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starbuck63
10-11-2005, 08:26 PM
Hi All

Just posting this one - it's another offshoot of the Literary Agency Group (aka Children's Literary Agency).

In fact if you go to the 'about' on their websites, it's practically the same.

http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/about.html

http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/about.html

It looks like the same scam namely: "We don't charge fees to read your work but we do pass on 'promising material' to a 'third-party' to improve (who you must then pay)"


Be warned

victoriastrauss
10-11-2005, 08:29 PM
ARRRGGGGHHHH!!

Is it not enough that there are already FIVE of these monsters? Must there be a sixth?

Now I have to go create a new file folder. And update my warning--again.

I have so much documentation on the ST/Stylus clones that I will soon need to give them their own filing cabinet.

What a waste of trees.

- Victoria

victoriastrauss
10-11-2005, 08:30 PM
P.S. Thanks for the heads-up, Starbuck.

- Victoria

DaveKuzminski
10-11-2005, 08:32 PM
Let's not forget all the poor distressed pixels being mangled by that agency. Oh, the pain, the pain! ;)

In the meantime, I'll get a listing on them made up real soon. Thanks for bringing this one to our attention.

CaoPaux
10-11-2005, 08:34 PM
Gaah! Is there no end to this madness? :Headbang:

Hopefully, like PA, they'll overreach and start crumbling.

ETA: I've added this one and the "Poets" agency to my ST post, and will update the main Index soon. :Hammer:

James D. Macdonald
10-11-2005, 08:43 PM
About & Contact

The Screenplay Agency has numerous contacts with influential buyers throughout the industry. We are proud to represent a very diverse group of authors. Our roster of authors includes:

• Doctors
• Lawyers
• Entrepreneurs
• Journalists
• Professors and teachers from universities, high-schools, and elementary schools
• Coaches
• Accountants and bankers
• Advertising Executives
• Stay at home moms...

What's missing from the list?


Screenwriters!

victoriastrauss
10-11-2005, 09:08 PM
OK, here's the full warning for the search engines.

The Screenplay Agency is one of several new "agencies" under the umbrella of The Literary Agency Group Inc. The Literary Agency Group Inc. appears to be a spinoff of the infamous Stylus Literary Agency (until recently known as the ST Literary Agency), owned and operated by Robert Fletcher. Writer Beware has received scores of complaints about Stylus Literary/ST Literary, which has charged fees, promoted its own paid editing services, and submitted in a haphazard fashion to inappropriate publishers (when it submitted at all). It used a boiler room-style operation, with clients receiving substantially identical e-mails and responses.

Right now, the Literary Agency Group Inc. umbrella appears to embrace the following:



Stylus Literary Agency (http://www.stylusagency.com/) (formerly ST Literary Agency)
The Children's Literary Agency (http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/)
The Christian Literary Agency (http://www.christianliterary.com/index.html)
The New York Literary Agency (http://www.newyorkliteraryagency.com/index.html)
Poets Literary Agency (http://www.poetsliteraryagency.com/)
The Screenplay Agency (http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/index.html)
More, no doubt, to come.

Writer Beware has documented that these agencies all operate in much the same way, using the same boiler-room-style approach as the original Stylus, with nearly identical intake materials and contracts. Right now, the main focus of the operation appears to be persuading writers to buy paid critique services (at a cost of between $50 and around $90) and editing services (anywhere from $99 to over $2,000) from a service that's described as a "sister" company but in fact appears to be under common ownership with the agencies (this is a conflict of interest: if an agency can make money by recommending critiques or editing, how can the writer trust that the recommendation is in his/her best interest?). There may also be other paid adjunct services, and it's possible that there are vanity publishers somewhere in the mix.

Neither Stylus Literary Agency/ST Literary Agency nor any of its spinoffs have any commercial book or script sales, as far as we're aware--despite their claims to the contrary.

There's a more detailed discussion of the whole scheme in the ST Literary Agency (http://showthread.php?t=529&page=1&pp=25) thread.

- Victoria

starbuck63
10-12-2005, 01:39 PM
Hey Victoria, weren't these guys threatening the legal system on you - what happened to that?

(Sorry if I missed it in an earlier thread - just point me there and I'll obey)

CaoPaux
10-12-2005, 07:49 PM
The idjits have been threatening for years. Nothing's happened, since Writer Beware has The Truth (and a certain law shark) on their side. :D

victoriastrauss
10-12-2005, 07:56 PM
Hey Victoria, weren't these guys threatening the legal system on you - what happened to that?Yes, they were huffing and puffing. They may yet try to blow my house down. But so far, nada.

- Victoria

yeyeman9
12-16-2005, 10:17 PM
In other words, they shouldn't be trusted? Don't have anything to do them?

CaoPaux
12-16-2005, 10:36 PM
Correct.

DaveKuzminski
12-16-2005, 10:43 PM
Remember, there is no cure for scamitis. You can only join Writers Anonymous and follow their 12-step program which consists of remaining at least 12 feet away from scammers so they can't reach into your wallet.

DaveKuzminski
01-15-2006, 10:32 PM
I think Sherry and the others are feeling the pressure. Here's what a writer sent me from their response to the writer's inquiry:




Here's an interesting thing about the Predators site. We can't find ANY contact information. Can you? So, here we have someone that purports to be an industry watchdog, that gives no contact information, or ability to discuss what they promulgate... doesn't that give you cause to question what THEY are saying? (We have had one author say they found a contact email, and we suggested that they ask Predators 'why?', but they never got a response.. so... we suggest that you make up your own mind based on the professionalism of our interaction, with us, as real people, not some 'shadow' person/entity that is unaccountable. We've been at this for years, and we haven't changed our name or ran, we've stayed and fought, and the only real person that loses is the first time author that can't get the time of day from most agencies.

I've heard that the Predators site is actually run by Bill Martin, the owner of Agency Research.. he runs the Predator site so as to create controversy so that people will buy his Agent Research package. If that's true, how's that for misinformation and misleading the public?

One of our clients said this, "I too did not find an area with contact information available for the Predators site. I feel they should be stopped from disseminating information about a company without explaining why they are not recommending them. I would like to continue the process with you to represent our work."

I know it's tough.. best to you in your decision.

Best regards,
Sherry Fine - VP Acquisitions

Our Pledge To You:
==================
* We respect what you have accomplished thus far as a writer.
* We believe that great authors are made, not born. We are willing to develop talent.
* We pledge straight talk in a confusing and old-school industry.
* We can't promise a sale. We can promise a professional relationship.


p.s. Missed Emails, Spam, Whitelists, and other reasons for lapses in communications. We are very, very diligent about returning every email that we receive within a couple of days. The same is true for our vendors and suppliers. IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE A COMMUNICATION AND YOU BELIEVE THAT YOU SHOULD HAVE, PLEASE, CHECK WITH US AND WE WILL SEE WHAT HAPPENED. Please don't jump to negative conclusions. The Internet is not 100% foolproof and we are very sensitive to our clients' expectations and our promises about timely communications.


Hey, maybe they'll claim I'm Jenna next and give me both a name and gender change! ;)

James D. Macdonald
01-16-2006, 09:16 AM
One of our clients said this, "I too did not find an area with contact information available for the Predators site. I feel they should be stopped from disseminating information about a company without explaining why they are not recommending them. I would like to continue the process with you to represent our work."

Perhaps that's because they failed to click on the link labeled "About Preditors & Editors" (http://www.anotherealm.com/prededitors/pubabout.htm) (right on the main page (http://www.anotherealm.com/prededitors/)), described thusly: "Our purpose, who we list, and why. Also an explanation of the colors used and information about the editor of P&E."

The "About" page you come to a) tells you in some detail exactly how the ratings work, what "recommended" and "not recommended" mean, and why some agents/publishers don't have ratings at all.

But wait, there's more! People who go to the "About" page will find a link there to Dave's personal home page, where they'll find his personal email address.

Not only that ... the main page has a link that's called "Email (http://www.anotherealm.com/prededitors/pecontac.htm)" with this helpful explanatory text: "How to contact Preditors & Editors. Comments, Questions, Updates, and Insults. Also, how to be listed in P&E."

Bill Martin? Dave's name is on nearly three dozen of P&E's pages, including these (http://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Aanotherealm.com+Kuzminski).

Dave isn't shy about letting the world know he runs P&E. Bobby Fletcher knows darned well exactly who Dave is.

So all I can say is that Bobby Fletcher, Sherry, and their anonymous correspondent, weren't trying too hard.

(As far as "not explaining why they are not recommending them," how's "Charges fee. Poor contract. Strongly not recommended. " That's right off the listing for Stylus Literary Agency. Do you want more explanation? It'll only hurt worse, Bobby.)

One more thing. Sherry says:


We've been at this for years, and we haven't changed our name....

Which is why you're still Sydra Techniques ... oops! ... ST Literary Agency ... oops! ... Stylus Literary Agency ... oops! ... The Screenplay Agency.

(Been at it for years? Care to mention what you've sold during those years? Anything? To anyone?)

David13
01-23-2006, 12:17 AM
Hi All

Just posting this one - it's another offshoot of the Literary Agency Group (aka Children's Literary Agency).

In fact if you go to the 'about' on their websites, it's practically the same.

http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/about.html

http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/about.html

It looks like the same scam namely: "We don't charge fees to read your work but we do pass on 'promising material' to a 'third-party' to improve (who you must then pay)"


Be warned

I only wish I had known about the Screenplay Agency before I spent $95, and many hours of my time. Plus the embarrassment now of telling my friends that I really DON'T have an agent! The Writer's Guild (whom I should have checked with at the beginning) said that they sign a contract with every writer that submits. Then they ask for the critique (which I paid for) and after giving one that calls for many changes, they refer you another company (yeah, sure!) that charges fees. Strange fees. The next one was going to be for $189! Then I woke up. RATS! Back to the drawing board, but glad that I only lost the $95.

James D. Macdonald
01-24-2006, 04:57 PM
Here's the cycle:

1) They accept you.

2) Critique (for money).

3) Edit (for money).

4) Edit (for money).

.
.
.

n) Edit (for money).

n+1) Author doesn't pay money.

n+2) They drop you.

Sherry Fine
01-24-2006, 09:49 PM
Dear Author:

We are keenly aware of the negative material on a lot of writer's message boards and I thought I would take a minute and give you more background than what you are getting (which as best I can tell is stuff regurgitated from years ago).

I know it is confusing to authors and I thank you for 'first seeking to understand".

I hope that you will view the professionalism of this reply, where we try to present both sides of the situation, and contrast that against the furor that will arise after this post. Hey, maybe the message board people will agree to be your Agent!


It is a fact that most authors (98%) can't get the time of day from an Agent. Why? Because invariably their work needs improvement and if an Agent takes the time to say, "I like the idea, but you need a little help" the Agent is blackballed by every writers blog on the net.


Some writers say, "it's the agency's responsibility to help the writer".. Maybe in the old days, but not anymore. An Agent's core competency is selling work and finding buyers, not editing. Do you really think that an Agent should contribute their valuable selling time to assisting a writer with editing/grammar/ and other mechanics? Some writers do, but not those that understand the power and clarity of focus on core competency in business. Most agencies go out of business in a few years, not us. Why, because we concentrate on selling, and let the editors and writers do what they do best, writing, improving, writing, improving, etc.

Furthermore, when a work doesn't sell, what typically happens is that the author adopts one of 3 postures, 1) you suck, you scammer you, 2) I'll improve, or 3) maybe I'll quit. Most of the material on the boards is from attitude 1.

At it's core, that's the real issue. Always has been. So, there's a situation where potentially great work is 'waiting in the wings' so to speak, and can't get access to the market. And, if the Agent offers to help, to coach, and to mentor, well, you see the boards reply.

What Do Buyers Think? That's what really matters.
==========================================
Buyers (publishers) love our model. Why? because they know that we've forced the writer to jump through a series of hoops to prove their mettle. And the writers whine, whine, whine, and the publishers say, "whew, thanks for bringing us great work and for filtering out the crackpots."

Where do you think the crackpots cluster? Right on the message boards because a successful writer is improving their craft, making submissions, and researching and writing.

I use the word 'cluster' in the marketing segmentation definition. Look on most of those message boards, and you will see advertising, newsletters, and other capitalistic products and services based on traffic generated by controversy. So now you understand that the point of the boards is to generate traffic and advertising revenues based on their niche in the market.


Anyway, that said, it actually does us a favor and we've come to thank these boards. They weed out two main categories of authors that we are actually glad to be rid of: 1) nervous authors that don't understand the nitty gritty of hard business and who can't make up their mind and who rely on others for their opinions, 2) the SFN's (writers that want Something for Nothing) who want it all, basically for free...

I place 4 bullets under my signature. That's our promise. It's simple and it's understandable, and I really do think you'd be hard pressed to find one of our clients that won't, even grudgingly admit that we've delivered.

Our Pledge To You:
==================
* We respect what you have accomplished thus far as a writer.
* We believe that great authors are made, not born. We are willing to develop talent.
* We pledge straight talk in a confusing and old-school industry.
* We can't promise a sale. We can promise a professional relationship.

So, in conclusion, this is what I would do, if I were in your shoes, "I'd proceed with us, eyes wide open, and see if we meet or exceed our four business tenets, A) Respect, B) Building Talent, 3) Straight Talk, and a 4) Professional Relationship.

Of course, if you'd rather us terminate our relationship now, no problem, fortunately for me, and unfortunately for you, there's 10 more to take your place, and you can go back to querying agents for the rest of your life, or you can just see what happens and see if maybe, just maybe, we are what we say we are.

Best to you whatever your decision.

Sherry Fine - VP Acquisitions

Just for grins, and so that you know we provide a service of value to aspiring authors, I would like you to see some of the unprompted quotes that we receive on a daily basis.

Our clients say it best. The quotes below are unedited and as you can see, quite from the heart. (We have lots more of these.) If you are really cynical, you will probably believe we made them up, but I promise you, we can prove every one of them.

=======================

"Just a note to say, whatever the outcome of my submission, it's refreshing to engage an agent who will a) take an email submission, b) turn it round as quick you've committed to do and c) actively work with a writer. Submissions are daunting enough anyway without having to wait ten weeks for an impersonalised slip of paper. Here's to you."

"It is refreshing to get an honest professional opinion of my work, it make me realise just how much I don't know about the written word and its presentation."

Dear Georgina, I'd like you to know how highly and gratefully I regard the clarity with which you explain the process as well as your reliability. I have complete trust in both your abilities and ethical standards. Best wishes, Judith

It's been a long time since I left school with considerable number of years passing before I became interested in writing again. I would like you to thank you for working with me and let it be known that I look at this as a new beginning and rebirth of my education.

You don't know how nice it is to have such timely responses. I am sure I am not the only writer that puts a lot of heart into their work and I have to say, I have "kept mine tucked away in the closet" for many, many years. I just enjoy writing, but didn't know if I would ever try and submit it to anyone. Making the decision to do that has been somewhat of a nerve-wracking process. Your timely responses and professional, yet "down-to-earth" responses are making the process a lot easier. At this time, I am not submitting my work to anyone else, because you have impressed me the most up to this point. Even if we do not end up working together, I felt it was important to pass this along to you.

Dear Georgina: Your professional zeal and resourcefulness cannot be overemphasized seeing the volatile-oceanic-wave called the American Hollywood with its impregnable sales frontiers.I hold you dearly to my heart in my every prayers towards our mutual success now and...very soon in sbsequent works.I doff my heart after your every professional spirit imagining the energy, sweat and travellings involved. Thanks for everything you stand for professionally.

Thank you for your constructive feedback. I found your critique of my work very informative, and it concluded many things that I already knew. I really do need to improve on my punctuation skills, and that has been something I have struggled with for some time. I appreciate your suggestions on materials to improve this, and I plan on taking an advanced grammar and puctuation class at the college I am attending. Several other points you made were also very informative. I know I have a long way to go before I am a "professional" writer, but I am glad that you agreed that the potential is definitely there. I'd also like to thank you and your company for staying in contact with me through this process. I would, and will, come back to your company if I need further material critiqued. Thank you again for your time.

I just want to say I have been rejected for years by Agents and Publishers. After awhile it all seems pointless. But I am in this for the long run and will never give up and never give in. Whether you accept me or not you have restored my faith and hope that someone out there is concerned and listening to what writings go through. I look forward to learning all that I can from you and your associates.

"After having reread all the information sent to me, I must say that I am impressed by the way your agency has handled the science, or art of appreciating new sources of writing. If only all agencies displayed your model the world may be a better place. Your FAQ has answered all of my questions and i am eager to get to work."

===========================

WE ARE CREATING THE MOST POWERFUL AGENCY GROUP IN THE UNITED STATES. Every author that we represent has been fully edited and we know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that their work is good enough for publication. Unfortunately, the ones that 'wash out', tend to grouse and *****. If you can make it through our process, then you will be in an elite group that buyers respect. We never promise a sale, but we can promise that if we present your work, it will get respect from our buyers.

Best to you in your career.

LloydBrown
01-24-2006, 10:12 PM
See my line-by-line in the other thread where this spam was pasted.

James D. Macdonald
01-25-2006, 01:03 AM
Gee, you guys aren't leaving me much to do. (Not to worry, I'll deal with "Sherry" anyway.)

Before I comment on that astounding post, though, let me give a little perspective on why "Sherry" may have showed up just now.

An author at PublishAmerica commented that he was considering paying The Screenplay Agency (one of the names Robert Fletcher is doing business under). This was picked up in the NEPAT Overflow topic here:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15336&page=117&pp=25

and

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15336&page=118&pp=25

(Comments from "xhouseboy" and me, respectively.)

I went to the main Neverending PublishAmerica Thread (NEPAT), and made a request here:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=467304&postcount=29830

I asked that someone with access to the PublishAmerica Message Board (PAMB) let the author who was thinking of using The Screenplay Agency know that Fletcher's outfit was a scam.

Soon enough, it happened, both on the PAMB and (I presume) on another board where PA authors hang out.

I'm guessing that "Sherry" got a bunch of emails this afternoon telling her to forget about it, that they weren't going to pay for that critique, or treatment, or edit, or whatever they're asking for this week.

She's here to do damage control. Why here? Because the first place you come to when you Google "The Screenplay Agency" (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22The+Screenplay+Agency%22) or "Stylus Literary Agency" (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22Stylus+Literary+Agency%22) is right here. Any of those PublishAmerica authors who Googled got an eyeful.

I see "Sherry" posted the identical screed four times.


(http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20359)
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=467714#post467714
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=467713#post467713
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=467710#post467710
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=467707#post467707




Good for you, "Sherry," very industrious.

I'll only reply in one place, but I'll put this note in all four so folks can collect the whole set. Lots of people have already replied, identifying Sherry's major fibs, distortions, and omissions.

TheGaffer
01-25-2006, 01:12 AM
Too many people have done excellent work debunking most of this garbage already, so I just want to home in on one statement.


It is a fact that most authors (98%) can't get the time of day from an Agent. Why? Because invariably their work needs improvement and if an Agent takes the time to say, "I like the idea, but you need a little help" the Agent is blackballed by every writers blog on the net.


Any agent that wrote back to someone saying they need some work would hardly be "blackballed." In fact, they'd probably be celebrated for actually providing feedback other than a form letter. This "the world is a bad, scary place and we're the only ones who can take care of you" attitude is a bunch of nonsense.

Jcomp
01-25-2006, 03:05 AM
wow... lot of good info regarding these "agencies." I thought their methods seemed suspicious.

Aconite
01-25-2006, 04:09 AM
wow... lot of good info regarding these "agencies." I thought their methods seemed suspicious.
Good instincts, Jcomp.

Welcome to AW.

victoriastrauss
01-25-2006, 09:16 AM
Buyers (publishers) love our model......so much that they've never bought a book from you. As far as I know, of course.

- Victoria

TwentyFour
01-26-2006, 07:52 PM
I have noticed the thread on PAMB has disappeared. Whoever wanted to know about the Screenplay Agency was told by three or more PA authors to not sign with them it was a scam, so they must have deleted their thread. Unless PA was hoping they go in to the scam and deleted it after neg. responses came up.

DaveKuzminski
01-26-2006, 08:06 PM
I have noticed the thread on PAMB has disappeared. Whoever wanted to know about the Screenplay Agency was told by three or more PA authors to not sign with them it was a scam, so they must have deleted their thread. Unless PA was hoping they go in to the scam and deleted it after neg. responses came up.

What gets me about PA is that they don't patrol their own forum as much as this one in order to "protect" their authors. You'd think that PA would at least expose the other known scams in order to maintain the pretense that PA isn't a scam.

But then again, PA's management contains idiots. Sure, they have a great scam going (better than LAG's), but they copied it from yet another. Smile, ILP, we're remembering you.

HapiSofi
01-29-2006, 03:05 AM
Maybe it's just PA's thing about not wanting to have discussions of other areas. Or maybe it's because authors looking for further information on those scams are bound to wind up here.

James D. Macdonald
01-29-2006, 03:14 AM
What do you mean? The thread is still right there at the PublishAmerica Message Board:

http://bb.publishamerica.com/viewtopic.php?t=10363

There you can read, "These people are not players," "I can see scam all over this," and " Before committing any money, first ask what book or screenplay they have sold, and to whom."

noelanenberg
02-02-2006, 07:08 PM
Hi, all. Thank you for the eye opening news about The Screenplay Agency. I should have realized that any agent advertising honesty, integrity and service is too good to be true. Because, if anything seems too good to be true it usually is.

