm as if itís a given.

Iíve heard that sometimes a good way to make something more clear, to drive the message home, is to exaggerate it. Okay, with that in mind, let me rephrase the OP, exaggerated:

How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Silly question, but it made you sit up.

Okay, Iím not dead, but Iím possibly closer to dead than many of those whoíve replied. Iím 74, I have an inborn lethargy about me, I have various age- and illness-related aches and pains, and I sometimes think writing might be a way to kill time until the Grim Reaper kills me. I donít have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where Iím coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.

We're all closer to dead. Who knows how much time we have?

You are whining.

If you don't want to write, don't write. We're not going to feel sorry for you.

Maybe you ought to write from a dead man's POV about how he spent the last 30 years of his life waiting to die and what he could have done instead. You could live to be 104, you know. Its been done.

Or maybe write from the GR's POV with the take on how it's not so fun taking someone who is waiting for him, as opposed to someone who expects to live a looooong life and then snip! Time is up!

Either way I wouldn't be so flippant about death, even at 74. You ought to have something better to say than "poor me" when you have to explain yourself to the Big Guy.

BjornAbust
03-07-2011, 11:34 AM
A great many replies here may well be written by people far, far younger than I. Their general tenor certainly makes them seem like that. Additionally, a great many have talked about enthusiasm as if it’s a given.

I’ve heard that sometimes a good way to make something more clear, to drive the message home, is to exaggerate it. Okay, with that in mind, let me rephrase the OP, exaggerated:

How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Silly question, but it made you sit up.

Okay, I’m not dead, but I’m possibly closer to dead than many of those who’ve replied. I’m 74, I have an inborn lethargy about me, I have various age- and illness-related aches and pains, and I sometimes think writing might be a way to kill time until the Grim Reaper kills me. I don’t have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where I’m coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.

You're making it sound as though you've got one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel. C'mon, now. That kind of negativity isn't going to get you any closer to finding the enthusiasm you need. Frankly, it sounds to me like an excuse for not getting work done.

I wonder, is every other aspect of your life devoid of enthusiasm as well? Are you having trouble mustering the enthusiasm to perform other tasks? If that's the case then you ought to seek some professional counsel.

mccardey
03-07-2011, 11:50 AM
How about starting with a journal of some kind? Would that idea interest you at all? I know it would be a great resource for Aussie kids doing their social history units to have your memories and years of living set out for them.

Also - 74 is the new 50. Just so you know ;)


A great many replies here may well be written by people far, far younger than I. Their general tenor certainly makes them seem like that. Additionally, a great many have talked about enthusiasm as if it’s a given.

I’ve heard that sometimes a good way to make something more clear, to drive the message home, is to exaggerate it. Okay, with that in mind, let me rephrase the OP, exaggerated:

How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Silly question, but it made you sit up.

Okay, I’m not dead, but I’m possibly closer to dead than many of those who’ve replied. I’m 74, I have an inborn lethargy about me, I have various age- and illness-related aches and pains, and I sometimes think writing might be a way to kill time until the Grim Reaper kills me. I don’t have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where I’m coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.

You remind me of a Terry Pratchett character. One of the Discworld ones. :)

The Backward OX
03-07-2011, 12:02 PM
You're making it sound as though you've got one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel. C'mon, now. That kind of negativity isn't going to get you any closer to finding the enthusiasm you need. Frankly, it sounds to me like an excuse for not getting work done.

I wonder, is every other aspect of your life devoid of enthusiasm as well? Are you having trouble mustering the enthusiasm to perform other tasks? If that's the case then you ought to seek some professional counsel.
Did you read the small print?

nighttimer
03-07-2011, 12:50 PM
I frequently lack the enthusiasm to write and wondered where you get yours from. What is it that gets you going?

My Godzilla sized ego. I have convinced myself the world is a lot more dull, drab and uninteresting without my writing. The miserable quality of some of the published work out there has proven me to be correct.


Writing's like sex. You might not feel like it tonight, you might plead a headache, but if you do it to keep other people happy, once you get into it you start enjoying it yourself.

See, I always thought writing was like masturbation. Even if it satisfies nobody but yourself it still feels pretty good. :tongue


I think I might inhabit a different world.

I would like to write. Fiction. Not necessarily to have a story published Ė that is too far off to even contemplate. At this stage my goal would be simply to finish the writing.

The first thing you need to do is to dispense with the "I would like to write" and simply write. You don't inhabit a different world. You inhabit the same one as the most of us where there's a disconnect between what we want to do and what we get done.

I would like to have a size 34 waist again. I would like to drive a BMW. I would like to find Halle Berry oiled up and butt nekkid in my bed (though I'll settle for Scarlet Peaches and we can discuss the competing theories of reluctant sex vs. masturbation) and I would like to be on the New York Times bestseller list for 52 weeks.

