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Maryn
10-14-2005, 07:57 PM
I'm just nosy, but I'd be interested in knowing what my fellow writers are reading and what they think of it.

I am no longer reading John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, despite people whose tastes seem similar to mine insisting they love this book, that it's in their all-time top ten, that it moved them, that it changed them. I've started it twice and stalled out less than a quarter of the way in both times.

I've set Tours of the Black Clock by Steve Erickson next to the chair I like to read in, but I haven't even cracked it open yet.

Maryn, regretting that the room with the fireplace doesn't have adequate light for reading

rtilryarms
10-14-2005, 08:21 PM
Der Wille zur Macht
By Friedrich Nietzsche

robeiae
10-14-2005, 08:42 PM
I'm reading The Assassins by Bernard Lewis. It's good, though Lewis tends to assume too much.

Rob :)

maestrowork
10-14-2005, 09:06 PM
I'm still trying to finish The Kite Runner.

WVWriterGirl
10-14-2005, 09:45 PM
I'm about a quarter of the way into The Chronicles of Narnia. It's a collection of all seven books. I didn't read them as a child, so I'm doing it now. I'm also reading Terry Pratchett's Sourcery and have been for about three months. Its good, but I keep getting sidetracked with other books and other things to do. Next on my list is some Terry Goodkind books and Turn of the Screw (see Lost hatch spoilers thread, if you're curious as to why).

Shwebb
10-14-2005, 09:56 PM
I just finished Orson Scott Card's Magic Street. Really liked it--reminded me a bit of some of Stephen King's work. But I almost anything OSC has written, actually.

I LOVED A Prayer for Owen Meany! But I know so many people, Maryn, who had the same reaction to the book. I think Owen's speaking in all caps was really distracting for me, at first.

And I've been sneaking some peeks at the SoS proof. Had to look up at least some of the stories/essays/poems. I don't think I will read it all, though, until I get the book in my grubby hands--I actually hate reading a book over the computer screen. Even the few times I've bought ebooks, I've printed them out before reading them. Call me old fashioned, I guess.

Andrew Dugan
10-14-2005, 11:32 PM
East of Eden by John Steinbeck.

Paint
10-14-2005, 11:53 PM
I just finished "Light on the Snow" by Anita Shreve. I don't think it was as good as her other books. Maybe it would do well classified as "Young Adults." I read everything she does as "Weight of Water" tops my all time favorites list. Next I have a new one by the author of "Into the Forest." That was an exceptional book.

I have a double stack of 'to be read' books, waiting for winter snows. I recently cut it back, but it still won't stand alone.

Robin Bayne
10-15-2005, 12:52 AM
About 100 pages into Diana Gabaldon's 1000 page "A Breathe of Snow and Ashes." It's the 6th book in her time travel novel series, this one taking place in America at the start of the Revolution.

Hannah
10-15-2005, 01:01 AM
I was reading America: Who Really Pays The Taxes? by Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele for background information--until these guys started to ramble.

Tiaga
10-15-2005, 01:05 AM
Diplomacy- Henry Kissinger
Just Finished "The Clash of Fundamentalisms" by Tariq Ali

trumancoyote
10-15-2005, 01:42 AM
I'm readin' Donald Ritchie's The Japan Journals, enjoying Morrison's Tar Baby, trying to finish The Lord of the Rings trilogy and am also struggling with Tanizaki's Tadekuu Mushi in Japanese (English: Some Prefer Nettles).

I usually try to stick to just one book at a time, but somehow I fell into four, which means I'll never finish any of them.

paprikapink
10-15-2005, 02:12 AM
As "homework" for NaNoWriMo, since I rarely read novels and haven't ever written one, I went to Long's Drugstore and perused the bookshelves. I just finished Janet Evanovich's "Metro Girl." It was kinda like eating potato chips. It's not really doing anything good for you, but can't stop. And since I've never read her, and it seems like she's really kind of a historical figure unto herself, I bought a Danielle Steele book too. Don't know what it's called, and haven't quite managed to make myself crack it open. I apologize if you love these books.

I'm also always reading The New Yorker. I read just about every word in every issue, and it's weekly, so that keeps me busy.

And I was reading "Hop on Pop," by Dr. Seuss aloud, but last night my little girl picked it up and started reading it to me! Another milestone. Sigh.

MadScientistMatt
10-15-2005, 02:36 AM
Right now, I'm about halfway through Moby Dick.

aadams73
10-15-2005, 03:30 AM
Tess Gerritsen's Gravity.