The Screenplay Agency et al are using the internet to commit interstate fraud, a felonious violation of Federal law. Has anyone filed a crimminal complaint? With who? The scripts these folks scam in can be read in a jail cell just as easily as in a boiler room.

B/R
Noel

James D. Macdonald
02-02-2006, 07:14 PM
I should have realized that any agent advertising honesty, integrity and service is too good to be true.

Hi, Noel.

You can amend that to "... any agent advertising." The real agents have all the business they need through pure word-of-mouth. Anyone with Google Ads isn't selling books or screenplays to publishers or producers.

noelanenberg
02-04-2006, 04:41 AM
Gd. pt. James, thanks....

winter
02-09-2006, 02:05 AM
I don't know. I think writers will always be their own worst enemies. As a rule I pay upwards of 5000 for what constitutes very little time from a script editor, so I can't see how 95 for a critique can be considered a scam.

Face it, agents don't sell scripts, they sell themselves. Agents can only ever facilitate.

And considering how much effort you seem to have put into finding dirt, without success, I'd say there's a definite possibility that the screenplay agency could offer an excellent bastion for writers to exhibit their work.

And what I've been reading here looks to me like the poison being spat by the frustration of your own failures.

Richard
02-09-2006, 02:06 AM
Oh, not another one...

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 02:18 AM
And considering how much effort you seem to have put into finding dirt, without success, I'd say there's a definite possibility that the screenplay agency could offer an excellent bastion for writers to exhibit their work.


No, no, "Winter." What we've had no success at finding is sales. Of dirt there's plenty. Here's a sample:

http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-063-01.pdf
http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-021-01.pdf

If you know of any screenplays Robert M. Fletcher has actually sold, now's the time and here's the place to post them. If not ... well, I'm not surprised.

Aconite
02-09-2006, 02:21 AM
Oh, not another one...
It was bound to happen, Richard. HorrorGirl and Isabella have been so thoroughly refuted and made themselves look so foolish that Bobby and Co. had to start over.

For anyone coming in late, the Screenplay Agency is one of a group of agencies run by Robert (Bobby) Fletcher, who was convicted of fraud*. The others are:

Stylus Literary Agency (formerly Sydra Techniques, formerly ST Literary Agency)
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=929
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529

The Children’s Literary Agency
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8312
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8286

The Christian Literary Agency
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13514

The New York Literary Agency
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=729

The Poets Literary Agency
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19104

The front/mask/umbrella group is The Literary Agency Group, Inc.
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13517

*http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-063-01.pdf
http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-021-01.pdf

LloydBrown
02-09-2006, 03:29 AM
And what I've been reading here looks to me like the poison being spat by the frustration of your own failures.

Why would you say that to a forum full of commercially successful authors? That's like walking into Congress and telling your audience they couldn't be elected for anything.

Royale With Cheese
02-09-2006, 03:35 AM
I just wanted to add that I have had my run in's with the screenplay agency myself. They do charge you money to get your script read by a third party. As soon as that happened I bolted.

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 03:48 AM
I do want to thank "winter" for inviting my attention back to The Screenplay Agency's website.

New over there is the "Book-to-Film Special Division."


The Screenplay Agency’s Book-to-Film Division offers an exciting new opportunity for authors of fiction, non-fiction or short stories who dream of seeing their manuscripts or prose on television or at the movies. For the first time, the Screenplay Agency's Book-to-Film division provides the services of credited agents of film and television to assist you toward bringing your manuscript to the Hollywood community.

Wow. That sounds pretty special. I wonder if these "agents" have names, or WGA numbers. I wonder what books they've adapted that have actually been optioned. I wonder how many have gone on to principal photography.

I wonder how much they charge for all this.

Can anyone enlighten me?

batgirl
02-09-2006, 04:39 AM
As a rule I pay upwards of 5000 for what constitutes very little time from a script editor, so I can't see how 95 for a critique can be considered a scam.
Wow. How do I get to be a script editor?
Oh, wait - does this mean honest script editors, or scammers? That might make a difference to my plans for riches.
-Barbara

victoriastrauss
02-09-2006, 05:08 AM
New over there is the "Book-to-Film Special Division."Like the late unlamented "Author Platform" program at ST Literary (back when there was only ST), this is just a ploy to funnel writers into the agency. People who approach the Screenplay Agency through its Books to Film come-on get the same offer as writers who submit scripts--representation with a critique requirement.

- Victoria

teaser
02-09-2006, 06:31 AM
I was on the verge of going through with this when I suddenly came across "absolutewrite.com" buzzing about this great scammer. Then, there's P&E's NOT RECOMMENDED warning! Oh my God!

The Screenplay Agency
“Developing the Best Writers in the World”

Greetings and Congratulations!

The Screenplay Agency is prepared to offer you a contract for acceptance as our client for
Agency Representation based on:

1) The screenplay you submitted,

2) the information that you have provided to us and the plan of action that we agreed
upon, i.e. the Critique-Coverage process.

In the sole opinion of the Literary Agency, if any of these items are inaccurate or
misleading this contract may be withdrawn at any time. This contract offer is good for 14
business days from receipt. (This deadline can be automatically extended by 10 days if
you contact us via email and request an extension). We give a deadline because we accept
only a limited number of authors in any time period and we cannot have contracts “hanging
out there”.

Some authors ask “why did you accept me?” Based on our interactions, you have
agreed to follow a plan of action that will lead to your work being of the highest quality,
and we believe that our odds for success are greatly enhanced. In short, we believe that we
can sell your work. We never promise a sale, but we do believe you have a solid chance of
success.

We look forward to working with you. Congratulations again.

.

Best regards,

Sherry Fine – VP Acquisitions
The Screenplay Agency

p.s. What’s Next? Please execute two copies of the contract and send them, along with a
note about your critique (date started, etc.) to the address in the contract. PLEASE send in
the contract at the same time you are having your critique done. If you don’t have a critique
already please contact adminScreenplay@writersliterary.com and you will receive our
negotiated discount and priority turnaround. Once we have your critique and contract you
will start working with the Agent who will be assigned to market your work.
Ofc. 866-876-4488 www.TheScreenplayAgency.com (http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/) 917-591-1916 Fax


The Screenplay Agency

“Developing the Best Writers in the World”

AGREEMENT FOR LITERARY AGENT REPRESENTATION

SCREENPLAY AGENCY: THE LITERARY AGENCY GROUP

Page 1/3 of Contract

This “Agreement” is between ______________________________ [the “Writer/Producer”] and The
Literary Agency Group, Inc, dba The Screenplay Agency, Inc. [The “Agent”] as of _____________, 200__
(please enter the date you sign the contract) for only the work entitled:

(Hereinafter “Work”)

Other Works Should Be Submitted Separately Only After Approval
Discuss Other Work Later with Your Agent


NOW, THEREFORE, for the consideration set forth in this Agreement Agent and Writer
intending to be legally bound hereby, mutually promise and agree as follows:

The copyright and ownership is specifically retained by the author for this work and all
author’s works submitted to, and accepted by, the Agent. The Writer does not grant to Agent or
any other party any right, title or interest of any kind in any copyright, ownership and/or any
other intellectual property right contained in or as a part of any work of the Writer submitted to
the Agent. The Agent agrees to make no claim to any such right, title or interest, however
denominated.

The Writer warrants that he is the sole and exclusive owner of the Work and that the
work does not infringe on any other copyright.

The Writer agrees to indemnify Agent against any judgments, liabilities, damages or loss
related to copyright or ownership.

The term of this contract shall be one year from the above date and must be renewed in
writing for each successive term. The Writer/Producer may terminate this Agreement after 90
consecutive days of no sale by Agent. Renewals and terminations via email are deemed
acceptable.

The rights granted in this pertain to written creative work prepared by the
Writer/Producer for print, television, radio and motion pictures to be sold in the United States of
America and Canada. The Writer/Producer may have other Agents in other countries.

The Agent may not have any conflicts of interest with regard to any specific contract or
employment negotiated under this Agreement. If any such conflict arises, he must relinquish his
commission.

The Agent is entitled to a ten percent [10%] commission on gross compensation accruing
to the Writer/Producer from any contract negotiated under this Agreement. This paragraph shall
survive termination of this Agreement. (This means that if we help you with a deal, you can’t fire
us and take away our commission).

The Agent is not responsible for damage or loss or return of any material.

Ofc. 866-876-4488 www.TheScreenplayAgency.com (http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/) 917-591-1916 Fax


The Screenplay Agency

“Developing the Best Writers in the World”

The Writer/Producer shall do his utmost to finish his work on time as per the terms of
contracts he has entered into. The Agent at his discretion may use the Writer/Producer’s name or
pen name and the name of the work in promotions for the Agent and to promote the Work.

The Writer/Producer has final say on any and all proposals or contracts delivered by the
Agent. The Writer/Producer is the only signer on any contract with a buyer.

The Writer/Producer acknowledges that the Agent will act only as an advisor and
negotiator and ‘buyer-finder’. The Agent specifically states that he is not an attorney, and is NOT
providing legal advice. The Writer/Producer acknowledges that the Agent is NOT procuring
employment for the Writer/Producer. The Writer/Producer will sign all agreements, not the
Agent.

The Writer/Producer also agrees that all leads, contacts, communications, documents,
emails, forms, and business processes employed by the Agent are considered confidential and
trade secrets and as such shall not be disseminated in any form or format without the express
written permission of the Agent. This clause survives termination of the Agreement.

The Writer/Producer will supply the Agent with an electronic version of their creative
work in a common word processing or screenplay format for the Agent to submit the work to
potential clients.

Both parties will make themselves available to each other within reason for any purpose
outlined in this Agreement. Both parties agree that any disputes will be settled in and governed
by the laws of the State of New York.

This Agreement is binding on the Writer/Producer and Agent and their respective heirs
and assigns. However in the event of a sale, insolvency or other change in the ownership or
operation of The Screenplay Agency, Inc., the Writer at his sole discretion may choose to
terminate this Agreement on 90 days notice. In the event of a termination both parties agree to
not disparage the other party in any form.

In the event that this Agreement is terminated for any reason, the Agent, his heirs and/or
assigns may continue to collect all commissions due on existing contracts negotiated under this
Agreement. If an existing contract between the Writer/Producer and any client is renewed, the
Writer’s Agent/heirs and or assigns may collect commissions on renewals until the existing
contract with that client is terminated.

This is the entire agreement. All changes shall require signatures of both parties.

WRITER/PRODUCER HAS THE RIGHT TO CANCEL THIS CONTRACT WITHOUT
QUESTION, WITHOUT RECOURSE, FOR 72 HOURS AFTER MAILING.

The Author may specifically EXCLUDE a contact that you have already made who might
sell or buy your work write them in here, up to a maximum of 3. If a sale occurs to, or
through, any of the following people or companies the Agent is NOT entitled to a
commission. (In other words, if we don’t find the buyer, we don’t deserve a commission.
You will find that we are very straightforward in our business dealings.)

1 __________________________________________________ ______

2 __________________________________________________ ______

3 __________________________________________________ ______

Ofc. 866-876-4488 www.TheScreenplayAgency.com (http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/) 917-591-1916 Fax


The Screenplay Agency

“Developing the Best Writers in the World”

Page 3/3 of Contract

THE WRITER/PRODUCER ALSO ACKNOWLEDGES THAT AT NO TIME AND IN NO FORM
HAS AGENT GUARANTEED THAT A SALE WILL BE MADE. _______ Writer Initial here.

I HEREBY CERTIFY THAT I AM OLDER THAN 18 YEARS OF AGE. _______Writer Initial
here. If you are not over 18, please have a parent or guardian execute the contract.

The Screenplay Agency -Writer/Producer
The Literary Agency Group, Inc.

_____________________(sign) ___________________________(sign)
Robert West - President

Print/typed Name:_________________________

Address: ____________________________

City/State/Zip: ____________________________

Phone: ____________________________

Email: __________________________________________________ _____

PLEASE BE SURE YOUR EMAIL IS LEGIBLE!

Pay particular attention to 1,l,0,O,2,Z, etc.…

PLEASE MAIL TWO SIGNED COPIES OF THIS CONTRACT TO:

The Screenplay Agency

Contract Administration Department

275 Madison Ave, 4th Floor

New York, NY 10016

You will be notified via email upon receipt of your mailed copies. Please allow
approximately 30 days for the return of your fully executed copy.

We look forward to working with you.

Ofc. 866-876-4488 www.TheScreenplayAgency.com (http://www.thescreenplayagency.com/) 917-591-1916 Fax

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 07:42 AM
When scriptwriters go bad:

I Spy For the Scribosphere Part 1 (of 3): Danny Broderick Strikes! (http://www.screenwritinglife.com/i-spy-for-the-scribosphere-part-1-of-3-danny-broderick-strikes)


I Spy Part 2 (of 3): "Friendship Alley" Has Potential! (http://www.screenwritinglife.com/i-spy-part-2-of-3-friendship-alley-has-potential)


I am positively waiting with bated breath for Part 3.

Meanwhile:

Sherry oh Sherry am I to be a Viktim to? (http://virginscreenwriter.blogspot.com/2006/01/sherry-oh-sherry-am-i-to-be-viktim-to.html)

She Never Met a Logline She Didn't Like (http://www.davidanaxagoras.com/2006/01/30/she-never-met-a-logline-she-didnt-like/)

Right you are, "winter": "I'd say there's a definite possibility that the screenplay agency could offer an excellent bastion for writers to exhibit their work."

winter
02-09-2006, 09:46 AM
Yeah right. If this is a forum full of successful writers then I'm santa claus. Hey, try working with a script editor.
Ah ah ah, not your downtrodden and dateless next door neighbor.

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 09:54 AM
Goodness! The sockpuppets sure move to mindless insults in a hurry when they can't answer pertinent questions!

One more time then I'm done with you, "winter": What has Fletcher ever sold? To anyone?

winter
02-09-2006, 11:21 AM
Look, I don't know, I don't even know who Robert Fletcher is, but I can't imagine anyone wanting their name or title mentioned on a slag site like this.
What's your real name? What are your titles? Who's your producer?

The mark of a successful writer is their fundamental appreciation for their development team. They look forward to every opportunity to work with an accomplished editor.

To learn something new about their work.

That's what concerns me, the urge you have to bolt from an editor.

Richard
02-09-2006, 01:40 PM
What's your real name? What are your titles? Who's your producer?

Why did you leave Otra? (http://www.go-girly.com)

Aconite
02-09-2006, 03:25 PM
Look, I don't know, I don't even know who Robert Fletcher is, What an amazing statement. Truly, I'm speechless. Luckily, I can still type.

Let's put aside the fact that two posts on the same page as yours stated that Robert Fletcher is the guy who runs TSA and its sister scams, and that both those posts linked to his record for fraud. (Here they are again, since you missed them twice: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-063-01.pdf http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-021-01.pdf) That doesn't inspire confidence in your ability to process information or do basic research, and it hurts your credibility, but we'll overlook that for the moment. Let's get to the second point, which is: You'd send your script out to someone you've never heard of?! Yeah, I know I'd want a complete unknown representing me and fooling around with my script. Uh huh. Great idea!

Name anything Fletcher's sold, winter. Go on, anything.

eqb
02-09-2006, 04:00 PM
Oh look, another sockpuppet. Bobby must have laid in a supply of extra wooly ones for each of his scam agencies. Alas, he didn't pay extra to give each sockpuppet its own personality. Izzie, HorribleGirl, and Old Man Winter all use the same approach -- an airy dismissal of any and all negative information, quickly followed by juvenile insults.

Fletcher/West has sold nothing. As Aconite showed in his post, Bobby's agencies, all of them, are scam operations designed to part hopeful writers from their money.

Roger J Carlson
02-09-2006, 05:12 PM
Look, I don't know, I don't even know who Robert Fletcher is, but I can't imagine anyone wanting their name or title mentioned on a slag site like this.
What's your real name? What are your titles? Who's your producer?

The mark of a successful writer is their fundamental appreciation for their development team. They look forward to every opportunity to work with an accomplished editor.

To learn something new about their work.

That's what concerns me, the urge you have to bolt from an editor.Well, this is astonishing. You'd really accept professional advice from someone you know nothing about? You admit you know nothing about Fletcher, yet you assume he's an accomplished editor (or will send you to one, again unnamed.)

Tell you what. Send me your script/manuscript. I'll send it to an accomplished editor (I really know one), who will give you his professional advice so you can learn something new about your work.

Oh, and be sure to include a check for $200. Better make it out to me. I'll be sure he gets it.

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 05:18 PM
Look, I don't know, I don't even know who Robert Fletcher is, but I can't imagine anyone wanting their name or title mentioned on a slag site like this.
Oh, right. Sure. You join a site, and on the very same day you join your first post is to defend a notorious scam. Sockpuppet, troll ... we know exactly what you are and why you're here.

What's your real name? What are your titles? Who's your producer?
My real name is over there to the left. My titles are too many to list here, but are easily obtainable (follow the link from my name). I don't have a producer.

The mark of a successful writer is their fundamental appreciation for their development team. They look forward to every opportunity to work with an accomplished editor.
No, chum. The mark of a successful writer is selling stuff. As to accomplished editors, Robert M. Fletcher isn't one. No one on his team is one. Nor do writers pay to work with editors. If you pay "5000" to work with an editor, in addition to being a shill, you're a chump.


To learn something new about their work.
You won't do that with Fletcher. First, he accepts anything and everything. The scam is to send you from useless critique, to coverage, to edit, 'round and 'round, paying money at every step, to companies that he doesn't reveal that he himself owns.

That's what concerns me, the urge you have to bolt from an editor.
Oh, come on. What concerns you is that the facts have come out about Fletcher and "Sherry Fine" and "Georgina Orr." Anyone with Google can find out who and what they are with one mouseclick. They're going to have to change their DBA names again. What concerns you is that Bobby Fletcher is losing money.

Okay, I'm done feeding the troll.

rudythewriter
02-09-2006, 06:50 PM
My "acceptance" e-mail from the Screenplay Agency -
Our review team believes that your Book-To-Film Adaptation has commercial
potential and we would like to proceed further with you. We believe we would
like to represent you....however.....
The Coverage Report usually takes the editor 1-2 hours and is $95... The
Pitch sheet takes about three hours of the editors time and is $189. If you
request them both at the same time, the total cost is discounted to $245.
PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR MONEY.

Roger J Carlson
02-09-2006, 06:59 PM
My "acceptance" e-mail from the Screenplay Agency -
Our review team believes that your Book-To-Film Adaptation has commercial
potential and we would like to proceed further with you. We believe we would
like to represent you....however.....
The Coverage Report usually takes the editor 1-2 hours and is $95... The
Pitch sheet takes about three hours of the editors time and is $189. If you
request them both at the same time, the total cost is discounted to $245.
PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR MONEY.*wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

Sounds like a waiter at a fancy restaurant who says they have no seating available, then gives you a meaningful look. Once you give him a $50, a table miraculously opens. The difference, of course, is that Fletcher will show you to the back door. "This way to the egress."

Thanks for posting. Their gall never ceases to amaze me.

James D. Macdonald
02-09-2006, 07:03 PM
Oh, that's rich! If they aren't asking for money, what's $245? Gefilte fish?

Meanwhile, I Spy Part 3 (of 3): Danny Broderick Gets an Agent ... Sort Of (http://www.screenwritinglife.com/i-spy-part-3-of-3-danny-broderick-gets-an-agent%e2%80%a6sort-of) is up.

aka eraser
02-09-2006, 08:58 PM
The mark of a successful writer is their fundamental appreciation for their development team.

That's the funniest thing I've read in a long time.

So success is not cashing cheques and receiving plaudits from readers. It's engaging in group hugs with your (bogus) agent/coach/editor.

I wanna try one:

The mark of a desperate con man is his inevitable appearance on message boards wherein he becomes an object more to be parodied than scorned.

Okay. Maybe 50-50.

victoriastrauss
02-09-2006, 09:25 PM
Oh, that's rich! If they aren't asking for money, what's $245? Gefilte fish?Nah. Chopped liver.

- Victoria

Duncan J Macdonald
02-09-2006, 10:37 PM
Oh, that's rich! If they aren't asking for money, what's $245? Gefilte fish?

Nah. Chopped liver.Hey! If to you it's chopped liver, send it to me! I'll use it wisely in my vocation of helping working girls uplift themselves.

Aconite
02-10-2006, 01:15 AM
Anyone who still has any doubts about the legitimacy of The Screenplay Agency--or who just wants a good time--should read Jim Macdonald's Take My Logline ... Please (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007246.html#007246). Do be sure to follow the links, and the comment thread is bound to be interesting very shortly, as well.

Royale With Cheese
02-10-2006, 03:12 AM
My response from the screenplay agency. Betcha it looks like every one elses who sent a synopsis to them.

Thank you for your query to the Screenplay Literary Agency. Based on
your
query form information we would like to see your work and learn a
little bit
more about your goals and your work.


1) Would you please send us an electronic copy
of your screenplay for further evaluation?

Please email your manuscript to
manuscript@thescreenplayagency.com (http://us.f500.mail.yahoo.com/ym/Compose?To=manuscript@thescreenplayagency.com&YY=1318&order=down&sort=date&pos=3) .
(We accept Final Draft, Movie Magic, Screenwiter, and pdf, doc,
and
rtf)

2) Would you please answer these 2 questions
in the body of the SAME email? (Just copy and paste
the questions).

