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Project nachonaco
10-08-2005, 07:09 PM
If anyone's ever been in JROTC or army, you know that a gun is always loaded.

I've adapted this philosophy to my writing: Until you open the envelope, it's a rejection.

Is this being pessimistic?

Boy, I'm talkative today. :)

maestrowork
10-08-2005, 07:27 PM
To me, it's just a "possibility."

awatkins
10-08-2005, 08:24 PM
FWI--I've gotten envelopes I was certain contained rejections. My reasoning ranged from 'it's too heavy so it must have my whole manuscript in there' to 'it's too light, so it must be a form rejection.' In both those cases, I was wrong. It was heavy because it contained a contract, it was light because it contained a short acceptance. lol. It's a coin-toss and you never know what's in there 'til ya open it. :D

And then of course, there are always the ones that are rejections. yuck.

Honey Nut Loop
10-08-2005, 09:03 PM
I'm a pessimist too. I prefer to believe everything is rejection until the envelope is open.

Alphabet
10-08-2005, 09:03 PM
My philosophy?
It's proof you tried.
What kind of proof?
look inside.

Jamesaritchie
10-08-2005, 10:40 PM
If anyone's ever been in JROTC or army, you know that a gun is always loaded.

I've adapted this philosophy to my writing: Until you open the envelope, it's a rejection.

Is this being pessimistic?

Boy, I'm talkative today. :)

Shouldn't the reaction be the opposite? Seems to me you're assuming the envelope is always empty.

Personally, I've never had an acceptance come back in my own envelope. The closest I've come to things is having an agent or editor ask to see a manuscript. But an actual acceptance, no, never.

Between fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, I've had several hundred acceptances, and every one of them came in a publisher's envelope.

Greenwolf103
10-09-2005, 07:48 AM
My own philosophy is, wait and see. Meanwhile, keep at it!

Whether or not you feel you're being cynical isn't the point. What matters is the strength of your persistence in getting your manuscript published.

kristie911
10-09-2005, 08:40 AM
Shouldn't the reaction be the opposite? Seems to me you're assuming the envelope is always empty.

Yes...and the glass is half empty.

Personally, every time I send out a query, I am expecting a rejection...but I can say at least I tried. This way I'm not so disappointed and if I get a request for something more (partial, full mss.), I'm really excited because I expected a rejection.

It's better than not trying.

Lyra Jean
10-09-2005, 08:52 AM
My friends and family are very supportive of me with my writing. In fact they are ones keeping on the ball so I don't get slack. I'm always telling myself that I will get rejections just because my people even though they tell me it needs work and give some basic stuff I still don't know how bad it is really.

Anyway everytime I get an acceptance I throw a party. So far I've recieved one acceptance and was published woot! $5.00 from Peeks and Valleys magazine. I don't have a lot of things out but working at being more prolific.

blacbird
10-09-2005, 11:31 PM
FWI--I've gotten envelopes I was certain contained rejections.

Me too. I've yet to be proved wrong.

bird

egem
10-30-2005, 08:29 AM
I don't even like to open them. I'll leave them on a table for an entire day before I get to them. I've been accepted and rejected, but before I open them I get myself into that "it doesn't really matter state." You know opening the letters: oh here’s the phone bill, junk mail, junk mail, holy crap...



Also, do you all keep your rejections slips? I don't keep mine. I have one on my wall that is dear to me hand-written by Lois Rosenthal, the others go in the trash.

Lyra Jean
10-31-2005, 10:02 AM
I have a book of rejection. I staple all my rejections in it. My boyfriend calls it the book of revenge for when I become a big household name. He's cute like that.

jackie106
10-31-2005, 10:04 PM
I usually give myself permission to be really angry about it for the rest of the day and then I let it go the next morning.

Rejection is part of the writing process. If you are only submitting to markets that you know are a sure thing, then you aren't challenging yourself enough.

Jackie

J. Y. Moore
11-01-2005, 10:19 PM
If anyone's ever been in JROTC or army, you know that a gun is always loaded.

I've adapted this philosophy to my writing: Until you open the envelope, it's a rejection.

Is this being pessimistic?

Boy, I'm talkative today. :)

Don't be such a pessimest. Rejection is part of life. In the words of Forest Gump, "Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're gonna get." Laugh at the fools who don't like your work and eat the chocolate - you'll feel lots better. Then sit down and make 'em love the next one (BIC).

Good luck.

Ragnarok
12-01-2005, 06:25 PM
I have a book of rejection. I staple all my rejections in it. My boyfriend calls it the book of revenge for when I become a big household name. He's cute like that.

Hehe. I keep them preciously too. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/smilepopcorn.gif

scarletpeaches
12-01-2005, 06:31 PM
And me. The folder's nearly full though. But that one acceptance makes it all better. :D