AdamH
10-15-2005, 06:03 AM
Just finished Spin By Robert Charles Wilson. Now, I'm sort of in between books. But I might check out one of the ones above me for my next adventure.

thewritingbug
10-17-2005, 02:30 AM
Augusten Burroughs' Dry. I just finished his Sellevision. And I have a stack of books and magazines in waiting.

KelseyF
10-17-2005, 02:37 AM
I brought a couple of books with me while I'm in France, and finished them waaay too soon. I'll have to pick up a few more when I'm home in November for part two of my French adventure, so thanks for the above suggestions ;)

I just finished:
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
Alice's Adventures in Wonderlandby Lewis Carroll (for about the trillionth time)

Currently working on:
The Badass Girl's Guide to Poker by Toby Leah Bochan

Gehanna
10-17-2005, 02:46 AM
Malachi

threedogpeople
10-17-2005, 05:26 AM
I just finished "The Mummy Congress" by Heather Pringle (different from my usual reading material but I liked it); and "Contagion" by Robin Cook (junk food reading but OK for the hot tub).

I'm trying to slog through "Michaelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling". It's interesting but I read 20 or 30 pages, then I have to put it down and read something else. I'm about to start "Flyboys" by James Bradley.

My interests are varied and I'm frequently at the mercy of my friends-that-read, since often the only thing new to read in the house is something that they have given to me (i.e. "Contagion").

samgail
10-17-2005, 08:46 AM
The Bourne identity Robert Ludlum
Don't Stop The Carnival Herman Wouk


I am also reading The Chronicles of Narnia to the fam.

September skies
10-17-2005, 09:03 AM
01-01-00 by RJ Pineiro (for me)

williemeikle
10-17-2005, 04:01 PM
The original novel from which "Angel Heart" was made.

Deeper than the movie, a brilliantly conceived central character, a tight plot.... this is a truly great book for anybody that likes noir detective stories with more than a tinge of horror

Willie
http://www.willie.meikle.btinternet.co.uk

Susan Gable
10-17-2005, 04:13 PM
Paprika, good for you for trying something new. Even if you don't like them, you've given them a try, and that's more open-mindedness than some can claim. :) I adore Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum books, and also enjoyed Metro Girl. Yes, they are like potato chips - such an yummy treat. (Not a huge Danielle Steele fan, though, although I think she's a pretty amazing woman. I read a true account she wrote about her son, who battled mental illness and eventually, after several attemps, succeeded in committing suicide. I have to give her a hel* of a lot of credit for launching and maintaining a huge writing career while dealing with that in her personal life. It was a very moving book.)

I just read Susan Elizabeth Phillip's Ain't She Sweet, which I very much enjoyed, and also The Secret Life of Bees, which was okay. It wasn't something I thought was absolutely fabulous, but I certainly didn't want to hurl it at the wall. It kept me engaged in the characters, which is one my most important criteria for judging a book. (Yes, I'm a potato chip reader. <G>)

Susan G.

paprikapink
10-17-2005, 07:12 PM
Well, I failed with the Danielle Steele. I was only on page 7, but I'd already reached my limit of reminders that this is the quiet, serious one and this is the frivolous, flirty one. And my limit is not unreasonably low. I think if she'd posted it in SYW first, it'd be a better book today.

(Susan, I love the title/subtitle of the book in your signature!)

Maryn
10-17-2005, 08:15 PM
Right now, I'm about halfway through Moby Dick.Wow. This is the one read for college that I just couldn't finish. Alas, my education predated Cliff notes--but not Classic Comics. (I aced the course, too.)

Maryn, who couldn't stand entire chapters devoted to islands where the damned boat didn't even stop! (Loved the movie with Gregory Peck)

Maryn
10-17-2005, 08:18 PM
I just finished "The Mummy Congress" by Heather Pringle (different from my usual reading material but I liked it)That's been on my unofficial reading list for ages. I haven't met anyone else who's read it, so I appreciate the recommendation and reminder.

Maryn, whose list shouldn't be alphabetical since it causes her to read mostly authors whose surnames start with A through about H

aka eraser
10-17-2005, 08:42 PM
Just finished Dan Simmons' Ilium. It was great! I rarely buy hardcovers because they're so darn pricey but am tempted to pick up the sequel now rather than wait a year.

But while mulling that, I'm reading (and enjoying) Robin Hobb's Fool's Fate, the last volume in her Tawny Man series.

Just picked up our own Victoria Strauss' The Burning Land and Neil Gaiman's American Gods and am looking forward to delving into them soon.

Jaycinth
10-17-2005, 09:06 PM
I've been eyeing Illium. It's good, huh? Ok! On my list NOW! I'm currently reading Tad William's Shadowmarch and two nice manuscripts I'm critting for AW folks. I'm reading good stuff.