A. How long have you been writing, and
what are your goals as a writer?

B. Do you consider your writing 'ready-to-go',
or do you think it needs some polishing.


You may send either 30 or so pages, or the entire screenplay, whichever
you
are more comfortable sending to us. Your screenplay is completely safe
within our company. We take care to properly manage all access and if
we
don't end up working together, we delete all files.

Please DO NOT include any questions with your submission. If you have
a
question, please send it to question@TheScreenplayAgency.com (http://us.f500.mail.yahoo.com/ym/Compose?To=question@TheScreenplayAgency.com&YY=1318&order=down&sort=date&pos=3) where the
proper people may address your question. Most of the questions you may
have
are answered on the website and at the bottom of this email. Please
see the
FAQs below.

DaveKuzminski
02-10-2006, 03:53 AM
Hey, Victoria, Ann, Jim, Jenna, let's keep a record of how many writers we save from the LAG and its tentacles. We could set up a tally that each of us could mark for each letter of thanks we receive just to let Fletcher know how much money we're saving for writers. I'm sure he'd appreciate knowing that. ;)

victoriastrauss
02-10-2006, 05:20 AM
Hey, Victoria, Ann, Jim, Jenna, let's keep a record of how many writers we save from the LAG and its tentacles. We could set up a tally that each of us could mark for each letter of thanks we receive just to let Fletcher know how much money we're saving for writers. I'm sure he'd appreciate knowing that. ;)Yes! Yes! That's a great idea. I'm going to start a thread and sticky it.

I suggest that rather than add a post each time we report a thankful writer, we edit our initial posts to add the numbers.

- Victoria

MMo
02-10-2006, 08:59 AM
On a slightly different subject:

O AW regulars, is there any way we can find out whether Bobby Fletcher's got a failed book(s) somewhere in his past?

While there are scam agents and publishers who aren't failed authors, that description fits all the scammers I've seen who strike back by saying their accusers are themselves failed authors. Also, I've noticed that Fletcher's sockpuppets react like they've been stung when people tell them they don't write very well.

The copyright office has several Robert (Middle Initial) Fletcher instruments, but no Robert M. Fletcher in the current database. The following are Robert (NMI) Fletcher, and there is no way of knowing if this is the Robert Fletcher of this thread. And of course I have no further information other than what is given here.


Registrations:

Books, Music, Etc.
1. Registration Number: TXu-1-255-157
Title: The fall of Noldur.
Note: Cataloged from appl. only.
Claimant: acRobert Fletcher
Created: 2005
Registered: 25Aug05
Miscellaneous: Rights & permissions info. on original appl. in C.O.
Special Codes: 1/B


Transfers:
Item 1 OF 1 V1743 P184 (COHD)
Date Recorded: 29Aug79
Date Executed: 5Jul79
Party 1: Robert Fletcher.
Party 2: Paramount Pictures Corporation.
Note: Assignment of copyright.

James D. Macdonald
02-10-2006, 04:10 PM
The startling conclusion to the Danny Broderick story comes in I Spy Part 4 (of 3): The Saga Comes To An End... (http://www.screenwritinglife.com/i-spy-pt-4-of-3-the-saga-comes-to-an-end)

Find out what happened to that hundred dollars Bobby Fletcher was fishing for.

CaoPaux
02-11-2006, 04:31 AM
What I'm loving is watching the scam-a-scammer meme spread in the screenwriter blogosphere. :ROFL:

James D. Macdonald
02-13-2006, 02:55 AM
This post is just too funny: http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007246.html#113610

victoriastrauss
02-15-2006, 06:39 AM
The back and forth with winter lost its usefulness (and its entertainment value) some time ago. I've split off most of his/her posts and the responses to them, and sent them to the Take It Outside topic. The thread there is still called The Screenplay Agency (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27315).

- Victoria

James D. Macdonald
02-17-2006, 12:36 AM
The thread in Take It Outside now contains today's flurry from "IsabellaBrown" as well, and has been retitled "Bob On The Run (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27315&page=5&pp=25)."

Mojo
03-10-2006, 03:02 AM
I just learned about TSA recently online and started researching because it seemed too good to be true. Thanks all of you for the heads up. I have to admit, the opportunity to send something in- only if it means I have to say "no" to proceeding further if they want money, is still tempting.

My real concern is that, if they really aren't in it for what they say, then what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)

Any thoughts on that? Thanks again- very good to read so many perspectives.

Mojo

CaoPaux
03-10-2006, 03:33 AM
My real concern is that, if they really aren't in it for what they say, then what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)They'd need the talent to do so and the knowledge to sell it once they did. They don't got neither. :cool:

James D. Macdonald
03-10-2006, 06:53 AM
...what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)



That would require that they sell something ... which so far they've shown no ability to do.

Aconite
03-10-2006, 05:16 PM
That would require that they sell something ... which so far they've shown no ability to do.And to write something, which they definitely can't do.

CaoPaux
03-14-2006, 03:06 AM
Almost missed one, ha!

This agency has been named one of Writer Beware's 20 Worst Agents/Agencies (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=525972#post525972).

VJwriter
03-30-2006, 10:32 AM
I found Hart Literary Management in the Hollywood Representation Directory. The listed Web site took me not to Hart Literary, but to a page with links. The first link was The Screenplay Agency, which I've already shied away from, thanks to stopping by the Water Cooler. Hart Literary looks authentic. WGA affiliation. Is anyone familiar with Hart Literary?

Roger J Carlson
03-30-2006, 05:29 PM
I found Hart Literary Management in the Hollywood Representation Directory. The listed Web site took me not to Hart Literary, but to a page with links. The first link was The Screenplay Agency, which I've already shied away from, thanks to stopping by the Water Cooler. Hart Literary looks authentic. WGA affiliation. Is anyone familiar with Hart Literary?A separate thread has been created to address this agency, so further discussion would be better directed here:
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30065

VJwriter
03-30-2006, 07:58 PM
The Hart Literary Management Web site is listed in The Hollywood Creative Directory as hartliterary.com. That took me to a list of "related Websites," with The Screenplay Agency topping the list. Others listed were New York Literary Agency, Childrens Literary Agency and Desert Rose Agency. Hart Literary is WGA approved, so why does their listed Web site take me elsewhere. It's a minefield out there! Thank gosh I chanced by The Water Cooler! I'm also adding a copy of "The Street Smart Writer" to my library.

sherryfine
04-09-2006, 09:13 PM
I'm giving you two answers to your question about what you've read. The first answer is the short one, and the second is the long one. I apologize in advance for any 'attitude' that you read in my reply, but it's a gut/core issue for us and we feel pretty strongly about certain things.


The short answer ....
We told the self-proclaimed industry watchdogs to shove it.
We've drawn the battle lines and we've said that unpublished
writers have very little chance of success unless they think differently.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We told the so-called watchdogs that they are hurting authors by maintaining 'old school' ideas. We explained that the agency business is so competitive now, that we can only focus on one thing, selling the work. The author has to take responsibility for bringing their work to industry standards. In short, we told the industry watchdogs that they don't get it, and they are promulgating old ideas that no longer apply. It didn't go over very well and they chatter incessantly, but if you think a writer has thick skin, you should try being an agent.

We've been in business now long enough to know that our model works, and that buyers respect the fact that EVERY AUTHOR WE REPRESENT HAS BEEN THROUGH A RIGOROUS CRITIQUE AND EDITING PROCESS. What you read on the boards is just authors whining about having to do more work, which they want us to do for free. Think about it for just a minute. If you were buying an unpublished author's work, wouldn't you want to buy work that had been through the proverbial wringer? And wouldn't you want to buy work that could get to market faster, because the grunt work, the editing, had already been done.

In the end, the truth of the matter is that you really want an agency that is willing to break a few rules on your behalf. The 'old school' doesn't want you to get in, and that's the truth. We have 4 sales, most agencies only have 1 or two. We will double that this year we think and you really need to consider whether some 'anonymous' board poster really has your best interest at heart or if you should give us a try, eyes wide open, and see if we don't keep our promises which are * We respect what you have accomplished thus far as a writer, * We believe that great authors are made, not born. We are willing to
develop talent. * We pledge straight talk in a confusing and old-school industry. * We can't promise a sale. We can promise a professional relationship.



------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's one author's reply to this email. We hope you are this discerning. "Thank you for the trouble you took to explain what's on those boards. I think I understand your frustration with the critics and nay sayers now. I have reviewed again the on-line comments and sources and agree that there is really nothing substantive in either their remarks or criticisms. In fact most of them whine about nearly everyone".
-----------------------------------------------------------------


Here's the long answer:
----------------------------------------
We are keenly aware of the negative material on a lot of writer's message boards. I thank you for 'seeking first to understand". Once again, sorry for the length of this email, but there's a lot to try to communicate to you.

I know it is confusing to authors. Luckily most authors can detect that there's something very negatively one sided about most boards, and a good author will ask for more information.

I think you would agree that it's tough to even get a reply from an Agency. Most authors (98%) can't get the time of day from an Agent. Why? Because invariably the author's work needs improvement and if an Agent takes the time to say, "I like the idea, but you need a little help" the Agent is blackballed by every writers blog on the net. So, it's easier to say no, or not reply, than to actually try to help a writer with a good idea and a good start.

Successful writers of books and screenplays use editors and coaches, always have, always will.. if you've never worked with an editor, you should. I would say that 95+% of the books on the shelves today have had an editors touch, either through the publishing company or as directed by an agent. There are two levels of editing. The first is our internal level. The second is the publisher level. When you pass our first level, it means that we will put our reputation on the line for you, however, it doesn't mean that it has been exhaustively edited, like a publisher would do. Their edit is MUCH more extensive. Our edit requirements are related to pitching and selling only.

THIS IS THE REAL ISSUE: If an agent assists the writer by telling them to get editing and then the agent will represent them, they get blackballed. So, here's a situation where potentially great work is 'waiting in the wings' so to speak, and can't get access to the market because Agents are overwhelmed and gunshy.

Luckily (for those authors that can see through the bs), we've decided that the old model is dead and we want new fresh talent. We want authors that want to improve and have their chance. And, our management team is a group of business warriors that basically say, "screw the naysayers because buyers love our model".

Why do buyers (publishers and producers) love our model? Because they know that we've forced the writer to jump through a series of hoops to prove their mettle. And the writers whine, whine, whine, and the publishers say, "whew, thanks for bringing us great work and for filtering out the crackpot writers that want the world and don't have an understanding of how competitive the market is." BUYERS WANT WRITERS THAT HAVE INVESTED IN THEMSELVES AND THEIR WRITING.

But why all the negative press you might ask? In short, the message boards attract unsuccessful writers. It's quite a statistical anomoly isn't it. A successful writer isn't sitting around responding to message boards, a successful writer is improving their craft, making submissions, and writing. As I'm sure you've seen the pettiness on the boards.. That pettiness is, to me, worse than a National Enquirer that you read in the grocery line, and frankly, I think the message boards attract the same caliber of people. Also, just for the fun of it, you should ask the people that work the boards to be your agent, and see how many writers run to help you.

LET ME STATE THIS AGAIN.. ASK THE PEOPLE ON THE MESSAGE BOARDS, BECAUSE THEY ARE SO SMART, WHAT THEY'VE SOLD, AND WHO THEIR AGENT WAS... And whether they'd be your agent. <I'm sorry to be a bit cynical here, but I'm sure you can see why? Nobody on those boards is going to work for you.. they aren't going to coach you, prep you, and try to sell your work.>

That said, we've come to thank these boards. The boards weed out three main categories of writers that we are actually glad to be rid of: 1) Authors that don't have a clue, 2) Authors that can't make up their mind for themselves and don't have any "grit", and 3) the SFN's (writers that want Something for Nothing). I hope that you aren't in any of those three categories. The Something For Nothing authors really get my goat, but that's another rant. Those are the authors that think we'll bear all their expenses because they've 'written the next bestseller'... egads...


Reread the 4 bullets under my signature. That's our promise. It's simple and it's understandable, and we deliver on it all day, every day. (Like this email really).

So, in conclusion, this is what I would do, if I were in your shoes, I'd proceed with us, eyes wide open, and see if we meet or exceed our four business tenets below, A) Respect, B) Building Talent, 3) Straight Talk, and a 4) Professional Relationship.

Just for grins, and so that you know we provide a service of value to aspiring authors, I would like you to see some of the unprompted quotes that we receive on a daily basis. Our clients say it best. The quotes below are unedited and as you can see, quite from the heart. (We have lots more of these.) If you are really cynical, you will probably believe we made them up, but I promise you, we can prove every one of them.

=======================

"Just a note to say, whatever the outcome of my submission, it's refreshing to engage an agent who will a) take an email submission, b) turn it round as quick you've committed to do and c) actively work with a writer. Submissions are daunting enough anyway without having to wait ten weeks for an impersonalised slip of paper. Here's to you."

"It is refreshing to get an honest professional opinion of my work, it make me realise just how much I don't know about the written word and its presentation."

Dear Georgina, I'd like you to know how highly and gratefully I regard the clarity with which you explain the process as well as your reliability. I have complete trust in both your abilities and ethical standards. Best wishes, Judith

It's been a long time since I left school with considerable number of years passing before I became interested in writing again. I would like you to thank you for working with me and let it be known that I look at this as a new beginning and rebirth of my education.

You don't know how nice it is to have such timely responses. I am sure I am not the only writer that puts a lot of heart into their work and I have to say, I have "kept mine tucked away in the closet" for many, many years. I just enjoy writing, but didn't know if I would ever try and submit it to anyone. Making the decision to do that has been somewhat of a nerve-wracking process. Your timely responses and professional, yet "down-to-earth" responses are making the process a lot easier. At this time, I am not submitting my work to anyone else, because you have impressed me the most up to this point. Even if we do not end up working together, I felt it was important to pass this along to you.

Dear Georgina: Your professional zeal and resourcefulness cannot be overemphasized seeing the volatile-oceanic-wave called the American Hollywood with its impregnable sales frontiers.I hold you dearly to my heart in my every prayers towards our mutual success now and...very soon in sbsequent works.I doff my heart after your every professional spirit imagining the energy, sweat and travellings involved. Thanks for everything you stand for professionally.

Thank you for your constructive feedback. I found your critique of my work very informative, and it concluded many things that I already knew. I really do need to improve on my punctuation skills, and that has been something I have struggled with for some time. I appreciate your suggestions on materials to improve this, and I plan on taking an advanced grammar and puctuation class at the college I am attending. Several other points you made were also very informative. I know I have a long way to go before I am a "professional" writer, but I am glad that you agreed that the potential is definitely there. I'd also like to thank you and your company for staying in contact with me through this process. I would, and will, come back to your company if I need further material critiqued. Thank you again for your time.

I just want to say I have been rejected for years by Agents and Publishers. After awhile it all seems pointless. But I am in this for the long run and will never give up and never give in. Whether you accept me or not you have restored my faith and hope that someone out there is concerned and listening to what writings go through. I look forward to learning all that I can from you and your associates.

"After having reread all the information sent to me, I must say that I am impressed by the way your agency has handled the science, or art of appreciating new sources of writing. If only all agencies displayed your model the world may be a better place. Your FAQ has answered all of my questions and i am eager to get to work."

===========================

WE ARE CREATING THE MOST POWERFUL AGENCY GROUP IN THE UNITED STATES. Every author that we represent has been fully edited and we know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that their work is good enough for publication. Unfortunately, the ones that 'wash out', tend to grouse and *****. If you can make it through our process, then you will be in an elite group that buyers respect. We never promise a sale, but we can promise that if we present your work, it will get respect from our buyers.

Best to you in your career whatever your decision. I hope you give us a chance to prove ourselves. What's your real risk anyway?

LloydBrown
04-09-2006, 09:17 PM
Sherry's on a paste-fest. We're going to see this message all over the board.

And I bet none of them says "we sold a book."

eqb
04-09-2006, 09:29 PM
What's your real risk anyway?

Nice cut-and-paste technique, Sherry! Too bad you can't list any sales.

Seriously, we answered that question already. Writers risk losing money, time, and opportunity if they sign with one of your scam agencies.

Gravity
04-09-2006, 09:34 PM
Bouncin' Bobby's scam-a-ramas must be losing potential victims at a prodigious rate, hence all the cut-'n-paste jobs handed off to Sherry. Must suck to be them.

MadScientistMatt
04-09-2006, 11:29 PM
Hello, Sherry. As long as you're here, I'd like to ask you a question.

I believe you were the one who replied to my logline submission to the Screenplay Agency. I sent it in under the alias of "Danny Timecube." I'd like to hear more about what you thought about my logline. According to my email, you said, "Based on your
query form information we would like to see your work and learn a little bit more about your goals and your work."

I have one question for you. The logline that you said that about read, in its entirity, "A fish of soap reflected green velvet and turned on the wooly log." Do you honestly believe that you could sell a script with that logline?

James D. Macdonald
04-09-2006, 11:50 PM
Gee, Sherry, that's old material. I already did a line-by-line on it.

But as long as you're here:

What have you sold? Ever? To anyone?

James D. Macdonald
04-10-2006, 12:44 AM
I told you I'd already done line-by-lines on "Sherry"'s nonsense, before "she" ever posted it here.

You can read the smackdowns here:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=729&page=13&pp=25

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13517&page=2&pp=25

MadScientistMatt
04-10-2006, 01:25 AM
Gee, Sherry, that's old material. I already did a line-by-line on it.

That just goes to show: If you fleece writers instead of paying them, it's nearly impossible to get new material.

James D. Macdonald
04-10-2006, 01:46 AM
I hope you give us a chance to prove ourselves.

Yes, "Sherry"! This is your chance!

List what you've sold, when, and to whom.

DaveKuzminski
04-10-2006, 05:13 AM
Should we remind Sherry that four sales divided by six agencies is less than one sale per agency?

If you're not up to the math, Sherry, we'll do it for you. I understand fractions are very impressive to newbies. ;)

similan
04-10-2006, 10:50 PM
For me, the hard part will be when I tell my love ones, and I only have three people who I care deeply for. Now I have to explain to my wife and her mom that it’s just a scam. That’s all. And it’s only been two days since we shot straight through cloud nine. What a ride it was, too. I feel like such a looser for letting them down. They were so excited when I told them the big news. My wife was several hundred miles away at work...man she broke down and cried when I phoned her. We’ve been married for three years and I’ve never, ever seen or heard her cry. I guess a real chance at leaving this cruddy tin shack we called home overwhelmed her.

But the hardest will be telling my daughter. See I created an email account for her when she was born seven months ago. I’ve been sending her emails every now and then letting her know about the things she did that put smile on our faces. My last one I’d told her about this very exciting news daddy has just received. Finally, I can provide care for you the way I wish I could. No more county hospital where your doctor treated us like cockroaches. Ok, I didn't say that last bit but...LOL Maybe I'll log in to her acct and delete that mail. hehe

Anyway, I’m very sorry for this rant and I’m not trying to be dramatic. I won't let it happen again. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif It’s just that I’m completely devastated. As if the crap we have to put up with living below poverty in a third world country isn’t punishing enough. Thank god my friend in LA forces me to wait until after she registered my script with WGA before I send my script to them. And no, I didn’t send them the 95$ for the critique. My left brain eventually returned and I started reading through the emails again and if you read them carefully, you can spot them trying to scam you. Google brought me here! You guys rule! :D


And Sherry Fine AKA "me, Joan" (that's how the uber editor that's going to critique my script introduced himself in the email) AKA Robert Fletcher, I've changed my mind and my check is on its way. Really! I'm so impressed with your extra uber fast replies that I gave you all my moolah. Just make sure you have a lighter handy, you're going to need to light it open cuz the check is inside the red tube thing. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/tongue.gif


Ok, now I feel a little better.

JerseyGirl1962
04-10-2006, 11:13 PM
Similan,

First - :welcome:

And secondly, don't be too harsh on yourself. The mind boggles at the scammers who aren't afraid to come between you and your money. Consider yourself fortunate you didn't send them any.

If you look at some of the other scam threads (check out the one on Publish America), you'll see what I mean.

Give your wife and daughter some hugs, hmm? :e2grouphu And don't be afraid to ask questions and do some research here. You're among friends. :)

~Nancy

Gravity
04-10-2006, 11:13 PM
Sim...I know it hurts, my friend. But know this. There's a little thing around called "payback." In the Christian world it's known as "sowing and reaping"; others call it karma. Whatever the label, Fletcher is stowing up a boatload of the stuff. And when all his misdeeds finally catch up with him...as they surely will...the resulting show will be spectacular.

Chacounne
04-10-2006, 11:15 PM
Oh, Similan,

Your message breaks my heart. Remember, this is but one agency, and they don't deserve you. Now's the time to research and find real agencies to query.

I wish you the best of life,
(((((((((((((((((((((((((((((Similan)))))))))))))) )))))))))))))))))))))
Chac

Sassenach
04-11-2006, 04:29 AM
Am I the only one who's wondering about Similan's veracity? Perhaps I'm wrong, but...

'tin shack'
'below poverty in a third world country' ???


If you do, where did you get the money for WGA registration and Internet access?

xhouseboy
04-11-2006, 05:24 AM
[QUOTE=Sassenach]Am I the only one who's wondering about Similan's veracity? Perhaps I'm wrong, but...