None of this is possible as long as I merely like these things instead of making the commitment to do them.

The world is full of writers who have never written a word but Someday they will. Sadly, on every calendar I've ever seen there's no Someday included among the days of the week.

I would say the odds are spectacularly long against the odds of you finishing your work of non-fiction if you don't get started, Backward OX.


1. Currently I have the broadest of broad outlines for a story in my head Ė it goes something like this Ė a guy wants nothing more out of life than to stretch out under a tree, but in order to reach that goal he finds he has to keep doing stuff.

2. I am unable to flesh out that outline, to give myself something to write. My mind refuses to co-operate. I think this may be caused by various age- and health-related aches and pains preventing me from zeroing in on writing.

Then screw the outline and take the plunge. Outlines are like blueprints for a house: good as far as building goes, but no substitute for placing the first brick on top of another.

If the physical act of writing is too uncomfortable or painful to do for prolonged periods, either do it in shortened times when it is not or don't "write" your book at all. Buy a good tape recorder and dictate your words. Perhaps you can find a college student who can transcribe the recordings into printed form.

You can find the method to get around your physical limitations but don't let the reasons you find it difficult to write become excuses not to. The way exists if you have the will to find it.


3. I thought, perhaps naÔvely, that if I had boundless enthusiasm for the project, that that enthusiasm might override the aches and pains.

Perhaps my OP was also naÔve.

Boundless enthusiasm tends to wilt in the face of the many obstacles writers face. Like when the power goes out and you realize you haven't "saved" the document before everything went dark. Enthusiasm only gets you started. Commitment gets you the desired result.

That's the only difference between those who write and those who aspire to be writers: the degree of committment. If you have it you don't need anyone's advice on how to find the enthusiasm to write. Ask 100 writers and you'll get 100 answers.

There's no finding enthusiasm and you can't lose enthusiasm. You make it and if you can't then nobody can give you the formula on how to. It's either in you or it it isn't.

NeuroFizz
03-07-2011, 05:54 PM
TBO, I didn't start writing fiction and poetry until I was 50 years old. However, I am in good health, so a perfect parallel isn't there. But I can say a good portion of the enthusiasm for writing comes from creating (not just from thinking about writing, but by doing it). And a rough outline is just a bare beginning. The real satisfaction comes from the challenge of facing down a novel-length project and from the sense of accomplishment that comes from completing it. That satisfaction has a positive-feedback like impact on enthusiasm for writing.

Try this as a test to see if you can find some enthusiasm for writing fiction. Each story is made up of distinct scenes, where characters act out some activity to move the story forward. One problem new writers have is to look at the whole project and get overwhelmed at the prospect. What they need to do is focus on just one single scene. Figure out who will be in it, what those characters will do, and how it will relate to the story and move it forward (according to the writer's story arc). Make the characters seem real, let them come alive in their actions and reactions, and in their dialogue (if appropriate). Try to get a hypothetical reader see the purpose of the scene and find some empathy or sympaty for at least one of the characters. See if digging into that one scene helps with the writing motivation.

If successful, plan out and write the next scene, putting good effort into making it seem realistic and engaging, and making it move the story further along. Continue with the next scene, and the next, and the story will start taking shape.

It's impossible to get to a distant destination without putting one foot forward at a time.

If you still can't get a scene down, or you can't find any satisfaction or enthusiasm in putting together a tidy scene, then writing may not be a good choice to occupy your time. The problem with writing is it's not easy to put together a novel-length story. To use your story as an analogy, writing is not a nap under the tree of life. It takes effort, thought, tough decisions, more thought, and more effort. Your idea sounds interesting. See if you can get it down for us.

As another older person analogy...viagra just makes the boner. It doesn't make the enthusiasm or desire to put that boner to good use. (There is no magic pill or pill-equivalent for creating the enthusiasm to write).

bearilou
03-07-2011, 05:55 PM
I feel like I'm spitting in the wind here but I'm going to say this again.

B-OX, I honestly believe this 'elusive' enthusiasm that you are seeking will be found for writing - if that is truly what you wish to do and not just talk about wishing to do it - by buckling down and focusing on what you want to accomplish. Goals, of any kind, are more easily achievable if you break them down by tasks.

These same goals will present you with times you just have to slog through to get it done. They will also present you with times of joy and accomplishment if you just keep picking away at them.

It's not something that the Almighty will bestow upon you one day. It's not a pill you take, or an energy drink, or a shot, or a knock in the head. Enthusiasm is something that you find because it's something you truly, deeply, desire to do. Somedays it flags but, as I said above, you push through because other days, it's such a grand feeling to know you are a little closer.