Kida Adelyne
10-17-2005, 09:13 PM
I'm inbetween books at the moment. I haven't found a good book for ages that will keep me occupied for longer than a day. So I'm rereading some on Tamora Pierces Books. One of these days I'm gonna get a copy of Les Miserables that isn't abridged at read it (I cannot stand abridged novels :mad: )

Ally:)

Pthom
10-17-2005, 09:14 PM
Just completed reading Cory Doctorow's three novels: Down And Out In The Magic Kingdom, Eastern Standard Tribe and Someone Comes To Town, Someone Leaves Town[I]. Doctorow is a very interesting writer.

Now I'm trying to decide whether to delve into some Heinlein juveniles I never read before but should have or the collection of William Nolan stories I received as a participant in a creative writing class he's teaching.

Or maybe I should just do my homework.

threedogpeople
10-18-2005, 01:23 AM
Maryn, I loaned it to a friend of mine. He was about half way finished last time I checked in with him and he is enjoying the book also.



That's been on my unofficial reading list for ages. I haven't met anyone else who's read it, so I appreciate the recommendation and reminder.

Maryn, whose list shouldn't be alphabetical since it causes her to read mostly authors whose surnames start with A through about H

BlueTexas
10-18-2005, 06:05 AM
I loved Owen Meany, too. After that I bought all of Irving's novels.

I just finished The Rule of Four( excellent), and am reading Prophecy(not so excellent) by Sylvia Browne right now.

Sarita
10-18-2005, 06:20 AM
I'm reading A Collection of Short Stories by Guy De Maupassant for the 3rd or 4th time. I don't have a lot of time for novels, with all the textbook reading I have to do. But when I get a week without homework, I pick up Goblet of Fire to get ready for the movie.

I have a stack of books waiting to be read. On it:

Seven Ages of Paris
On Writing (Stephen King)
Riding the Bus with My Sister
The Dragonbone Chair (and a few other Tad Williams books)

TemlynWriting
10-18-2005, 07:56 AM
Currently reading:

Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, by Gregory Maguire (must finish this before I go see the musical "Wicked" at the beginning of November!)

Taming the Star Runner, by S. E. Hinton, because my mom said the main character reminds her of me.

I've got an absolute ton of other books on my to-read list, and about 3 or 4 nonfiction books on writing that i'm working through as well.

Dawno
10-18-2005, 08:05 AM
Brian Hill's & Dee Power's (how *should* that be done?) Over Time
just finished Nancy Mehl's Malevolence
Next up: Susan Gable's The Mommy Plan, Gaiman's Anansi Boys

Susan Gable
10-18-2005, 07:16 PM
On Writing (Stephen King)


I really enjoyed that one. Insteresting to read. Inspiring as far as showing you that even he got many many rejections as he started out.

Temlyn, I haven't read anything by S.E. Hinton in a long time, but I always enjoyed her books. The Outsiders, Rumblefish, That was Then, This is Now...all really excellent books!

Dawno, I'm tickled that one of my books is in your TBR pile! :) Thanks! (That's so cool! :Jump: )

Susan G.

robeiae
10-18-2005, 09:09 PM
Seven Ages of Paris
Is it a horror novel?

Rob :)

threedogpeople
10-18-2005, 09:33 PM
I loved Owen Meany, too. After that I bought all of Irving's novels.

I just finished The Rule of Four( excellent), and am reading Prophecy(not so excellent) by Sylvia Browne right now.

I liked "The Rule of Four" also. I would give it a "very good" though. I thought the story was a little thin.

clintl
10-18-2005, 09:42 PM
Believe it or not, I'm just getting around to reading Peter Beagle's The Last Unicorn after it's been sitting on my shelf for 15-20 years unread. (There are plenty more of those unread books on my shelf, too.)

Poppy
10-18-2005, 10:06 PM
Trying to read Labyrinth of Evil (Star Wars, Episode III Prequel Novel) by James Luceno, but I find myself going back to reread certain parts because it's just so "busy" and hard for me to get a grasp on what's going on. I think I prefer Timothy Zahn's Star Wars books over anyone else's.

I just finished Dragonswan by Sherrilyn Kenyon. It was an impulse buy as a I waited in a checkout line. They had several "quick reads" on display. I picked up Dragonswan, read the first couple of pages and ended up buying it just so I could see where it was going. Short (less than 90 pages), but I enjoyed it.