Maybe I'm as cynical as you, Sass. But there's a 'twang' throughout the post that doesn't (to me) suggest tin shack and all the rest of it.

I get the impression that there's a tongue firmly in a cheek somehwere.

similan
04-11-2006, 06:09 AM
JerseyGirl, Gravity and Chac,

Thanks guys. My desire to have my script read by a Hollywood agent momentarily blinded me. Boy, having my ego storked really was a trip, but in the end, reality bites. Hard! lol Better start doing it the hard way by sending query letters. Anyway, this could be karma or retribution for hurting someone who I cared about in the not too distance past, so I deserve it.

Sassenach,

I completely understand. In short, I used to live all over So Cal; LA, Eagle Rock, Burbank, Cerritos, N. Hollywood, Reseda and Alhambra. I moved back here (Thailand) several years ago. Initially it was a vacation, but met a girl and eventually we married. Things were decent at first. Had a decent paying job and was doing all right at first, but turned out I'm not much of a salesman. This computer, bought it when I first decided to stay. Now I'm jobless and been living at my mother-in-law's for a while. She's dirt poor but extremely kind. Anyway, got a writing gig last month but the project was put on hold. sigh...

Oh, my friend in LA registered my script with WGA for me and she even paid for it.

Take care guys.

Ezy Rider
04-11-2006, 08:28 AM
Yeah, I loved hearing how great my screenplay synopsis was.

Did not enjoy hearing about what a crock of **** they were?

Roger J Carlson
04-11-2006, 04:22 PM
Anyway, this could be karma or retribution for hurting someone who I cared about in the not too distance past, so I deserve it.I personally don't believe that anyone deserves this kind of treatment. But if reincarnation is true, then Bobby and his crew should come back as Myxomycetes (slime mold). They don't just steal people's money. They steal their dreams.

similan
04-12-2006, 06:41 AM
Got a LONG email from him yesterday! Basically, it (and I'm not refering to the mail) says you guys are wrong and to trust...it!

Is there anything we can do to shut him down as I'm almost certain many more will fall for this scam. Losing money is one thing but to most writers, it more that money he's taking. And some people might not cope all that well.

James D. Macdonald
04-12-2006, 09:37 AM
Is there anything we can do to shut him down as I'm almost certain many more will fall for this scam.

Write to the New York Attorney General, the Florida Attorney General, and your home state's attorney general.

Tell the facts about your interaction with Robert Fletcher.

xhouseboy
04-15-2006, 02:56 PM
I was reading this thread a few days ago, and based on Sherry's claims I decided to put her agency (once more) to the test. This has been done many times before, but who knows, perhaps she was telling the truth (yeah, right!).

So I sent this utter nonsense to her:


Title of Work: Honey Patter and the Goblet of Water

Synopsis: A young boy discovers he possesses magical powers, and he must
fight evil forces to realise his true destiny.

NYP-Work Been Edited: No.

NYP-Bio: Aspiring screenwriter for several years. I have only just purchased
a copy of Final Draft, which I believe wil make my screenplays even better.


Today I got this utter nonsense back. BTW, it landed in my spam folder. My emphasis.

Thank you for your query to the Screenplay Literary Agency. Based on your
query form information we would like to see your work and learn a little bit
more about your goals and your work.

1) Would you please send us an electronic copy
of your screenplay for further evaluation?

Err, No. I don't actually have any screenplays that are a blatant and nonsensical rip- off of the Harry Potter franchise.

Please email your manuscript to
manuscript@thescreenplayagency.com (manuscript@thescreenplayagency.com) .
(We accept Final Draft, Movie Magic, Screenwiter, and pdf, doc, and
rtf)

You accept anything.

2) Would you please answer these 2 questions
in the body of the SAME email? (Just copy and paste
the questions).

A. How long have you been writing, and
what are your goals as a writer?

To avoid scamsters like you.

B. Do you consider your writing 'ready-to-go',
or do you think it needs some polishing.

Again, no to the first question. It was a complete load of bollocks. To the second question; it needs reading, is what it needs, mate. And if you had read it, you too would have realised it was bollocks. Oh but wait, I forgot, it's my money you're really after. Sorry, my mistake, carry on.



SNIP - scam nonsense

Please see the
FAQs below.



We believe we are very different than other agencies.

Yeah, too right.




================================================== ========
We believe that we are unique in that we are willing to develop an author
and their talent. We like the metaphor of a business incubator as a
description of how we will take time to bring an author's work to the proper
quality level, even if it takes months to do so. We take pride in the fact
that we answer every email personally within 2-3 days.

And this personal response lands in one's spam folder.


Also, you may understand how a Literary Agency works, but many authors
don't, so please excuse me while I take a minute and let you know how the
process works. As your Literary Agent, our mission is to assist you in
finding a buyer for your work and to coach you along the way in various
options available to you. We don't edit your work, our mission is to sell
for you. As for compensation, get paid on success only, meaning we only get
paid if you get paid. Typically we will receive 10% of what you receive if
we are successful.

I have an agent. She takes 15%. We both do all right out of the arrangement. After all, 85% of something is a whole lot better than 90% of hee-haw, not to mention the 'service' (sorry, fees - see below) charges old Sherry would soon be tagging on. Real agents don't charge clients a penny, Sherry.


We do not charge fees, so our compensation is based on success only. Along
the way, we may suggest that you improve the quality of your work and or how
it is presented. Once your work is deemed 'presentable', then we'll start
shopping it to buyers. We never promise a sale, but we can tell you that we
have a model that works.

You never promise a sale because, quite frankly, you never make any sales. Nor do you intend to.




We look forward to receiving your materials.

In your dreams


Sherry Fine - V.P. Acquisitions



Frequently Asked Questions: (I've again deleted most of this garbage)


Q) Why is there no phone number? I want to talk to someone...
A) Quite frankly, we are deluged with submissions. It is our policy to
provide a contact number later in the process, assuming we would like to
proceed with you.

Real answer: because we're little more than an automated scam.


Q) How do I know you are for real?
A) All we ask is that you judge us on the professionalism of our
interactions together. We will never ask you for money, so that's one way to
judge for yourself. Our commitment to you is that we believe that we should
get paid only if we sell your work. Your commitment to us is that you will
do what it takes to make sure your manuscript is the best it can be and that
it meets or exceeds industry quality standards.

I have judged you on the professionalism of our interactions together. You failed miserably.



Q) What if you find errors or problems with my screenplay? Should I spend
time revising now, or later?
A) We receive very few 'ready-to-go' screenplays. We believe we are unique
in that we are willing to work with our authors along the way. Most that we
receive need some level of polishing before we can submit them to buyers.
Some need very little polishing. Some need a lot. Over the years, we've
learned that it is worth our time and effort to do what it takes to develop
new talent. We've learned that incubating new talent makes good business
sense.


For 'good business sense' read 'good financial sense'. For 'incubating' read 'fleecing'.



Q) Is this an automated email? Is there a real person out there?
A) Yes, and yes, and yes... We personally review each query form to
determine whether the story idea/synopsis sounds interesting. This tells us
which screenplays we would like to receive.

So you really would like to receive my nonsensical 'Honey Patter and the Goblet of Water'? Sorry, my apologies. I've completely misjudged you.


Best regards,
Sherry Fine - VP of Acquisitions
We Grow Talent

You GROW more and more disreputable as each day goes by.







---------------------------------------------------------------------------

James D. Macdonald
04-20-2006, 04:24 PM
Personal for Winter:

You can find your latest drive-by in the Bob On The Run (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27673&page=1&pp=25) thread.

What you can post up here is the name and author of any screenplay that The Screenplay Agency has actually gotten optioned by a legitimate producer.

Even better if it's getting produced.

Max_payne
04-27-2006, 08:49 PM
Ok ppl i'll try not to take sides here because if I said the company is

fine you're gonna accuse me of being a sock puppet and if I took

your side then I would be accusing the company with something

that I don't have proof on.

The case is that I sent my script to the screenplay agency and they

took it and sent me the contract and told me to get a critique

coverage and I did thru their sister company but the case is that I

payed for the critique and I got it and it was really helpful so I don't

regret paying this money even if it lands eventually in the pocket of

so-called Robert Fletcher.
And i've sent a friend of mine in NY to check out their building and e

should get back to me on monday.

Right now i'm making the adjustments advised by the critique and

they sent me a hot-sheet to fill which thy'll put in their database so i

think i'll go through and see where this leads.

I've been querying agents for two freakin years and all i got was an

agent that I won't mention his name who was elusive and always

asking for money and he done nothing but these guys aren't asking

for money except after the sale so I think i'll go through and i'll keep

you guys posted...

Roger J Carlson
04-27-2006, 09:48 PM
Ok ppl i'll try not to take sides here because if I said the company is
fine you're gonna accuse me of being a sock puppet and if I took
your side then I would be accusing the company with something
that I don't have proof on.
The case is that I sent my script to the screenplay agency and they
took it and sent me the contract and told me to get a critique
coverage and I did thru their sister company but the case is that I
payed for the critique and I got it and it was really helpful so I don't
regret paying this money even if it lands eventually in the pocket of
so-called Robert Fletcher.
And i've sent a friend of mine in NY to check out their building and e
should get back to me on monday.
Right now i'm making the adjustments advised by the critique and
they sent me a hot-sheet to fill which thy'll put in their database so i
think i'll go through and see where this leads.
I've been querying agents for two freakin years and all i got was an
agent that I won't mention his name who was elusive and always
asking for money and he done nothing but these guys aren't asking
for money except after the sale so I think i'll go through and i'll keep
you guys posted...
I think you could better spend your time by joining a critique group. You'll get better critiques and it won't cost you anything. (You can even post some of your work in Show Your Work forum right here.) If you must spend money to improve your writing, I'd suggest a writer's workshop. There are many around the country and they're honest about why they're taking your money.

The truth is that most rejections are a result of poor writing and not indifference on the part of agents and publishers. If you've submitted to dozens of agents and only the Screenplay Agency gives you any positive feedback (and asks for money to 'critique' it), it might be worth your while to investigate their motives.

Please do keep us posted.

MadScientistMatt
04-28-2006, 04:56 AM
Well, Monday is going to be very interesting here.

May I suggest you try a little test of your agent's legitimacy that you can do yourself? Make up a pen name and get a free email address somewhere like Hotmail. Use these to send the Screenplay Agency the worst logline you can imagine - cliched, ungrammatical, or thoroughly incomprehensible. They will accept it within two weeks, unless they have made some major changes in the past two months.

Mac H.
04-28-2006, 05:26 AM
What you can post up here is the name and author of any screenplay that The Screenplay Agency has actually gotten optioned by a legitimate producer.You might want to be careful - anyone can get a '$1 option' that means nothing. (I can say 'anyone' with confidence, because even I've had one)

A REAL option is one that pays at least in the ballpark of the Guild Minimum.

Mac

James D. Macdonald
04-28-2006, 05:48 AM
Well, Guild Minimum would be nice, but I'll let Bobby take baby steps.

Max_payne
04-29-2006, 02:59 AM
Sure guys i'll keep u posted...
I did create a free e-mail account and sent them a screwed up logline but I don't wanna mention it her because they're "on to us" U know ;)
And as for the writing and critique groups the problem is that I can't because I'm living outside the U.S. and i'm not even A U.S. citizen but I don't wanna mention my nationality just now because as I said be4 they're "on to us".....LOL

James D. Macdonald
04-29-2006, 03:08 AM
There are on-line writing and critique groups.

Tilly
04-29-2006, 03:09 AM
There are online writing and critique groups that you might find helpful, and there's a share your work area on this forum.

sherryfine
05-03-2006, 05:15 PM
Dear Message Board Citizens:

The company has asked me to tell you, in my own words, what I do and to let
you know just one aspect of what they do to help writers sell their work.

I work with Sherry Fine, our director of acquisitions, and I am using her
login for speed and efficiency with this post. One caveat, I'm in phone
sales, so if there are grammar or spelling errors in this post, please
realize that you are the writer, and that's your job to write 100%
correctly, not mine.

My job is to constantly expand the company's relationship of buyers. As you
know buyers in large companies change jobs and titles on a regular basis.
I've found that about 25%, that's 1/4 names that you can find in Writers
Market, or various public sources are INCORRECT.

So, my job is to live on the phone and email. I am paid to call buyers for
our authors and for our database of contacts.

Basically what I do is take a manuscript and a potential list of 30 buyers,
and get on the phone and qualify the list. I call, I make sure that we have
the right buyer's name, I check spelling and address, and most importantly,
I confirm what they are 'Looking For Now'. When I find a qualified buyer
with a need, I immediately communicate that to the Agents, and they
aggressively go into our roster of authors to find matches for the buyer.

Our materials are very well received by the buyers. Our buyers have learned
that we posess one of the most qualified groups of authors in the industry.
They know that all of our authors have been formally critiqued and edited.
Our buyers know that they can trust what we send them. Our buyers know that
we have filtered out the hobbyists from the authors that will do what it
takes to succeed.

Yes, we tell our authors that they have to reach industry standards.
Doesn't every agency do that in one way or another? I can tell you from
personal experience how frustrating it is to hear from a buyer that the work
we are trying to sell isn't as good a the competing works they are looking
at. So, if anything, our agency is becoming MORE demanding that our authors
take their work as far as they can from a quality perspective.

So, I hope that I have helped you see one aspect of an Agents job. The
company spends a lot of money paying me to do nothing but find buyers and
qualify them. And when I read this ongoing thread with all these bad words,
written by people that have only sour grapes to say, I just wanted to let
you know that "it ain't so".

Also, I can assure you that this company isn't a scam. I've known the
principals for years and they do the best they can for their authors. They
also pay their bills on a regular basis and they are beginning to acquire
other companies in the industry.

Here's a question.. if a literary agency buys a publishing company so that
they can publish or partner books they believe in, is that a conflict of
interest?
========================================
I can tell you right now that the company is participating in a new business
model. We're promoting a joint venture where we have put up $2500 in
partnership with the author and the publisher to get the book out the door.
That's unique! And that's how much we believe in what we are doing. The ad
is in the PMA newsletter and has been for 4 months.
A copy of the ad can be seen using this link.
http://www.theliteraryagencygroup.com/pma-literaryagencyad.pdf
This really is important for you to think about. We think that we are the
ONLY LITERARY AGENCY that has stepped up to put our own money behind
certain authors that we represent. If you can find any other agency that
has done this please let me know. This, to me, is brilliant, out of the box
thinking, that shows beyond a shadow of a doubt that our company is behind
our authors.

=======================================


Furthermore, all this talk about who owns what is rubbish. This is
business, and it's a lot like a Darwinian evolution. You either grow and
prosper, or you go out of business and you die.

If we can sell your work, we do. If we can't, then we will tell you why we
think it isn't selling. Usually this means more work, and really, that's
what most of the whining on these boards is about.

So, in conclusion, the company is real, they've paid me a regular salary for
years, and we're putting our heart and soul (and our money) behind our
authors.

Well, that's all the time I have for this post. Best to you and your
writing career. I don't have the time to monitor this post so
unfortunately, all the carping that will occur will be ignored. I have a
real job to get back to.


RKForever

James D. Macdonald
05-03-2006, 05:24 PM
Hi, RKForever/Sherryfine/Robert!

I did a line-by-line on this twaddle last time you posted it. Here's the link.

Come up with some new material -- this nonsense has already been refuted.

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19104&page=1&pp=25

Gravity
05-03-2006, 05:55 PM
Bobby really IS a dumbass, isn't he?

James D. Macdonald
05-03-2006, 06:52 PM
I think he's getting desperate. I think that threads like these are really cutting into his ability to scam people.

Max_payne
05-03-2006, 07:20 PM
Hey RkForever thanks for the explanation but I want to ask you,,, where do u live? and where exactly is your work place?? do you have an office there in the company and what's your real name? and your department name?

Roger J Carlson
05-03-2006, 07:59 PM
Hey RkForever thanks for the explanation but I want to ask you,,, where do u live? and where exactly is your work place?? do you have an office there in the company and what's your real name? and your department name?Good questions.

James D. Macdonald
05-04-2006, 06:03 PM
where exactly is your work place??

Yo, Max -- what did your friend who was visiting New York City find in that building where Bobby Fletcher claims to have an office?

Max_payne
05-04-2006, 06:53 PM
Yo, Max -- what did your friend who was visiting New York City find in that building where Bobby Fletcher claims to have an office?

my friend checked it out and he found that it was a mail drop but he sent me this e-mail a few days later
(hey man,

i had the place checked out at the Better Business Bureau here in NY. The company has had no complaints filed against them so far. That means that the company is legitimate but I cannot tell you they will get you what u want meaning a contract, etc.)
so what do you think guys?

James D. Macdonald
05-04-2006, 06:55 PM
As discussed here many times, the BBB is useless, particularly when it comes to literary scams.

I'm aware of fraudulent agents who had unblemished records with the BBB the day the cops came by to box up everything in the agents' offices for evidence.

aka eraser
05-04-2006, 06:57 PM
...so what do you think guys?

I think you should read this thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26990) from beginning to end.

And just because a business doesn't have a complaint registered by the BBB doesn't mean it's legitimate.

Max_payne
05-04-2006, 07:03 PM
I think you should read this thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26990) from beginning to end.

And just because a business doesn't have a complaint registered by the BBB doesn't mean it's legitimate.
OK ppl maybe you're right but I'll just continue walking down that road and see where it leads me...The moment they ask for money i'll walk straight out:flag:
i'll keep you posted

broughcut
05-04-2006, 07:16 PM
Here's a question.. if a literary agency buys a publishing company so that
they can publish or partner books they believe in, is that a conflict of
interest?


Uh, yeah, dumbass.

Or was that a rhetorical question?

Roger J Carlson
05-04-2006, 07:20 PM
OK ppl maybe you're right but I'll just continue walking down that road and see where it leads me...The moment they ask for money i'll walk straight out:flag:
i'll keep you postedMax,

I hope you don't think we're ganging up on you. We're not. But you have to realize that Fletcher and his gang send sockpuppets to these forums every once in a while. We've become suspicious of anyone who supports them.



If you read through all of the threads:
The Literary Agency Group, Inc.

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13517

Children’s Literary Agency, The (Dorothy Walker, Robert West)
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8312
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8286

Christian Literary Agency, The
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13514


New York Literary Agency, The (Sherry Fine)

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=729


Poets Literary Agency, The

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19104


Screenplay Agency, The

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20359


Stylus Literary Agency (formerly ST Literary Agency, formerly Sydra Techniques) (Robert Fletcher, Jill Mast, Mark Bredt)

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=929
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529

you'll find numerous posts from people who have sent them money and received nothing in return. You will NOT find a SINGLE post where someone claims the agency has actually sold a book for them. Even if they're not a scam (which they ARE) would you really want an agent who can't show a single sale?

DaveKuzminski
05-04-2006, 07:23 PM
OK ppl maybe you're right but I'll just continue walking down that road and see where it leads me...The moment they ask for money i'll walk straight out:flag:
i'll keep you postedYes, but can you get back the time you wasted on them before finding out they can't do you any good as we've stated?

Max_payne
05-04-2006, 11:33 PM
Quick question for you guys... If u're so sure that the agency is a hoax and scam why haven't anybody filed complaints or law suits or something if any of you did can you tell me where did you file it???

Thanks

Tilly
05-04-2006, 11:52 PM
It's difficult to get legal action taken against literary fraud, and it takes time. Often, it takes years before anything happens. Literary fraud is not a high priority.

As to whether this company has been sued, perhaps it has? I don't know. But I can see that the costs versus what might be retrieved could be prohibitive for many people. Most seem to chalk it up to experience and search for an agent who sells books to publishers, rather than leeches off writers.

I highly recommend this blog for information, it's run by Victoria Strauss and Ann Crispin. Not only do they warn new authors, they have been involved in some of the successful cases against literary fraud:
http://www.accrispin.com/about.htm

LloydBrown
05-05-2006, 12:02 AM
Quick question for you guys... If u're so sure that the agency is a hoax and scam why haven't anybody filed complaints or law suits or something if any of you did can you tell me where did you file it???

Thanks

You'd have to file the lawsuit in Florida. Most people are reluctant to admit they've been scammed. Of the ones that have, most of them haven't spent that much money. The filing fees for small claims courts would cost more than they lost.

However, I'm working on another alternative. Again.

James D. Macdonald
05-05-2006, 12:32 AM
I have no standing to bring a suit, nor do most of us. Only someone who's had a business relationship with this guy can do that.

Much of what Bobby's doing is unethical, but may fall into the realm of barely-legal. You pay for a critique, you get a critique ... even if it may be useless.

There isn't any licensing for agents. All you have to do to be an agent is say you are one. It isn't like falsely claiming to be a doctor or lawyer or engineer.

Law enforcement isn't much interested in nickles-and-dimes. Until you start talking about millions of dollars (Edit Ink comes to mind) no one much cares. It took ten years to nail Dorothy Deering, and she was egregious.


Bottom line: If all you're after in an agent is "hasn't yet been convicted of fraud...." well, you'd still cross Fletcher off your list. If all you want is "hasn't yet been convicted of fraud while posing as a literary agent," there are hundreds, perhaps thousands, who will fit your criteria. Get your next-door neighbor to print up some letterhead as a literary agent and have him submit your material. It'll be just as effective as anything Fletcher offers, and a heck of a lot cheaper.