If you want to write and if you have the bare bones of a story, then look for the tools to bring that story into sharper focus. Your idea as you put forth is vague. It's unfocused. There's no tension, no conflict, no repercussions, no resolution. You need to find those for the character to get him from where he is to where he wants to be. Once you see a story starting to developing beneath your efforts, I think you'll find the enthusiasm is there to give you momentum to keep moving forward.

Although, something tells me I'm not really addressing the question put forth. I read your original question as that you are truly looking for suggestions on how to grab this enthusiasm for a story idea you have. Your subsequent responses all seem to be of the bent to dismiss anything that does not give you the magic phrase to make it all happen without some serious elbow grease applied.

Wish it were so, but it's not. I haven't discovered that to be true and from what I read on this board, the other authors here don't see it as true either.

At some point, you're going to have to do some work, put some thought into it, and do some writing on it. Inspiration and enthusiasm will happen.

scarletpeaches
03-07-2011, 05:56 PM
Enthusiasm is like the muse - you have to make the first move. Enthusiasm, the muse, being 'in the zone', 'flow'...all that comes once you give the writing gods something to bless. If you're doing nothing, why should they help you? Give them something first, just make the first move and after that, it'll come good.

jaksen
03-08-2011, 02:16 AM
A great many replies here may well be written by people far, far younger than I. Their general tenor certainly makes them seem like that. Additionally, a great many have talked about enthusiasm as if itís a given.

Iíve heard that sometimes a good way to make something more clear, to drive the message home, is to exaggerate it. Okay, with that in mind, let me rephrase the OP, exaggerated:

How would a dead person acquire enthusiasm for writing?

Silly question, but it made you sit up.

Okay, Iím not dead, but Iím possibly closer to dead than many of those whoíve replied. Iím 74, I have an inborn lethargy about me, I have various age- and illness-related aches and pains, and I sometimes think writing might be a way to kill time until the Grim Reaper kills me. I donít have a burning desire to write. Now do you understand where Iím coming from? If someone in my shoes replies, we might get somewhere.

Ox, I'm old, too, though you got me beat by a few years.

Thing is this, I've seen a lot of younger people go before me. You probably have, too. No one gets a guarantee of 50, 60 or a 100 years. I actually had a much younger colleague laugh at my old-fashionedness one day (good-naturedly I always liked to believe) and she was dead the following week. (Accident.)

However, if you've got the bug to write, it can strike at any age. Some of us got it at age 3 or 4; others felt it in grade school or as teenagers. There are also some very renowned writers who didn't get the urge until they were adults and even then it surprised them. (Think Roald Dahl.) Anyhow, a memoir or fiction-based-on-life-events strikes me as the perfect instrument sometimes. I had a 96-year old aunt who wanted to write her memoirs and I was constantly encouraging her to do so. She said she would, when she 'had the time.' (She ran out of time.)

If I were told I had a week or month to live, I'd be struggling to finish my unfinished stories and leaving notes so my kids could finish what I could not.

The Backward OX
03-08-2011, 02:32 AM
Okay, everyone, I'm writing again.

mccardey
03-08-2011, 02:39 AM
Okay, everyone, I'm writing again.


Yayy!!!

So - where did you get your enthusiasm? Because that's probably where you'll have to look next time you lose it... ;)

The Backward OX
03-08-2011, 03:39 AM
Yayy!!!

So - where did you get your enthusiasm? Because that's probably where you'll have to look next time you lose it... ;)
Dunno. Listening to you lot, perhaps?

Shadow_Ferret
03-08-2011, 07:44 AM
It's the paycheck.



...people bought what I wrote.



Primarily the money.


I'll be honest - money.


Wow. If it was about the money for me, I'd have quit 35 years ago, since obviously I haven't been paid at all.

No. I simply enjoy writing.

Sydewinder
03-08-2011, 08:07 PM
I can't help but wonder if it's only not about the money to people who haven't made money at it yet. People who are still trying to become writers. Those who are successful (and yes, I do mark success by earning money) see the reward the way most people see the rewards of their profession: payment.

NeuroFizz
03-08-2011, 09:32 PM
For far too many authors, publication does not come close to making enough money to live on for any length of time. And many of those who do make a living at it have to hustle with several different types of writing projects and writing-related activities. But no matter what one's monetary success, money is only one motivating factor. It may be the primary one for some, but it may not be the primary factor for others. There is tremendous inspiration/motivation in looking at one's first few stories and then at the most recent ones--seeing a writing maturity, a better understanting of the fine points of the writing craft. And there is the challenge of still seeing areas where improvement is possible or needed, which also can be a significant motivating factor. And there is the inspiration of having some success, even if it is modest. The money is nice, and it would be great if it came in larger and more regular bunches, but there are many other factors that can inspire a writer. There isn't much money in writing poetry, yet poets still find the inspiration to write.

scarletpeaches
03-08-2011, 09:33 PM
Fizzy!