And I'm always reading or rereading a book of poetry. These days it's Intimate Kisses: The Poetry of Sexual Pleasure (an anthology edited by Wendy Maltz) and Loveroot by Erica Jong.

maestrowork
10-18-2005, 10:12 PM
I liked "The Rule of Four" also. I would give it a "very good" though. I thought the story was a little thin.

I do not like TRoF. Thin story, thin characters and I particularly dislike the authors' voice (it's co-authored).

Susan Gable
10-18-2005, 11:34 PM
I just finished Dragonswan by Sherrilyn Kenyon. It was an impulse buy as a I waited in a checkout line. They had several "quick reads" on display. I picked up Dragonswan, read the first couple of pages and ended up buying it just so I could see where it was going. Short (less than 90 pages), but I enjoyed it.
.

Oh, she's another author I really enjoy! She has this one book, Fantasy Lover, that's a lot of fun - about a half-Greek god that's been entombed in a book for thousands of years, allow out only when "summoned' - and he's a sex slave of the summoner. :Clap:

Okay, OKAY, I TOLD you all I liked potato chip books! Well, that's a damn wonderful potato chip book. <G>

Susan G., who now realizes it's not just her snacks and the fact that she sits in this chair all day that's adding to the weight, but also the books she picks. <G>

TemlynWriting
10-19-2005, 08:05 AM
Temlyn, I haven't read anything by S.E. Hinton in a long time, but I always enjoyed her books. The Outsiders, Rumblefish, That was Then, This is Now...all really excellent books!

Susan G.
I've got several more of her books on my shelf, including That was Then, This is Now, and Rumblefish. I read The Outsiders several years ago for a course on YA lit, and I loved it. In fact, my husband read it at the same time; we were engaged at the time, and in a long-distance relationship. It was fun discussing the novel as we read it.


Believe it or not, I'm just getting around to reading Peter Beagle's The Last Unicorn after it's been sitting on my shelf for 15-20 years unread. (There are plenty more of those unread books on my shelf, too.)
The Last Unicorn is another novel I read during my YA lit class. Absolutely wonderful! I grew up loving the animated film, and the book just was amazing! Love it!

Dawno--(re: your rep comment) let me know what you think of Son of a Witch when you get into it. I'm loving Wicked, and I can't wait to read the "sequel." I'd been wanting to read Wicked for a while, and finally bought the novel a few months ago. A friend of mine also read it, and sadly disliked it so much that she gave me her copy, which I'm passing on to my mom. Plus we're going to see the musical (which I know is quite different) in a few weeks. I adore Elphaba!

KelseyF
10-20-2005, 09:23 PM
I liked "Wicked" the book, and *loved* the musical. Part of my wants the popularity of the stage production to dry up a bit so they'll hurry up and make the movie!! I'm rooting for Nicole Sullivan for Glinda (she has a *much* bigger part in the musical).

When is the sequel released?

paprikapink
10-21-2005, 01:20 AM
Dawno, I'm tickled that one of my books is in your TBR pile! :) Thanks! (That's so cool! :Jump: )

Susan G.

That is cool! I'm putting that on my "I'll know I've really Made It when..." list.

clintl
10-21-2005, 03:26 AM
The Last Unicorn is another novel I read during my YA lit class. Absolutely wonderful! I grew up loving the animated film, and the book just was amazing! Love it!



I haven't seen the film, either. In fact, until the Beagle thread a couple of weeks ago, I didn't even know there was a film.

Azure Skye
10-21-2005, 03:32 AM
Just finished:
Steady Beat by Rivkah
Beyond the Valley of Thorns by Patrick Carman

In the middle of:
The Book of Alchemy by Francis Melville

Barely started:
Terry Jones' Medieval Lives
An Alchemy of Mind by Diane Ackerman
Witchcraft in the Middle Ages by Jeffrey Burton Russell

I'm going through a very strange reading phase at the moment.:Shrug:

BlueTexas
10-21-2005, 06:44 PM
Just finished:
An Alchemy of Mind by Diane Ackerman
Witchcraft in the Middle Ages by Jeffrey Burton Russell

I'm going through a very strange reading phase at the moment.:Shrug:

I finished An Alchemy of Mind a month or so ago...well worth the read! The Russell book I read a couple years ago, and it was also good--better than similiar books about the topic.

Mr Underhill
10-24-2005, 08:09 AM
Castle of the Otter by Gene Wolfe. A rather odd little book describing how he composed the Book of the New Sun. The title is from a misunderstanding by Locus, I believe. Upon hearing that the final installment of the tetralogy was to be titled Citadel of the Autarch, the editor apparently heard Castle of the Otter and reported it thus in the magazine. In any case it is useful background, as one of my book groups is in the process of reading the BotNS. There is one whole chapter explaining some of the obscure words he uses, such as epopt, arctother and xenagie.