What you really want, though, is someone who has a demonstrated ability to sell literary works. If you put it that way why would you look twice at any part of The Literary Agency Group?

Max_payne
05-05-2006, 01:24 PM
Thanks for the info guys.. but from what i've noticed you're all published and successful writers so why not help a brother out?:D

Maybe you guys can tell me where can I find legitimate agents or managers and how can I contact them please take in concerne that I don't live in the U.S. or europe but I live in the middle east so it's really hard to purchase an agent's directory or something so wat can I do??:Shrug:

waylander
05-05-2006, 01:51 PM
Look at Agentquery.com

Many agents will take take e-mail queries

Tilly
05-05-2006, 03:16 PM
There are online lists of agents. Bloomsbury has one for the U.K:

http://www.bloomsbury.com/writersarea/AgentsUK.asp

But no list is perfect, and it's important to check that any agent you query has sales to commercial publishing houses. You need to do your research.
Check agents online with the Bewares and Background checks board here, Preditors and Editors and Writer Beware. You can subscribe to industry publications like Publishers Marketplace online as well, which will help with information on sales.
Try and find out which agents represent authors who have published similar work to yours.

You don't need an agent who just hasn't been taken to court. You need an agent who has a proven track record of selling books to commercial publishers.

Some links:
http://www.anotherealm.com/prededitors/
http://www.sfwa.org/beware/
http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/

James D. Macdonald
05-05-2006, 03:54 PM
Don't limit yourself to agents who take email queries. (In fact, even if an agent takes email queries, I'd still send streetmail.)

Two more links for you:

<li>The Safest Way to Search for an Agent (http://www.sff.net/people/VictoriaStrauss/agentsearch.html)
Everything You Wanted to Know About Literary Agents (http://www.neilgaiman.com/journal/2005/01/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about.asp)


Meanwhile: the most important advice. Keep writing. Something new, different, better. That's the secret.

RichNice
05-05-2006, 11:30 PM
I have to admit that I was almost caught by them as well until I saw that they were not with WGA. Also when I saw what you guys new about them.
Thank you very much for having the true full story on them.

broughcut
05-06-2006, 01:53 AM
There isn't any licensing for agents.

Not novelists' agents. But script writers are considered "artists" in California and their CA agents must therefore be licensed with the state.

Always surprised that Grey Fox dude has never been reported to the California Labor Commissioner.

Mac H posted a great quote from Zoditch recently:

"This is one of the few industries where the sheep fight for position to be fleeced."

gunnerrat
05-07-2006, 07:14 AM
The reason I chose to give it a try was basically a banner ad at the script magazine site. It caught me off-guard - I didn't expect to be scammed by anything coming from there. Maybe I should pull out my poison keyboard and write them a nasty note! images/icons/icon8.gif Thanks for posting a heads-up before I bothered.

On a side-note, does anyone know what happened to the Zide-Perry web submission system? They took it off-line, promising to bring it back... and never did. What's the scoop?

sherryfine
05-07-2006, 06:21 PM
I'm giving you two answers to your question about what you've read. The
first answer is the short one, and the second is the long one. I apologize
in advance for any 'attitude' that you read in my reply, but it's a gut/core
issue for us and we feel pretty strongly about certain things.


The short answer ....
We told the self-proclaimed industry watchdogs to shove it.
We've drawn the battle lines and we've said that unpublished
writers have very little chance of success unless they think differently.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
We told the so-called watchdogs that they are hurting authors by maintaining
'old school' ideas. We explained that the agency business is so competitive
now, that we can only focus on one thing, selling the work. The author has
to take responsibility for bringing their work to industry standards. In
short, we told the industry watchdogs that they don't get it, and they are
promulgating old ideas that no longer apply. It didn't go over very well
and they chatter incessantly, but if you think a writer has thick skin, you
should try being an agent.

We've been in business now long enough to know that our model works, and
that buyers respect the fact that EVERY AUTHOR WE REPRESENT HAS BEEN THROUGH
A RIGOROUS CRITIQUE AND EDITING PROCESS. What you read on the boards is
just authors whining about having to do more work, which they want us to do
for free. Think about it for just a minute. If you were buying an
unpublished author's work, wouldn't you want to buy work that had been
through the proverbial wringer? And wouldn't you want to buy work that
could get to market faster, because the grunt work, the editing, had already
been done.

In the end, the truth of the matter is that you really want an agency that
is willing to break a few rules on your behalf. The 'old school' doesn't
want you to get in, and that's the truth. We have 4 sales, most agencies
only have 1 or two. We will double that this year we think and you really
need to consider whether some 'anonymous' board poster really has your best
interest at heart or if you should give us a try, eyes wide open, and see if
we don't keep our promises which are * We respect what you have accomplished
thus far as a writer, * We believe that great authors are made, not born. We
are willing to
develop talent. * We pledge straight talk in a confusing and old-school
industry. * We can't promise a sale. We can promise a professional
relationship.



------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's one author's reply to this email. We hope you are this discerning.
"Thank you for the trouble you took to explain what's on those boards. I
think I understand your frustration with the critics and nay sayers now. I
have reviewed again the on-line comments and sources and agree that there is
really nothing substantive in either their remarks or criticisms. In fact
most of them whine about nearly everyone".
-----------------------------------------------------------------


Here's the long answer:
----------------------------------------
We are keenly aware of the negative material on a lot of writer's message
boards. I thank you for 'seeking first to understand". Once again, sorry
for the length of this email, but there's a lot to try to communicate to
you.

I know it is confusing to authors. Luckily most authors can detect that
there's something very negatively one sided about most boards, and a good
author will ask for more information.

I think you would agree that it's tough to even get a reply from an Agency.
Most authors (98%) can't get the time of day from an Agent. Why? Because
invariably the author's work needs improvement and if an Agent takes the
time to say, "I like the idea, but you need a little help" the Agent is
blackballed by every writers blog on the net. So, it's easier to say no, or
not reply, than to actually try to help a writer with a good idea and a good
start.

Successful writers of books and screenplays use editors and coaches, always
have, always will.. if you've never worked with an editor, you should. I
would say that 95+% of the books on the shelves today have had an editors
touch, either through the publishing company or as directed by an agent.
There are two levels of editing. The first is our internal level. The second
is the publisher level. When you pass our first level, it means that we
will put our reputation on the line for you, however, it doesn't mean that
it has been exhaustively edited, like a publisher would do. Their edit is
MUCH more extensive. Our edit requirements are related to pitching and
selling only.

THIS IS THE REAL ISSUE: If an agent assists the writer by telling them to
get editing and then the agent will represent them, they get blackballed.
So, here's a situation where potentially great work is 'waiting in the
wings' so to speak, and can't get access to the market because Agents are
overwhelmed and gun-shy.

Luckily (for those authors that can see through the bs), we've decided that
the old model is dead and we want new fresh talent. We want authors that
want to improve and have their chance. And, our management team is a group
of business warriors that basically say, "screw the naysayers because buyers
love our model".

Why do buyers (publishers and producers) love our model? Because they know
that we've forced the writer to jump through a series of hoops to prove
their mettle. And the writers whine, whine, whine, and the publishers say,
"whew, thanks for bringing us great work and for filtering out the crackpot
writers that want the world and don't have an understanding of how
competitive the market is." BUYERS WANT WRITERS THAT HAVE INVESTED IN
THEMSELVES AND THEIR WRITING.

But why all the negative press you might ask? In short, the message boards
attract unsuccessful writers. It's quite a statistical anomaly isn't it.
A successful writer isn't sitting around responding to message boards, a
successful writer is improving their craft, making submissions, and writing.
As I'm sure you've seen the pettiness on the boards.. That pettiness is, to
me, worse than a National Enquirer that you read in the grocery line, and
frankly, I think the message boards attract the same caliber of people.
Also, just for the fun of it, you should ask the people that work the boards
to be your agent, and see how many writers run to help you.

LET ME STATE THIS AGAIN.. ASK THE PEOPLE ON THE MESSAGE BOARDS, BECAUSE THEY
ARE SO SMART, WHAT THEY'VE SOLD, AND WHO THEIR AGENT WAS... And whether
they'd be your agent. <I'm sorry to be a bit cynical here, but I'm sure you
can see why? Nobody on those boards is going to work for you.. they aren't
going to coach you, prep you, and try to sell your work.>

That said, we've come to thank these boards. The boards weed out three main
categories of writers that we are actually glad to be rid of: 1) Authors
that don't have a clue, 2) Authors that can't make up their mind for
themselves and don't have any "grit", and 3) the SFN's (writers that want
Something for Nothing). I hope that you aren't in any of those three
categories. The Something For Nothing authors really get my goat, but
that's another rant. Those are the authors that think we'll bear all their
expenses because they've 'written the next bestseller'... egads...


Reread the 4 bullets under my signature. That's our promise. It's simple
and it's understandable, and we deliver on it all day, every day. (Like
this email really).

So, in conclusion, this is what I would do, if I were in your shoes, I'd
proceed with us, eyes wide open, and see if we meet or exceed our four
business tenets below, A) Respect, B) Building Talent, 3) Straight Talk, and
a 4) Professional Relationship.

Just for grins, and so that you know we provide a service of value to
aspiring authors, I would like you to see some of the unprompted quotes that
we receive on a daily basis. Our clients say it best. The quotes below are
unedited and as you can see, quite from the heart. (We have lots more of
these.) If you are really cynical, you will probably believe we made them
up, but I promise you, we can prove every one of them.

=======================

"Just a note to say, whatever the outcome of my submission, it's refreshing
to engage an agent who will a) take an email submission, b) turn it round as
quick you've committed to do and c) actively work with a writer. Submissions
are daunting enough anyway without having to wait ten weeks for an
impersonalized slip of paper. Here's to you."

"It is refreshing to get an honest professional opinion of my work, it make
me realize just how much I don't know about the written word and its
presentation."

Dear Georgina, I'd like you to know how highly and gratefully I regard the
clarity with which you explain the process as well as your reliability. I
have complete trust in both your abilities and ethical standards. Best
wishes, Judith

It's been a long time since I left school with considerable number of years
passing before I became interested in writing again. I would like you to
thank you for working with me and let it be known that I look at this as a
new beginning and rebirth of my education.

You don't know how nice it is to have such timely responses. I am sure I am
not the only writer that puts a lot of heart into their work and I have to
say, I have "kept mine tucked away in the closet" for many, many years. I
just enjoy writing, but didn't know if I would ever try and submit it to
anyone. Making the decision to do that has been somewhat of a
nerve-wracking process. Your timely responses and professional, yet
"down-to-earth" responses are making the process a lot easier. At this time,
I am not submitting my work to anyone else, because you have impressed me
the most up to this point. Even if we do not end up working together, I
felt it was important to pass this along to you.

Dear Georgina: Your professional zeal and resourcefulness cannot be
overemphasized seeing the volatile-oceanic-wave called the American
Hollywood with its impregnable sales frontiers. I hold you dearly to my
heart in my every prayers towards our mutual success now and...very soon in
subsequent works. I doff my heart after your every professional spirit
imagining the energy, sweat and traveling involved. Thanks for everything
you stand for professionally.

Thank you for your constructive feedback. I found your critique of my work
very informative, and it concluded many things that I already knew. I really
do need to improve on my punctuation skills, and that has been something I
have struggled with for some time. I appreciate your suggestions on
materials to improve this, and I plan on taking an advanced grammar and
punctuation class at the college I am attending. Several other points you
made were also very informative. I know I have a long way to go before I am
a "professional" writer, but I am glad that you agreed that the potential is
definitely there. I'd also like to thank you and your company for staying in
contact with me through this process. I would, and will, come back to your
company if I need further material critiqued. Thank you again for your time.

I just want to say I have been rejected for years by Agents and Publishers.
After awhile it all seems pointless. But I am in this for the long run and
will never give up and never give in. Whether you accept me or not you have
restored my faith and hope that someone out there is concerned and listening
to what writings go through. I look forward to learning all that I can from
you and your associates.

"After having reread all the information sent to me, I must say that I am
impressed by the way your agency has handled the science, or art of
appreciating new sources of writing. If only all agencies displayed your
model the world may be a better place. Your FAQ has answered all of my
questions and I am eager to get to work."

===========================

WE ARE CREATING THE MOST POWERFUL AGENCY GROUP IN THE UNITED STATES. Every
author that we represent has been fully edited and we know, beyond a shadow
of a doubt, that their work is good enough for publication. Unfortunately,
the ones that 'wash out', tend to grouse and *****. If you can make it
through our process, then you will be in an elite group that buyers respect.
We never promise a sale, but we can promise that if we present your work, it
will get respect from our buyers.

James D. Macdonald
05-07-2006, 06:31 PM
Hiya, Sherry. Who are you today?

That screed of yours was dissected in detail the last time you posted it.

Come up with new material or I'll lock your sorry, lying, spamming, scamming self off this messageboard. Then you'll have something else to whine about.

Listen up:

If the next thing you post isn't a list of your verifiable sales from the last twelve months, I'll delete it, and ban you.

Fair enough?

DaveKuzminski
05-07-2006, 06:36 PM
Nah, you need to leave it, edit it to add a note pointing to your previous post, and then ban her. Then visitors will see that she was banned for a deliberate violation.

LloydBrown
05-07-2006, 06:48 PM
She *could* try to engage us in some actual dialogue, but I imagine it's tough defending an indefensible position.

eqb
05-07-2006, 06:51 PM
Isn't Sherry in danger of getting RMS from all that cutting-and-pasting to message boards?

James D. Macdonald
05-07-2006, 06:53 PM
Reasonable enough, Dave.

Now because "Sherry" posted, I think that I'll gather all the line-by-lines on Robert Fletcher's years of whining into one place, for easy reference.

How about The Literary Agency Group Tentacles (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26990&page=1&pp=25) thread?

Since "Sherry" posted "her" nonsense in The Screenplay Agency thread this time, here's a link to a story about how a bunch of genuine screenwriters made "Sherry" and "her" pals look like fools (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007246.html).

similan
05-08-2006, 01:43 PM
They're still at it. I guess they have not updated their mail system and the darn thing is on some kind of auto pilot.

They sent me 'another' one today and here's what I wrote back.

============

Hey there, Admindle. Say. Mind if I call you swindle?

Right! The check 'is' in the mail, but I haven't gotten up in days on account of me having no legs and all. But the check is in the envelope but I have no stamps. Hard to get to post office on the account that my car is a stick and answering all the spam mails takes most of the days, too.

Say! How about you give me a free critique and I tell everyone you sold 10 of my scripts?

On 5/4/06, Lynn - Payment Administration <admindle@writersliterary.com> wrote:

Re: Critique Payment Reminder



We are performing our monthly audits and verifying the status of your account. Thank you for taking a moment to verify our accuracy.



Our records show that we are awaiting payment of the critique fee.



If this is in error (and yes, it happens) please email me with any details you have. We sincerely apologize if we have missed entering your payment. Also, sometimes checks cross in the mail so if you have sent it in recently, don't worry, we'll pick it up*. If you need to pause for budgetary reasons, please let us know and we can make sure that your literary agency is notified.



Continued best wishes for your writing career. If you need the paperwork again please let me know.



Account Administration



p.s. We sincerely apologize if this email is in error. Sometimes we have duplicate records that contain old data. Please just let me know if that is the case.



* If your check was mailed: 14 days is the longest delay we've seen for a check to be mailed from Europe, received by our accounting department, and to notify the client of receipt. If you mailed your check earlier than 14 days from the date of this email, then it is safe to assume that it is lost. Please let us know if that is the case and we can make alternative arrangements.

MadScientistMatt
05-08-2006, 03:10 PM
It's starting to look like the Literary Agency Group is little more than an enormous computer program. We already know that submitting a logline on the Screenplay Agency website will automatically trigger the same response for a good logline or a bad one - even if you submit a logline for a movie that can't legally be filmed or can't possibly be filmed.

But it looks like there's more to it. The way they handle letters from clients who have gotten wise - they read like an automatically generated response triggered by key words in the emails. When they try to defend themselves on this board, they frequently do nothing but cut and pasted lines that are identical to what they send out on the emails. You could easily write an automated script, similar to the programs used by blog comment spammers, to automatically post a screed here on this forum every time some particular trigger occurred, such as sales dropping a certain amount.

I don't know if that's the case. Maybe they aren't using a script to post here. But the way the Literary Agency Group's own members try to defend themselves here shows no signs of an actual human intelligence reading posts and crafting a response to them.

MadScientistMatt
05-08-2006, 05:15 PM
Now that the Screenplay Agency defenders have returned, can I get you to answer one question?

I sent the Screenplay Agency the logline "A fish of soap reflected green velvet and turned on the wooly log." They acted enthusiastic about it and said they wanted to see the whole thing. If the Screenplay Agency is legitimate and takes on screenplays to sell them, why did they accept that nonsense?

Max_payne
05-08-2006, 07:47 PM
Now that the Screenplay Agency defenders have returned, can I get you to answer one question?

I sent the Screenplay Agency the logline "A fish of soap reflected green velvet and turned on the wooly log." They acted enthusiastic about it and said they wanted to see the whole thing. If the Screenplay Agency is legitimate and takes on screenplays to sell them, why did they accept that nonsense?

I'm not a defender and I think you all know that by now but to tell the truth I sent to them a real screwed up logline and gibberish under a pen name with a new e-mail address and they haven't replied back... maybe they developed their system or maybe they learned the trick:D,,, I really don't have a clue!

Sassenach
05-08-2006, 08:01 PM
I'm not a defender and I think you all know that by now but to tell the truth I sent to them a real screwed up logline and gibberish under a pen name with a new e-mail address and they haven't replied back... maybe they developed their system or maybe they learned the trick:D,,, I really don't have a clue!


It takes a few days.

Believe me, they accept anything.

Max_payne
05-08-2006, 08:10 PM
will 2 weeks be enough????

Sassenach
05-08-2006, 08:36 PM
Probably. Will that finally make you realize they're scammers?

DaveKuzminski
05-09-2006, 03:47 PM
Max, I've been tracking them for years now. They don't have any legitimate sales. The ones they claim were made by the authors, not them. They don't have an office in New York. It's a mail drop. They have claimed to have 15 agents. So you tell me. How do 15 agents live off only 4 sales over a five year period, especially since none of those books have ever become bestsellers which might conceivably bring in lots of royalties?

Believe me, those agents are not living in Mr. Rogers' neighborhood. They're not going to treat you fairly. All they intend to do is mug your wallet.

victoriastrauss
05-11-2006, 01:50 AM
I'm closing this thread for a few days to let things quiet down.

Winter, your posts are in the Bob on the Run thread in the Take it Outside topic. Feel free to continue the conversation there.

- Victoria

victoriastrauss
05-17-2006, 06:48 PM
Unlocking, as promised.

- Victoria

razormoney
07-06-2006, 11:43 PM
Add me to the list of people you kept from being scammed. I only got as far as sending the initial e-mail. I will go no further.

Razor

Roger J Carlson
07-06-2006, 11:44 PM
Add me to the list of people you kept from being scammed. I only got as far as sending the initial e-mail. I will go no further.

RazorGreat! Welcome aboard.

Relaxnhere
07-21-2006, 09:13 PM
I made a stupid mistake and sent my script in to "The Screeplay Agency". I know, I know this was absolutely idiotic of me to do it without researching. My screenplay is registered with the writers guild and copyrighted. Do I need to worry or is that enough? This was my first time sending it to anyone so I don't know what to think now. If anyone has any advice on what I should do (other than researching next time) I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

Maddog
07-21-2006, 09:18 PM
Just don't pay them anything and they will go away. Did you sign a contract?

Relaxnhere
07-21-2006, 09:21 PM
No I didn't sign anything. I just sent them a copy of my script.

victoriastrauss
07-21-2006, 09:44 PM
Relax, if you didn't sign a contract and your script is registered, you've nothing to worry about. A good agent won't risk his reputation by stealing. A bad agency (like this one) isn't interested in your script, only in your money.

To avoid thread proliferation, I've merged your question with the existing thread on the Screenplay Agency.

- VIctoria

Relaxnhere
07-21-2006, 09:52 PM
Thanks. I just found this site today and love it! Thanks again.

puddlejumper
08-21-2006, 06:07 AM
Thank you, folks. I had a feeling something was off with those people. What I don't understand is how they get past the fact that everyone can type them into their Google and literally find out about their scam in ...well, it took me about 4 and a half seconds.

I know ...if your young and excited you don't think to check. I'm old and decrepit and have a decent amount of skepticism. And then I found y'all.

I think I'll hang around a while. Maybe I can find links to a REAL agency who accepts queries from unknown writers.

Peace

PJ

LitFa
09-13-2006, 06:38 PM
Hi, I just found this forum today and quickly joined. I am so sad, I have already been taken by TSA. I was so excited that an agency was interested in my work that I was blinded. I signed a contract and I spent $95 on a referred critque. I know, I know, after reading these threads, I feel so stupid and I actually want to cry. They asked me to get an editor and I refused so they reviewed it themselves and then asked me to get another editor but I refused again. So far I haven't heard from them. My screenplay is not registered with the WGA. I do have it written in several formats including my original handwritten draft. I wish I had seen this site earlier. My question is this, does anyone know how I can get out of my contract? Also, is my script in danger of being stolen? I emailed the agency and asked them if I could terminate the contract and I am awaiting a response. I am open to any and all advice.