NeuroFizz
03-08-2011, 09:37 PM
Yes, M'am.

scarletpeaches
03-08-2011, 09:38 PM
Hai!

Phaeal
03-08-2011, 10:55 PM
Money's only as good as what you did to get it.

Sydewinder
03-08-2011, 11:40 PM
Money's only as good as what you did to get it.

Really? So if my money comes from poorly written books it will behave poorly?

dpaterso
03-08-2011, 11:43 PM
Could be we're skidding off-track here.

-Derek

shelleyo
03-08-2011, 11:50 PM
Money is rarely the only motivation for writers, in my opinion. But a deadline and a paycheck can become motivation enough on those days when it's hard to get excited about the words. At least, that's what works for me.

Shelley

Phaeal
03-09-2011, 03:09 AM
Really? So if my money comes from poorly written books it will behave poorly?

Money behaves like the person who spends it. But if your money comes from poorly written books, should you be proud of it?

Sydewinder
03-09-2011, 03:51 AM
Money behaves like the person who spends it. But if your money comes from poorly written books, should you be proud of it?

If it's earned honestly, then yes, be proud of it. There are thousands of poorly written books on the market. There's nothing dishonest about being a bad writer. Just like there's nothing dishonest about a crappy painter selling their wares.

zebrachick83
04-09-2011, 02:15 AM
Writing's like sex. You might not feel like it tonight, you might plead a headache, but if you do it to keep other people happy, once you get into it you start enjoying it yourself.


Words to live by. Truly. :Hail:

Nick Blaze
04-09-2011, 09:42 PM
My enthusiasm lies in seeing my dribble turn into something better-than-dribble. Really, though, I write to better myself.

Darren Frey
04-10-2011, 09:23 PM
my motivation comes from my love of horror. I would like it to go somewhere as my wife and I do need the money for personal reasons.

TrickyFiction
04-11-2011, 12:13 AM
I frequently lack the enthusiasm to write and wondered where you get yours from. What is it that gets you going?

Habit. It's a terrible, terrible habit. Make it a habit and you'll have trouble breaking it.

susz
04-11-2011, 06:31 AM
my muses inspire me and music sets the mood. my aspirations to become a published author motivates me.

Kenpoclimber
04-17-2011, 03:51 AM
I write because there is a story in me, one filled with love, and hate, and death, and murder; a story that spanns the universe, spans the very meaning of life itself. At night my dreams put me in this story. I become the characters, and I wake to feel as if I have gone somewhere far away, experienced something profound. In my dreams, I have known, war, love, peace, freedom, and the many things that inspire me to continue living. Like the pieces of a puzzle, I put together this story with burns inside me, then I put it on paper. That is why I write.

Gravity's Rainbow
04-17-2011, 07:46 AM
I had an idea stuck in my head for over a year and the only way to get it out was to write it down but then life happened and the (partially) unfinished story got buried until two weeks ago when I met a guy who is studying to be an English major and he convinced me to dig the story back out and finish it.
Now I'm here

Voxtrot
06-10-2011, 03:53 PM
I go through bouts of wanting to write, and then 'stuck periods'. I never leave my stories in my head, but finding the motivation to sit down and write (amongst other daily commitments) can be a challenge for me.

Right now I am a bit stuck. I don't even feel like reading my draft... let alone writing. How to get over it?? I'm not sure.

Maybe I will try starting on something new and see if that gets me interested in my novel again. Finding motivation isn't always easy, even though I love writing once I'm doing it. Frustrating.

bearilou
06-10-2011, 04:48 PM
Where, how, in what way do you acquire enthusiasm for writing?

The Dollar Store.

TerraAnn
06-11-2011, 03:44 PM
Oh I sometimes hate myself, lol. For example, I'll have a day off and all the time in the world to write. Do you think I could type so much as one word? Nope. I just sit there until finally I have to shut down my laptop and go watch TV or something. And then when I am at work, with no pen or paper in sight and am busy as can be, then I suddenly want to write pages and pages. Luckily my boss allows me to scribble notes down if I get ideas, but still, lol. Every so often I'll luck out there. Usually on those days when I get ideas at work, I race home after and will sit and write for hours. That's a good feeling. And sometimes all the stars will align just right and when I have a day off I will feel like writing. It all just depends on my mood and sometimes there is just nothing I can do about it. Reading and watching movies and listening to music can sometimes get me in the mood to write. But if I don't want to, sometimes there is just nothing that can be done. My mood has a mind of it's own, lol

bsymom
06-12-2011, 01:43 AM
Enthusiasm comes after inspiration.