I'm also in the middle of Marianne Wiggins' Evidence of Things Unseen and trying to decide if I should complete it. I've read half and skimmed the rest and rather got the point. And further, we've already done the group discussion. So perhaps I should move on - I'm supposed to have completed The Brothers Karamazov in two weeks, after all.

I've recently completed Patrick O'Brian's Master and Commander after rescuing it from a local library's excess book stack for a quarter. It even has Mr Crowe's picture on it, despite the fact that his film was based on The Far Side of the World as I now realize. I'll have to look for some more, as it is a classic, and moreover has the kind of naval ambience I'd like to bring to the protagonist of my NaNoWriMo project. Some good WWII naval flair would be useful too.

The library also now collects graphic novels, so I polished off Gaiman's 1602 saga of an afternoon. An interesting concept: Gaiman transposes the Marvel heroes of the Silver Age of Comics to Elizabethan times, so that Nick Fury is QE2's Master Intelligencer; Carlos Javier and his school of "witchbreed" and the intrepid mariner Sir Richard Reed and his companions all appear as period figures. Count Otto von Doom of Latveria is, well, pretty much himself. Charming work and visually intriguing. If you were a fan of all that as a youngster you shouldn't miss it.

unthoughtknown
10-24-2005, 09:29 AM
I'm currently reading A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews.

Maryn
10-24-2005, 05:03 PM
Somehow Tours of the Black Clock has been supplanted by White Oleander. Interesting, because it's not the sort of book I enjoy, although it's well-written, almost lyrical at times. Oddly, my brain keeps imagining TV actors playing most of the roles.

I suppose I'll be obligated to rent the movie when I finish, even though its lackluster box office implies it'll be lacking (not to mention that all the wrong people will be in it).

Maryn, who walked out on a play last night for the third time ever

Sarita
10-24-2005, 05:13 PM
I jumped my stack on a recommendation. Now reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel. So far, so good.

rhymegirl
10-24-2005, 05:32 PM
Does the cereal box count?

tjwriter
10-24-2005, 07:50 PM
Sure, RG. I go crazy if I don't have something to read when I eat alone. I just finished Talyn by Holly Lisle. Awesome read, but I haven't started anything else since. It's still in my head and I may just have to read it again to move on.

Maryn
10-24-2005, 08:28 PM
Does the cereal box count?You bet it does. There have been many days when that's been the most compelling thing I read.

If something readable is sitting on the table, I have to read it. Have to!

Maryn, who can recite from papers that have been on the kitchen table too long

samgail
10-24-2005, 08:38 PM
Does the cereal box count?
TRIX or TREAT
"If this box screams you win!
Look inside!
if this box screams when you open it you
could win one of these cash prizes:
$10,000 GRAND PRIZE"

If you are not reading this I feel sorry for you because you could be missing out on $10,000 but wait, that is not all-

(on same box)
"Introducing the general mills fitness squad(written in super hero script)
Fitness
Scramble
It's not hard to discover the secret to keeping fit. Unscramble the words below to reveal the activities that are also great exercise.
a.wmngsiim b. coresc c.tochspcho d.bdgsantakoeri e.drganengi"



Profitable, educational and entertaining-sounds like a good read to me.:Thumbs:
Sam

Dawno
10-25-2005, 06:52 AM
Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

Just read this:

"Fat Charlie went inside. There was a young woman on reception. He showed her his passport and the reservation number. He put the lime on the reservation desk.

'Do you have any luggage?'
'No,' said Fat Charlie, apologetically.
'Nothing?'
'Nothing. Just this lime.'

He filled out several forms, and she gave him a key and directions to his room.

Fat Charlie was in the bath when a knock came on the door. He wrapped a towel around his midriff. It was the bellman. 'You left your lime in reception,' he said, and handed it to Fat Charlie."


I love this book.

Carole
10-26-2005, 08:18 PM
I just got home with them so I haven't actually started yet, but this aftenoon I will be reading:

Business Style, Grammar and Usage
Peterson's field guide to medicinal plants & herbs in the eastern US
Their day in the sun:Women of the Manhattan Project
GI Guinea Pigs
Shadow Government: The hidden world of public authorities abd how they control over $1 trillion of your money
Writing and Selling Non-Fiction
Writing From Personal Experience
and last but not least...
Write the Perfect Book Proposal


WHEW!

I'm gonna be BUSY!

littleblackdog
10-26-2005, 08:40 PM
The Glass Castle, Jeannette Walls.

I love memoir and this one is both hilarious and heartbreaking.