LloydBrown
09-13-2006, 07:18 PM
Your script is rarely ever in any danger of being stolen. In the hands of the Screenplay Agency, it's pretty safe: Fletcher couldn't sell a screenplay if you put a gun to his head.

Nangleator
09-13-2006, 07:44 PM
...I feel so stupid ... They asked me to get an editor and I refused ... I refused again.
Welcome aboard, and you've proven that you're not stupid!

JerseyGirl1962
09-13-2006, 07:56 PM
I signed a contract and I spent $95 on a referred critque. I know, I know, after reading these threads, I feel so stupid and I actually want to cry.

LitFa,

You are not stupid. These are professional con artists who've been in business way too long - and what Lloyd says is correct, so I definitely wouldn't worry.

Since they're so inept attempting to sell scripts (and novels, which is yet another octopus tentacle in Bouncin' Bobby's "empire"), they have to make their money somewhere, hence the "critique."

Oh, and :welcome:. Stick around some more. I've learned quite a lot perusing these boards, and I think you will, too. :)

~Nancy

LitFa
09-13-2006, 08:13 PM
Thanks for the welcomes, I am glad to be here. Since TSA is a scam, does that mean that my contract is void? Can I use my screenplay to try and secure a real agent? Or should I just wait out the 90 day clause and use other material til then? I am thinking about joining inktip.com.

James D. Macdonald
09-13-2006, 08:17 PM
To get out of your contract just email them, backed up with a registered letter, saying "You do not represent me." Then forget that they ever entered your life.

After the second time you refused to hire one of their "editors" they probably deleted your screenplay anyway. As Lloyd said, these fellows have zero ability to sell anything. Their model doesn't work except as a way to drain hopeful writers' bank accounts.

GaryBuglass
10-21-2006, 05:31 PM
God I wish I had come across this message board sooner! I'm another naive screenwriter who fell for TSA's "promise". I paid $95 for a pathetic critique and since the second draft of my screenplay was re-submitted I've received two responses. The first one was this --

Dear Gary,

Sorry I haven't been able to get you a proactive report on any marketing
results. (You beat me to the punch by a few days :)

In the past month there have been a couple of "internal matches" that
were relatively close to your work from the Look For Now (LFN) database
process. I am in the process of following up to discover if any of them
will agree to review your work. I will be continuing to work for you in
this manner over the next month if that's ok with you. It's slow, but
it is a good place for us to start and for you to get used to the slow
pace of the industry, which is almost tougher than writing!

Circle back to me in about a month if you have not heard from me before
then. During the next 30 days, if we don't have anything more concrete
from the LFN process, we will shift gears and get more aggressive and
discuss other options.

All the best,
Mary Bluestone
Senior Agent


3 moths past and I heard absolutely NOTHING so I sent a query e-mail - only to get the exact same e-mail sent back to me - word for word..including their promise..."During the next 30 days, if we don't have anything more concrete from the LFN process, we will shift gears and get more aggressive and discuss other options"...complete bull because more than 30 days have past and they haven't shifted gears or discussed ANYTHING with me thus far.

The latest e-mail I got from them when I sent another query a few days ago is a peach. Read this --

Gary,

Sometimes the LFN process can be maddeningly slow.

At this time, we are planning ahead and asking certain authors about
whether they would like to create a website to assist us with marketing
your work in more circumstances.

If you remember, email and having a website is one of the methods we use to market your work. It's more aggressive than just waiting for the LFN database to give a hit. The way having a website helps us is that we
have a certain group of buyers that we send an email pitch to. You can
also reference your website in any communications that you initiate.

The pitching website mimics your hotsheet, except it's placed on the web
in an attractive and industry accepted format.

If you would like to be included, you must have a website that the buyer
can click to. Uf you have one of these websites it gives us many more
options with marketing your work, so if you can afford it, we strongly
suggest that you have it.

If you would like to proceed in this manner, we found a web creation and
hosting company that does a great job and we have negotiated a greatly
Reduced price for our authors ($145 total cost.) That's the only cost
for the website for up to 2 years, and it includes creation, and hosting for
that time period. Of course if you can get a website done yourself
that's fine too, it needs to match this format exactly.

Here are a couple of examples of what the pitching websites look like.


http://www.stauthor.com/6044/Suffocate.htm (http://www.stauthor.com/6044/Suffocate.htm)

http://www.stauthor.com/6044/legendofdestiny.htm (javascript:ol('http://www.stauthor.com/6044/legendofdestiny.htm');)

http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/Ghostplc.html (javascript:ol('http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/Ghostplc.html');)


So, let me know your thoughts about proceeding with a website, or if
you'd rather wait and let the LFN process continue to move along.

I look forward to your reply.

Mary Bluestone
Senior Agent

CAN YOU BELIEVE THOSE SCAM ARTISTS OR WHAT???????? What a change from the very start huh? From the lame promise "we never charge a fee until we sell your work" to "we have negotiated a greatly
Reduced price for our authors ($145 total cost.) That's the only cost
for the website".

I URGE ANY ASPIRING SCREENPLAY WRITER/ AUTHOR TO STAY WELL AWAY FROM THIS USELESS, PATHETIC EXCUSE FOR AN AGENCY. IT IS A COMPLETE WASTE OF TIME AND THEY DON'T EVEN DELIVER THE "PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP" THAT THEY KEEP PROMISING.

"We never promise a sale"....now I can see why. Because they CAN'T.

James D. Macdonald
10-21-2006, 06:34 PM
Woo! The infamous "you beat me to the punch by a few days" letter! You aren't the first or only to get that one, my friend. (See http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=818730 and http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26990&page=8 for more.)

As to the "Looking For Now Database," that's just more smoke and mirrors. Here's an editor's reaction to it: http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26990&page=3

Now I see that they're back to pimping their "online pitch page" scheme. That's an old (and failed) scam of theirs. You could get a webpage elsewhere for a heck of a lot less than $145, if such a thing was useful for selling your book. Which it isn't.

Here's more about that (from more than two years ago): http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=529&page=6&pp=25

Since you're looking for The Screenplay Agency in particular (not that there's a lot of difference among all the tentacles of The Literary Agency Group), try looking here for more: http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007246.html

victoriastrauss
10-21-2006, 07:22 PM
If you bite on the $145 website, you get a pitch for the "Aggressive Agent Program", which will cost you $95 for submissions to 5 publishers.

- VIctoria

GaryBuglass
10-21-2006, 08:15 PM
I'm soooo glad I discovered you guys. There is no way I am going to pay anything else to this "agency". I am so close to sending them an e-mail right now and telling them where to shove it! The thought of having to go through the sleuth work of finding another agent is almost off putting.

I've noticed a lot of people have been asked by this agency to pay for an editor after the critique has been done. I never got asked this. When my critique was done I received this e-mail --

Gary,

I received your screenplay critique and I have reviewed it

A very nice critique! The editor said "there's not much to change , and
that you can probably make the changes yourself". That's almost rare, so we
congratulate you. We call this a "CR-GOOD" designation.

Many of our authors that get this CR-GOOD designation feel as though there
should be more to change. This isn't the case. Frankly, you've recieved the
top deisgnation that the editors offer and we'll move directly to marketing
because of it.

Please let me know if you are going to make the changes and approximately
how long you expect them to take. (If you ever want assistance let me
know).

After we receive your changes, we'll discuss marketing. Good job!

Best Regards,
Mary, Senior Agent

This e-mail was sent to me March 29. All I've received since then is the infamous "you beat me to the punch by a few days" reply - twice...now the "pay us to create your own website" scam.

James D. Macdonald
10-21-2006, 08:17 PM
In a spirit of fun I decided to Google on Mary Bluestone. An unusual name, and very few hits.

A couple of geneology sites don't seem relevant. Here are the ones that are:

A reader review (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ean=9780977171903&crvAll=1&crvStart=1&displayonly=CRV&z=y#CRV) of Jungle: A Harrowing True Story of Survival
by Yossi Ghinsberg over at BN.com.

Listed as an agent at The Screenwriter's Market (http://www.screenwritersmarket.com/cgi-bin/swm.pl?disp=loglines) (where you can apparently post your own loglines). There doesn't seem to be a way to search the loglines over there other than by paging through and reading them one by one. Here's the Google cache:


Title: Dark Ruler
Author: Vito Di Bello
Agent: Mary Bluestone
Genre: Horror
Synopsis:
Judgment Day has arrived for Satan and his demons as one man learns the horrifying truth what must happen before all of hell is let lose on earth.
added: 2006-07-27 12:00:51-04

Real pay dirt is here, though, where the author thanks his agent Mary Bluestone: The Monroe Files (http://themonroefiles.com/). It's a series that's coming out from Ivy House Publishing (http://www.ivyhousebooks.com/).

What is Ivy House? It's a pay-to-play vanity (http://www.ivyhousebooks.com/index.php?pid=services):


The cost of our Tier 1 or 2 services range anywhere from $1,000 to $10,000, depending on the particulars of your book (word count, binding, number of photographs or illustrations, etc.). Turnaround time for Tier 1 is four to six weeks, while Tier 2 takes about six months.

...

The cost of a Tier 3 contract starts at a minimum of approximately $9,000, averaging at about $14,000. The publication time frame is between 9 and 12 months.

Oh, excellent deal you've found for your client, Mary Bluestone. Keep up the good work!

James D. Macdonald
10-21-2006, 08:36 PM
I've noticed a lot of people have been asked by this agency to pay for an editor after the critique has been done. I never got asked this.

It looks like they're evolving their scam. Perhaps too many people were saying "Pay for an edit? No way!" so they've dropped back to their tried-and-tested online pitch page scam in its place.

The "Aggressive Agent" deal that Victoria mentions is truly inspired. How can we charaterize it? "Unless you pay me up front I'm going to sit on my a$$ and wait for someone to call me"?

And w00t! part two! Just noticed this:


Here are a couple of examples of what the pitching websites look like.


http://www.stauthor.com/6044/Suffocate.htm (http://www.stauthor.com/6044/Suffocate.htm)

http://www.stauthor.com/6044/legendofdestiny.htm (http://javascript%3cb%3e%3c/b%3E:ol%28%27http://www.stauthor.com/6044/legendofdestiny.htm%27%29;)

http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/Ghostplc.html (http://javascript%3cb%3e%3c/b%3E:ol%28%27http://www.childrensliteraryagency.com/Ghostplc.html%27%29;)


The last two links lead to broken pages. Check 'em out! Those are sure going to get a lot of requests.

For the one that isn't broken, look at "Praise/Reviews":



"It was intense!" - Best friend, Lisa Trabold.
"You've done it again, kid! It was amazing!" - Neighbor for 19 years, Jean Hurt.

I can't imagine anything less likely to fire a Hollywood executive with excitement about the commercial potential of your script than a review from your best friend or your next-door neighbor. Unless your best friend is James Cameron and you live next door to Steven Spielberg ... and in that case you sure don't need to go through The Screenplay Agency.

GaryBuglass
10-22-2006, 11:38 PM
HAHAHA. That's brilliant! I'm sure Hollywood executives would be thrilled to consider a screenplay that was praised by the writer's best friend. Jeez!

What I don't get about the misleading Screenplay Agency is this whole website option....here's a quote from my last e-mail from my (cough) "agent" --

"If you have one of these websites it gives us many more
options with marketing your work, so if you can afford it, we strongly
suggest that you have it."

What difference does having your own website make? Can't they just be like normal agents and submit your work through meetings with buyers, query e-mails etc.? It's just an excuse to get more money from you.

Also, I just LOVE how they advertise themselves on google. --

"EXPERIENCED. NO FEES. FAST."

Yeah, right! Experienced how? There is no evidence ANYWHERE of any successful clients through the screenplay agency (or their affiliates).
No fees? Gimme a break!! How come I was charged for a useless, unprofessional critique??? How come I'm now being asked to pay money for my own website???

FAST.....? Pull the other one. Since I signed their contract and was promised a "professional, fast business relationship" My best friend has met the girl of his dreams, married her and is now soon to be a father! Fast? I don't think so!

I just remembered another one of their false promises -- "Choose the screenplay that you feel is your best work. If accepted, we will discuss your other works with you later in the process"

Did I read that right???? "if accepted, we wil discuss your other works"......hmmmmm.....still waiting on that discussion Sherry!

xhouseboy
10-23-2006, 12:39 AM
"Choose the screenplay that you feel is your best work. If accepted, we will discuss your other works with you later in the process"



This is just Sherry-snake-speak for: 'we will hopefully squeeze more money out of you later in the process.'

As I mentioned some time ago, if Sherry had been around in another age she'd have lost count of how many times she'd found herself on the outskirts of town picking the tar and feathers off.

GaryBuglass
10-24-2006, 12:06 AM
Hopefully it won't be long until Robert Fletcher and his so-called "agents" go out of business. News of their fake and fraudulent business is spreading across the internet like wild fire.

They have pissed me off so much I feel like doing this -- :Headbang:

but when they go out of business I'll be doing this -- :roll:

and I'll be inviting everyone here that helped me open my eyes to their scam over to my place for a bit of this -- :PartySmil

Thanks again for all your help on this subject matter guys. I'm very grateful. Lets stick together to crumble these fraudsters into dust! :banana:

GaryBuglass
01-09-2007, 07:31 PM
I've noticed THE SCREENPLAY AGENCY has recently amended their home page. This is what they've added --


we are not finding employment for authors, our job is to sell your script :)
What are we 'Looking For Now'? Here are just a few of the requests that we are in the process of fulfilling. (Note: if your work matches one of these requests, please let us know on your submission query.

Looking for completed script where one of the main lead characters or a central supporting character is a 10-year-old boy.
Looking for completed family-oriented animal scripts, i.e. scripts that revolve around a horse, a dog, or some other animal and that would garner a probable G or PG rating. Scripts should be live-action.
Looking for completed comedy script where the lead character is an African-American male in his 30’s. The more outrageous, the better.
Looking for smart, high-concept comedy set in a unique world and possessing an engaging protagonist. Can be R or PG-13, but should have a moral compass.
Looking for clever, completed psychological horror scripts,
Looking for completed feature sci-fi scripts. Only interested in big-budget summer blockbuster-type stories with strong fantastical elements that require lots of special effects.
... and more are added every day.We take pride in finding and developing fresh, new literary talent. We believe that just because you are a new writer doesn’t mean that your work should be excluded from the marketplace, and we promise to work hard to give you a chance at success.

Honestly, they will try ANYTHING to get people to contact them. Let's hope nobody falls for it, though. They're scam artists and they always will be.

DeadlyAccurate
01-09-2007, 08:13 PM
Let me guess: those are the most common types of scripts new writers produce?

James D. Macdonald
01-10-2007, 08:50 AM
I've done some more Googling on Mary Bluestone, busy agent for The Screenplay Agency (and, apparently, The New York Literary Agency as well).

What did I find?

First, she represents at least one unsaleable screenplay: Death Note (http://www.gregsorrells.com/greg1.swf)

Why is this unsaleable? I have no idea how well it's written. Instead, its author notes that it's based on a copyrighted work, a Japanese manga, which has already been made into a movie.


One interesting tidbit as far as marketing is concerned, there was a movie released in Japan based off of the same manga (Japanese comic) that this film is, and it held the top spot on the charts in Japan for several weeks, beating out other films such as The Da Vinci Code. The manga and anime (Japanese cartoon) that this film is based off of are extremely popular stateside as well as in Japan.

I'm just guessing, but I bet this would-be screenwriter doesn't own the film rights.

+++++

See more of Mary Bluestone here: http://www.google.com/search?hl=enl&q=%22Mary+Bluestone%22+agent

Richard White
01-10-2007, 09:37 AM
So, the mighty Screenplay Agency is now representing fan-films? That would be funny if it wasn't so sad.

GaryBuglass
01-23-2007, 03:24 AM
A guy called Kent posted this on his myspace blog -- I discovered this through a search for the hatful Screenplay agency --


“what I really want to do for myself is write for television. I've written a screenplay and conquered the ever-so-difficult part of getting my foot in the door of Hollywood: landing an agent. I write for dramas, not comedies. Spec scripts are available upon request. Represented by The Screenplay Agency, Mary Bluestone.”

Poor guy. Not long until he realizes like the rest of us his dreams are about to get pounded on.

AC Crispin
01-23-2007, 09:24 PM
I hope all of the folks posting here who are complaining about having been scammed by Robert Fletcher in one of the fake "agency" incarnations have written to me to get guidelines on what to do now that you've been scammed.

My email address is anncrispin@aol.com

Feel free to pass it on to all known victims.

-Ann C. Crispin
Chair, Writer Beware
www.writerbeware.com (http://www.writerbeware.com)

Sour Lemon Pie
01-26-2007, 05:15 PM
I received a mail back from them too. I am glad i found out the truth about them.

Roger J Carlson
01-26-2007, 05:27 PM
Welcome to the Truth-(about The Literary Group)-Shall-Set-You-Free club, Sour.

Sour Lemon Pie
01-26-2007, 06:11 PM
Awe, thank you!!! :D

James D. Macdonald
02-10-2007, 08:11 PM
A bit of an update on the acceptance standards of The Screenplay Agency.

The original link is here: http://www.screenwritinglife.com/i-spy-pt-4-of-3-the-saga-comes-to-an-end


UPDATE: Just for kicks, a few weeks ago I used a different e-mail account and sent in the following query:

Name: Josh Sanchez

How Did You Hear of Us: Mwerk hell.

Title of Work: Hoppa Smirky Flirking Poop

Synopsis: Mwerk.

Has your Work Been Edited: Smoolapa oijjs certainty flocksure pinanten coolaiding slader.

Short Bio: Whentoes Sanchez flipristki centerop.

The response ten days later from Sherry Fine?

“Thank you for your query to the Screenplay Literary Agency. Based on your query form information we would like to see your work and learn a little bit more about your goals and your work. Would you please send us an electronic copy of your screenplay… etc., etc., etc.”

Someone really needs to shut these guys down.

Far more at the site that comes from.

Gravity
02-10-2007, 08:20 PM
Maybe Bouncin' Bob, er, Sherry had started in on the Johnny Walker Red a bit early the morning they got that query, and thus it made perfect sense...

mystified
02-20-2007, 10:22 AM
I guess this is an old thread, but hope it's OK to post anyway. I just want to say a BIG THANKS to absolutewrite for maintaining this site. I'm still a rank amateur here, but I've learned enough to ALWAYS check out an agency here before doing any more. I had just gone to The Screenplay Agency's site for the first time (never heard of them before). After reading what I've seen posted here, I know it would have been disastrous to send them my script. I'm patient....I'll just keep checking around, but whoever I find will be checked out here, first....you can bet on that. Thanks again for being here! :)

GaryBuglass
02-20-2007, 03:16 PM
I've contacted almost everyone I can think of about this "fake" agency and all its affiliates but they're still out there and nobody has the power to do anything about them.

James D. Macdonald
02-27-2007, 04:28 AM
There's a new scam in town: Writers Literary Agency & Marketing Company (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=56488). They've supposedly "acquired" The Literary Agency Group (home of Sydra Techniques/ST Literary Agency/Stylus Literary Agency/The New York Literary Agency/Christian Literary Agency/Childrens Literary Agency/Poets Literary Agency/The Screenplay Agency).

Same cast of characters, same lack of sales, same fraud.

James D. Macdonald
03-06-2007, 01:07 AM
The Screenplay Agency has renamed itself as the WL Screenplay Agency & Mgt. Company, www.wlscreenplayagency.com

xhouseboy
03-06-2007, 02:51 AM
Same old sh*t, just wearing a different mask.




Just a note to say thank you for your amazingly detailed, efficient and rapid service. When I resolved to get an agent this year or bust, I was prepared for the long haul. What I have encountered has been a whirlwind. I am sure that other agents worldwide will soon have to copy your submissions system as the model for a new industry standard, or become extinct.



You're welcome. Sorry we couldn't accomodate the 'agent' part of your wish, but despair not as you will be well and truly 'bust' after we're finished with you. I'm glad you see things as we do regards other agents desperate to copy our submisions system. Quite frankly, I don't think they have the bottle. The vast majority of them try to steer clear of borderline criminal behaviour - the losers.

Sherry.



I too wish to send in a personal comment on your delightfully refreshing acquisitions process. How different it is to be greeted with wit, intelligence and such a well thought out plan of action! Even if we go no further, I will send others to your company because I have such respect for businesses on the Internet that strive to give their customers the most efficient use of their time. I truly cannot see how one would not appreciate immensely, what you have put together and your commitment to those you do business with.


Thank you. We also find our acquisitions process both very refreshing, and a well thought out plan of action. Our commitment to you will never falter. We will continue to accept your money for as long as you're willing to part with it.

Sherry

P.S. Do you know a writer who wrote a similar testimonial about us? He didn't sign it either, but your style is almost identical to his. Just shows you, all the good writers eventually find their way to us.


Please allow me to say thank you for accepting my work for review. I also want to thank you for your timely e-mails and information regarding publishing protocols. It is because of conscientious professionals in the industry like yourself, that allows perspective writers to have their voices and ideas heard. Once again, thanks in advance for your timely information and professionalism.

Hang on a minute. I'm getting paranoid here. You are the same person, have to be. Is this a joke? Conscientious? Professional? Moi? Who are you? And why don't you ever sign these testimonials?

Sherry.



