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View Full Version : Lendle - gaming Kindle's ebook lending function



Torgo
02-18-2011, 04:55 PM
Have a look at this. I didn't see this coming, but I surely ought to have done, because it's the obvious next step once Kindle enabled lending...

http://lendle.me/how-it-works/

Essentially I think this means the creation of a free public lending library for Kindle books; either Amazon tolerates it, or they'll have to disable lending again. Any thoughts?

Irysangel
02-18-2011, 07:03 PM
Well, the book has to be enabled for lending, and you can only lend a book once. I personally have no issues with it. IMO, it's like paperback swap. You read it once and you want to network with others to trade your reads. What can be wrong with that?

Torgo
02-18-2011, 07:14 PM
Well, the book has to be enabled for lending, and you can only lend a book once. I personally have no issues with it. IMO, it's like paperback swap. You read it once and you want to network with others to trade your reads. What can be wrong with that?

You'd be surprised how many people feel that lending is depriving authors of revenue, but yes, it's not much different to lending paperbacks.

However: the way ebook lending was conceived was probably that Alice and Bob are pals who both own Kindles. Alice lends Bob The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and Bob lends Alice The Da Vinci Code. There's nothing to stop Alice and Bob sharing their whole libraries, assuming they're enabled for lending, but only one person can have a given book at any one time. This is a nice cosy personal relationship that's precisely like sharing your print book libraries with each other, and this doesn't seem to be a problem for most people. Of course, if Bob owns a really enormous collection of books, Alice need never pay for a book ever again, but we probably don't worry about edge cases like that in the real world.

With Lendle, on the other hand, the library of books that are available for free lending is enormously larger. Now if Alice doesn't own The Da Vinci Code, or know anyone with a Kindle who wants to lend it to her, it really doesn't matter - she can very quickly find a total stranger, Carol, who has it, and obtain it from her. As more members join, the library gets bigger and bigger, until you can obtain anything you like.

It's typical internet: you take something innocuous and use networking to scale it up until it's something very different...

Torgo
03-22-2011, 03:48 AM
http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/lendle-ebook-lending-service-reportedly-revoked-api-access-by-amazon_b26087?c=rss

Apparently Amazon didn't feel inclined to tolerate it.

Amadan
03-22-2011, 03:54 AM
http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/lendle-ebook-lending-service-reportedly-revoked-api-access-by-amazon_b26087?c=rss

Apparently Amazon didn't feel inclined to tolerate it.


Not surprising (and I hope it didn't come as a surprise to Lendle -- they couldn't have thought Amazon was going to be okay with it for long).

What they should really be worried about is that this move will just drive more people to say "Why should we put up with DRM anyway?"

AlexPiper
03-22-2011, 03:58 AM
With Lendle, on the other hand, the library of books that are available for free lending is enormously larger. Now if Alice doesn't own The Da Vinci Code, or know anyone with a Kindle who wants to lend it to her, it really doesn't matter - she can very quickly find a total stranger, Carol, who has it, and obtain it from her. As more members join, the library gets bigger and bigger, until you can obtain anything you like.

Except Kindle books -- like Nook books -- can only be loaned once. Ever. Period. If I loan a book to a friend, and they don't get around to reading it before the 14 days are up? Too bad. That book can never be lent from my library again, ever, even to the same person. One loan, to one person. Then the 'loanable' bit is burned.

If 20 Lendle members have copies of The Da Vinci Code, then people can borrow that book 20 times before it's no longer in the Lendle library and available to be borrowed.

Torgo
03-22-2011, 03:59 AM
Not surprising (and I hope it didn't come as a surprise to Lendle -- they couldn't have thought Amazon was going to be okay with it for long).

I genuinely think they hadn't thought it through.


What they should really be worried about is that this move will just drive more people to say "Why should we put up with DRM anyway?"

That, and indeed perhaps to just create a version of the site that doesn't bother using Amazon's API; at which point Amazon again either have to tolerate it, or limit the lending function itself to a friends and family list; or disable entirely.

Torgo
03-22-2011, 04:01 AM
Except Kindle books -- like Nook books -- can only be loaned once. Ever. Period. If I loan a book to a friend, and they don't get around to reading it before the 14 days are up? Too bad. That book can never be lent from my library again, ever, even to the same person. One loan, to one person. Then the 'loanable' bit is burned.

If 20 Lendle members have copies of The Da Vinci Code, then people can borrow that book 20 times before it's no longer in the Lendle library and available to be borrowed.

Ah. Thank you for telling me that. That is an important limitation that I had somehow managed to overlook! In my defense, we don't have lending enabled over here in the UK.

The potential impact is much lesser then; still a bit of an impact, but I'll stop wibbling on about it now. Wish you'd showed up a few weeks ago and prevented me from talking bollocks about it for that time...

thothguard51
03-22-2011, 04:08 AM
So let me get this straight. The lend feature on the Kindle and Nook, once activated will only last for 14 days. After that 14 days, then no one can read the book other than the one who bought it...

Let us also not forget that Amazon is notorious for removing books from a users library... They find it on this size, and they will remove it from that persons library and no one will get to read it...

Torgo
03-22-2011, 04:10 AM
Let us also not forget that Amazon is notorious for removing books from a users library... They find it on this size, and they will remove it from that persons library and no one will get to read it...

They say they don't do that any more - they've accepted that the time they did that with 1984, it was a horrible, horrible PR nightmare.

thothguard51
03-22-2011, 04:13 AM
They say they don't do that any more - they've accepted that the time they did that with 1984, it was a horrible, horrible PR nightmare.

Ahhh, no, they have done it several times in the last couple of years over controversial books.

What Amazon says and does, is two different things...

Torgo
03-22-2011, 04:15 AM
Ahhh, no, they have done it several times in the last couple of years over controversial books.

What Amazon says and does, is two different things...

Can you cite that? I thought they'd done sneaky stuff with site listings, but not actually removed controversial books from people's hardware?

pangalactic
03-22-2011, 04:18 AM
Out of interest, what happened with that? It must have completely passed me by.

thothguard51
03-22-2011, 04:22 AM
Can you cite that? I thought they'd done sneaky stuff with site listings, but not actually removed controversial books from people's hardware?

They don't remove it from a persons computer. They remove it from the persons Amazon library. Previously, they went into a persons computer and removed it without the persons knowledge. That they no longer do, but the Amazon library belongs to Amazon and they can remove a book as part of the terms of sale.

I don't remember the exact books but there have been other threads on this in the self publishing forum, I believe. Some were very controversial as I remember and some were just out right ridiculous...