Jeeminy, I passed cloud nine so fast I hardly noticed it.I am so pleased and grateful to you folks and Louise of the critique administration. I thank the good Lord for the talent he has given me, but this is far more than I expected. I do plan to make the changes. Why not? I have already started and the difference is remarkable. Rewriting many scenes, booting out the cliches and tidying up the punctuation as well as adding many more words.
The advice and recommendations are well received. I will go at it like I'm killing snakes so should be finished in no more than a week.



Okay, this sarcasm has gone quite far enough. Who are you? Whoever you are, please cease and desist from writing all this crap about us. Everyone knows who we are and what we're about, and if they don't then they must have been living under a rock for the past few years.

And I don't much care for the reference to 'killing snakes'. This could be construed as a threat against my person. If I hear from you again I'm calling my lawyers.

Sherry.

For those of you out there who are genuinely willing to part with your hard earned money, here's what we're really about:


Our Pledge To You:

We can't promise a sale. We can however promise professional looking 'sale's receipts' based upon the never ending torrent of cash that will flow from you to us.

James D. Macdonald
03-06-2007, 03:52 AM
A note for the folks who sent the testimonials:

If you are one of the people who sent a testimonial to the WL Literary Agency (regardless of the name it was operating under at the time) please tell me how things worked out for you. Your name will be held in confidence.

xhouseboy
03-08-2007, 05:54 PM
p.s. You might as well get used to these long emails. Part of our filtering
process is to see if you actually read them <grin>. Why the long emails? If you will read them you will actually get a decent view of the agency
business and what we see from our side. We try to explain as much as we can along the way and I am always pleased when authors tell me that they enjoyed learning from these emails.

Please don't be upset because we use forms and long emails. I spend my time doing two basic tasks, 1) managing submissions and evaluations (currently about 3000 applicants a month), and 2) answering questions. If I can answer your question BEFORE you ask it, then the entire process will proceed much more efficiently.

As a corollary to that, if you want long-winded, personalized emails you
will probably not enjoy our process. If you are as busy as we are, and you pride yourself on operating efficiently (it is a business after all), then
you will enjoy how efficiently we focus on the point, and that is, whether
we can work together based on your writing and attitude.

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THAT YOU WILL HAVE A MUCH MORE PERSONALIZED INTERACTION WITH OUR AGENTS IF YOU PASS THE EVALUATION PROCESS. This is the biggest complaint that we get and I wish I could spend oodles of time with each of you. I just can't. Sometimes it's like drinking from a firehose over here. So, please rest assured that there will be plenty of personal interaction with your agent but not with me. I am a real person, and I do look at every email. After that we have some pretty sophisticated tools for managing emails.




Kudos to them. Looks like they have changed their business practise. I've never before received this 'P.S.' from Sherry, after submitting to their 'book to film' evaluation.

I sent the query to their new company about 36 hours ago, and got a very prompt reply. The rest of her email was the usual stuff about how based on my proposal they would like to see the work with a view to reresenting me.

The book in question was 'The Da Vinci Code', and a short synopis describing how Da Vinci may have implanted a secret code in his painting the last supper, and blah, blah, you probably know the rest.... (this was the actual wording in the synopsis)

I did mention in my bio that my name was Dick Brown, and that the book was actually written by a guy called Dan Brown (no relation) but that if she was up for it we could just nick it and make a better remake than the last adaptation as he probably wouldn't mind.

Looks like she's up for it.

I'm still waiting for responses to my other two submissions. The first was 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' and I informed Sherry that it was based upon my uncle Charlie's experience of once winning a golden ticket to visit a chocolate factory that was owned by a guy who was a bit of a fruitcake.

The second was called 'The Shining', and concerned a young lad whose Dad went loopy with an axe.

Fingers crossed. I could soon be gaining representation for all three books. And once Sherry's guided me towards how to adapt all three into screenplays, then hopefully she'll be shopping the scripts around all the major film companies.

Hollywood here I come!!!

DaveKuzminski
03-08-2007, 08:23 PM
If the 3000 submissions per month is remotely true, it might be safe to guess that they actually manage to scalp one percent of those for a critique. Even though they charge only $95, I'm going to round it up to an even $100 to make the math easier. That means they make close to $3,000 per month just from critiques alone.

We have no way of even guessing how many later go on to get the editing service they offer. That would have to be pure cream for them even though I feel certain that even fewer of their marks opt for that. Because the price tag is significantly higher, it could equal what the critiques bring in. Wouldn't surprize me if they're drawing in ten grand a month.

I am soooo in the wrong profession.

xhouseboy
03-08-2007, 09:30 PM
We have no way of even guessing how many later go on to get the editing service they offer. That would have to be pure cream for them even though I feel certain that even fewer of their marks opt for that. Because the price tag is significantly higher, it could equal what the critiques bring in. Wouldn't surprize me if they're drawing in ten grand a month.

I am soooo in the wrong profession.

If they're to be believed that they read all submissions, they're even trying to rip off kids.

I just got another positive response back to this:

Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by
*********** on Monday, March 5, 2007 at 20:09:53
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

FormSource: CLA

FormDate: 3/6/2007

Name: Stephan King

How Did You Hear of Us: my mummy told me about youse

Title of Work: The Shining

Synopsis: A little boy goes to live in a hotel for the winter, and then his
dad goes loopy and chases him with an axe.

NYP-Work Been Edited: my mummy says it's good

NYP-Bio: I'm at school. We're making plasticine models tomorrow.

DaveKuzminski
03-08-2007, 10:34 PM
Hmmm, I think P&E's going to hold a contest. Have to think on this for a bit as to what to award, but it will involve submitting to an agency like this one and the participants must prove they submitted by sharing a copy of the response from the agency.

There will be several levels involved. One level will be for proving participation. The next level will involve having a weird submission invited to send more information. The top level might be based upon receiving a offer for representation though I doubt anyone would want to try to go that far.

Of course, the flakier the submissions, the better. Anyone have any suggestions to offer on this idea? Right now, because the process can take some time, I'm thinking of making this contest valid for the next quarter. Most likely, the awards will be recognition only of one's accomplishment unless something suitable can be arranged or thought up.

DaveKuzminski
03-09-2007, 08:08 PM
Well, I actually have offers of prizes to offer should P&E go forward with this contest idea. I am viewing this more seriously. It just come to be.

oobie
03-14-2007, 04:22 AM
I was almost taken. Thank you so much.

El Mariachi
06-09-2007, 07:18 PM
After confronting "Sherry" about being legitimate, this is the reply that I received. I will give them an "A" for effort.

I'm so sorry that you find yourself in a conundrum. As a writer, you really don't know who to turn to, and there is conflicting information everywhere. Before you lose a real chance to move your career forward, please consider the additional information below.

Interestingly, we had a publisher make this comment the other day (remember, it's the publisher we care most about). The publisher said, "the more they scream, the more we know you are doing the right things and forcing discipline and business reality on these writers". What the publisher was telling us, was basically, "thanks, you're doing your job", which is weeding out the writers that won't get their work edited or brought to professional standards. We get a lot of comments about how good a job we do, but of course, real writers and real publishers don't hang out on message boards.

Please, you owe it to yourself to take this one step further! That data is so old, and so distorted by writers with an axe to grind, that I cringe when I hear a writer making a career decision from it. You've been with us this far, and I think you will agree that we have treated you professionally and in a timely fashion. Read what I say below and tell me if it doesn't make sense, and that it is worth your time to gather a little bit more info.

Let me tell you where that stuff comes from. First, we insist on working only with edited work. There is an entire camp of people that believe that we should pay for the writers' editing. If the writer's name is Hillary Clinton, we'll pay for the editing, but for a new author, we just can't afford it. Also, because the value of editing and critiquing stays with the owner/writer of the script, even if we were fired, then it would make logical sense that the author would pay for editing.

The next group is basically just upset that they can't make it as a writer and they are spiteful and generally upset with the way the world treats them. And to add to their angst, telling a writer their story isn't good enough to sell is like telling a parent that their kid is ugly. And, when a writer is upset, they write hateful things. We just toughen up and ignore them. I suggest you do the same.

We used to try to set them straight, but it was a useless task. We've tried to get these people into a dialogue. They just keep dragging old information around. They talk about people and processes that are at least 5 years removed from what we do now. Please read this and you will see what I mean. http://www.writersliterary.com/acquiretlag.html

Here is what I would do if I were you.

1) Please spend a minute or two asking them for concrete proof of their allegations or what they say. See if they will give you anything substantial. We have asked and never received an answer. I don't think they will either answer you or give you anything concrete either. I've seen their answers, there is nothing concrete, just allegations of more complaints from internidiots.

Then, once you've weighed all the facts and done your diligence, please feel free to return to us. We are willing to work with new authors and that's what everyone holds against us (and unfortunately, new authors know less about the business than anyone.)

Good luck to you, really! I hope you will give us a chance to prove ourselves. (We won't waive our quality standards though).

And, one final thought. The people on the boards, even the moderators ARE NOT AGENTS. THEY CANNOT KNOW WHAT OUR BUSINESS IS REALLY LIKE. They are writers who think they know, but they don't know, they can't, because they have never agented someone elses work.

Do you understand that if someone hasn't gone through the tribulations of being an agent, they really can't comment accurately on what being an agent is like? John Kennedy said it best....


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena,
whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood,
who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions,
and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at best, if he wins,
knows the thrills of high achievement, and, if he fails,
at least fails daring greatly, so that his place shall never be
with those cold and timid souls
who know neither victory nor defeat."
John Fitzgerald Kennedy

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

James D. Macdonald
06-09-2007, 07:59 PM
Ohhhh! I feel a line-by-line coming on!

While you're waiting, here's the world's tiniest violin playing "My Heart Bleeds For You" over the tribulations of being an agent who can't sell a book. Hope it helps turn that frown upside down, "Sherry."

victoriastrauss
06-09-2007, 08:10 PM
After confronting "Sherry" about being legitimate, this is the reply that I received. I will give them an "A" for effort. Most of this is canned; they paste it together differently depending on the question, but these are all prepared responses.

- Victoria

DaveKuzminski
06-09-2007, 09:35 PM
After confronting "Sherry" about being legitimate, this is the reply that I received. I will give them an "A" for effort.
...
1) Please spend a minute or two asking them for concrete proof of their allegations or what they say. See if they will give you anything substantial. We have asked and never received an answer. I don't think they will either answer you or give you anything concrete either. I've seen their answers, there is nothing concrete, just allegations of more complaints from internidiots.
...

From P&E's newest definition: "internidiots": An interesting jumble of words created by Sherry at what is now known as Writers Literary Screenplay Agency. We can only guess whether she meant to combine intern with idiots or internet with idiots. To be honest, we favor the former since it brings a refreshing idea to the Internet that there are people interning to be idiots. We presume that Sherry and the others at the Writers Literary Agency and Marketing Company are now past the intern stage.

James D. Macdonald
06-10-2007, 04:48 AM
I'm so sorry that you find yourself in a conundrum.

What conundrum? Go with someone who's never sold anything in their pathetic life, or continue to seek real representation? How hard is that choice?


As a writer, you really don't know who to turn to, and there is conflicting information everywhere.

Nor is there conflicting information. Everyone agrees that Bobby Fletcher's collection of scams ... is a collection of scams.


Before you lose a real chance to move your career forward, please consider the additional information below.

Yes, please do consider the additional information below before you lose a chance to move your career forward. Signing with WL Screenplay Agency, of course, would put a real roadblock in your way.



Interestingly, we had a publisher make this comment the other day (remember, it's the publisher we care most about).

Which publisher would that be? And what do publishers have to do with screenplays anyway?


The publisher said, "the more they scream, the more we know you are doing the right things and forcing discipline and business reality on these writers".

I would really really like to know which publisher that is. While you're at it, could you mention one publisher who's actually bought something from you? (I don't mean something that the author sold him/herself -- something that you sold.)


What the publisher was telling us, was basically, "thanks, you're doing your job", which is weeding out the writers that won't get their work edited or brought to professional standards.

Publishers have been rejecting books since just about forever. But since WL Screenplay Agency (under any of its incarnations, all the way back to Sydra Techniques), has been sending in agented slush (when they could be bothered to send in anything at all), their stuff is put in the Automatic Reject pile. Did you see where one of their "agents" couldn't get anyone to take their calls or return their messages? I could point to the link, and I probably will one of these days Real Soon Now.



We get a lot of comments about how good a job we do, but of course, real writers and real publishers don't hang out on message boards.

On the contrary, my friend, real writers and real publishers and real editors and real agents do hang out on message boards. They're people, they talk with their friends. What I seriously doubt is that you know any of the real folks.


Please, you owe it to yourself to take this one step further!

Indeed, research Sydra Techniques, the Stylus Literary Agency, The Literary Agency Group, and WL Writers Literary Agency. See if you can find any record of sales that they've made. Anything at all!

Why would you want to go with proven losers?


That data is so old, and so distorted by writers with an axe to grind, that I cringe when I hear a writer making a career decision from it.

True, the record of Robert Fletcher's scams goes back years. But the lack of sales is current as of this morning. Want to make a career decision? Ask "Sherry" for the titles, authors, and publishers of five books that "she" has sold in the past twelve months.


You've been with us this far, and I think you will agree that we have treated you professionally and in a timely fashion.

The form letters from the auto-responder have been sent!


Read what I say below and tell me if it doesn't make sense, and that it is worth your time to gather a little bit more info.

It doesn't make sense, but that's okay. Gather the info: What sales has "Sherry" actually made?


Let me tell you where that stuff comes from.

It comes from experience, and from the expertise of working professionals inside the industry.


First, we insist on working only with edited work.

A worthless requirement.

The "editing" is the source of WL Writers Literary's income. They don't make money off of selling books. They make their money off of selling editing and critiques. That the edits are bad is proved by their sales record.


There is an entire camp of people that believe that we should pay for the writers' editing.
No, fools. There's an entire camp of people who believe that the "professional editor" scam is a scam. That a book that can be made publishable with editing will be edited by a publisher (at the publisher's expense!) while a book that isn't publishable can't be made publishable by any amount of "editing," professional or otherwise.


If the writer's name is Hillary Clinton, we'll pay for the editing, but for a new author, we just can't afford it.

This herring is very red. Hillary Clinton has a real agent, and a real publisher.


Also, because the value of editing and critiquing stays with the owner/writer of the script, even if we were fired, then it would make logical sense that the author would pay for editing.

No, fool. Agents don't edit. That isn't part of their job. Nor do authors pay for editing. Not in the real world, the world that actual published authors inhabit.


The next group is basically just upset that they can't make it as a writer and they are spiteful and generally upset with the way the world treats them.

Not that going with the WL Writers Literary Agency will help them. Nor are they the main class of people who warn newbies against WL Writers Literary.


And to add to their angst, telling a writer their story isn't good enough to sell is like telling a parent that their kid is ugly.

Real agents, and real editors, do it every day. Repeat after me: "Dear Contributor: Your work does not meet our current needs."



And, when a writer is upset, they write hateful things.

When a writer is scammed -- induced to pay money for a worthless service by people who know that they are unable to sell a book if their lives depended on it -- they write truthful things.


We just toughen up and ignore them.

Is that a fact, "Sherry"? Do you really ignore them? I have reason to believe that you're lying -- again.


I suggest you do the same.
I suggest you seek real representation by a real agent.


We used to try to set them straight, but it was a useless task.

Really? Give it a shot.


We've tried to get these people into a dialogue.

Oh, yeah, really. I've seen you refuse to answer legitimate questions. Repeatedly. Like, every time they're asked.


They just keep dragging old information around.
Like the fact that Robert Fletcher (http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-063-01.pdf) is an adjudged scammer (http://www.dfi.wa.gov/sd/orders/SDO-021-01.pdf)? That information?


They talk about people and processes that are at least 5 years removed from what we do now.

You mean that you aren't using the "aggressive agent" program? That you've dropped the "Looking For Now" database? That you aren't trying to set up worthless web pages (at $125 bucks a pop!) for people right now today?


Please read this and you will see what I mean. http://www.writersliterary.com/acquiretlag.html

Already the subject of a line-by-line (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=62493&page=14).


Here is what I would do if I were you.

Here's what I would do if I were you:

Go out of business.
Make restitution to the authors you've defrauded.
Turn state's evidence against your co-conspirators.


1) Please spend a minute or two asking them for concrete proof of their allegations or what they say.

It's all over the Internet.


See if they will give you anything substantial.

WL Writers Literary Agency has a bogus "system" that doesn't result in sales to legitimate publishers/studios.


We have asked and never received an answer.

Liar. (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8286&page=2)


I don't think they will either answer you or give you anything concrete either.

Try me.


I've seen their answers, there is nothing concrete, just allegations of more complaints from internidiots.

So, "Sherry," what have you sold, ever, to anyone?


Then, once you've weighed all the facts and done your diligence, please feel free to return to us.

Or, better, seek real representation by someone who's actually sold something to someone. (Selling stuff to a vanity press doesn't count.)


We are willing to work with new authors and that's what everyone holds against us (and unfortunately, new authors know less about the business than anyone.)


What possible motive could anyone have for holding a willingness to work with new authors against these (or any) folks?

This is purest BS. What people hold against you is that you're a scammer who couldn't sell a book if someone held a gun to your head. Real agents pick up previously-unpublished authors all the time. Real publishers publish first-time authors all the time. Somehow those first-timers are never WL Writers Literary clients. Care to explain that, "Sherry"?

The fact that new authors don't know much about the business is something that "Sherry" banks on: If it weren't for that "Sherry" wouldn't get any marks at all.


Good luck to you, really!
The same, and mutually!


I hope you will give us a chance to prove ourselves.

You've been in business (under one name or another) for half-a-decade. Here's your chance to prove yourselves: List your sales.


(We won't waive our quality standards though).

What quality standards (http://www.davidanaxagoras.com/2006/01/30/she-never-met-a-logline-she-didnt-like/) would those be?

And, one final thought. The people on the boards, even the moderators ARE NOT AGENTS. THEY CANNOT KNOW WHAT OUR BUSINESS IS REALLY LIKE.

Those of us who are long-time professional authors know what an author needs, and what an author needs isn't one more scammer with a fancy story. The folks who make their livings from their writing know a heck of a lot about what an agent's business is, and selling "critiques" and "edits" isn't any part of that business. Nor is selling web pages. Nor an "aggressive agent" program.


They are writers who think they know, but they don't know, they can't, because they have never agented someone elses work.

But we've been agented, and we know what an author needs from an agent. Not that real agents have anything good to say about WL Writers Literary Agency, under whatever name it's using at the time.


Do you understand that if someone hasn't gone through the tribulations of being an agent, they really can't comment accurately on what being an agent is like?

Awwww.... Boo hoo hoo! How about you list your sales?



John Kennedy said it best....


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena,
whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood,
who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions,
and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at best, if he wins,
knows the thrills of high achievement, and, if he fails,
at least fails daring greatly, so that his place shall never be
with those cold and timid souls
who know neither victory nor defeat."
John Fitzgerald Kennedy

So, tell me, "Sherry," what victories have you won? What have you actually sold, to anyone, ever? Is there any reason for anyone to think that you're "in the arena" at all?

El Mariachi
06-14-2007, 03:08 AM
Not that I was in need of further proof of this scam, but, I felt compelled to try it out anyway. I submitted the following, and of course, received a "we want to work with you response". What a load of crap. . . Please read...particularly my name, synopsis, and other answers...these people are a piece of work:


FormSource: CLA

FormDate: 6/9/2007

Name: Jules Winfield

How Did You Hear of Us: Internet Search

Title of Work: Hostility, Part III

Synopsis: Two 8-year-old girls go on a backpacking trip to Transylvania
during summer vacation, in the 1800's. They stay in a hostel, which they
will never forget.

THIS SERIOUSLY SOUNDED GOOD TO THEM?

NYP-Work Been Edited: Yes. I had my screenplay critiqued by my mother, who
once dated Dean Martin's chauffeur.

FURTHER PROOF THAT THEY DIDNT EVEN READ WHAT I WROTE

NYP-Bio: I like long walks on the beach, and hayrides with my sister. Well,
she isn't really my sister. She's my half sister. That's not against the
law, is it?

I AM ALMOST CONSIDERING WRITING A BOGUS 30 PAGES, JUST TO SEE WHAT THEY SAY.

destinationbig
07-03-2007, 05:42 AM
very helpful.... thanks everyone

Juan
07-25-2007, 03:05 AM
Well, first of all my english is a crap.

Now im going to explain my experience, it happend last week. I sent a logline of a Tv show im writing, sci fi one. They awnser me and i was like O_O OH MY GOD! FINALLY ILL HAVE A CHANCE IN THIS WORLD! I only wrote some spanish scripts(im from spain) and some crap, but i saw a light with this. I paid a translator 450$ to translate my spanish script to english.

Now i read this and i wanna get the end of my life. Probably i gave up and leave the world of writers and start working in any crappy shop or similar shit.

Im near to cry cuz my life is a shit and this was my last chance.

See you all guys, and thx for all

James D. Macdonald
07-25-2007, 07:09 PM
Juan, hang in there.

These guys weren't a chance -- they never were, they're never going to be.

Pretend it never happened. Just try again, only this time with a real agent.

James D. Macdonald
08-03-2007, 04:22 AM
What is the WL Screenplay Agency "Looking For Now"?

What are we 'Looking For Now'? Here are just a few of the requests that we are in the process of fulfilling. (Note: if your work matches one of these requests, please let us know on your submission query.

* Looking for completed script where one of the main lead characters or a central supporting character is a 10-year-old boy.
* Looking for completed family-oriented animal scripts, i.e. scripts that revolve around a horse, a dog, or some other animal and that would garner a probable G or PG rating. Scripts should be live-action.
* Looking for completed comedy script where the lead character is an African-American male in his 30Õs. The more outrageous, the better.
* Looking for smart, high-concept comedy set in a unique world and possessing an engaging protagonist. Can be R or PG-13, but should have a moral compass.
* Looking for clever, completed psychological horror scripts,
* Looking for completed feature sci-fi scripts. Only interested in big-budget summer blockbuster-type stories with strong fantastical elements that require lots of special effects.
* ... and more are added every day.


===============

Wow. Just wow. Sure are casting their nets wide.

What are the odds that any prodcos actually return the WL Screenplay Agency's phone calls?

Wait, what am I saying? In order to get their calls returned they'd have to make calls....

BarbJ
08-03-2007, 07:49 PM
"... and more are added every day."

Very wide, Uncle Jim. Wouldn't it be easier for them to simply write: "Looking for people willing to pay us to stomp on their dreams"?

James D. Macdonald
08-10-2007, 12:26 AM
No opinion on www.soyouwannasellascript.com. Please start a new thread on them if we're going to discuss 'em.

Joseph
08-13-2007, 11:25 AM
Hi, just read some things some companies are doing to steal honest writers' money. Can somebody tell me of any real honest agents for books and screenplays. I'm trying to take all the caution I possibly can to avoid any scam.

Also, about Writers Literary and all its agency groups, if all the negatives are true, then someone tell me how to proceed, with caution.

Popeyesays
08-13-2007, 04:12 PM
Hi, just read some things some companies are doing to steal honest writers' money. Can somebody tell me of any real honest agents for books and screenplays. I'm trying to take all the caution I possibly can to avoid any scam.

Also, about Writers Literary and all its agency groups, if all the negatives are true, then someone tell me how to proceed, with caution.

How do you proceed with caution?

If they ask for money up front, don't proceed with them at all. It does not matter HOW they ask for money, or why they ask for money.....if they require money at all it's because they cannot sell your script or your book at all.

You cannot get anything from WLA in any of it's incarnations--caution or not. You cannot allow yourself to be scammed 'cautiously'.

Between here and Preditors and Editors you can vette most anyone.

Regards,
Scott

xhouseboy
08-13-2007, 04:29 PM
[quote=James D. Macdonald;1518136]What is the WL Screenplay Agency "Looking For Now"?

What are we 'Looking For Now'? Here are just a few of the requests that we are in the process of fulfilling. (Note: if your work matches one of these requests, please let us know on your submission query.


And we all know who's making these requests.

Bobby sweats over his PC in the basement, hoping to uncover that one killer script that he knows the industry is crying out for. When he finds what he believes could be a real winner, he sets it aside for submission. It subsequently disappears, and he later finds it edited beyond all recognition and attached to an invoice for $450. He rushes up to the attic room to tear a strip off Sherry who sits with her back to him, gazing out of the window...

In fact there's probably a movie in there somewhere.

No wait, Hitchcock got there first.

xhouseboy
08-13-2007, 04:37 PM
Also, about Writers Literary and all its agency groups, if all the negatives are true, then someone tell me how to proceed, with caution.

Forget they even exist, because, in actual fact, they don't -- they're a figment of Bobby Fletcher's imagination.

Joseph
08-13-2007, 07:35 PM
Does anybody have any links to real true agents that are legit? I really need an honest feedback with a real link to a real hardworking agent who will try their hardest to sell my screenplay for their 10% or 15%. I just need a real agent. Please give me some links. I tried with Writers Literary Screenplay Agency, but it's taking a very long time, and now I'm not sure, with all the complaints. If anybody has any real links to real, honest, true, hardworking agents that they no for sure because they've worked with them before and know that they're real, please let me know. Thank you.

Joseph
08-13-2007, 07:49 PM
I humbly thank you all for the replies you gave me on my first thread. Very sadly, I really am considering the advice. Hopefully WL might still be honest enough to sell my script after all the time and hard work I have invested in it, not to mention the money. Money is money, I know everybody needs it but I surely do frown at those who try to take advantage of people to get it.

But on my second thread, can someone please reply with some names of actual, real, legit, true, hardworking agents who will sell my script. I will great appreciate any agents that you know from personal experience because they've sold your own script so therefore you know they're true agents. Again, thanks for all the advice to my first thread.

Momento Mori
08-13-2007, 08:09 PM
Joseph, there's a thread in the Scriptwriting Forum here:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24087

which gives some tips on producing screenplays and also resources for checking who to submit them to. Whilst I'm sure other people will chip in here to give any further databases/resources you can check out, ultimately you're going to have to do your own research as to who is the best fit for your script - no one else can do it for you.


Joseph:
Hopefully WL might still be honest enough to sell my script after all the time and hard work I have invested in it, not to mention the money.

You need to cut your losses because they're not going to sell your script. They are not set up to sell your script and they have neither the interest nor the capability to do so. All they will do is come up with more ideas for trying to gouge money out of you and after all that you will still have nothing to show for it. The very best thing you can do is terminate any contract you have with them and knuckle down to do some hard research. You can always check out agents/production companies here on AW if you're not sure about it.

I'm sorry if any of this sounds harsh, but there's an awful lot of legwork to trying to make a success of writing and doing it helps build up your own experience.

MM

eqb
08-13-2007, 08:18 PM
Hopefully WL might still be honest enough to sell my script after all the time and hard work I have invested in it, not to mention the money.

WL will never, never, never NEVER sell your script.

They are SCAMMERS.

Next question....


But on my second thread, can someone please reply with some names of actual, real, legit, true, hardworking agents who will sell my script.

You need to do your research. Start here:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=151221&postcount=2

Find the agents in the list that handle scripts.

Read the threads about them to find out which ones handle the kind of scripts/storylines you write.

Then query them.

You should also visit this form:

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=12

where other script writers talk about writing, querying, and selling their scripts.

The key is research. The tools and information are here on AW, but you need to do the work.

DeadlyAccurate
08-13-2007, 08:26 PM
Hopefully WL might still be honest enough to sell my script after all the time and hard work I have invested in it, not to mention the money. Money is money, I know everybody needs it but I surely do frown at those who try to take advantage of people to get it.

They aren't honest enough to sell it. They never have been. Nor are they competent enough. They won't sell it. Doesn't matter if you put in years of hard work or only minutes. They won't sell it. At all. They aren't interested in selling it. They don't care about you, not even a little bit, except for how much money you're willing to give them.


But on my second thread, can someone please reply with some names of actual, real, legit, true, hardworking agents who will sell my script. I will great appreciate any agents that you know from personal experience because they've sold your own script so therefore you know they're true agents. Again, thanks for all the advice to my first thread.

No, not really. Go to www.agentquery.com and research agents that are the right genre for you. Then check Preditors & Editors and the Index to this forum to see what people have to say about the agent and then check agent's own website if they have one. There's no such thing as a list of agent-good/agent-bad, because the right agent for a writer depends on many things.

xhouseboy
08-13-2007, 08:33 PM
I humbly thank you all for the replies you gave me on my first thread. Very sadly, I really am considering the advice. Hopefully WL might still be honest enough to sell my script after all the time and hard work I have invested in it, not to mention the money. Money is money, I know everybody needs it but I surely do frown at those who try to take advantage of people to get it.



Joseph, I'll second the above advice. I realise it's a hard one to take on board, but WL do not sell scripts, never have. Their income stems from the money they dubiously solicit from writers for a variety of 'services' that they claim to undertake. 'Honesty' does not enter into it.

Good luck in your search for an agent. If it's any consolation, in looking for a genuine agent there's at least a slim chance you could gain representation and your work might one day be produced, whereas with WL there was not the slightest hope of that.

James D. Macdonald
08-13-2007, 10:11 PM
If, by some lucky fluke, a writer who has a script with WL manages to sell it somewhere ... I promise you that WL has no idea how to negotiate a contract or what the clauses mean. If you follow WL's advice you will find yourself signing a disadvantageous contract for lowball money.

Joseph
08-14-2007, 08:38 PM
Thank you all so much. I'm still a little bit new here, but I'm definitely looking in for a new agent as of right now.

Roger J Carlson
08-14-2007, 08:45 PM
But on my second thread, can someone please reply with some names of actual, real, legit, true, hardworking agents who will sell my script. I will great appreciate any agents that you know from personal experience because they've sold your own script so therefore you know they're true agents. Again, thanks for all the advice to my first thread.Here's the thing. Bad agents are bad for *all* writers. They are either out-right scammers or clueless. In either case, they should be avoided. Period.

However, it's not so easy to identify good agents because "good" is relative to a lot of variables. A good agent for you is one who: 1) represents what you write (and of course, has good contacts in that genre), 2) is taking new clients, and 3) one whose personality is a good fit for you.

No one here can determine these things for you. That's why no one is jumping in with suggestions. There's no such thing as a universally "good" agent. And there's no substitute for doing your own research. For one thing, you'll learn a lot about the publishing business in the process.

JAG4584
08-15-2007, 02:45 AM
I have queried many agents and wonder how bad is bad regarding confidentiality. Is it often that an agent can steal the story idea and sell it etc? Not sure where I should have posted this question but figured we have enough threads that somebody may see this and share their thoughts.

JCT
08-15-2007, 03:00 AM
I have queried many agents and wonder how bad is bad regarding confidentiality. Is it often that an agent can steal the story idea and sell it etc? Not sure where I should have posted this question but figured we have enough threads that somebody may see this and share their thoughts.

No agent with any reputation will steal your script or your idea. An agency like WL Screenplay can't sell anything, period. If they could, they wouldn't be scammers.

DaveKuzminski
08-15-2007, 05:15 AM
A good agent also has to want to represent what you have written to offer because the agent has to sell it and enthusiasm counts a lot in sales. Many good agents will pass on what is offered to them because they can't get behind it totally.

Bad agents will rarely pass up a manuscript. This is because they are after the money in your wallet. They will find a way to get you to pay them. If not through a reading fee, then they'll do it with a critique fee before agreeing to represent you. If not those, then with a representation fee. If not that, then a management fee. If those aren't how, then they'll do it with a large upfront fee for copying and postage.

Bad agents are also clueless and lack contacts in the industry. Good agents generally come from publishing backgrounds which includes working at a reputable publishing house or as an intern at a reputable literary agency. By the time they go out on their own as an agent, they generally have at least one sale or have taken part in sales with other agents. Very rarely will an agent appear without a background such as these who is capable of selling.

James D. Macdonald
08-15-2007, 06:06 AM
A real agent won't steal your book because he/she doesn't just want that book, but your next book, and your next, and the one after that.

A scam agent won't steal your book because what would he do with it? Sell it? He doesn't know how, and that's not where his cash flow comes from.

As to stealing ideas -- ideas are cheap. Everyone has 'em, and ideas aren't the important part of writing. The specific arrangement of words that expresses the idea. That's the important part.

AC Crispin
08-15-2007, 06:33 AM
I'm presuming that these authors who have been posting about having lost not just time, but money to one of Robert Fletcher's agencies or editing services have already contacted me for important info on what to do now.

If not, they should write to me immediately. anncrispin@aol.com

This is very important.

Thank you.

-Ann C. Crispin
Chair, Writer Beware
www.writerbeware.com (http://www.writerbeware.com/)

firemothjoe
08-18-2007, 07:03 PM
Add another name to list of those saved from the scam! I almost signed the contract and paid the $95 critique with wlscreenplayagency.com A little Google research beforehand lead me straight here! I read all 9 pages of this thread and give you all my humble thanks for saving me the cash and time.

I will never forget how good it felt when Sherry told me that they "wanted me as their writer" but I didn't let it get me down when I found out it was all lies and crap. I truly feel for the ones who were crushed at the news- but I learned a long time ago that it's not the end of the world, there is always another chance, another oppertunity. After all, American spirit means starting from scratch (often more than once) and still finding a way to live well, with a new hope each and every time.

I also learned that good outnumbers evil by at least 1000 to 1. The trick is finding a way to unite the good folks out there. This site is a perfect example. Incidently, both lessons are the underlieing theme behind my screenplay. It's a story that I feel must be shared with the entire world, and I cannot let such a small setback stand in my way. I hope you all feel the same way about your work.

To Sherry, if she happens to read my post, allow me to float a question quoted from Larry King:
"Who got you, was it the bloggers?"

JCT
08-18-2007, 08:46 PM
Welcome!

Richard McNally
10-20-2007, 06:47 AM
Glad to have this information about WL Screenplay Agency. I'll be sure to trash their e-mail if they respond to mine.

buffyangel37
11-05-2007, 09:12 PM
Well, this thread saved me from WL ...thank God! I just received their reply inviting me to send my screenplay and was thrilled but then read these threads and am no longer thrilled.

But I am not crushed because they were only the first in a line long of agents and production companies...I have done much research and reading about how difficult it is to sell your screenplay and so when I received a reply in two days that they wanted to read it my flags went up.

What I should have done is read this thread before I filled out their query sheet...lol...oh well, a lesson learned...thanks, everyone for your expertise and experience.

JulieB
11-05-2007, 09:31 PM
Welcome to AW! Hope you stick around for a while. We have a great board for screenwriters.

Whalen
03-28-2008, 06:52 AM
This tread saved me too... sadly I went one step further than my counterpart above me and sent them a pfd of my script. Thankfully I'm paranoid enough that its registered with the WGA and the Library of Congress. It's still unsettling to know these people are out there.

NatalieG
04-10-2008, 06:09 AM
I have just sign the contract for this mary agency. I hade know clue that thay would do this. I was so happy to get an agent and now they took that way from me.:( I'm not as lucky as some but i did spent 225.$ for the editor only because I'm so new at this. I wish I hade a book on all the scames. Now what? Do I fire her or is it to late for that.


Nat

DaveKuzminski
04-10-2008, 06:14 AM
Tell them in a polite letter or email that you are terminating the contract because you have discovered they are not what they claimed. Further state that you will report them to the State Attorney General for fraud unless they refund your money.

NatalieG
04-10-2008, 01:57 PM
Ok I will and thank you. Does enyone know were I can get a real agent?

Plot Device
04-10-2008, 04:41 PM
Natalie, have your work read first.

We have a peer-review sub-forum here at AW called "Share Your Work (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=26)" where you can post excerpts from your screenplay. Try going into that forum (it has a password on it --the password is "vista") and try reading a few existing threads where others have shared. Then after you get the hang of "how it's done" around here, go ahead and post your own thread where you share your script for critique and review by other scriptwriters. Some of the scriptwriters here at AW are pros. And even a few Hollywood executives chime in from time to time.

There is also a sub-forum just for scriptwriters to tlak and exchange ideas. It's called (what else?) Script Writing (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=12).

kullervo
04-10-2008, 06:22 PM
http://www.loreleiarmstrong.com/The%20Agents.html

stankid182
06-22-2008, 02:03 PM
Thank You so much to all of you here. I sent in a synopsis then my screenplay and then they sent me my contract. Thankfully I'm 16 and am not legally bound by it, so I had to request a new contract, and stumbled across here later that day. They haven't sent me a revised contract yet, so I'm really pumped for that Email. I wonder if it'll be generated or not? They'll probably dump me because Bob is way too lazy to revise the contract for a single potential client. What I want to know is, are there multiple people in on it? Is sherry real? Or is she just Bob's counterpart? If you think about it, There's a lot of work to do, and with only one person doing it, i'd be swamped. With all the money he's making, I'm sure he could at least hire one more. I requested their critique service, and they're still getting me details, when they return with the details, i'll respectively say F*** Off.

James D. Macdonald
06-22-2008, 02:39 PM
There's no evidence at all that "Sherry Fine" exists as a real human being.

agrippa80
08-30-2008, 11:53 PM
Hello all. I may have a problem, and I need advice.

I sent my script to these people, and have yet to get a reply. After reading all of your comments on this forum, there's no way in hell I'm gonna go with them. But that doesn't bother me. What does is that I actually sent them my scipt.

Now for the question:

Is my script safe? I have it copyrighted with the government, so it's safe that way, but I guess what I'm trying to ask is can they steal my script now that they have it? Is there any little fine-print, law-stretching, scam-artist way they can get my script and pass it off as their own?

I may just be paranoid, but after reading all your comments about them it makes me wary.

So is my script safe?

Toothpaste
08-31-2008, 12:11 AM
Don't be worried at all about that. The key to this particular scam is that they are in no way interested in selling your work to anyone. They just want you to pay them more and more money without ever actually doing anything for you. To steal your script, to get someone interested, to produce it, to pay them for it . . . that is way more work than they are willing to put into it.

Your script is fine.

BenPanced
08-31-2008, 12:16 AM
The only writing scam artists are interested in is your signature on the check.

AC Crispin
10-16-2008, 06:41 PM
There is, and has been, an ALERT up on Writer Beware for people who have had problems with Writers Literary Agency, Strategic Book Publishing, Eloquent, New York Literary Agency, S.T. Literary Agency, WL Children's Literary Agency, WL Screenplay Agency, The Literary Agency Group, Global, or any of the other Robert Fletcher owned "agencies" or "publishing companies."

Just go to www.writerbeware.com and it's right there on the front page



Gives contact info, etc.



If you have had problems, please check out this ALERT.



-Ann C. Crispin

Chair, Writer Beware

www.writerbeware.com

James D. Macdonald
12-18-2008, 07:19 AM
The Florida Attorney General is investigating this agency. (http://myfloridalegal.com/lit_ec.nsf/investigations/31273A2F06893B9B852573760050A9EA)

Tepelus
12-18-2008, 07:53 PM
Good! Hopefully they'll get shut down and the other scammers out there as well. It boggles my mind that any of these so-called agencies/publishers operate for as long as they do.

zanizh
12-18-2008, 08:08 PM
*sigh* I was almost taken in by this agency. I got the contract offer but something just didn't click right while reading over all their info. There was no specific client list, no specific sale listings, and it just seemed a little too over the top. There's no way someone can be as busy as they claim to be and be able to read my novel in two days. Furthermore, they accept work that hasn't been completed? Come on! After doing research, I found the P&E lists through a writer friend.

Do I need to be concerned that they have my novel and may use it illegally now?

Momento Mori
12-18-2008, 08:16 PM
Hi, zanizh, and welcome to AW

You don't need to be concerned that WL will do anything with your novel. Once you notify them that you will not be signing a contract with them, they won't do anything with it because they can't use it to try and get money out of you.

MM

zanizh
12-18-2008, 08:32 PM
Thank you. After years of doing this it just seemed to good to be true. Guess the adage rings true.

cooljim
01-06-2009, 09:45 PM
AARRRRGGG!!!

For me, another case of 'Ready, Fire, Aim!!'

I didn't do the research before I submitted my screenplay today to The Screenplay Agency!

Now I know the company is just a scam. Good thing I registered my screenplay with the WGA and only sent the first 30 pages!!

Jim Boyd
www.cooljim.com (http://www.cooljim.com)

James D. Macdonald
01-06-2009, 09:48 PM
Don't forget to get in touch with the Florida Attorney General. The Screenplay Agency (along with the rest of the names Bobby Fletcher goes by) is being investigated.

Gravity
01-06-2009, 10:43 PM
What's amazing to me is Bouncin' Bobby still continues to blithely pitch his wares even as the Florida AG prepares to bring a big ol' claymore slamming down on his johnson.

Berry
01-07-2009, 05:22 AM
Cooljim, you should be OK if you JUST submitted to them; just be careful not to sign ANYTHING or pay them ANY money at all.

If they could sell novels or screenplays to anyone, you might need to worry, but evidence seems to indicate they can't, or don't.

cooljim
01-07-2009, 05:29 PM
Berry,

Thanks. Thanks to everyone on this board. To be honest, I guess I was about to commit a 'newbie' mistake. This board steered me clear of the rocks!

The other day when we (I include my wife, since I wouldn't be able to write without her moral support) received an email from 'The Screenplay Agency,' it was cause for great celebration in our house! Even though I'm not a very religious man, I asked my wife if we could hold hands and say a little prayer before I hit the 'send' button, sending TSA my screenplay.

Now that I've found that TSA is just a scam, my wife and I feel disappointed, and I feel a little silly for getting my hopes up. (we weren't house-shopping in Hollywood, but we were damn near close.)

So we'll just soldier on. From here on out, I'm sticking to the WGA West approved agents. Honest rejections from several WGA approved agents is better any day than one 'approval' from a scammer.

Jim Boyd

P.S. The file (screenplay) I sent TSA was registered with the WGA-W registry, providing some legal protection IF they decide to steal. The file was labeled 'The Inheritance (WGA reg).pdf.' With "WGA" in the file's name, I wonder if TSA will notice that and run away, hissing and screeching like Dracula does when he sees a cross?? Just wondering.

Roger J Carlson
01-07-2009, 05:37 PM
P.S. The file (screenplay) I sent TSA was registered with the WGA-W registry, providing some legal protection IF they decide to steal. The file was labeled 'The Inheritance (WGA reg).pdf.' With "WGA" in the file's name, I wonder if TSA will notice that and run away, hissing and screeching like Dracula does when he sees a cross?? Just wondering.Evidence suggests they never read anything you write except the check you send them.